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Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

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UST ElPiTWU 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




liSKJHICAL. 



VOLUME XXIX— NO. 78. 



SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 8, 1911. 



S0I1W9 C^NTS. 



ms 



PASSENGERS BLAME 
CAPTAIN FOR LOSS 
OF UVES IN WRECK 



WITNESS FOR 
GIRLS GONE 



PUTS TASK UP 
TO TEACHERS 



Declare Four Seamen Are 

Not the Only 

Victims. 

Hysterical Refugees From the 

Santa Rosa Reach 

Santa Barbara. 

Swamping of Lifeboats From 
Wreck Causes Fa- 
talities. 



Santa Barbara. Cal.. July 8.— In spite 
©f assertions from conipiiny officials 
and shlp'a officers to the contrary, the 
passengers of the wrecked steamer 
Santa Rosa who arrlvej here early 
tofiay after a ihrillinf? bat'lt with the 
breakers tl.al sma!^he<l the stranded 
ship, declare that more than four sail- 
ors lost their Uvea. 

One hundred and ninety-two passen- 
gers are all that have boen accounted 
for 80 far. say the survivors. There 
were -*'i) on the steamer, and many 
of the rescued declare that the missing 
ones went down to death when the 
8urf battered life rafts to pieces. 

Few of liu- shipwrecked voyagers 
have it'ioverea from tlie nerve rucking 
iftrain of the ixittle with the l>reakers 
In the dark night. 

>lanv Are HjMerlciil. 

Manv of the rescued women still 
are hxsttricul under the care of phy- 
sicians who were called when the spe- 
cial trains bearing the survivors ar- 
rived ' •- '' '>; morning. Tho.>*e that 
were continue the journey 

South , .ui. .. ; regular trains this 
morniniic and the first was due to ar- 
rive at Los Angeles at J<:45 o'clock. 
Others will take later trains, but a 
large number, especially of the women, 
win not le able to travel for a day or 
more. 

Many of the passengers were vehe- 
ment in their denunciation of the sliip's 
officers, who refused to land the pas- 
sengers soon after the Santa Kosa 
grounded near Point Arguello. Capt. 
Faria declined, they say, to listen to 
the pleading of the passengers, who de- 
sired to be put ashore before the gale 
arose yesterday. He replied to en- 
treaties' it is said, with the .statement 
that he had received Instructions from 
the Pacific Coast Steamship company 
officials to permit no one to go ashore 
until it became absolutely necessary. 
UefuiceeM In Pitiable State. 

The relief train bearing the rescued 



Hearing in Stekes Shooting Report to It L A. Says Amer- 




Case Goes Over to 
Tuesday. 

Millionaire Hotel Man Is 

Accused of Hiding 

Letters. 



icans Must Learn to 
Respect Law. 

Test of School Efficiency Al- 
so Demanded at 
.Convention. 



DO NOT LET 
SEEJBTIFY 

"Prophet's" Attorneys Keep 

Hun Off Stand Against 

HbWilL 



JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN. 



Birmingham. 
Chamberlain ce 
dav at his ho 
The veteran f 
cipient of worl 
His health Is fi> 
ment noted upi 
Riviera being i 



Eng.. July ».— Joseph 
ebrated his Tilth birth- 
me, Highbury, today, 
talesman was the re- 
I wide congratulations. 
Irly good, the Improve- 
■n his return from the 
naintalned. 



ENDEAVORERS 
HEAR OFWORK 

Instructive Addresses Given 
at International Meet- 
ing. 



New York. July 8.— For lack of the 
last witness wanted, a further hearing 
of the Stokes shooting case was post- 
poned today until Tuesday morning. On 
that date Magistrate Freschi will de- 
cide whether the evidence warrants 
holding Lillian Graham and Ethel Con- 
rad to the grand Jury on a charge of 
trying to murder \V. E. D. Stokes, the 
wealthy hotel man. 

The missing man Is Wilfred Hart, the 
elevator operator who took Stokes up 
to the defendants' apartment on the 
evening of June 6, when he was shot. 
Attorneys for the defense explained 
that Hart's testimony Is important be- 
cause through him they expect to prove 
that Instead of Hart saying to Stokes. 
■ Go right up, you are expected, " Stidtes 
said to the elevator boy "You needn't 
announce me; I am expected," Indi- 
cating that rftokes wished to arrive 
without warning. 

••^ihootins Wan JiiMlflable." 

In the course of an informal state- 
ment todav, the attorney for the girls 
declared that the principal argument 
for the girls' dismissal was the anxiety 
shown by Stokes to recover the letters 
he wrote to Miss Graham. 

"The evidence that someone in Mr. 
Stokes" emplov stole some of those let- 
ters from my clients' rooms," said the 
attorney, "shows that this shooting was 
justifiable." . , « , 

Unless the de fense succeeds in nnd- 

(Contlnued on pa ge 6, fifth column.) 

FRANClSUFFERS 
FROM HOT WAVE 



RestThe'ff Case With Woman's 

Account of "Holy 

liisses. 



"PUT FOIWDATION OF 
BREAD liND BUHER" 
UNDER ZENITH CITY 




ta> "T- ' 



HELPING CHOOSE 

SITE FOR FARM 



San Francisco. Cal., July 8. — "Disre. 
gard for law is fast becoming an Am- 
erican characteristic' is the finding 
of a report made by the committee on 
a system of teaching morals in the 
public schools, at the first session of 
the national council of the National 
Educational association. 

Declaring the nineteenth century to 
have been the "marvel of the ages»" 
■'especially In the accumulation of 
wealth and tjie capitalistic centraliza- 
tion and control of the output and dis- 
tribution of the comforts and neces- 
saries of life," the report declares the 
chief problem of the twentieth century 
to be "to control these gigantic ener- 
gies." . 

"The pernicloui practice of giving 
rebates and discrlmating against ship- 
pers; the prevalence of graft, boodling 
and bribery; the white slave traffic, 
mobs, riots, whitecapplngs and lynoh- 
ings. " are cited as Instances of law- 
lessness. 

SitKKent ReMcdy In ScboolM. 

To meet this situation, the report 
says, "certain elemental virtues must 
be inculcated lu childhood and youth, " 
and a tentative course of Instruction 
to this end is olTered. It starts with 
the teaching. In kindergarten, of tidi- 
ness. Inculcating of individual virtues 
like patriotism, courage and determina. 
tion, and concludes with a high school 
course covering the relations of the 
Individuals to society, to avocation and 
to the state, and the study of the fam- 
Ilv as the foundation of society. 

The report is signed by Chairman 
Tames M Greenwood, superintendent of 
schools. Kansas City; Martin G. Brum- 
baugh, superintendent of schools, Phil- 
adelphia: John W. Carr, superintendent 
of schools. Bayonne, N. J.; William 
Lowe Bryan, jiresident of Indiana uni- 



tContinued on pa ge 6. third column.) 

CASTRO HAS 1,000 
MEN WITH HIM 

President of Venezuelan State 

Reported Killed By 

Bomb. 

"Willamstad, Curacoa, July S. — The 
■Venezuelan government has positve 
news that Ciprlano Castro, the exiled 
president of Venezuela, effected a land. 
Ing on the western part of Venezuela 
and today has a following of 1,000 
men. 

Rumors reached here this afternoon 
that Gumersindo Mendez, president of 
the state of Zulia, Venezuela has been 
killed by a mob. 

HOOK BIG FISH; 
TWO ARE DROWNED 

Boat Is Upset in Excitement 

and Man and One Woman 

Lose Lives. 

Utica, X. Y.. July 8.— W. E. Ledger- 
wood and Miss Shalleck of New York, 
were drowned in Big Tupper lake late 
yesterday afternoon. Mr. Legerwood 
his wife and Miss Shalleck were troll- 
ing opposite Pages Bluff when a big 
fish was hooked, and there was so 
much excitement in the boat that it 
was overturned, throwing the occu- 
pants into deep water. 

Mr. Ledgerwood tried to assist the 
young women, but appeared to be 
seized with cramps. He sank in less 
than a minute after the accident. B. 
O. Lott crossing the lake in his motor 
boat to Paradise Point, succeeded in 
reaching Mrs. Ledgerwood, who was 
unconscious. 

brothersTSking 

4,000 MILES 

Harvard Instructor Will Dic- 
tate Their Diet Dur- 
ing the Trip. 

Boston, Mass.. July 8. — Two brothers. 
Jesse H. and Warren H. Buffum of 
Rochester. N. H.. started from here 
todav on a 4.000-mlle walk across the 
continent In the Interests of science. 
They expect to spend five months in 
making the trip and will conduct ex- 
periments in dieting at the request of 
Dr. D. H. Sargent, director of the 
Hemenway gymnasium. Harvard uni- 
versitv. The men bear a letter from 
Governor Bass of New Hampshire to 
Governor Johnson of California. 



President Taft Tells Dele- 
gates About His Peace 
Plans. 



Atlantic City N. J., July 8.— Follow- 
ing yesterday't strenuous activities, 
which were brv ught to a close by a big 
meeting last n ght at which President 
Taft was the s )ecial speaker, hundreds 
of the Christian Endeavorers turned 
out early today for the sunrise serv- 
ices on one of the piers. Rev. J. Wil- 
bur Chapman again led the cjulet hour 
before breakfast. Most of this morn- 
ing was given over by the delegates to 
the intenatlons 1 convention to listening 
to Instructive addresses on Christian 
Endeavor work. 

That churcli members are growing 
more and mc re Pharisaical in their 
attitude towar 1 those not of their par- 
ticular faith, war: declared to be the 
case by Rev. Thomas M. Evans of 
N'ebra.=ka before the Christian Citizen- 
ship confereni e, one of the sectional 
meetings. D ■. Evans spoke in favor 
of the use of the word "good" rather 
than "Christit n " in speaking of citi- 
zenship. He Maid that all creeds and 
races should oin in the good citizen- 
ship inovemei t. Dr. Evans Is the 
founder of t le good citizenship day 
idea, which i; for all persons to ob- 
serve the Sumlay before the Fourth of 
July as Good Citizenship day. 
Hear President Taft. 
President Taft. in a speech to the 
convention lai-t night, declared that the 
negotiations lor the arbitration treaty 
between Grea Britain and the United 
States have r' ached such a stage that 
there is no doubt as to the signing of 
the pact. 

"I am glad to say." said the presi- 
dent, "that toilay we have reached such 
a point in the negotiations for a treaty 
of universal a bitration with one of the 
great Europe m powers, that we can 
ccnfidenilv p -edict the signing of a 
satisfactory treaty. The arbitration 



Suffering Is Most Intense 

Known There Since 

1900. 

Paris, July 8. — France Is suffering 
from a heat wave more intense than 
the country has experienced since IKOO. 
T(»day the temperature In the shade 
was .slightly above ItO with a humid, 
breezeless atmosphere. Some prostra- 
tions and one death resulted in this 
city. 



* DONKEY AND ELEPHANT * 
TK MACI.Nti ru WHITE HOrSE. » 

* * 

■» New York. July 8. — \ donkey * 
^ and an elephant iitarted from Jt 
i Coney lalaud luMt niebt In a race ^ 
^ for the White HuuNe, intended to 4^ 
^ foreoaMt to the world jtenerally ^ 
^ the reauit of the election In lOll!. ^ 
^ Several hundred rollowerN of He- l/e 

* mocracy are pinnInK their faith ^ 
^ to the donkey, while the elephant ^ 
^ bait no fewer weii-wlaherit from -^t 
^ the Hepiililican camp. The trail «- 
^ lead* tbroutrh Trenton, Philadel- ^ 
^ phln and llaltimore. -k 



(Continued on page 5, fifth column.) 

HUNTING GRAFT IN 
STATE DEPARTMENT 

House Committe Is Looking 

for "Double Salary" 

Evidence. 

Washington, July 8.— In executive 
session today, the house committee on 
expenditures In the state department 
expected to examine, it is said, certain 
state department vouchers for sums 
paid out ot the department's emergency 
fund. The committee desired to learn 
whether these vouchers would tell tales 
of "double salaries," money for work 
on special commissions paid to persons 
who were also drawing regular salaries 
from the department's pay roll. 

Representative Hamlin of Missouri, 
chairman of the committee, has deter- 
mined at least that he will, if possible, 
find out whether, as he said, "the de- 
partment is not paying from the 
emergency fund extra compensation to 
some of Its employes by placing them 
on special commissions." 



Chicago. July 8. — The defense In tho 
trial of Eveljn Arthur See, charged 
with the abduction of Mildred Bridges, 
concluded its case at 10 o'clock this 
morning without the cult leader taking 
the witness stand in his own behalf. 

The announcement that the defense 
rested was made at the opening of 
court by Attorney Cantwell. and came 
as a surprise to the prosecution, who 
confidently believed that See would 
take the stand to tell his own story 
and interpret certain passages from 
the "Hook of Life." It is said that See 
was anxious to testify, but finally was 
persuaded by his attorney to keep off 

the stand. , ., .^ , i 

The state announced that It would 
call Police Capt. Max Danner and Mona 
Hees In rebuttal. It is expected that 
the case may be concluded and given 
to the Jury Monday. - - 

Gave Him «'Holy" Kla*es. 
Mrs. Lucile Bridges frequently kissed 
See called him 'dear," and wrote let- 
ters to him while he was in jail telling 
of her love for him, according to her 
testimony late yesterday. She de- 
fended him loyally though he Is 
charged with al)ducting her 17-year- 
old daughter, Mildred Briflges. She 
was the last witness for the defense. 
"The many kisses I exchanged with 
Mr See were holy and sinless salu- 
tations," Mrs. Bridges testified. "They 
had none of the meaning of the kiss 
the world outside of absolute life 
knows. Mr. See Is a pure and chaste 
man. It was not sinful for us to kiss. 
We had the true light. 

Could Do No Wrong. 
"We were above sin. and safe from 
temptation. Nothing we could do 
would be wrong." 

Mrs. Bridges also admitted that she 
frequently visited the temple of Abso- 
lute Life, where See made his home, 
on many nights while her husband 
was away from Chicago. She also said 
that she had made contributions of 
$1,000 and $500 respectively to See in 
the cause of Absolute Life. 

SUICIDE IS LAID TO 

HEAT IN PITTSBURG. 

Pittsburg, Pa.. July 8— W. Stanley 
Coleman, aged 30, connected with the 
Carbon Steel company, was found dead 
In the company's office today with a 
bullet hole through his head. It Is be- 
lieved Coleman shot himself while tem- 
porarily insane with the heat. 

_ * 

Twelve Ktllfd by Boiler. 

feullna, Roumania, July 8. — As an 
attempt was being made to refloat the 
stranded river steamer Queenborough 
today, the boiler exploded. killing 
twelve persons and wounding four 
others. 




PRESIDENT G. E. VINCENT. 

THEYASKED 

Sufferers By Fire Secure Judg- 
ment Against Canadian 
Northern Roai 

Verdicts in Most Important 

Civil Actions Ever Tried 

in Crookston. 



That Is Object of Notable 
Gathering of Agricul- 
tural Experts. 

Flying Squadron of Bankers, 

Regents and Capitalists 

Visits Farm Sites. 

Local Enthusiasts "Show" Dis- 
tinguished Visitors Farm- 
ing Possibilities Here. 



In the language of C. P. Craig * 
"bread and butter foundation wa« 
placed under Duluth today." 

The artificers Included the governor 
of Minnesota, the president and re- 
gents of the state university, the dean 
of the agricultural school, capitalists, 
farmers, busint-ss and professional men 
of Duluth. Their .specific labor was to 
choose and watch the selection of a 
site for the agricultural school for 
which the last legislature appropri- 
ated $50,000. . ^ .. 

In automobiles they visited the site* 
that had been offered, leaving the 
Commercial club shortly after S o'clock 
this morning. About fifty were In the 
party. Their tour covered most of the 
agricultural region aajactnt to thl» 
city, and in order to keep up with tha 
schedule the travelers hit only tho 
high spots. 

Governor Adolph O. Eberhart can- 
celled an Important engagement to 
help Duluth select a site for Its farm. 
He was unable to come from St. Paul 
last night with most of the visitors, 
but he arrived at 1;55 o'clock this aft- 
ternoon, climbed In to an automobllo 
and started In hot pursuit of the fly- 
ing squadron. The governor's auto- 
mobile broke six speed records in tho 
first block to get Into the game Tho 
governor Is intensely lntere.«ted in tho 
agricultural development of Nortiiern 
Minnesota, and he regards the estab- 
lishment of the Duluth Experiment 
farm as a foundation stone for tho 
structure of commercial and agrariaa 
development In Northern Minnesota 
that will be reared upon the basio 
solidity of agriculture. 

Vincent Here. 
George E. Vincent, president of the 
University of Minnesota, arrived last 
night. He will wind up a strenunu* 



i 



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FAHMER FIGHTS MAD 

HILL WITH JACKKNIFE. 



Neche, N. D., July 8 J. Wlnen, 

a .Mennonlte farmer of the AI- 
toona district, wan attacked by an 
curased ImiII yewtcrday and re- 
ceived injurie* that may cause 
his death. He fought the animal 
with a Jackknife, but bi« reMlat- 
ance ended when the bull*H hornii 
pierced his abdomen. 




*«»»««»«»»»*»»»*»*»*»»»«»») i () | c»»»J | (»»»»»»»W»4 l ** * ** 



DON'T FORGET THE DATE. 



(Continued on page 5, sixth column.) 

jAMESPEfrrT 

IS FOUND DEAD 

Treasurer of Peavy Crain 

Company Dies at 

Waukegan. 



Chicago, Ju 
nrer of the 
lost his life 
Waukegan s 
bodv was fov 
Mr." Pettit w 
morning plun 
drowned whei 
buovid him v 
ping his heati 



y i,. — James Pettit. treas- 
Peavey Grain company, 
In the lake near his 
immer home today. His 
nd In four feet of water, 
ts accustomed to take a 
ge In the water, and was 
1 the Inflated wings which 
P slipped to his feet, tip- 
under water. 



EARTHQUAKES JAR 

HUNCiARlAN TOWN. 



Budapest, 
earthtiuake s 
morning In 
thirty miles 
followed, th« 
into the stre 
squares. Hu 
overturned a 
buildings mi 



Hungary, July 8. — Two 
hecks were felt early this 
the town of Kecskemet, 

from this city. A panic 
Inhabitants rushing out 
its and assembling In the 
idreds of chimneys were 
id the town hall and other 
re or less damaged. 




Crookston, Minn., July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Verdicts totaling $9,- 
741.64, vitally important, because every 
plaintilT in the twelve suits Involved 
against the Canadian Northern railway 
for fire losses, including eleven farmer-j 
and one insurance company, was given 
a verdict, were returned by a Jury In 
the district court after wrestling with 
the cases from early yesterday after- 
noon till 2 o'clock this morning. The 
Individual verdicts M-ere as follows: 
Mary Peterson, $968. Hans Chrlsten- 
son, $1,098; Thomas Hanbury, $l.ue7; 
Wheeler Misner Loan company, Crooks- 
ton, i'iZb: Frank Laviscque, $753; Will- 
iam Brennan, $80; James Clarke, $1,270; 
John Stone, $265; Edith Hall, $525; An- 
drew I'eterson, $930; Pat Henbury. 
$695; Lumber Underwriters, $1,036.64, 
the full amount sued for. 

Gave .More Than Aaked. 

The jury returned a verdict for $301 
for Stone, but the amount had to be 
cut down to $265, the amount sued for. 

The verdict for the lumber under- 
writers is vitally important owing to 
the fact that the balance of the Insur- 
ance companies are combining their 
losses amounting to $825,000 prepara- 
tory to starting a suit against the Can- 
adian Northern. Fifty other settlers' 
suits are now pending also and others 
will be started owing to the verdict 
that has been rendered. 

The combined cases were stubbornly 
fought for ten days, the longest civil 
trial ever held in Crookston. The de- 
lendants centered their fight against 
the claims of Mary Peterson and the 
Wheeler Missner Loan Co.. the only two 
verdicts that were materially less than 
the claims, which were $1,965 and $1,100 
respectively. 

Loring & Qiungquist of Crookston 
and Childers of Williams, near where 
the losses were sustained, represented 
the plaintiffs, and Baxter of Minneapo- 
lis and Oscar Mtchell of Duluth were 
attorneys for the defendants. 

RENEWOATiiSTO 
HOLY CROSS ORDER 



Five Hundred Members in 

Ceremony at Notre 

Dame. 

Notre Dame, Ind., July 8. — Five hun- 
dred members of the Order of the Holy 
Cross, composed of presidents of col- 
leges, principals of preparatory schools 
and pastors of churches controlled by 
the order, renewed their oaths of alle- 
giance to the organization at the Uni- 
versity of Notre Dame today. The Im- 
pressive ceremony followed the close 
of the annual retreat under the direc- 
tion of Rev. Alfred Cagney of New 
York. A meeting of the chapter of the 
order for the United States, with Very 
Kev. Andrew Morrissey presiding, fol- 
lowed, to determine the assignment of 
members for the coming academic year. 

DR. REILLY'S ATTACK 

OX JURY PANEL WINS. 



Langdon, N. D., July 8.— The jury 
panel for the trial of Dr. J. J. Reilly 
was thrown out by Judge Bury, on the 
challenge of the defendant. This will 
result in a delay in the trial. 
» 






^ CIMMINS AMENDMENT 

^ VUTED Dt>UN 14 TO 32. 



I 



WaMhInston, July S The iien- 

%r ate toda; defeated 14 to 31! the 
4t CnmrolnH amendment to the t'a- 

• nadian reciprocity bill to add 

* meats to the free Hat. 



»)K»i | o t (»*»»»iK*«»»»»»»*»*H(*» »i 



(Contlnud on page 6, first column.) 

TELL KING THEY 
WANT HOME RULE 



Irish Embody Demand in 

Welcome to Royal 

Party. 

Dublin, Ireland, July 8.— King Georgo- 
and Queen Mary received a quiet but 
cordial welcome to Ireland today. Th» 
attitude of the people Is well ex- 
pressed by a banner stretched outsldo- 
the city council hall at Pembroke, a 
suburb of the capital, which refused 
to present an official address to tho- 
king. The banner reads: ,^ 

"W^elcome. We want home rule. 

The lord mayor of Dublin, whoao- 
threat that he would present an ad- 
dress to his majesty despite the con- 
trary decision of the corporation it 
was feared would lead to trouble, ro- 
mained at home^^ ^ 

mayfjmerIeads 
out into oceak 

President and His Senatorial 

Guests Start Week-End 

Cruise. 

Philadelphia, July 8.— The gov- 
ernment yaclit Mayflower, with Presi- 
dent Taft and senatorial party on. 
board, which left the Philadelphia navy 
yard at midnight, anchored for thfr 
nignt in the Delaware river off Thomp- 
son Point, N. J. about eleven miles be- 
low this city. At 7 a. m. the Mayflower 
weighed anchor and proceeded down 
the river. The yat ht passed out to sea^ 
about noon and will sail down the coast 
to the Virginia capes and then up- 
Chesapeake Bay. The Mayflower iB- 
due in Washington on Monday. 

MIXEDIvIFE IDEA 
ENDS IN RUMPUS 

No. 1 Leaves Peter Sharp t(> 

No. 2 After Experiment 

in Kansas. 

Pittsburg, Kan., July 8. — The effort- 
of Peter M. Sharp to keep peace and. 
two wives in the family at the samo 
time, has ended In failure. Convinced 
that she and Mrs. Sharp No. 2 coulfl 
not live together amicably. Mrs. Anna 
Catherine Sharp left the residence or 
her husband vesterday for the home of 
her son, William, In New Orleans. 

Sharp became separated from his 
first wife and his son during the Chi- 
cago fire, fortv years ago. Nine years- 
ago thinking them dead, he re-marrled. 
Tnls spring, through the pension office. 
Mrs. Sharp No. 1 found him here H» 
Invited both women to live In his- 
bouse. Peace reigned lesg than a week. 



a 



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Saturday, 



THE DULUTIf HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 



TESTING ICE 
CREAMCONES 

Herald Receives Complaints 

From Persons Taken 111 

After Eating Them. 

Health Department Takes 

Samples and Has An 

Analysis Made. 



The ice cream anii the ice cream 
eone.-i which art- bfinj? sold in the citj 

are l.-i:-.j. a ■. i;, /-i-'i I'V the health de- 
partin. :.i tu deteiauiie whether or not 
they a re as pure as reiiulred by the 
•tale and national regulations. 

Several comiilainis were recentlj 
made to The HoruM Wy persons who 
■aid that they were taken -luite HI 

aftvr eating ice cream <-'^>''*'-' ^'**'*Xi;''' 
they purchased in various pla^es^ii* 
matter was i)rouslit to the ^it .^n'', " 
of the health .iepartment l>> The 
Herald and a number of sample.- in 
diff. :■ irts of the city were taken 

T' -ts from 

■werf [ ■ •■ 1 ved by l»r 



f^esT R worn tf^m 



A. JTeasea. 890 Nvrtli 



BRAXrn OFFICKSi 
BTth Ave. W. J. J. Moratt, »1«H Worth Central At* 



^^M. ^■^^^^•^^^■n^^^^^^^^^ 



TELI5TALE 
OFJOLDUP 

Lionel Leonardson Says Kind 

Robber Retnnied Watch 

to Hioi 



the first sample 
I J. Murphy, as- 

elaiaiu haUh commissioner, tins ntorn- 
insr It sliowed that tliere were j11.- 
00* t.:i t-ria to the cubic centimeter 
t; '- i-* e.msidered niitte a tavorable 
t, It is in violation of the state 

I h seta a limit of f.00.000 bac- 



1 



the 
In 



teria. l-ut is nut nearly as bad as 
Ice cream found in other cities. 
Chicago as many as 5.000.000 bacteria 
to the cubic centimeter were found. 
Most of the illness is believed to have 
been due to the ice cream and not to 
the cones, which consist mostly or 
water and flour 




Victim Claims Sentimental 

Thug Grabbed Him Under 

Big Arc Light 



After being held up by two masked 
highwaymen. Lionel Leonardson last 
evening told the poll, e that the rob- 
bers gave him back his watch and 
only kept a purse witli $4.30. 

The police are in :llned to doubt 
Lionel's story ,. ■, 

Leonardson to th( police drew a 
vivid picture of how he had been ac- 
costed by two masked highwaymen, 
each carrying shining blue revolvers. 
The scene of action was laid at Fifty- 
seventh avenue west and Grand avenue 
under an arc light. The two robbers 
inquired of Lionel if he had any spare 
change about his per.- on. to which he 
replied he had $4.5i>. He also pas.sed 
over his gold watch, according to the 
story 

"Lionel dldnt care so much about 
the $4.50. but he hatev; to see his time- 
piece go. as it was a tlft to him. The 
ippeal touched the he trts of the high- 
Aiiymen, and wiping u tear out of one 
eye. one of the robbers handed it back 
to him. Leonard-^on hen notified the 
police and gave them a description of 
the alleged hold-up irtists. He said 
that the masks whlcl they wore con- 
sisted of red handkerchiefs with holes 
cut in them for the eyes. When the 
two men left Lionel, they started west, 
he said. 



Irving school alumni association was 
held last evening at Great Kastern hall. 
.\baut 150 members and friends wer«» 
present. L. A. Barnes was toastmaster 
and Mayor CuUum was the principal 
»r)eaker After the banquet, there was 
dancing. 

Madame Rock left yesterday for Ash- 
land, where she will visit with friends. 

At a meeting of the West Duluth 
Commercial elub last evening. A. H. 
Merriman was Indorsed for the posi- 
tion of justice of the peace to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of the late 
.lodge J. B. Flack Mr. Merriman. how- 
ever, declined and a committee was se- 
lected to find another candidate. The 
committee consists of M. J. Murray. Da- 
vid Sang and Thomas Olafson. 

W. C Ilendrickson of Spokane has 
returned home after a visit In West 
Duluth. 

Mi.'^s Jennie Merrill of Fifty-seventh 
avenue west has as her guest Miss 
Helen Woodrow of Rlkhorn. Iiid. 

Harrv B. Butler of Little Rock. Ark. 
a fi)rmer resident of West Duluth is 
visiting In the western end of the city 

Watch repairing. Hurst. West Duluth. 



LAST NIGHT TONIGHT 

WEST DULUTH 



BIG CARNIVAL 

PARKER SHOWS 

FURNISHING ATTRACTIONS 

IS— .SPLKMJII) SHOWS — IS. 

Free .Vttraotlonii Duy and Mght. 

DKKTl.M, Spiral To^er. 

HTRAHL, the llnffalo Fireman, In 
■ I.tO-foot nive. 

ESLICK'S FORTY-PIECE BAND. 



YOUNG MEN 
INSURGENTS 

Branch of Progressive Repub- 
lican Club Is Formed 
in Dttluth. 



Will Give Banquet July 18 

With Lenroot as 

Headline. 



Duluth has a branch of the State 
Progressive Republican club. 

The Duluth club has been formed by 
young men who are not heartily In 
favor of some of the policies of the 
Taft administration, or of some of the 
thoughts and actions of the standpat 
members of the Republican party. 

The Duluth club will aftlllate with 
both the state and the national pro- 
gressive Republican clubs. 

Hans B. Haroldson Is the president 
of the club. This morning Mr. Har- 
oldson stated that the club was not 
identified tvlth the movement recently 
launched to back Senator La FoUette 
for the Republican nomination 



He 



Why Take Chances? 

When you can buy a 

Chemical Fire 
Extinguisher 

\t 10 1 Wr.ST riRST STREET. 

F. Wickey, Agt., 



158 — IJoth Thoiie,* 



158. 



WILL DOUBLE 
. SIZE_OF PLANT 

Ouellettes Buy Interest in 

Nelson Sash & Door 

Company. 

p. C. and .\. V. U lellette. formerly 
of the Ouellette-Baxt !r company, have 
acquired a substantial interest In the 
E. N. Nelson Sash & I -oor company. 

Ttia plant, which if situated at For- 
ty-sixth avenue west, will be enlarged 
immediately so that 1' will have double 
Its pre.sert capacity, »nd will be e-iual 
\v efficiency to any similar plant at the 
Head of the Lakes. 

TRIED tTpAWN 
STOLEN WATCHES 



FRENCH BANKERS 
GO TO CANADA 

Prominent Financiers Pass 

Through City on Way 

to Winnipeg. 

Jean Buffet, vice president of the 
Soclete Centrale des Banques de Prov- 
ince, of Paris; Jules Hunebelle, brother- 
in-law of the governor of the Bank of 
France: Theodore RevlUion and P. S. 
Henry of Washington. D. C. who is a 
brother of Sir Charles Henry, member 
of the British parliament, have left St. 
Paul en route to Winnipeg and are ex- 
pected In Duluth some time this after- 
noon. 

The Frenchmen are members of the 
Canadian Mortgage association organ- 
ized a year ago and which has loaned 
$6,000,000 In Western Canada. They 
are taking the trip to view the coun- 
try on which they hold mortgages. 



If 'advertising pays, you, as a busi- 
ness man, want to use it. The most 
successful merchants of the country 
have proved that advertising does pay 
— why not begin now? 




IOWA RAILROADS HAVE 

INCREASED EARNINGS. 



But 



DR. MITCHELL 



Making New Curds Every Day at 
309 Columbia Building. 

A r-^cord of nearly sl.xteen years of 
the most remarkable cures in Duluth. 
old cases of rheumatism and paraly.-i.s, 
helpless for years, are made to walk; 
old .supposed incurable cases of deaf- 
ness and blindness that had wrecTted 
peoples lives tor a score of years: 
nervou.-* pro.»tration, women who from 
fema: > weaknes*? an<l disease have be- 
come contlrnifd invalids and are cured 
in a short time. He has ( ured case 
after case ot st'>!nach troubles, con- 
stlpati'tn. kidney and b-.adder trouble, 
remi>v«»-l troublesome growths, cured 
cancer- Dr. M't.liell in talking to a 
reporter a few days ago, said: "I 
know thai I have a treatment that 
•will reach diseases^ that medicine will 
not Mv treatment .stands upon Its 
merit* and will bear tlie closest in- 
vestlcfation " 



Jewelry Is Recovered 
Thief Malies His 
Escape. 

Nearly all of the twenty watches 

j which were stolen ea ly on July 4 from 

the jewelry store of S. J. Nygren, 232 

Central avenue, have been recovered at 

d i?uperior pawnshoi* 

The man who ye.' terday afternoon 
attempted to sell thtm escaped, when 
he found the police oq his trail, and Is 
still at large. 

About 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon 
a man entered the si up of the Marcus 
Loan company. 702 Tower avenue, and 
attempted to sell the watches. Hav- 
ing heard of the rob! ery in the papers, 
the proprietor's susp cion was aroused 
and telling the man to wait a minute, 
he stepped to the : ear of the store 
and telephoned the i ollce. 

When the officers arrived, the man 
had left the store, but the watches 
were there. The pioprletor tried to 
hold him, but he w.is too strong and 
got away. The watches were taken 
to the police station and then brought 
to Duluth. 



Des Moines, Iowa. July 8. — Steam 
railroads operating In Iowa Increaseil 
their gross earnings practically JiJ.OOO.- 
OiH) during the year 1910, according 
to a statement Issued Ijy the state ex- 
ecutive council. The figures in this 
statement will be Issued by the coun- 
cil when it meets next Monday for the 
purpose of assessing the railroad com- 
panies. The net earnings are lower 
by Jl. 000, 000, due to heavy expendi- 
tures within the state. Interurban 
companies show an increase in gross 
earnings amounting to more than 
$200,000. No interurban company re- 
ports a net loss. ^ 



LOCAL TRAIN WILL 

LEAVE EARLIER. 



The change in the time of departure 
of the Chicago & Northwestern train 
No. 95 will take place, whereby It 
will leave at 4:45 p. m.. Instead of 8:15. 
This train id a local between Duluth 
and Eau Claire, and is of special bene- 
fit to those from this city who are 
spending the week-end, or camping at 
.Solon Springs and other resorts In 
Wisconsin. The regular train leaving 
at 6:1.1 for Chicago will not be 
I hanged. 




40th to 41st StretU on Park Aet. 
New York 



ONE block from Grand Central Sta- 
tion — Subway, Express and 
Local — Elevated and Surface 
Cer liQes. This widely and f iivcrably 
known Hotel crcwns Murr.iy Hill — 
the mo«t desirable of central loca- 
tions, with the fazhioncbic chcpping 
and theatre districts directly at hand. 
Extensive improvement* complete, 
Popul*r prices — European plan. 
'We roQaett your patronaee. 

B. L. M. Hates I /,„,»_>, .^ 
Lov,is P. Roberts s'''oP^"'^ 

Geo. T. S.\ndai.ls, Manager 



RESIGNS FROM WEST 

DULUTH BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Rev. Hugo P. J. Sellnger. for the 
past vear pastor of the West Duluth 
Baptist church. Fifty-ninth avenue 
west and Grand av« nue. has resigned 
and after October will be no longer 
connected with the ihurch. 

Rev. Mr. Sellnger same to West Du- 
luth to fill the vaca icy caused by the 
resignation of Rev, Arthur J. Hoag. 
who is now assocl.ite pastor of the 
First Baptist church of St Paul. 

When asked toda • about his plans 
for the future Mr. -selinger was very 
reticient and would not even admit 
that he had resigned. Frank M. Ash- 
lev, one of the trustees of the church, 
htjwever, .^tates thi t the resignation 
was turned over to the church board 
two weeks ago. 

Tomorrow evening Rev. Mr. Sellnger 
will exchange pulpits with Rev. C. W. 
Uanishaw of Proctoi . 




FIRST SERVICE IN 

-- NEW FREE CHURCH. 



OPEN AND BLEED 

■ 

Blisters Formed, Skin Scaled Off, 
and Flesh Burned and Itched 
Dreadfully, Healed by Less Than 
One Cake of Cuticura Soap and 
One Box of Cuticura Ointment. 



The first service to be conducted at 
the new Norwegiar Lutheran Free 
church will be held tomorrow. 

The church edifice is located at Six- 
tieth avenue west md Bristol street. 
St^rmons will be uellvered by Rev. Flax- 
tcd of this city. 




ULCERINE: SALVE 



la a sore <^ur« for Chronic Ulcers. Bone Ulcers, 
B«rcla\ons Ulcers, Varicose Ul«er«,IH«rcnr» 
lalUlcer«.Fever Soren.Ganjrrene. Blood Pol- 
■onlng, 'Whit* Swellins:, Poisoned Wounds, 

Sll 8ori53 of long Bt» iid !nK. PoalllTely nerer f alU.Cor* 
also Cats. Boras. lioiU. F^lon«. Carbuncles, 
Abscett.'S. For sale b/ .IrutrnlsW. Mali 85c and BOc. 

\. y. Ati.iiN medicine: co.. " 



Sr. Facl. MiKH, 



No Funeral Arrangements. 

No funeral arrangements have been 
juade for Gjorog Le March, aged 27. 
who was crushed to death when a huge 
crane tipped over ai d a bucket of con- 
crete struck him esterday morning 
at the steel plant Le March came 
from Austria and has been In this 
country but a short time. He has no 
known relatives hei-e. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Mr and Mrs L. .1. Gibson have as 
their guests this we ?k. Mrs. S. Doan of 
Brimson. J. Connelly of Hibbing and 
W. Stevens of Eau \'!alre. 

D Burgoyne of Ml meapolla is a guest 
at the home of Mr. tmd Mrs. S. Kraken- 
berg. 

At Asbury M. E. c lurch. Sixtieth ave- 
nue west and Raleigh street, the Ep- 
worth league will have charge of the 
evening service ton orrow. 

The sixteenth anr ual banquet of the 



"About two months ago my hands started 
to crack open and bleed, the skin would 
scale oCr, and the good fle.sh would bum and 
itch dreadfully. When my 
hands first started to get 
sore, there were small 
blisters like water blisters 
which formed. They 
Itched dreadfully. It Just 
seemed as though I could 
tear the skin all off. I 
would scratch them and 
the skin would peel off, 
and the flesh would be 
all red and crack open 
and bleed. It worried me 
very much, as I had never had anything the 
matter with my skin. I was so afraid I would 
have to give up my employment. 

"I consulted my doctor, and he said he 
didn't think it would amount to anything. 
But It kept getting worse. One day I saw 
a piece In one of the papers about a lady who 
had the same trouble with her hands. She 
had used Cuticura Soap and Ointment and 
was cured. I decided to try them, and my 
hands were all healed before I had used one 
cake of Cuticura Soap and one box of Cuticura 
Ointment. I am truly thankful for the good 
results from the Cuticura Soap and Ointment, 
for thanks to them I was cured, and did not 
have to lose a day from work. I have had 
no return of the skin trouble." (Signed) Mrs. 
Mary E. Breig, 2522 Brown Street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa„ Jan. 12, 1011. 

Cuticura Soap and Ointment are for sale 
everywhere, but those who wish to try them 
without charge may do so by sending to 
Potter Drug A Chem. Corp.. Dept. 6A. Boston, 
for a liberal sample of each, post-free, together 
with 32-p. book on the skin and scalp. 





HANS B. HAROLDSON. 



stated that the members of the club 
were In favor of many things that 
were opposed by some of the old line 
Republicans and were heartily In 
favor of the progressive legislation 
that "fcad been brought about by the 
more jMrogresslve members of the 
Grand Old Party. , ,, 

Dr. Bowden is the treasurer, I. K. 
Lewis, vice president, and Harvey 
Clapp chairman of the executive com- 
mittee. 

A banquet will be held on Julv 1', 
according to the present plans or the 
club, when Congres.nman Lenroot and 
several other speakers of national 
prominence will address the members 
of the new organization. 

The membe.'s of the club expect to 
take an active Interest In politics In 
iHiIuth and this i^lvX of tiie state. 
In working with the state organiza- 
tion the members of the club also ex- 
pect to take an active part In the 
next national campaign. 



McNAMARA LOSES 
IN PRELIMINARIES 



Plea of ''No Jurisdiction" k 

Thrown Out By the 

Court 

Los Angeles, Cah, July 8. — A pre- 
liminary victory was won by the pros- 
ecution In the caee of John J. Mc- 
Namara, secretary-treasury of the In- 
ternational Association of Bridge & 
Structural Iron workers, accused of 
connection with the Los Angeles Times 
dynaigltlng. when Judge Walter Bord- 

well sustained the objection to the 
plea of no Jurisdlotlon Introduced In 
behalf of the allfeged dynamite con- 
spirator. 

Judge Bordwell said that the Log 
.-Vngeles courts have jurisdiction over 
the impending trial of McNamara on 
nineteen charges of murder. As to 







Lighting Talks 



NUMBER 34 



DULUTH, JULY 8, 1911 




A Good Many People 

still cherish the delusion that competition in any Public Utility is 
beneficial to the community. But that old fallacy has been exploded 
so many times that all thinkers who have given the subject any seri- 
ous study now admit that such a Public Utility as the supplying of 
Electricity for light and power is a NATURAL monopoly, and is of 
greatest permanent benefit to any community only so long as it is 
kept a monopoly. 

Wherever two competing Electric Lighting plants are built the 
people of that community inevitably HAVE TO PAY FOR BOTH 
— end it makes no difference whether a city or a private company 
builds the competing plant. A Municipal plant is no exception. 

It has taken 23 years to build up the present lighting business 
of the Duluth-Edison Electric Company. But a Municipal plant 
could not take that business away from us in 50 years. This com- 
pany can hold its own against any competition a Municipal plant can 
possibly bring. 

We offer to light the City at a much lower price thag a Municipal 
plant could do it for, and a price that is $23.41 LESS ON EVERY 
ARC LIGHT than the average price paid by all other leading 
American cities. 

A Municipal plant could not sell current to private consumers at 
lower rates than this company without losing money on all such 
business. 

The City has no money with which to build an Electric Lighting 
plant, but would have to go into debt for it no matter how much 
the plant would cost. That debt would have to be paid someday, and 
even if its liquidation were shoved so far into the future that your 
grand children would have to bear the burden of its final settlement, 
YOU would have to pay the interest on the debt. 

YOUR TAXES would inevitably be higher the very first year 
of the plant's existence; and they would get higher and higher for 
years to come, because every Electric plant costs more than the in- 
itial estimate and the building of the plant is only a start in the 
spending of money. The City would have to borrow more money 
every little while for new equipment and improvements to keep up 
the plant's efficiency. Electrical machinery depreciates faster than 
any other kind. 

These are the FACTS, Mr. Taxpayer. Do YOU see any valid 
reason for this City of Duluth to squander hundreds of thousands 
of dollars, borrowed money, on an Electric plant that it does not 
need and to make taxes higher and higher year after year without any 
real benefit either to the City or to its individual citizens? 

Read the next Lighting Talk, in next Tuesday's Herald. 

DULUTH-EDISON ELECTRIC CO. 



i 



-H 




■■>' ■■ " r 



-<! 




•■ 



jectlon to the court's considering the 
motion to quash also was made. 

The case came up again this morning, 
when arguments were continued. 



IN THE DAY'S WORK 
AT WASHINGTON 



Seal Treaty Slgued. 

Washington. July 8. — The final signa- 
tures have been affixed to the treaty 
for the protection of seal life, and the 
convention will be submitted immedi- 
ately to the senate by the state de- 
partment. 

Ambassador Bryce has left Wash- 
ington for the coast of Maine t(4 be 
gone until October. His absence will 
not delay the conclusion of the nego- 
tiations for a general arbitration 
treaty. By the terms of the seal 
treaty, pelagic sealing is prohibited in 
the seas of Bering, Oklhotsk, Kam- 
chatka and Japan. 



Deflolency Blli PaMttcd. 

The deficiency appropriation bill, 
carrying $213,031 for neces.sary ex- 
penses of congress and the government 
departments has passed the senate. A.s 
the bill passed the house It carried only 
$31,650. The senate added $181,381. The 
measure now goes to conference. 



GOOD STEAMER 
TRUNK AND 
MATTING CASE 



OUR VACATION T'ZER 

$5.00 FOR BOTH 



Remember, from 
the maker to you 



NORTHERN TRUNKG0. 



TRUNKS, BAGS, CASES. .y^<^% 
Wc Arc Makers. 228 West First sircet. 



EILERT BROS^ :^^ 



r^-. \^ 



li 



May Subpoena Roo»cveM. 

Chairman Stanley of the house 'Steel 
trust" Investigating committee has 
gone to Pittsburg to seek evidence re- 
lating to the United States Steel cor- 
poration. Upon his return the com- 
mittee will resume hearings and iii- 
qulre further Into the corporation s 
absorption of the Tennessee Coal & 
Iron company. Several members in- 
sist that Former President Roosevelt 
be called to testify as to his meeting 
with E. H. Gary and H. C. Frlck. and 
the failure of the government to In- 
terfere with the merger. 



Coal Rate Case Appealed. 

The legal contest between the inter- 
state commerce commission and many 
railroads in Eastern states over the 
freight rates on railroad fuel coal has 
reached the supreme court of, the 
United States as the first case to be 
appealed from the recently organized 
United States commerce court. The 
interstate commerce commission held . 



LAKE EXCURSIONS ON STEEL STEAMER EASTON 

Saturday, July 8th. 

Steamer >vill leave BooUi's Dock 3 p. ni. for a 30-nillc trip, retum- 
Injc at 5:30 p. m. FARE 25c. 

Sunday, July 9th. 

Steamer will Icive Tower Bay Slip, Superior, at » a. m. and 2:30 
p. m.; 15ooth'.s Dock. Dulutli. at 9:30 a. \\\. and 3 p. m. for Two Har- 
bors. ReturninK. leaves Two Harlwrs 12 noon and 5 p. m. FARE, 
50c round trip; children, half fare. 

STE.\MER EASTON will leave Tower Bay Slip, Superior, 8 p. m.; 
Bootirs Dock, Duluth. 8:30 p. m.. for a trip on Lake Superior and 
around tlie Horn. F\YRE. 2.5c; children, half fare. 

"First class meals served at reasonable prices. Refreshments of all kinds. 






that the railroads had no right to dis- 
criminate In rates on railroad coal and 
those on any other kind. The com- 
merce court disagreed with the com- 
mission and enjoined the latter from Chambers 



enforcing its order. The appeal from 
this Injunction was filed yesterday. 

♦ 

A SPARJCLING NOVELI.ST. 

Los Angeles Timea: A New York 
editor, at the Century club, told a 
story about Robert W. Chambers, the 
well known young novelist. 

"Chambers went one summer," he 
said 'to Sunapee with his brother. At 
the Ben Mere Inn the aristocratic old 



ladies in rocking chairs, seated on the 

cool piazza that overlooks the lake, 

were very much stirred up by Mr. 

arrival. Whenever he ap- 



peared, they gathered about him and 
talked book.s. 

"Chambers was always ready for 
them. He had always on his lips some 
witty .saying to double them up. 

'■ 'Oh, Mr. Chambers," cried an old 
lady one day, "I admire "Lorraine" so 
much! I've read It eight times!' 

" 'Madam,' answered Chambers, with 
a bow. 'I would rather hear you sajr 
you'd bought eight copies.' " 




JUDGE BORDWELL. 



the allegations that extradition had 
been accomplished by Irregularities, or 
what the defense termed "fraud." Judge 
Bordwell said It was not his province 
to enter into the question of how a 
prisoner was brought into the Juris- 
diction of his court, but to try him 
after he had arrlvted there. It was 
agreed that the sarme ruling should 
apply to all the pleas of no Jurisdic- 
tion. 

MotlonM to Q,uaitfc. 
Replying to the questions of the 1 
prosecution as to where the defense 
desired to h^ve Juhn J. McNamara 
plead to charges ^galn.'it him. the 
latter's coun.sel ans^vrered by filing mo- 
tions to quash the indictments, the mo- 
tions being the same as those filed 
in the case of hl.s brother. James B. 
McNamara. so far as the murder 
charges were concerned. The prosecu- 
tion then mo.ved that all affidavits ] 
filed with the motlon» to quash be 
stricken froni the • records. An ob- \ 



When Your Teeth Are All Gone 

OUR RESTORATION PLATE removes the wrinkles and restores the hollow, sunken cheecks to their 

nattiral symmetrical appearance; adding youth and a healthful, pleasing expression to 

your countenance. _,^,,,__ 

This plate restores perfecty your lost POW ER 
OF ARTICULATION, re-establishes PERFECT 
DIGESTION, repairs the BROKEN DOWN NER- 
VOUS SYSTEM, renews your lagging mental ef- 
forts and revives your nervous energy to a degree 
that social and business life are a success. 
Come and meet us. Have a consultation on your 
dental needs. We have helped thousands, why not you.'' 




[MOTE 

Finest 22 
carat. No 



XHESE: PRICES: 



$3 



Gold Crowns 

better at any price, for 

Bridge Work '^^^^. $3 

ty and quality has never been excelled. 



Silver Fillings^;,::.. 50c 

any price, at ^^ 

Whalebone Plates !ld $5 

42: values. S;8 and V^' 



I 



% 



w»^*^ 



$25 values, $8 and. 



We Specialize In Gold inlays— Gold and Aluminum Plates. 



UNION 

DR. FRANKLIN GREER & CO., Owners, 317 West Superior St., Duluth. 




Open from 8:30 a. m. to 7 p. m. Sundaj^M, 10 to 1. 




\ 




1 

4:1 iii|§(|| » 





V 

I 



Bliss 
Native Herbs 

The Gr*«t Spring Blood Purtfler, 
Kidney and Liver Re»ul«lor. 



200 DAYS' TREATMENT $1.00 

For Sale only by 

FRED GABRIELSEN 

15 Wcat Superior Street. 



Cakes and Bread 

T'..it :r'~>''. ut', ly possess that 

i ■luaiity is what we 

. , ,kr. When wo intro- 

(luLiti lur hi'me-made bakery we 

^v. -p -•■■■■y rnrf'fu! that It also 
I at we olaJmfd t>>r i 

li . , , ^.1 v.-ri'Tijr on yuur \ 

baK-Tj b' ■■■...» 11' yuu buy ;rurn the 



Zenith Home Bakery, 

4:17 Enut F«»nrth Street. | 

Zenith I'houe. Grand, 1*7»-D. 



AH Disease 
Is Caused 
Bj Pinched 

Nenes 

Get eured 
without 
druB* hy 
Dr. D. W. 
]lle«lauil. 

The 
Chlroprae- 
tor, at 70T- 
TOS-709-710- 
ri1-7I2 Pal- 
ladio Bld«. 





HI. W. TURNER 



218-220 East 
First St. 



City Gun c«ri« Store 

for all kinds of FlPhlnif Tackla. 
Hunting and Camplnif Goods, 
and outdoor sports, you should 
■ee our line. 

Home of the 
Brilliant Search Light 

We Repair RverythlnK. 

402 We»t SopcHor Street. 
Opponlte r'aMadio BulIdlnS. 

R. C. KKUSCHKE 



WestDuluth 

Cement Block Works 



M rt-s ftiiiu.t IllotlB. TJIe. Buck. 

I -:>■. »ls<' t-xi'!i»i»e cigl.t in St. 

i •■ t mi!iur«i-fure thp .Vatl< n.il 

s.' , . .,1 W;i;tn>'i f <'tmtiit Biirial 

V 1 upon •pplleatlon. 

n. r. BROW>', Prop. 

1, - 1 .iiin.v t. ;■.; M 

UU'Hf- Zil.ith 'k<l« 1;C :<lJo-A. 

Oftle:*: r'.luuiet. JK-U 

M. W. Corner Fim-*<«tti and Grand Avtnues 

West. 

N. P. Track. Siitty-Kcord and Grand 

Avcnui'l Wftt. 



To Light the World 



with out dlamind 1». of course, an Im- 
neibauj. tut If our stock of diamcp.to 
«»re »11 In ri.e Inrgi. Mltii-B it would »l- 
tratl ccnslderabl* atttntion. 

Ol'K ASSOUTMKNT f»P HA-NDStlMfc 
IKWKLKY is well wir.h ■•efliiB <ii«i an '"' 
»p«-lloii wiu sm rts«. pleuw urid (if lou 
&UJFI. profit sou. 

GARON BROS., 

Wholtsalc and Retail Jeweler*. 

213, 2 15 WfSt Fir»t Str et. Out ol th« 

HIgli Real District. 



Diilulh Gas Engine Works 

PARK POI.\T. 

^: 




HitilOtrsi uf lit* safe family boat. a«atln« 
l«i pfrsoiia. equipped with 4 cycle, i-part ea- 
llne. CiDie for a trial trip. 

M^ken cif all slw* of «i*eil pnpellers. 
ferass. aluminum castings; machine work of 
ail kloda guaranteetl. - 



COWEN <i ZIMMERMAN 

&31 Eitst Superior Street. 

FURNISHERS & 
DECORATORS 



Flue Fabric* and Wall Paper*. 

FIXK LINE t»F WILLOW CRAFT 

FVUXITLRE. 

Estimates cheerfully grlven. 

BOTH PHOXFSt 
New, Gruud, :i04. Uld, Mel., 3480. 



=For= 



Prescriptions 

to be filled accurately 
and wit:» dispatch, go to 

LeRICHEUX'S 

DRU(J STORES 

405 East Fourth Street, or 432 
W^esi First Street. 

BOl H PHONES. 



SAM KASSMIR'S 



New s t e ti nn 
Baker aid 
Carlsbad Min- 
eral Treat- 
ments, a pi k1- 
tlve cure or 
all rhfunijiiic 
ailments — ire 
the Talk of 
the Town. 
13 ithsare un ler 
H.tel MoKiy. 
F'ifth av e n u e 
west and First 
street. 

t»PFX r>AY 
Zeulth Ph tne. 




.%>n MtillT. 
Graad. 13U0-A. 



The Way to a 
Woman's Heart 

is paved irith chocolates and 
bon-bons, and the wise men who 
travel that road order theirs 
from dealers who sell and han- 
dle 

WINKLFR BROS.' 

DELIt lors tHOCOLATES. 

Winkler Bros., Mfgrs. 

Factory: 2230 W. MiehiKan St. 
Dn.lTH, MINN. 



John Wahl 
Candy Co. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Manufacttirers and Jobbers of 

High-Grade Candies 

Dlstrlbntera of Rcx and Sparrow 
Chocolates. 



VictorBuot's 
Candy 

M IDE TtinW. 
EXPRESSED E\ ERVWIIERE. 

"None Nicer" 

223 WCftt Superior Street. 
Borii PHONES. 



BREADMAKING 



is our busl 
the subjet 
thoughtful 

fained mu< 
rom aiti 
bread we 
wholesome 
Belter b 
than uur 
loaves. 

Mail 



ness. \V>e have jriven 
t a great deal of 
study. We have also 
h valuable knowledge 
al experience. The 
bake Is as good and 
as ran hi? made, 
•ead cannot be made 
Diamond home-made 

e Fresh Dally. 



E. BJORLIN 

220.1 \Vest First Street. 
BOTH PHONES. 




LAUNDRY 



Fancy Launderers 
French Dry Cleaners 

A. Rtionc Bring* a Wagon 




Ottf J. WctUUndl. 



Wm. H. Wen4Un«. 



Wcndlandt Bros. & Co, 

Blank Book 
Manufacturers 



LOOSE LEAF DEVICES AND 
MAGAZINE BINDING. 

114 and 116 W^eat First Street, 
DL'LUTH, MINN. 

Zsnlth Phone, 628. 




It Is Time To Paint 

If you anticipate paint- 
ing, don't stop and 
think paints are too ex- 
pensive; tlie difference 
now and when paints 
wf-re at the lowest price 
will not exceed $3 to %i 
on an average house with the 
present high prices of materials. 
BUY S. W. P. PAINTS. 

Northwestern Paint Co. 

323 West First Street. 
Both Phones, SOO. 

Ask for Color Card -^nd show It 
to your wife. 



FITGER 
BEER 

The Kind That Satisfies. 



Fitger Brewing Co., 

DULUTU, MINN. 



Now Is the Time 



to have your painting done be- 
fore tiie weatner gets too hot. 
Also to finish up your interior 
decorating; and wv are ready to 
estimate your work or stil you 
the materials. 

Jno.Hogan& Company 

PAINTERS and DECORATORS 

22 EAST FIRST STREET. 
Both Phones. 





• *^»*<«^if 



Our New Catalogue 
Is Ready tor You 

WRITE OR •PHONE FOR ONE. 

If ym arr- thlnklrn 'f prtrarlng fiT a 
f:tm<>fr*|.hlo or Bix kKceDlrg ptmltlnn It Is to 
yiiur li.tertut tc altcrui .lAe .artiocl which will 
Bl»e yt'U the l>«Kt tralidng for such a place. 
Glre MA an tipportunltjr to »l»»w you wheisin 
irur sclic><il Picela li; W'* wcfii 

CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE. 
30 East Superior SIrePt. Duluth, Minn. 



W occasions. 

40,000 FEET OF GLASS. 



J. J. L©i 

921 East Third Street 

BOTH 'PHONES. 



CONSOLIDATED 
Stamp & Printing Co. 

14 Fonrth Avenue West. 
Dl LITH, .Ml.NX. 



Card EnKrH\lMKf 

Steel Die FmbosMlng, 

Rubber StanipH. 

Stencils and SralH In large 

varieties. 

Drop in and let us figure on 
your wants. 



Sick Men! 

Weak, fatigued. nenoua ? 
We hare maile tl.cusanil* of 
men well durlns our SO 
years l-ractlce In Uulutli. 
We accrpt no Incurable 
rnsn. We guarantee all 
p.iUriits who ar< suffering 
from RheumatUm. Stomaib 
TrX'uLle aud all lilseases it 
men. Coutultatlun rrci 

Hcun 9 a. m. lo S p. u. 
iiui>days 10 to 1 p. m. 

Progressive Medical Association, 

I West Superior.. Str««t. Upstairs. 




Got Your Garden Ready? 

We sell ail kinds of fences and 
tools for it. 

L. K. DAUGHERTY 

— Denier In— 

Hardware and Farm 
...Implements... 

PAINTS A\n FARMING 
IMPLEMENTS. 

ROl East Fourth Street. 
Old Phone 703. Ne»v Phone 1093-A 



G. MOISAN, 

French 
Hairdresser 



TWO BIG STORES, 

212 West First Stret and 
10 East Superior Street. 



Everything in human Sanitary 
Hair Goodp, hlghvet tjualities al- 
ways. I'rlces always the lowest. 



Melrose, 2522. 



Grand, t)24. 



ELECTRICAL 
WORK 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

repaIrj^ork. 

TBE WRIQHT ELECTRICAL CO. 

Practical F.let-lrlelans and 
Contractors. 

402 East Superior Street. 




A. L Norberg's Optical Parlor 



Anomalies of refraction, care- 
fully corrected. Broken lenses re- 
placed or ground to order. Re- 
pairing and Btraightenir.g of 
glasses while you wait. Arti- 
ficial eye.** carried and Inserted. 
Consultation free. 

Parlori Room 110 Oak Hall 
Building. 



EDWARD M. STONE, 

Wholesale and Retail 

BOOKSELLER and 
STATIONER 

Blank Books, Office and Type- 
writer Supplies. Drawing Mate- 
rials and Engineers' Supplies. 
Anyfhlng In the book line we can 

fret tot you. Write for our cata- 
ogs. 

221 West Superior Street. 
DULUTH, MINN. 



C. P. Anderson. \ Arthur Falk. 

Duluth Pattern & 
Model Works 

lesi WEST suPsatioR street. 

DULUTH, MINN. 
Both Phones. 

Machinery Patterns 
and Models 

Patterns for Steel, Iron, Brass 
and lllumlnum CaatingB. 



AGENTS 
WANTED! 

Men and women to sell our 
foods direct to consumer In 
every town of Northern Minne- 
sota. Call or write 

GRAND UNION TEA CO. 

214 West I^lrst St. 



Phone Rings. 

"Good heavens, John! The of- 
fice is on fire'" 

"Never mind, Jane! All my 
books and papers are in my Her- 
ring-Hall-Marvin Safe, which if 
guaranteed fire proof, and Ihs 
office furniture Is Insured. ' 

Can you feel as secure? 

Buy your Safe and Office Fur- 
niture at 

Christie Lithograph 
& Printing Co. 



J 



House-Cleaning 
Time 

"We are prepared to clean your 
house with our Invincible Reno- 
vator. "SVe send a competent 
man to do the work. Our prices 
are reasonable. 

Interstate Carpet Cleaoiog Co. 

8INNOTTB & VAN NORMAN, 

Proprietors. 

1028 West Michigan Street. 

Both Phones 



West End 

Furniture House 



2012 West Superior Street. 
JOE POPKIN, Prop. 

Zenith Phone— Lincoln, 447- A. 

The best place in the West end 
to buy Furniture, Carpets, Ruga, 
Stoves, etc. 

Either Cash or Credit 

We Buy Second-hand Furniture. 



We Fool the Sun 



Now If the time to order your 
A-wnln«. Porch Curtaluf and 
OutdooT Sleeping Tentf. 

BVBRYTUIIfO IN CAPTVAS. 

Poirier Tent and 
AwningCompany 

Estabflshed. 1888. 

Inogrpor^tea, Idll. 

I East Superior Strs 



106 Cast 



Strast. 



Bath 



konea. 



We are now ready for business 
In our new store, the finest west 
Of Chicago We sell Genuine 
>fee<Jles, Oil and Parts for all 
Bewlng Machines. We have re- 
liable machines from fU, up, to 
the White Rotary, the finest me- 
thanlcAlIy oonstrusted machlns 
made, which yoU can buy for Too 
Per \^eak. 

W5ITE SEWING 
MACHINE COMPANY 

W. L. SMITH, Manager. 
O S%«t Superior Street 




"eimt>. 



ach's 



''Wears to a 
Wafer 

Is Instantly detachable so It can 
be worn on either shoe, and Is 
absolutely sanitary, as tnerO &f<| 
no nail holes to carry dirt. Bold 
by all dealers. 



9 f 



It GOPHER a 

Fhxnoug ovsr tha Northwest tot 

SHOE-*^ 

REPAIRING 

WHIXiS) YOU WAlV. 

Wf alflo sell HJKh-Qrade Shoes 
{or L««a thftit you p»)r sU«wher«. 

iHOPS AWD 8TOREI9, 
Dvlvtll «i4 8tt»«Hotf. 



We Handle ■ Complete 
Line of 

CUTLERY 

Ond guarantee utlatactloa 
with each parchMC. 

RAXOR9 HONED, 

onouiVD 

AND REPAIRED. 

Aerial Cutlery 
Supply 

ai9 W««t Flnt street. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





City 
Wood Yard 

1 15 Second Ave. W. 
J. D. O'CONNELL, Proprietor 

Wood, Posts and 
Piling. 

BOTH 'RHOIMES 



ROOFING 

GENERAL JOBBING IN SHEET 

METAL. 
Tinning, Metnl Windows, 

CornU-e, Fire Doorw, 

Skylights, Veutilatlng. 

Steel Ceilings, Smoke Slacks, 
llent Hegiilntors, 
Warm Air Furuaces, 
Gutters nud Spouting. 

HOLLIHAN & MILOSTAN 

401-lo:{ East l'ir«t Street. 

TELEPHONES 8 

Grand, 701. Melrose, 2201. 



SPIRELLA 
CORSETS 



made to order according to meas- 
ure. The only perfect and un- 
breakable Corset made, (iuaran. 
teed for One Vcar. 

Blade to Meaaure Pettlooata. 



MRS.E.A.NASH 

631 East Superior Street, upstairs 
Zenith, 17b0-D. 



Fred H. Loansberry. Prsnk Mskowakl. 

F. H. LOUNSBERRY & GO. 

General Printing 
Blank Books 
Loose Leaf 
Devices 

Mall Orders Promptly Filled. 



PROVIDENCE BUILDING, 
Fourth Ave. West and Superior St. 



30 East Superior Street. 




Photographer 




Both Phones. 



Duluth Fur Co. 

Importers— Mnnufneturers. 






FUR 
STORAGE 



Place your furs 
In our care 
during the summer mr.ntlis. vve 
Insure them against .Moth, Fire 
and Theft. 
Furt le Order— Repaired and gemodeled. 
325 West First Street. 
Melrose, 4S3«. Zenith, 624. 




Yon are 
probably under 
the wen t h e r 
with this kind 
of weather. 
Let 

Herbaqueen 
Remedies 

make you well. C?i .1 and 1< t me 
explain their qualities and what 
they will cure. 

E. ANGERMEIER 

CHEMIST AND ASSAYER. 
81 East Superior Street. 



Duluth Bedding 
Company 

Uaanfaettircra af the Beat 
Make of 

Mattresses 

la the Northwest. 

Insist on Duluth Bedding Co.'s 
Ooodf. when buying Bedding. 

t06 LmUm Aveane South, 
DtLlJTH, MINN. 



BEER 



FOR HOME, CLl B OR CAFE 

AND HOTEL. 

Pure and Wholesome. 



ORDER BY PHONB. 

PEOPLE'S BREWING 
COMPANY 

FORTY-SEt OND AVE.NUE. W. 
Both Phones. 



A SURPRISE 

Let us surprise you by making 
yoH n Suit of Clothes to your 
mesKure Ibnt villi he Styllwh, 
Durable and First Class e%ery 
way, nt a price you enu afford. 
Come III and be convinced. 

J. H. MATHESON 
& ARNIO, 

TAILORING EMI'ORII M, 
28 Lake Ave. .No., Duluth. 



A $12.00 Rocker for 

$6.95 

Write (or ilksfrafion and description 
of tills roclcer. 




8 E. Superior St. 

DULUTH. 



Trunks 

Bags 

Cases 






m NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 

are home iiiniiufactun rs. 
BUY rROM THE MAKER. 

228 WEST FIRST STREET 



BAKER ELECTRIC 




Plfnwr Slii:!t I)rlve. Tl.c oliUtt »nij BtsU 

Duluth Automobile Co. 

316 Wctt Firit Street 



» » 



"Will Go on 
Your Bond 

COXTRAt TORS' BONUS, 
1 fDKIJTY lUJXDS, 

K|^B* OrKICl.^L noNDS. 

S^W DF.IMiSlTORV IIO.VDS, 
COURT BONDS. 

American Bunding Com- 
pany of Baltimore 

GEO. R. LAYBOl RN, Agent. 
14 Phoenix Block. 



Zenith 
Dye House 

Largest exclusive 
Clothes Cleaners 
and Dvers at the 
head ol tlie Lakes. 

230-232 East Superior St. 




AGENTS FOR 

THOMAS, CHALMERS, HUDSON 

See our sccond-liand Hargalns 
and get some of the snaps we are 
offering In .Supplies. 

MUTUAL AUXO CO., 

OBNTRAl., G.4RAGE. 
DISTRIBUTERS, DULUTH. 




t«*«.«^4«^«4 




■^ SOr-^ -tt 



' 



t**" 




























1 






1 










1 
1 

I 

: 
i 



I ~ 1 -■—---'--' ■ 



-:n- 



ailinlBI! 



BlIlillllllBllllieSM^^^^ 



t'! 



'"f 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 



/ 



RIVER EXCURSION 

TO FOND DU LAC, NEXT MONDAY, JULY 10, A.M. 

2^';p}'ilTi?ll STEAMER COLUMBIA 



*5n» 



'-aji*'^' 









Steamer Columbia will leave dock at 
foot ol Fifth Avenue West at 9 a. m. 
Returning leave Fond du Lac at 4 p.m. 

ROUND TRIP (ir/^SSTER^Yo^Sp^F^gl) only 

No more delightful trip in all the world than up the St. Louis river, with fishing, swlm- 
mlnp and boating, at Chamber's Grove, Fond du Lac A perfect all-day outing for the family. 
Bring the children and a well-filled lunch basket — l-ut if you dealre, meals can be secured at 
the grove. 



NEXT THURSDAY AT 4 P. M. THE HEflAlD 
WILL GIVE AN EXCURSION TO TWO HARBORS 
ON THE PALATIAL STEAMER EASTON-IARE 
FOR THE ROUND TRIP 



30c 



MOVING PICTURE SHOWS 
IN THE PUBUC SCHOOLS 



»— r- 



Mrs. Perry Starkweather 

Wants Buiidings Made 

Social Centers. 



Duluth Children Spent Nearly 

$25,000 in Theaters 

Last Year. 



MAKES GOOD IN 
SECRETARY'S JOB 

Regre. E;p;;;:ed When 

Downing Leaves Y. M. C. A. 

at Miami, Ariz. 

Nev. s "has been received here that 
Pranic Downlngr. who for five yeara 
waa employed in Y. M. C. A. work In 
Duluth and Is widely known here has 
resigned his secretaryship of the Y. 
M. C. A. at Miami. Ariz., where he has 
been for tlie past year. Speaking of 
Mr. I>owning".s work there, the Miami 
Me.~3eager says: 

"Mr Downing has been in Miami a 

tittle over a year and during that time 
las not only male the Y. M. C. A. a 
popular place, but he has earned the 
friendship of everyone in camp. Be- 
eide.s possessing a thorough knowledge 
Of Y. M. C. A. work, gained through 
ppecial training, he is a genial fellow 
^nd mixer and all will regret to hear 
of his Intended departure." 

Mr Downing left Duluth two years 
ago to take work in the Y. M. C. A. 
training school for secretaries. On 



leaving there he went it once to Mi- 
ami, where he has been for the past 
year. 

He has several offers but has not de- 
cided where he will go. Mr. Downing 
will spend the month of August in 
Duluth. 



Ready New! At AU I^ews Stands ! 

DULUTH" PICTURE 

THE FINEST SOUVI MR BOOIC 
ON DULUTH EVER 1 UBLIiHED 

K««p One Yourself ! S«nd One Away 



one occasion bit her on the finger. 

The oldest of the children is 7 years 
old. 



WILL OBSERVE 




This Remedy Will 
Cure You 

CASCOLA 

T3Y every test and in thousands of 
-'-' cases we have proven the merit of 
this remedy. 

Rheumatism, Kidney and 
Blood Disorders 

Readily yields to this remarkable prep- 
aration. It reaches the seat of the trouble 
by purifying the blood. It rids the sys- 
tem of its impurities by sending them off 
through the natural channels. It is pleas- 
ant to the taste. Cascola is a guaranteed 
remedy and if taken regularly as directed 
will surely cure you. We will refund 
your money if it fails to help you. 

Price $1.50 per Bottle 

For Sale at Drug Stores, or sent express 
prepaid if your druggist does not have it. 

RE A BROS., Manufacturinj{ Chemists 

Ceotury Bltli.. Minneapolis 

LEITHHEAD DRUG CO. 

Diiluth, Minn. Diatributor* 




WIFE IS GRANTFID 

TEMPORAIU ALIMONY. 



Homer C. Waters, 31 

is )>elng sued for divor 

Jane G. Waters, 30 yea 

dered by Judge Dlbell t 
pay the sum of $35 per 
rary alimony, until th 
ha.s been disposed of. 

Mrs. Waters was also 
to'ly of tlie three minor 
ing the action. The ca^ 
ed, will be heard at 
term of the district co' 

Mrs. Waters bring.s 
grounds of cruel and 
n:ent. In her complain 
that on different occasio 
struck her, threw fur 



years old, who 
:e by his wife, 
•s old, was or- 
hls morning to 
month, tempo- 
j divorce case 

given the cus- 
children pend- 
e. it is expect- 
the September 
irt. 

the action on 
nhuman treat- 
t she claims 
ns her husband 
liture, and on 



MERCY SUNDAY 



Duluth Pastors Asked to 

Preach on Kindness 

on Animals. 

Tomorrow will be Mercy Sunday. 

Notices were sent out by the Humane 
society' during the week to all the pas- 
tors of the city churches and the su- 
perintendents of the different Sunday 
schools to speak on some subject which 
pertains to animals: 

The intention of the Humane society 
was to reach all the churches by means 
of po.stal cards, calling attention to 
Mepcy Sunday. 

Mercy Sunday Is a day which was 
set apart some time ago to bring to the 
attention of children and adults the 
proper treatment of animals. 

Many of the Sunday school superin- 
tendents and pastors of the churches 
will speak tomorrow on animals. 
Stories will be told and tiie children 
Interested in seeing that animals are 
not ini.streated. 



To make each school building the 
center of social activity for the dis- 
trict in which it Is located and to in- 
stall free in the buildings moving 
picture shows that parents and children 
may together enjoy them, is what Mrs. 
Perry Starkweather, in charge of the 
women's department of the state labor 
bureau, is working toward. 

Mrs. Starkweather is in Duluth today 
and she states that the idea is not only 
practical but that the time is surely 
near at hand when each school build- 
ing will be the center of social activ- 
ity for the neighborhood in which it is 
located. "This is much better than 
having our children on the main streets 
at night unattended," she says. 

Mrs. Starkweather is giving much of 
her time to this work even though she 
is often .pressed for time in which to 
attend her many other duties in con- 
nection with her office. She is great- 
ly Interested in the idea and has fig- 
ures which back her up in the state- 
ment that the plan la not only cheaper 
but far wiser than the old method of 
giving the children small change and 
sending them off down town to pick 
their own shows and their own amuse- 
ment. 

According to Mrs. Starkweather's 
figures, J24.164.50 was spent by Du- 
luth school children during the year 
past In moving picture amusement 
places. In the Washington school the 
pupils spent |4.716.i(4 of this amount. 



In three of Duluth's schools, the chil- 
dren spent over $2,000 and eight of 
them spent more than $1,000. The low- 
est amount from any building was $200 
and tlie building is located on the out- 
skirts of the city. 

In all nearly $80,000 was spent by 
the school children of Minneapolis, St. 
Paul and Duluth during the year past. 
These figures were carefully compilefl. 

Some time ago Mrs. Starkweather 
wrote the principals of each school to 
ask in each school room how many 
times each child attended the theater 
during each week. 

From the answers to the inquiries 
thus made, the figures were arrived at. 
Clean SbuwH Here. 

Mrs. Starkweather says that Duluth 
moving pictures are clean. She never 
visits a city but that she pays some 
attention to the class of moving pic- 
tures being exhibited. She states that 
Duluth has one of the best ordinances 
governing moving pictures in the en- 
tire country. She says the pictures 
are good and many of them good as 
to educational and historical value for 
young eyes, but that the environment 
would be a great deal better if they 
were exhibited to the parents and the 
children together at the social center 
of the neighborhood, the school. 

Mrs. Starkweather is working with 
the various school boards throughout 
the state at the present time and she 
hopes before long to try out the mov- 
ing picture idea in some of the schools. 

She tells many stories of what effect 
good pictures have on the mind of the 
child. She finds that the pictures have 
great educational value because noth- 
ing so Impresses a child as an inter- 
esting picture. She says that If the 
story of Moses is enjoyed by children 
when seen in down town theaters, why 
not pictures of the French revolution, 
and other historical events. 

In St. Paul the figures as to attend- 
ance of children at picture shows are 
Incomplete as the school authorltlns 
did not co-operate with the labor 
bureau officials. Reports were re- 
ceived from only sixteen schools but 
an average was struck and the total 
expenditure by .St. Paul school children 
for the thirty-eight weeks was $21,- 
G40.20. St. Paul holds the record for 
the lowest per capita expenditure for 
moving picture amusement. In Minne- 
apolis with an enrollment of 45.000 
school chlldran, $33,565.66 was spent on 
moving picture shows. The highest 
amount for any single school was 
$I,S00. 



ORPHEUMWILL 
BE REOPENED 

Second Season of Duluth 

Theater Will Begin 

Aug. 6. 

The Duluth Orpheum theater will! 
be reopened Sunday, Aug. 6. 

Manager H. W. Pierong and Mxa. 
Plerong returned last evening from 
their summer home at Lindstrom. 
Minn., and Mr. Pierong left last night 
for St. Paul. From there he will go 
the Shriners' convention at Rochester, 
and then he will go to New York to 
complete arrangements for the open- 



ing. Regular Orpheum bookings will 
be presented aa last year. 

The first season of the Duluth the- 
ater was a successful one, and next 
year is expected to be even more so. 

The theater closed early in June, and 
since that time has been thoroughly 
cleaned and renovated. Owing to the 
fact that the building wa.s new last 
summer, but few repairs were necea- 
sary, biit these have been made. 

WILL BE DEPORTED. 



t 



Religious Insanity Develops After 
Four Months in America. 

Miss Anna Terlap. 42 years old, will 
be deported on July 23 to her native 
land, Austria, on the grounds of la- 
sanltv She came to this country four 
months ago, and two months after ar- 
riving here she developed insanity, said 
to have been Induced by religious be- 
liefs. About seven years ago fhe was 
Insane in her native land, but recov- 
ered. The Immigration department will 
appoint a woman attendant to take ner 
to Austria. 



T* 



t 



POPE PIUS ONLY HAS GOUT 

Considering His Years, He Has Wonderful Strength 

and Vitality— Does Not Discuss 

His Health. 



ARE YOU ANY RICHER AFTER PAY DAY 

— or does all your money go to swell the bank accounts of 
OTHERS? 

If the latter be true, make a change next pay day — place 
something to YOUR OWN credit in this bank. 

There's no need for waiting until you have accumulated a 
large sum, as vou can start a savings account here with as little 
as ONE DOLLAR. 

We will pay you i liberal rate of interest on your savings deposits and 
make your banking connections pleasant as well as profitable. 

American Exchange National Bank. 

SavlngM Deimrtiueut Open Kvrry Saturday Night tn the Year, 

(i to !^ O'clock. 



Rome. July 8. — Pope Leo, especially 
in the later years of his pontificate, was 
accustomed to go to bed quite well and 
wake up to find himself reported at the 
point of death. So accustomed did he 
become to this that lie used to scan the 
papers "to find out the state of my 
health today !"" 

Up to within a year or two. Pius X 
was almost free from this kind of an- 
noyance, and when such a statement 
was made, allowed himself to be seri- 
ously discomposed and took the trouble 
to try and discover the source of the 
yarn. Once a rumor of the kind 
reached his sisters, who. hurrying to 
the Vatican, insisted on seeing him, al- 
though there is a strict rule that they 
must give notice of their visits. Thus 
some difficulties were made for them, 
but when they did enter his presence 
their surprise at his robust condition 
was so great that Pius X laughed with 
amusement, exclaiming. "Did you ex- 
pect me to be shrunken to a shadow? 
By your expression 1 should sav that 
you are disappointed to find me well!" 

At the present moment sor.icthinflr of 
the kind is taking place. According to 
the rumors the pontiff is seriously ill 
and a conclave Is Imminent. This, of 
course, is nonsense, but certainly he is 
not the man he was. and the trouble 
can be described with one word — gout. 
There Is absolutely nothing else the 
matter with the pope, but those who 



watch mm find that he recovers ever 
more slowly from each attack, and in 
consequence ig more lanquid, take-'? 
more rest and does less work. But 
this Is onlv natural, and when his 7C 
years is taken into consideration, it 
must be ackowledged that he has 
wonderful strength and vitality. If ^ 
nothing unexpected happens he should 
round out four score years. 

Pius X is e.ssentially a genius man 
He loves his kind and enjoys the j 
breath of fresh air which he gets from I 
the outside world through audiences. I 
For this reason he is apt to prolong 
the receptions, and so uses up tne time 
that he should be resting, but all re- 
monstrance Is In vain, the usual an-) 
swer being. "I am not made of paper, 
let me enjoy what I can'." 

Recently the visits of his sisters, who 
live "just around the corner," have 
been more frequent, but his health Is 
not discussed, as he does not like the 
I topic. "Just as though I were an In- 
I valid," he cried the other day. Thus 
I the good ladies confine themselves to 
i pleasant gossip about "home" affairs. 
His Holiness still takes a most affeec- 
tionate interest in all the members of 
his family. The latter, however, do 
not profit by his exalted position. The 
inn at Rlese is kept just as before, his 
1 nephew's wife still teaches the primary 
class in the village, and his brother is 
still a postman. Pius X certainly can- 
not be accused of nepotism. 



IS BOUND OVER 
TO GRAND JURY 

Robert Levine Must Await 

Trial on White Slave 

Charge. 

Robert Levine. arrested under the 
new white slave statute, was bound 
over to await the action of the Sep- 
tember grand Jury after a preliminary 
hearing in jiollce court yesterday after- 



S S SSSf Si ^ m fM% ! Snm li ff !m f i ^ w ffi^ ^ 



In 



THE 
FIRST NATIONAL 

BANK 
OF DULUTH. 

Capital $600,000 

Surplus aid Profits. . 1 1.526,000 




-WE ISSUK- 



$10, $20, $50, $100 
Travelers' Checks. 



Safe, convenient, self-identifying. 
Payable everywhere for full face value. 






TEN DAYS THIS MONTH 

REMEMBER, Savings Deposits made, or accounts opened 
with this Banlf on or before the 10th day of the month, 

DRAW inti:rest from the first day of 

THE MONTH. Six months' interest credited January 
1st. 1912. 

3% -INTEREST— 3% 

Paid on Savings and Time Deposits. 

'phe ly prthern Rational R ank 



Alworth Eiuilding-"Look Up, You Can't Miss It. 



ft 




ROBERT LEVINE. 



noon. His ball was fixed at $1,000. 
Theresa Ray. an inmate of a St. Croix 
avenue resort, testified that In the last 
three or four weeks, she had been giv- 
ing him about |3 a day. Detective 
Irvine stated that Levine had admitted 
that he received $25 or $30 from her. 
Under the statute the penalty for be- 
ing supported wholly or in part by an 
Immoral woman Is one to three years 
in the state prison. No testimony was 
offered by the defense. Levine is said 
to have been living with another wo- 
man as man and wife while accepting 
money from Theresa Ray. Levine was 
arrested while with the second woman 
in the .Vlvarado hotel, wh^re it is al- 
leged that they were smoking opium 
together. 



Graff of the equity division of the 
district court, the city council is re- 
strained from issuing saloon permits 
to more than eighty-six saloons in the 
city, thereby knocking out seven sa- 
loons in Des Moines. Judge De Graff 
upheld the validity of the Moon law. 
The ruling has an Important bearing 
throughout the state, as other city 
councils have issued licenses in ex- 
cess of 10 to every 1,000 Inhabitants. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
OF AUTO CLUB 



The annual meeting of the Duluth 
Automobile club will be held on Tues- 
day, July 18. 

The place of the meeting or the time 

of the (Jay has not been fixed. This 
will be done at once, however, and no- 
tices of the meeting will be sent out 
to the members. 

The most Important business to come 
before the attention of the clvih is 
the election of officers. Howard T. 
Abbott is at the present time presi- 
dent of the organization. 

The club has been very successful In 
Its work for better roads thus far. 
and it Is hoped that even more enthu- 
siasm for good roads may be stirred 
up at the meeting. 

The club Is doing a good work and 
with the hearty co-operation of the 
county commissioners many improve- 
ments have been made on the roads 
about Duluth in the past year. 

The commissioners have welcomed 
the auto club and the suggestions of 
the members. 



IOWA L.\W LIMITIXG 

SALOONS HELD VALID. 



Pes Moines. Iowa, July 8. — By an 
opinion handed down by Judge De 



A. L WISNER & CO. 
ARE INDICTED 



New York, July 8. — The federal 
grand jury has returned Indictraenta 
charging seventy-three overt acts 
against A. L. Wlsner & Co.. firm and 
members. who were raided last 
March by postofflce inspectors. The 
inspectors declared that investors 
had sent the promoters more than 
$2,000,000 for the purchase of min- 
ing and oil stocks. These charges 
are embodied in counts alleging con- 
spiracy to defraud Investors in con- 
nection with the sale of stock in the 
United States Tonopah & Goldfleld 
Mine. L'fd. 

Among the confiscated papers laid 
before the grand jury was what the 
postofflce Inspectors called the largest 
•'sucker list" In existence. It con- 
tained 120,000 names and was di- 
vided into four classes labeled "spe- 
cial," "good." "fair" and "worth try- 
ing." 

• 

AN EXCKLLEXT NIGHTCAP 



Homford'H Add PhdMphate 

Half a t?«.<;)' oiiful of Hor^fonrs A.nd Tli ispliatP In 
baU a sUm of wiler on relirlux loduues resiful sleep. 




OUR LAST 

PIANO 



■*— t 



AT YOUR OWN PRICE! 



^ ;r— 



ONE DAY ONLY— "WIND-UP" DAY 

9 to n A. M. I to 5 P. M. 7 to 9 P. HI. 



JULY 1 

We have left just a few of the finest pianos we ever 
carried in stock. These are now in storage, as we have 
closed our store room. In order to dispose of them, we will 
hold a special sale on next Thursday, at the hours above, 
and will sell every instrument at practically your own price 
for cash or on time. One day only, Thursday, July 13. 

Call at our wholesale office, 209-210 American Exchange 
Bank building, corner of Third avenue west and Superior 
street, and we will advise you fully concerning our new 
plans, and notify you where these last few pianos will be 
on sale. 

KORBY PIANO CO. 

209-210 AMERICAN EXCHANGE BANK BLDG. 

NOTE: We will also have for sale, that day, a number of old 
and new violins — instruments valued at from $10 to $150 — that 
we will sell from $2 up. A number of $5 piano scarfs, 50c each. 
Used and new $5 piano stools, 50c and up — whatever you will give! 
Also violin bows and cases. Thursday, July 13th. 

Mail orders and orders at our office for future delivery v^ill 
be taken that day for our own makes of pianos, Kimball, Whitney 
and Hinzc, Kimball and Whitney Player Pianos and Kimball 
Organs. Cash or time payments. 



-I 

t 



t 




'eimbach s 



O Qubl&- Wg 




UNIQUE— A Triumph of Duluth Genius See It! Buy 
It! Wear It I Up-to-date Shoemen Sell It! Attached 50c 




^ 



«• 



Wears to a Wafer'* 




• * 




1^ Offers All .^ 

That is Best in Hotel Life *^^ 



Recognized for years as the headquarters of New York's 
representative visitors from eveiy state in the union. 




wj Ananged, appointed and conducted unda an established system of Hotel 

Hi Management that has long catered to public demand. 

^U^ HOTEL PERFECTION AT CONSISTENT RATES .Qj 

N^^ HOLLAND HOISE, 5th Ave. and 30th St. ^^V 

N^rtg^ Near all railway terminals, undentround and ..^JS^ 




Near all railway terminals, undentround and 
elerateil stations, ftieamshlp piers, the- 
aters, shopping centers and commer- 
cial districts. 




T 



4 



DULUTH HERALD. 



July 8. 1911. 




RANGES 



j , _^ » _/ in.> m t -x-x- t r-M ■ ■-■■■■* 



I Twigs on the Nocthlanders' home 
grounds by the Ec ore of 14 t o 11. 

ElY TO INSTAll 
UP-TO-DATE SYSTEM 



BEAR RIVER 
CROPS HNE 

Lars Brude Tells Hibbinf 

People That Section Is 

Doing Finely. 

Ten-AcreGarden Truck Farm- 
er at Swan River Is 
Also Prospering. 



I 



pBi 



Jiiniial .,« 



HibMng. Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald. (—"Potatoes planted late 
this spring have been drowned out and 
have rotted badly, but thuse planted 
early are In fine shape.' »aid Lars 
Brude. the Bear River bonanza farmer, 
who was in Hibbing this morning. 

••The Bear River country will again 
hav.- a very large crop of potatoes to 
market.' said Mr. Brude. Since the 
exten.sion of the Swan f-jver com- 
panys line to Sturgeon ^^^f' Jl'^Jl^.iy 
Itiver farmers can v^-'-y .^^"^^"'^''een 
market their pr.-duce and imve teen 
doing so tl:e past year at a ver> suo 
Btartial P'-c'St ^o themselves. 

Mr. Brude declares that all other 
crops in the Bear River district are 
In excellent condition and says that 
the district will thjs f«'»ll ^'^'^^S*^! 
grt-atest amount of farm produce in its 

Vwan River Truck Farmer. 

J VV Biake. the Swan Kiver mar- 
ket' gardener and produce dealer, was 
also in Hibbing today. Mr. Blake has 
been doing some extensive farming 
ir Swan River for the past two or 
three vears with the result that upon 
l?.M than ten acres he raised a v^ry 
ar^e amount vt garden truck and 
mlkts regular shipments to the range, 
marketing nu.sl of his pruduce at Hlb- 

**&fr. Blakes few acres of garden are 
only half a mile from the station at 
ywan River and are well worth a visit 
from those wh-^ are compelled to ia> 
ever there betwt- en trams. 

LAID OFFW 

PULLING GUN 



Virginia Policeman Who Men- 
aced Governor's Auto Parly 
Gets Vacation. 

Virginia, Minn., July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The police and fire com- 
mission passed a resolution, recom- 
mending that the chief of police sus- 
nend Patrolman Pickle from the PO'ice will not 
Fo"ce for ten days for unnecessarily grounds 
pUUng his revolver on an automobue 

^"^The occasion referred to by the com- 
mission is when Governor Kberhari 
wa«rV ere June 24 and delivered an ad- 
dress at the National Finnish Temper- 
ance society picnic. While the govern- 
or Mayor iiawkinson. Secretary ^v. J, 
Archer of the Commercial club and 
Mavor Saari of Eveleth were speeding 
Ir an automobile from Olcott park to 
the Iron Range depot, f ^^'f tance of 
neariy two miles, to <;at<:^ the train, 
tiiev w-ere ordered to halt by the of- 
ficer. Failing to comply promptly w'lth 
his order, he pulled his revolver. The 
Sirtv stopped and Mayor Hawkmson 
explained the situation and the auto- 
mobile continued on its speedy journe>. 
V olating the city ordinance. The com. 
mhssion takes the position that the of- 
ficer exceeded his authority and caused 
prominent citizens undue annoyance^ 
<bn his return to St. Paul. Governor 
Eberhart denied tnat the policeman 
pulled his revolver. ^^^^ 



r.'s'odv In the cour ty jail. T^>^, J^ 
vVui to have been a « old blooded crime 
for the purpose of robbery by the con- 
fession of the prlsoi .er. 

FIVE CANDIDATES 
SEEK SCBOOL JOBS 

Two Women Among Candi- 
dates for Viriimia School 
Board Positions. 

Virginia, Minn., July i*.—t Special to 
The Herald.)— C. E. Hendrick. Mitchell 
C. Stewart and C irl R. Johnson an- 
nounced their candidacy Friday after- 
noon for men.bers , f the school board 

|:^f'^l^Srfc^«-i!^ Whose 
^^rE.'1?erfdrfck^h.''suP-intendent^^of 

K' m"an"' He' stkm a high as a public 

*''MUcnen'c'stewart is a well known 
«afesman^>f the Virginia *J Kamy l^ke 

'^d ^n'e"Jca"iona %«a?rr'aJ;d'"is% 
g1-a'fuate of t'he Urlversity of Wlscon- 

"'carl R. Johnson is the ^^%^'\ ''J J^,^.\ 
league and is quite popular „^,„_ 

be well taken cari or. 



in the contract that the city if '^^-V^l^f 
to enter municipal lighting business 
Should buy the plant of the company 
caused a warm discussion and the mat- 
ter was referred. 

Some City StatlMic*. 
The citv clerks report for second 
quarter ending June 30. fhows »44.. 
477.61 In receipts and 128.976.05 in dis- 
bursements. while r"e»Pts for the wa- 
t.-r department show a total of >^.3»i-P„ 
kml disbursements of 13.753.85 leaving 
a balance of $5y7 21 for the second 
«;uarter. The h«^alth commission re- 
rf.rtPd twentv-three births and five 
[lealhs /o"7u^e, while the poundmaster 
empounded fourteen an""alf Twentj 
six arrests were ^"^ad^ during the 
month of June, while »Jjl-^^ ^a.s col 
lected In fines and costs. The muni- 
cipal court cUrk^s report for week end- 

iv7ek^rn!l.rf^jJr|%e'J'55 in f^n^s.^* 

AITO SCAiIeS^ HORSE. 

Manager of floqnet Store Thrown 
Out and Severely Injured. 

Cloquet, Minn.. July 8 — (tJpecial to 
The Herald.)— Last night about 6 
o'clock Andrew Johnson, manager of 
the shoe department at the companies 
store, had his arm broken, his head 
badly bruised and received a cut on 
the jaw that necessitated s^^^*^/^' 
stitches. He was riding home on the 
store delivery wagon when the horses 
became frightened at a Pa««'"8 a^'to 
and ran away. They were a new team 
recently purchased by the store. 



leave for there early in September Her 
uncle, Thomas Flannigan. has charg:e 
of the Republic Iron & Steel company b 
properties there. Miss Schumacker 
was graduated from the Marquette 
normal last month. Miss Erma Alt- 
.-•chwager, who was graduated Irom 
the normal i.t the same lime, has ac- 
cepted an offer of a position as grade 
teacher In the East Houghton school. 
Miss Altschwager had two other of- 
fers, one at Munlsing and the other in 
Duluth. 



Is 
as 



Vl( TIM IX HOSPITAL. 

Bulgarian Stabbed at Holman Being 
Treated at Coleraine. 

Coleraine. Minn, July S.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — JoJm De Groat, a Bul- 
garian of Holman. is In the Coleraine 
hospital with a doz<jn knife wounds, 
which may prove fatal. On July -ith, 
he wa.s attacked In a dive at Holman 
by three Italians. Frank De Chance 
and another were arrested by Sheriff 
R lev and lodged in jail at Grand Rap- 
Wso await the result of their vic- 
tims wounds. One of the assailants 

^"TheTe^^is great satisfaction over the 
arfest of Steve Mlchelovlch. the al- 
leKtd murdered of Todor Skaiiish of 
Hflman. Sheriff T. T. Riley has him m 



IMPROVEMENTS IN 
SCHOOimANNED 

Coleraine School Board Will 

Make Betterments in 

Structures. 

Coleraine. Minn , July S—^Sp^^i*^; ^^ 
The H.rald.)-ThJ board of education 
has undertaken extensive improve- 
ments in the bull lings of this district. 
A four-room addition will be added to 
fhe Bovey Tchool which will include a 
rnodern klnderga, ten department This 
imnrovement wlU cost about |15,ouo. 
ffi' Jc'nson of Minneapolis has the 
contract for completing the w orkac 

^.J^'SfeJ^w^ hiS '^-1 Sll^^^ 
Colera ne will be thoroughly repaired 

i^n^cufdinl roof. « .-^'n'L'^'Tl'e '^a^yo^nife 

tr Vhe Oicott^ .hool 3Uf ,----1 

^. ^ have b.en greatly Improved 

and will be profited by ^ substantial 
fence. Contracts have been let lor an 
the above work, 

PEST Choppers 

INVADE^HIBBING 

Winged Nuisances Are Very 

Thick in the Lively 

Range Village. 

Hibbing. Mirn.. July 8.— ^Special 
to The Herald. —This city Is being 
visited by a scourge of grasshop- 
pers. The I ests are found in 
swarms all cv. r town, but are par- 
ticularly actlv. in the southern or 
residential section of town, where they 
are doing considerable damage to 
vegetation. Tl ey are so numerous In 
ti^f business ptrt of town that their 
dead bodies Ih- on the sidewalks in 

^Tarmers'ln'town from the outlying 
districts report that they have not been 
visited by the pests as yet. 

EVELEmslAYOR 
CARRIES HIS POINT 



HIBBING AND VIROIMA 

Ball Teams Are to Play Two More 
Games. 

Hibbing. Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The strengthened Vir- 
ginia team will play with Hibbing to- 
day and Sunday. The two teams have 
played four games thus far this sea- 
son, all of them being won by Hib- 
bing. The last game, however, went to 
eleven innings. Hibbing ,^''?"*!;!8 bV a 
«!rore of '1 to 1. Virginia la reporiea 
?o have Secured ne^ talent for he 
games today and tomorrow and the 
two garner are e.xpeeted to be the best 
that Hibbing has seen this year. Hib- 

H^l^'^^lhl^^^^^Tregffia 

VllUaNlAPE^ONATNOTES. 

Items Pertaining to Visitors and 
Residents of €ity. 

Virginia, Minn, July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Miss Alice Wetzler of 
Duluth is the guest of Miss Harriet 
Simons for a few days. 

Mrs. C. R. Webster and daughter 



To Get 
Its Beneficial lii^s, 

Always Buy the Genuine 

SYRUP-fiGS 

Euxr'SENNA 

mant^ictured hyihe 

6old by all leading 
Druqqists 
One5izeOnly,50^ o bciile 



Effort to Clothe Chairmen ^f 

Coramittees With More 

Power Fails. 

Eveleth, Mian., July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— A motion offered by 
Alderman Sutl erland placing the heaus 
of the city dti>artments under the su- 
i,f rvision of t le chairmen of the c^'m- 
mi^tees over he veto of Mayor Jacob 
A Saari after a warm discussion was, 
lost at the ccuncll meeting last even- 
ing as it falle* to be seconded. In \ eto- 
inl the resolitUm Mayer Jacob Saari 
s"f ted that h. done so on the grounds 
that it wouh take power out of the 
hands of the council, and place u di- 
rectly with hrads of committees while 
Alderman Su herland conteiided that 
the heads of departments should be held 
'respon^sible. ^.hich , understanding has 
been conveyeo to city officials. 

The application of Anron Ravezt for 
. limior licenje was refused on recom- 
^iXuon''of>ie police and license 

committee wl ile that of Magnus Carl 
Son was grai ted. , «, .. 

drew* li» Barred Oni. 

On motion of Alderman Matt J. 
Do%. the° yv. H. coulter Railroad 
shows which have been ,^*t«"f*''^iy 
billed to show here July 15, ^^ as re 
fused the u^e of the city ball park 
and as that i» about the only available 



. and _ 

MlTs" "Maude Webster, stenographer for 
thP M A Hanna company, left Mon- 
day for Park Point, Duluth. to spend 

^^^M^'r^s'^" G^Flournoy and son. James, 
ipft Thursday for Seattle. wasn., 
Ihere they will visit for two months. 

Mrl P J. Erlckson and son, Paul. 
leftlarly In the week for the south- 
ern part of the state to visit with 
relatives and friends Sabotta 

W. J. Archer and Julius baooiui 

«pent several ^^ys ^^^^ T^^^^^^t came 
southern part of the state, but came 

'''^^r 'aml^Mrs: Frank Parker. Joseph 
Parker and Adelaide Thurston of Du- 
luth were guests over the J'ourth ui 
e home of*' Clarence Mickelson 
Miss Eleanor iMtchell of St. Cloud 
it- a guest of her sister. Mrs. c>. a. 

^^Mrrw J. Schulze and sons are in 
DuUith for a few days visiting with 

^'mst Elizabeth Miller of S'iPe'-lor 
nr,,i Ml9s Ellen Anderson of Duluth 
were guests 0? Miss Jessie McNeill on 

^''Mir.=''"st%a Ward of Hibbing is the 
gii'est of Mh-'s Pearl ^^artln. 

\\r< C C. Butler and Mrs. F. C. 
WMtlng and children left Wednesday 
for Iron Mountain. Mich., where tney 

"'iliss'l\h;!' Margoeles of MHwaukee 
i« the Kuest Of Miss Minnie Cohn. 

Mr^ P J. Busha and daughter, Con- 
stance left last Saturday for a trip 
U,^"winniplg. Toronto and Montreal, 
wherw they will visit relatives. 

Mrq A C. Travis and two children 
and Raymond and Hammond White of 
Kalamazoo., Mich., are guests at tji« 
home of Alderman and Mis. Micna i 
Rf.vian The White boys are students 
I^t Nazareth college and will spend 
tiielr vacation here. 

Mrs M. West of Duluth is a guest at 
the home of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. 

^M^s ^Charles Larson left Thursday 
for Duluth where she will visit for a 

^Tlr'^and Mrs. Jack Getchell and Mr. 
and Mrs William McCoy left Thurs- 
day for Vermilion Lake for a few days 

°"m?s^* C. B. Richert of Chadron, Neb., 
is the guest of her sister, Mrs. G. C. 

^M'lfs^Esther Olson of Tower, who 
has been visiting for a . month w ith 
relatives and friends in Duluth. Is 
now the guest of her sister. Mrs. Ben 
Olson of this city. , 

Mrs E. J. O Rourke and three chil- 
dren of Duluth are guests at the home 
of City Clerk and Mrs. A. E . Blcktora. 

Northland Beatu Tw*«- ,__^ 
Independence. Minn . Julv ^—}^\'^- 
rial to The Herald.)— On July 4 the 
Northland baseball team defeated the 



New Fire Alarm System for 

the Vermilion Range 

City. 

Ely. Minn.. July 8.— (Sliccial to The 
Herald.)— The city council has de- 
cided to install the Gamewell system 
of giving fire alarms, and with this 
system installed there will he one of 
the best fire fighting outfits In the 
north, for volunteer firemen. The com- 
mittee empowered to act on this, 
ordered to get this system as soon 

^The^*celebratlon at Wlnton Tuesday 
was conceded by all to be very fine^ 
The entire day was filled with everts 
that were enjoyed by the home people 
and a large number of visitors from 
U.is citv Section 30. and other places. 
The Citv band furnished the music 
for the occasion. The ball game at 
1 o- clock was won by the Winton 
team by the score of 7 to 4. 

Joe Dann of the casualty department 
of the Oliver Iron Mining company, 
feft Monday for the Mesaba range, 
cities to spend a few days. 

Mrs. Thomas McLaughlin. M sf' Kate 
McCurdy and Miss Nettie Sheridan 
went to Tower Friday to spend the day 
on Lake Vermilion. 

The Sampo band went to Tower 
Tuesday morning to furnish the music 
for the Tower celebration. They were 
accompanied by a large crowd, w.io 
went to spend the day there^ 

Mrs D. Waller and Mrs. Ben Horo- 
vitz went to Eveleth yesterday for a 
visit with Mrs. John Glode. 

Rodger Williams was here on tne 
Fourth for a visit with his young 
friends during the ttlfe*'pt*on. 

Mrs William Tracey of Two Harhora 
visited with her daughter Mrs. \Mil- 
iam ORourke here sever! days this 

'*'m?ss Hazel Richardson of Hudson. 
Wis., arrived in the city Friday for 
a visit with her aunt. Mrs. H. J. lock- 

Dr G T Ayers. who has been a vis- 
itor in Chicago the past two weeks re- 
turned Tuesday morning. He was ac- 
companied by his mother. Mrs A. A. 
Avers, who has been visiting in Chi- 
cago for the past two months. 

David Childers has been named as 
alderman of the Second ward to fill 
the unexpired term of Peter Matheson 
who rUtgned to g.. cm the police force. 

Peter Bezek his left for his farm 
In the Little Fork valley, near C.heen 
after spending some time with his 
'family in this city. Mr. Bezek says that 
the c-rops are In excellent condition, 
more particularly the hap crop, the 
grass being as high as a man s head. 

Capt James Hodgon of the ^^ h.te- 
side mine near Buhl arrived Sunday 
for a visit in the city. Accompanied 
hv Mrs Hodgon. who came here ahead, 
he returned to Whites^lde ^yednesday. 

Miss Theresa Gianottl, who i.s em- 
nloved with the office force of tho 
Hanna Ore company at Virginia was a 
Fourth of July visitor with her pa - 
ents Mr and Mrs. John Gianottl, in 
thl.s' city. She returned to Virginia 

Wednesday. . , -mc^-^ov. 

John E. Cosgrove returned Monday 
from Centurla. Wis., where he had ac- 
companied the remains of his nephew, 
Ixiwrence Williams, for t>urial. He 
was accompanied on his return by Mr 
and Miss Williams, father and sister 
of the unfortunate I^wrence.who met 
his death in a gasoline explosion at the 
boat house Wednesday of the last 

week. ^ ., ^, 

Sunday Ball Oame. 

Sunday afternoon the fire department 
ball team played the Mohaml team of 

^ A^*pirtv of six from St Paul, who 
came up 'Friday night for a trip 
through the lakes and woods to Tower. 
Thev will start from Wlnton. where 
they will start to go south by the 
various lakes and rivers which connect 
with the Vermilion river into the Lake 

^' Thi-^in^nual meeting of the Independ- 
ent School District No. 12 was held 
today at the Central school building 
This year there will be three directors 
t(^ be elected to take the places of 
President Trezona, Director Anderson 
of Wlnton. and Director Fenske ap- 
pointed at the last meeting to fill the 
unexpired term of Director Gleas^on 
resigned. Some who have signified 
their intention of running are: John 
A Hirri Dr G. T. Ayers. W. i. 
^ug^he"^' Olaf'' Berglund. Charles 
Trezona. A. Anderson, and Mrs. A. J. 

^*"ew ^beat Winton in the game played 
here on the Fourth by the score of 19 
to 3 in seven Innings. 



on which the convention may split at 
"s anAual meeting next Thursday. 
Compared with these issues, both 
sides agreed, the election "^.^i^,. "'^l' 
dent becomes a minor itrm, panic. par- 
iv as Mrs. Elia Flags ^oung of '-h-- 
ckgo i-.as refused to run af «in. and r.o 
fight is now expected on the repo.l oi 
ttie rominating committee 

EXDEAVORERsllEAR OFWORK 

(Continued from page 1.) 



SPARTA MAN IS 

VICTIM OF SUNSTROKE. 

Gilbert. Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald. (—Nichola Ojala, a Finnish 
laborer of Sparta, working on the con- 
struction crew of the Duluth & Iron 
Range Railway company, died a few- 
days ago after becoming overcome by 
sunstroke. Funeral services were held 
here and interment made In the Vir- 
ginia cemetery. „„.i,„.. 

So far as can be learned a mother, 
who lives at the Sparta location. Is 
the only relative in this country sur- 
viving the deceased. 

EVELETHIANS PICKING 

LOTS OF BLIEBERIES. 

Eveleth Minn. July 8-— < Special to 
The Herdld.) — Eveleth this year has 
the largest berry crop in its histor... 
The season for strawberVies is about 
over but the blueberry crop is ripe. 
ManV pickers have been at Mud lake, 
Fayal. Iron Junction and Zim this week 
returned with full pails.Many of the 
boys who have been picking berries 
are selling blueberries here at 2a cents 
a quart The season for raspberries 
will soon open. ^ 

NORTHWESTERN CHAIR 

CAR ON RANGE ROAD. 



Fveleth. Minn., July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald^-A Chicago & Northwes- 
tern chair car has been . Installed on 
all Iron Range trains leaving ami com- 
ing to Eveleth and 10 cents extra is 
charged to use the new chair car which 
?8 one of the finest in the Northwest 
Parlor cars will probably be added to 
the Iron Range coaches, as the new 
car is being well patronized. The car 
was recently installed, and is in charge 
of C. Halden o f th i s city. 

CLOQl ErprPiiiS IN 

MUSICAL PROGRAM. 

Vlbert gave a musical at her home 
yesterday afternoon, at which the foN 

Bs^i^ ^S£^n\a:^»~i 

^^sllepheJd Song,-^ ^«?Jf.-r.«,vh?ms •''"isa-' 
•■IdlUu,- Frances Erwin. ^ \\ hlms isa^ 

belle McNair; •Cowslip. 97^S^%^r\&n 

Kenzie ; ^/l^^P^^JS^^^^i; "L^a'i " ••English 
Dance No. 3. Marcia V.fT:,',,. Waltz ' 
Dance." Marie Moody Vlnce'' Ruth 
Lloyd Coathup: i>carf l'^n?.^-„ ""'L 
Rlair- "Pussy Willow March, Hanna n 

nuolo." Margaret McLean^ 

hirbing'presbyterians 

1MPR0\ E CHURCH PROPERTY 



treatv heretofore with Great Britain 
ind other countries has excepted from 
the causes which may be arbitrated 
Sose which involved t^^ vital interests 
of either party or us honor. The treaty 
which we are now closing with Great 
Britain eliminates these exceptions, 
and provides that all 'i"«stions of In- 
ternational concern of a Justifiable 
character shall be submitted to the ar- 
bitration of an impartial tribunal. 
Would Xot Abolish 'War. 
The president expressed the hope 
that eventually half a dozen European 
countries may make ^^iniilar treaties^ 
Such action, he said, will not abolish 
war. but would furnish a forcible in- 
strument in preventing it. ,,,,„_. 
The president spoke from a platform 
on the Million Dollar pier. ,''e^ffal 
thousand persons heard nim and cheer- 
eci him as he entered and as he left the 

^*The first part of the presidenfs 
speech was devoted to a brief review 
of the work of the Christian Endeavor 
societies. From pra4se of the sc.cleti 
the president turned to peace and ar- 
bitration, which he said could be ex- 
pedited by the influence of such organ- 
izations. He said in part: 

"In the last tv.-eniy-flve years w* 
have made great progress towards an 
international condition In winch Avar is 
less likely than heretofore. It is true 
that in that time we have had several 
freak wars — the war between Ciiina 
and Japan, the war between Russia 
and Japan, the war between the United 
States and Spain, the war between 
England and the Boers, and perhaps 
some others. 

Peace In Europe. 
-Nevertheless, as between the great 
countries of Europe, which have armed 
themselves to the teeth since the Ger- 
man-French war of 1870, peace has 
been maintained, and under the in- 
spiration of a common desire Ipr 
peace, treaties have been made wnn 
reference to arbitration and for the 
establishment of a court at The Hague 



for the settlement of international 

^^"We^\ave ameliorated the ancient 
cruelties of war by Red Cross agree- 
ments. Now we are agreeing npoa 
what is called the Declaratio.n of Lon- 
don, which if confirmed,, as It seem* 
likely to be. will take aw;ay from war 
on the sea those princip.es of lawful 
piracv that have always characterized 
the dealing with private property oX 
the cltizeni^ of enemies. 

•Just today four great powers--Lng. 
land, Russia. Japan and the ignited 
States — signed a fur seal treaty, by 
which we agreed In effect to banish 
the shooting of seals at sea in order 
to preserve the valuable herds on the 
land and to allow them to propagate 
in such a wav as to maintain the fur 
seal industry and secure for human 
use the valuable fur that such seals 
furnish. It is the beginning. I hop*>. 
of the adoption of useful game laws 
for the open season, which has hereto- 
fore been subject to the wanton and 
Irresponsible use of men of every na- 
tion. It is the settlement by treaty or 
a controversy that has troubled these 
four nations" for several generations, 
and it ought to be the cause of great 
congratulation. 

Supported by OrganlxatlonH. 
'•Every movement which tends tO 
discourage war. and to furnish a means 
of avoiding it, ought to receive, and 
does receive, the earnest support of 
an organization that has the purposes 
and principles that actuate the Society 
of Christian Endeavor. 

'The treaty in one sense. Instead or 
making arbitration necessary, inter- 
poses mediation of a year between the 
happening of the differences and the 
bringiiig of the matter to arbitration, 
with the growing possibility, as the 
ruffled feelings of the nation may be 
smoothed out by time, that the dif- 
ferences mav be adjusted by media- 
tion instead of judicial action, but 
holciing judicial action as the ultimate 
resort to prevent war. „ ,. . 

Of course war between Great Britain 
and the United States, between France 
and the United States and between 
(fermany and the United ^States, Is 
ouite remote; but the adoption by 
tiiese great countries of arbitration 
and mediation as a means of meeting 
111 controversies, must have the most 
healthy moral ^-ff^t upon the world at 
large and must assist all the filends 
of peace In their effort to make it per- 
manent To this audience, and tills 
K;eat society with Its world-wide In- 
fuence, I do not '^^^sltate to appeal 
to give the tremendous weight of Its 
support to such a cause." 



Listened to Wife, Saved 

By Neal Treatment 



A MICHIGAN MAN ES- 
CAPED DRINK'S 
BONDAGE. 



A Superior Neal Institute 
Graduate Writes a Cheer- 
ful Letter of Appre- 
ciation. 



^■"Funds^^ for this work, amounting to 

neirly l^iOO.were^ contributed Jreeb^ by | ^^^^^^.^.^ drinking discussed 





.^^^\mQ.%% 



RANGE MINISTERS 
TO PULL TOGETHER 

Meetings to Be Held at Vir- 
ginia to Perfect an 
Organization. 

Hibbing. Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Merald.)— A movement is on foot 
for the organization of a Range Minis- 
terial association and a meeting will 
be held at Virginia in the Cleveland 
Avenue Presbyterian church Monday. 
July 10, at 10:30 to discuss the matter 
and to effect a preliminary organiza- 

^*^The purpose of the association is to 
unite the preachers of the range In an 
association which will cV'^^.^'^t'^ n^v.Vi 
ters of common interest. It is believed 
that such an association can oe mc.de 
to result in good to th e rang es. 

TO IMPROVETpblTlON. 

Shank's Additiou to Crookston to 
Be Much Improved. 

Biwabik, Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— At Its session Wednes- 
day evening the village council decided 
to put in the sewer and water In 
Shank's addition, the engineer's esti- 
mate of the cost being ^'^''^,^^- .^^^J^^,]' 
ter came up on the report of the vil- 
lage engineer that he had completed 
the surveving and made blue prints 
iiif eui .. o. . ^^^ proposed 



When the Superior Neal Institute 
was opened and dedicated to the sav- 
ing of victims of the drink habit, it 
so happened that the first case of 
nt.«. .,..-"". --V-.^^.^ of the churco, I excessive drinking discussed was 
anTthe%h^"rch Is very grateful to thfUy^^t of a man up in Michigan. The 
Irr tiVa^^s';nafiaiir;!irwKf man himself didn't realize that he 
ably be itft after all the work is fin- 
ished. ^_ 

Eveleth Charch AnnounceinentH 
Eveleth. Mlnn^. J"l>'„-*-—;^'le First 

church here tomorrow ^°'^^^^^%'^illt 

Schwarz Jr., who is expected back 
nexrwe;k will resume his regular du- 
?ils as pastor of the church July 16. 

At the Methodist Episcopal church, 
Rpv B D Hanscom will deliver a ser- 
mon on " The Results of Wr ongdoing. 

Eveleth Clerks «o Meet. . 

Eveleth Minn., July ^.-^Special ^o 
The Herald.)— A meeting of .the clerks 
Implo/ed in the stores of this city ^'jl 
be held Monday to perfect an organi- 
zation and arrange working hours. Tho 
lalarj que stion will also be considered. 

Grand Rapldn School Meet. 

Grand Kaplds. Minn., July 8.-— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Saturday, July 15 
Is the date of the annual school meet, 
ing As ll Is at this meeting that the 
tax levy for the coming year will be 
made a'iid the policy of .the school 
district fixed, it is anticipated that 
much Interest will be taken in the 
meeting and that there will be a large 
attendance. 



The highest poiat of woman's hap 
piness is reached only through moth- 
erhood, in the clasping of her child 
within her arms. Yet the mother-to- 
be is often fearful of nature's ordeal 
and shrinks from the suffering inci- 
dent to its consummation. But for 
nature's ills and discomforts nature 
provides remedies, and in Mother's 

Triend is to be found a medicine of , .... ri- --?, — ,„, 

great value to every expectant mother, fnd specifications for 

It is an oily emulsion for external t 
application, composed of ingredients 
which act with beneficial and sooth- 
ing effect on those portions of the 
system involved. It is intended to 
prepare the system for the crisis, and 
thus relieve, in great part, tho suffer- 
ing through which the mother usually 
passes. The regular use of Mother's 
Friend will repay any mother in the 



Eveleth Police Chief III. 

Eveleth, Minn.. July «•— ^Special to 
The Herald.)— feam R. Pincus. a for- 
mer member of the local police force. 
ITas' bTeTre-appolnted This v^as made 
necessary because Chief of i'oiice jonn 

^Ser^'Jelnt*^ Peter Nordi is acting as 
ch!e"^in the absence of CMef Farley 
while Patrolman John Zldar xs act 
Int as night sergeant. 

c«nrk nuKT At HibblnK- 

Hibbfng Minn July 8.-. Special to 
Th^ HenUd V-The stork has been 
Ksv in Hibbing during the past Uiree 
i„r.o T4o Vii«5 left a son at the nome oi. 

Matt saari nome, a boy «or Mr and 
Mr« Alex W. Johnson and a girl at the 
Jome of Mr^^and^li^^ 

PUTS taskIjpto^achers 

(Continued from page 1.) 



man himself didn't realize that he 
was a subject of grave concern to 
all who knew him and hold him dear. 
He didn't know that he had crossed 
drink's danger line. There waa noth- 
ing strange in that. Few excessive 
drinkers ever realize their plight. 
The persuasion of those nearest to 
him, however, overcame his own dis- 
senting views about taking the Neal 
Treatment and down from his Michi- 
gan home he came. 

The story of the results of his 
three-day stay at The Neal Institute 
Js best told in his own letter of grate- 
ful appreciation which has just been 
received. 

Prefacing his message with the 
words 'To my friend" and naming 
the doctor in charge, he writes: 

"Well, sir, I am home again, all 
right and feeling fine, thanks to you 
and The Neal Treatment. You and 
vour assistants were very kind and 
attentive to me while with you and I 
can't thank you too much. I at first 
thought I would not go. but my wife 
and daughters wanted me to. So I 



did. Now I am very glad. You see 
the doctrine of a man stopping of hie 
own accord doeJ?n't always go. I 
have the drink' all out of me now 
and I am satisfied and dont want It 
any more. My daughters feel grate- 
ful to you and will always remember 
you with a kindly feeling. My wife 
is more than happy and says Thanks 
to you.' If you see any of the con- 
tractors and denlifcts who were with 
me at The Neal Institute, tell them 
to -stick to it." and keep away from 
old alcohol." . 

This Michigan mane case ib not 
unusual. Hundreds of bright biisi- 
ness men whose faculties were dulled 
through drin'K's influence break 
awav" from liquor for good every 
mon'th through the Neal Treatment, 
which in three short days transforms 
craving desire and resistless appetite 
into aversion for all alcoholic drink. 
The Superior Ntal Institute is one of 
over three score such prand infrtitutes 
in American, Canadian and Australian 

cities. .T-- 1 o 

The Neal Treatment is ethical— a 
veg<-tabie remedv taken inttrnaUy, 
adminstered by regular physicians 
and with positively no hypodernac 
injections. It is tonic in its effects, 
restores shattered nerves. brings 
sleep to restless eyes, puts color or 
health into bloated cheeks, brightens 
toptiy eyes and clears muddled brains. 
Three days spent at the Neal In- 
stitue will bring about a transfor- 
mation in any excessive drinker so 
wonderful that Father Flavin of Des 
Moines. Iowa, after witnessing the 
results of the Neal Treatment de- 
clared: "Nothing like it has been seen 
since Lazarus was raised from the 

*^Guests at the Neal Institute enjoy 
all the comforts and privacy of home, 
club or hotel. Meals are served In 
the patient's own room. Names are 
never divulged. . 

For further informatic>n and free 
booklet, write, call or 'phone The 
Neal Institute, corner Belknap ana 
West Seventh street, Superior, Wis.; 
St Paul Institute, 676 Dayton avenue; 
Minneapolis Institute, 403 Seventh 
street south. 




TIES, PULPWOOD, PIIINC 
MINING TIMBER 

nr.d .\;. Other Timber Pm Incts 

MoLEOO-DAVIS TIMBER CCMPANY, 

SIS Lyceum Btdr-. Duluth 



tile for'outdMor amulement.^ it is be- comfort it affords before, and the help 
lieved the at raction will have to can- j^^ restoration to health and strength. 

"Vhl%^oundma?ter'was granted two it brings about after baby comes. 
.„.. .._ „..„,», v..»,os« jyjother's Friend 



assistants at $30 per month, whose 
terms will e>pire Oct. 16. i^„*,«- 

Amendmcnis to the range electric 
road which s to be given its S£C\>aU 
leaaing Tuesday evening, fixing the 
charge at 5 c;nts in the city limits were 

^'^T^e^bld of Gust Johnson of $3,800 for 
lots 1. 2 and 3 on Adams avenue, for a 
fire hall was referred to the commit- 
tee on city iroperty. 

The Home Heating and Electric com- 
pany submit ed a bid of $6 per pole, for 
lighting the White Way on Grant ave- 
nue for a period of five years. A clause 






is for sale &i 
drug stores. 
Write for our 
free book for 
expectant moth- 
ers which contains much valuable 
information, and many suggestions 
of a helpful nature. 
BRADFIELD REGULATOR CO., Atlanta, ۥ 



The council formally adopted the 
report of the engineer and took the 
preliminary steps to let the contract^ 
The village clerk was Instructed to 
advertise for bids to do the work in 
a local paper and The Dtiluth Herald^ 

Shank^ addition lies just north of 
the original townslte, being the forty 
directly between the town and t^e 
Biwabik mine property. It is a finely 
laying piece of land, perfectly drained 
and tlie soil is of the best quality 

The council requested that the Com- 
mercial club call a mass meeting of 
citizens to consider the issuance of 
$20,000 to $25,000 In village bonds. 

Bids for the water and sewer sys- 
tem decided upon will be opened 
Thursday evening. July 20. and In tne 
meantime the legal requirements will 
be gone through, by which the propor- 
tlon of cost to be assessed against the 
property can be levi ed and collected. 

TAKES POSITION'iN 

SCHOOLS AT GILBERT. 



Ishpemlng. Mich.. July S.— ^Speclal 
to The Herald.)— Miss Angela Schu- 
macker has accepted 4 position as 
teacher at Gilbert, Minn., and will 



versify Bloomington, Ind.. and Clifford 
W Barnes? chalFman of the committee 
on moral training, Chicago. 

Tent School Efficiency. 
• ^^.^^itte^c to begin work on tne 
BUbJecro^f tests' and ^standards of the 
Imilency of ^^hools and schoo^ sys- 
tems Is recommended In tne »»""*' 
st™tlment of Charles H. Keyes of New 
York president of the council and ex- 
IcutlVe"^ secretary of the committee on 

«^^.!i^°tLV'neSt,"1a?l^hr/^tement 
••wi have physical, chemical, biological 
and econoSiy standards. , It has been 
#A,,r,/? Tipressarv to have them. But m 
Iducation we^ hardly have begun 
!^i^ntlflcallv to measure efficiency." 
^ The repor^t l?so recommends. that the 
national council meet In mld-winter, in- 
stead of the summer, because of the 
^i^^anXi made upon them by summer 
UrmT of variotl^s^ educational Instltu- 

***The day's program included an ad- 

Washington, and a joint session at 
nlKht with the Religious Educational 
nsforlaaon at which addresses were 

and President David Starr Jordan or 
Stanford university. 

iMues Are forecasted. 

•Rv laws and proposed amendments 
to fhe constitution of the National 
au^atlonai association embodledj^n a 

a^d"''Demo??acV o7 Oligarchy' and 
teUing what some of the so-calle<l in- 






lUJ 



"Supper Ready 4 



When vou get back to 

camp, tired and hungry, you 

do not want to spend the 

evening gctting^supper-^ready. You want a »tove you 

can sUrt up in a minute— that will cook quickly and wcU. 

aim For camp^ houseboat or bungalowra New Per- 

fection Oil Cook-stove is the ideal cooking device. It 

is ready for use in a moment It saves all the trouble 

of cutting wood and getting in coal It does not overheat 

or make dirt in a kitchen ; there are no ashes nor smoke. 

. It requires less attention and coob better than any other range 




.ng. turquoi* blue eo»mde<l cWmX*- 
i»«kjnely 6m»h«d U»roi»thou«. lh« 
»n<l 3-bun»«r rtore* e*n b« l>»a w 



without • c»binrt lop, wKicbttittea 

,1 
oltha 



it'p »h«T>«, towel ri(b. etc . 
' *t»Verrwhefet of wfi - 






Standard Oil Company 

(Incorpormtei) 







_J 




■*■■ — Jt>.-'^- 



1 










-■ " 
















1 


• 
! 






































I 








6 



Saturday, 



THE DULUXH HERALD 



July 8, 1911. 



BIG CASES 
THKMONTH 

htersfate Commerce Commis- 
sion Will Hear Petitions 
Important to Duluth. 

Decision on Duluth's Milk 
and Cream Rates Ex- 
pected Early. 



A sciitis .>t" i't't'^tate commerce com- 
missioii cast- u . ti will »'<• oi vital Im- 
portance to Duliitli. and Mtniiesoia and 
Wis. i>;;.-in groneraliy, wa^ started at , 
the : building yesterday when j 

the i '.^ jf Bridgeman ik Russell va. 
the lUeat Northern Kxpress company. 
•nd the Oiroux. Mining company vs. 
the NV>v=..l,, Northern and the Denver ', 
A l: mde railways were argued 

before cipe-ial Examiner Vassault at 
the •unmission. The latter case was 
I»ostj>.'Uc'd because its deci.-4ion will de- 
pen 1 upon the ruling made by the 
commts-sion in the oases regarding the 
Keutra! Western Commodity freight 
«dva;;,es for the inter-mountain dis- 
trict Ahi.-h are now pending bef ne it. 

Th.- Bridgeman & Kussell case, tn- j 
volvujg the milk and cream rates, 
occupied m )»t of the day. Mr. Bridge- 
nj ill ■>.-ing Oil tht> stand most of the 
time Tiie rales on milk and cream 
per t»!i-sallon can for ID'^ miles are 
now hxed at ;J0 cents by the railroads. 
This Is the accepted rate, and that ap- 
priv .! by the commission for the 
t: itation of cream, but the com- 

1'. s conteii'l that a-« value is al- 

ways an important element in fixing 
freitjht rates, the rate for milk should 
be l..n-er than that charge<l tor cream. 
In llu-i they hive several decision.^ 
of tlie cornmis.si Jii in other cases to 
back fliem up. 

Ititter shipped in refrigerator cars 
•s third-' lass freight rate, the rail- 



OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



run — — — '—'— ^~-^~^ » ^ » ^ ^ M ^ 




broke in two. A lifeboat carrying 
five men had just put out. Heavy seas 
sent it crashing against the hull of 
tlic vessel. (Jscar Patterson, a sea- 
man, .succeeded in swimming to shore, 
but his fi.ur companions perished. 
Woiu^a Throw u Into Sea. 
A life raft containin;? twenty women 
capsized oft' the bow of the Santa 
Rosa. Darkness had fallen anrl the 
searchlights on .shore lighted the .scene 
Imperfectly, so that it could not be 
clearly determined whether all the 
women were rescued. 



B 
pay _ 

roa ! f':r-.!shin!< the ice an! refriger- 
atin 1'r.jiii this the petiiioners con- 
tend It at cream, shipped in passenger 
trains in exprt'ss car.-*, a more oxpen- 
•Ive -.r t ;,-,« shauM go at about sec- 
ond- ~ while milk on account 
of It Alue should go at third- 
class r;i Jiout 2;J cents instead of 
the ;■.)-' tie now charged. 
ike <iralM Ca^**-*, 

Tht- other :ases which are to come 
up thi.s month are of greater import- 
ance to this section, and those who 
have been watching the development 
of them say that they will prove the 
m.'st Irni' .rtant grain decisions ever 
haul . I i I'.vn by the Interstate com- 
nier.v- t uiumiaslon. 

Tbe.se cases involve the p<»titions of 
t" » >'■ '■ "rkee Chamlwr of Commerce. 
t - - ir Commercial club and the 

I ird of Trade tor an adjust- 

I am rates to the lake ports 

f: Pakjta. Southern North 

!■ and Southern Minnesota 

B . .'a fair competition with 

tiif' Twill Cities in this regard. The 
ta>i».s win be heard before a member 
of the c>mmis3i>n itself. Commission- 
er E E. Clark. The cases will be heard 
In Miivaukee — ' • the Cream City 
pet;ti.>:i. on J . . and in Superior, 

on tlie •^onipia^riu of the Commeroia! 
club ani the Duluth Board of Trade 
on July 2 (J. 

Bri:;^ Intereste 1 m the case, the 

?,'■•■ ■ '''is Chat;: - ■ '"-K-.imerce has 

1; and ■ , any read- 

• f the r.i -v^ .. ...v.i give the 

'l s their present a^lvantage. to 

a - ...1. The lllnr.eapolis men ap- 

pr '• .ale their advantages and are 
p!-v'>,.i.-.-il to fiErhf f,.r t'.:em, as is 
t len a re- 

a A as planned 

t- suosLilpUon of llOo.- 

t there to tight the 

c 

North Da- 
kui.i V juiuu--i.s:on i.as intervened 

in - of the coiupiaining cities, 

and St" ' !:)Iish more equitable 

rate.s w to giving the West- 

er- s I .laiice f'»r competitive 

i -, fp>m all the lake ports 

T.itr i : ;-.>iate Equity So "iety has also 
Intervf-nel In support of the petitions. 
and the Chicago B^ard of Trade has 
Intervened to support Milwaukee l."i 
her ti<ht for a readjustment. 

In view of the fact that the com- 
missi n 1 as all -ady pa.«!«ed on cases 
ver the milk and cream 

cas I yesterda.v a decision 

on till? points involved there is ex- 
pectei within a few weeks 




If we had only 
had a Fourth like 
th:<!' This expres- 
sion has been fre- 
qu-nt in Duluth the 
la.st three days 
wlien the weather 
ha » lift'ii such tbat 
th> most persistent 
pesisimist could not 
ha .'e fountl a thing 
to kick about. To- 
da .■ has been just 
like yesterday and 
the day before that, and that means 
about all that could Ue desired in the 
way of weather. It louded up for a 
time yesterday aften oon and there 
was just a hint of raiifall. but the sun 
broke through, and tlie day on a whole 
was ideal. Today the? e has been hard- 
ly a cloud in sight anii the temperature 
leaves nothing it te desired. The 
gentle lake breeze stil keeps up. tem- 
pering "'Old Sol's" en. rgies to just the 
right degree. Forecaster W. T. Rich- 
ardson expects to see it warmer, how- 
ever, with pi>3sible sliowers. He says. 
•High temperatures igain prevail In 
the Missouri. Mississippi and Ohio val- 
leys and the Souther i states. In con- 
nection with the low pressure centered 
over the Dakotas. Thi< disturbance has 
al.so caused showers o .er Western Can. 
ada. Washington. Northern Oregon, 
Montana. North Dakota. Wyoming. Ne- 
braska Colora'io and New Mexico. 



More or less rain also fell over the 
Southeastern and gulf states during 
the last twenty-four hours. Somewhat 
cooler weather has appeared over Mon- 
tana and the plateau regl m, as a re- 
sult of the Increasing barometer pres- 
sure. At the Head of the Lakes, the 
weather will be rather unsettled and 
warm with scattered showers during 
the ensuing thirty-six hours.'" 



General FurecaatN. 

Chicago. July 8. — Forecasts for twen- 
ty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. Sunday: 

Upper Michigan — Generally fair 
weather foUowel by thunder showers 
early Sumlay morning or on Sunday; 
warmer in east portion tonight, prob- 
abiv cooler Sunday afternoon. 

\Vlsconsin and Iowa — Unsettled 
weather with probably local showers 
toniglit or .Sunday; warmer tonight. 

Minnesota — Unsettled weather and 
pri>bably local showers tonight or Sun- 
day; warmer in east portion tonight. 

North and .South Dakota — Generally 
fair tonight and Sunday: cooler tonight 
and in east portion Sunday. 

Montana — Generally fair tonight 
and Sunday; cooler in extreme east 
portion tonight; warmer In west and 
central portions Sunday. 

♦ 

Tke Temperaturrs. 

Following were the highest tempera- 
tures for twenty-four hours and the 



lowest 
today: 



for twelve, ending at 7 a. 



AI)IIen« 

.\lpt>n» 

.\tlaritle City ...8t 

ILittlefinJ tJ 

Hj-<iUi»r';k 9* 

IJ.l-e T9 

H.stin 78 

n .rfaio ti 

< .»li»rT 79 

Cliiirteston 96 

Chlojgo 14 

Corp'jji ChrlsU. .86 

Deii^^r 88 

I)«s MaliiHB !)•» 

DevlU iMke 86 

Do.lge 92 

O'lifuquc 88 

DULOTM 87 

l>iir.iti(i) 7i 

Kilmontiia ..72 

E*au.il)« 70 

tialrrntjn 82 

Griiixl Hurea ...86 

lircwi Bdjr 80 

Hittcraa W 

H.ivr9 80 

llHl^n* 76 

il 'Uiihtnn 

Hunii 94 

J»<-lt.»»nr1lle 00 

K.imloopit I'l'i 

KsnsAi «t» ....9S 

Knuxvllla 90 

I.« «°r'i.«e 



Hi«h. Low.l High. 

9<) 74 MinaeiloM 88 

Si'Moilena 90 

gg .M'liitcomenr 9<) 

-,4) MMitrpni 7G 



L->iiLhv1U« 

Madi«m 

Mivilcin« H*t 
Meniphlj .... 
MiUs City .. 
Milwaukee . . . 



..»4 
..88 
.66 
..76 
.86 
.102 
..76 



72 Moorlicail 88 

Ijji .New Urloans 78 

41(1 j .Nnw York 83 

b8l Nirth Plane «2 

4,)| Oklalioma 92 

7gi Oraalia 9i 

74' Parry Sauud 

go! P'>0Pii!Jt 100 

821 Plerra 96 

7ijj Pittibura SU 

86 Port .Arthur 68 

7'2j Portland. Or 82 

7J Prince Alljert 8K 

54 vi"i'.\ppelle 74 

.10! Kalelgh 94 

44I K.IPI1I rity 98 

64| |{ Heliurg 66 

74 ItMWeU 91) 

68' SI. UiuU 94 

64lsi. Paul 84 

T 4 Salt I.aka City.... 92 

34) San Dleao (>8 

46 Sin Krtinoteoo ....64 
58 Lsault Ste. Marie. .78 

78 .Seattle 62 

72' .sherl.Un 9« 

481 .Shr*vepoit *> 

74is^.ux City 92 

70 Spolune '♦ 

74iswlf! Current "8 

72iTampi ** 

63 Tole.lti W 

6j| WiishtngtoD 94 

..IwilUiiton *8 

72. Wlnnemucca 90 

54 WUinlpeg 84 

68: Yellowstone T4 



m. 

Low, 
60 
60 
72 
90 
74 
70 

ei 

70 
70 
76 
56 
74 
82 
70 
54 
SO 
50 

:>« 
72 
fiO 
42 
64 
76 
72 
58 
58 
52 
58 
&0 
56 
72 
74 
48 
48 
70 
72 
7'» 
61) 
44 
64 
42 



*Tl T FOl ND.\TION OF 
BKEAD AND lU HER'^ 

IXDEK ZEMTH (ITY 



f Continued from page 1.) 

di" '■■ .1 1 Ire-'sing the Minnesota A!um- 
i. on at the Trianon farm of 

J -benius on London road al 

T > ■ N-ck this evening. He will leave 
1mm- iiately afterward for Chicago. 
Pr*'s:Mfnt Vincent said he thought It 
a '^>iii thing that a city should de- 
cld ■ t'::at is prosperity should not. rest 




upon one Industry. He thought It 
significant that the state university 
should co-operate with Duluth in se- 
lecting a site for he experimental 
farm. He indicated that the event was 
of more than local importance. He 
said that the action of representa- 
tives of the different localities of the 
state that made th- school possible 
aiid the activity of che state univer- 
sity, representative of the common- 
wealth, emphasised tie element of co- 
operation. 

Among the v!sit« rs wera Dean 
Woods of the agrici'ltural school. C. 
G. Scliultz. superliitnQdent of public 
instruction. A. E. lUce of Wiiniar, 
Charles A. Smith of Minneapolis, Pierce 
Butler of St. Paul. CI arles L. Sommers 
of St. Paul, B. F. Nelson of Minne- 
apolis, regents of trie state univer- 
sity, Prof Andrew Boss of the agri- 
cultural college and T. P. Cooper of 
the agricultural school's department of 
farm management a id extension. H. 
V Hovland of Dull th, a regent of 
tlie university, was i member of the 
party. G>vernor Eb» rhart and Presi- 
dent Vin ent are re:rents ex-of[iclo. 
Tke ♦♦CUM}- Party. 
As the party left the Commercial 
club the procession moved forward 
headed by a phalanx of bankers. A 
platoon of millionaire farmers followed, 
flanked by flying s luadrons of real 
estate men. preceded by couriers of 
editors and newspaper owners and sup- 
ported in the rear by capitalists. Fol- 
lowed a battery of representatives of 
wholesale houses attended by a light 
brigade of commissio i men and retail- 
ers. In tlie center wna borne the sweet 
svmbol of light and reason. Rallied 
about were educatoi s. university re- 
gents and various high-brows. Bring- 
ing up the column were attorneys, pro- 
fessional men and H tmecrofters. 

Somewhat figurative as this is, It is 
not wholly imaginative. The list of 
tourists as given to the newspapers, 
must of whom made the trip, in ■lub .1 
Luther Mendenhall, capitalist and far- 
mer; John Millen, piesldent of .\lger. 
Smith ci Co., who. w tile not a farmer. 
Is sales agent for 4,000 acres of per- 
fectly good land owi ed by the lumber 
comiiany; John G. Williams, attorney, 
capitalist and joint proprietor of the 
biggest farm in Northern Minnesota; 
A. M. Marshall, pres dent of the Mar- 
Jhall-Wells Hardwar.^ Co.; J. L. Wash- 
burn, attorney and capitalist; M. H. Al- 
worth. mine owner and banker; Dr. W. 
H Magie, surgeon a id potato special- 
ist; C. S. Mitchell, eilitor of the News 
Tribune; John Ston^ Pardee, original 
Homecrof ter; Ch«stei A. Congdon, Re- 
publican leader in t le state house of 
representatives, min« owner and cap- 
italist. 

And then there wei e J. B. Cotton, at- 
torney and capitalist; Mllle Bunnell, 
one of the owners of the News Tribune; 
stillman H. Bingham, editor of The 
Herald; Rt. James McGolrlck. bishop 
of the Catholic dloct se of Duluth and 
one of the most extensive farmers in 
the state; Hamilton M. Peyton, presi- 
dent of the Americ in Exchange Na- 
tional bank; A. B. Hostetter. agricul- 
tural expert for the Duluth Commer- 
cial club; John Un j Sebenlus, chief 
mining engineer foi the Oliver Iron 
Mining company and owner of Trianon 
farm and chef for to light's big feed. 

And then there were C. A. Luster, 
president of the Clyde Iron Works; 
Fred L. Ryan, ex-sut veyor of logs and 
lumber; Stephen H Jones of A. D. 
Thomson & Co., form ir president of the 
i Duluth Board of Ti ade, and farmer; 
John H. Hearding, assistant general 
manager of the Oliver Iron Mining 
com.pany, who mixe.'- in agrarian pur- 
suits by running the county's farm for 
the indigent: L. B. jvrnold. land agent 
for the Duluth & Ir)n Range and the 
Rock Island, who knows the location 
and production of « very farm in the 
county; Michael H. Kelley, president of 
the Kelley-How-Thoinson company, and 
owner of pine lan<.s; John KiUorin, 
capitalist and own tr of more pine 
lands. 

And then there were A. L. Ordean, 
president of the First National bank; 
David Williams, flrsi vice president of 
the First National oank; H. B. Hov- 
land. mine owner and regent of the 
state university; Julius H. Barnes, 
grain exporter and capitalist; Charles 
P. Craig, superintendent of the agri- 
cultural department of the state fair, 
real estate operator and part owner of 
the famous Jean Dul Jth farm; Dr. I. T. 
Hurnside. doctor ai d farmer: A. B. 
Wolvin, vessel own -»r and capitalist; 
Judge W. A. Cant of the district court; 
and C T. Fltzslmmoi s, president of the 
Fitzsimmons-Palmer company. 
An Idenl Day. 
The day was Ideal for an excursion 
to the country. Th 5 sun was shining 
brightly, the air was salubrious and 
"it was cool In Duluth." When the 



half hundred agricultural experts [ 
reached the country the dickey birds | 
were straining their throats In melo- j 
dlous welcome. The autoists spent ! 
rive minutes at each of the garden 
tracts near Woodland, which were 
reached soon after S:30 o'clock. The 
Annandale farm was visited and the 
big Greysoion farms ijropoaition was 
inspected at 10 o dock. 

A proposed site near the Greysoion 
farms was the next stopping place. 
The Snively farm and Jean Duluth 
farms were visited, luncheon being j 
served at the latter. The party swung < 
around a circle by way of the Lismore : 
road. Vermilion r<>ad, passed through '. 
Arnold to the Calvary road and ran | 
through Homecroft and Kenwood to 
the Villa Sc'uolastica. where Bishop Mc- 
Golrlck grows vegetables, every one a 
prize winner. The county farm was 
reached at 2 o'clock and inspected. 
The party sped through Highland. 
Maple Grove and Five Corners to • 
Adolph on the Duluth. Mlssabe & 
Northern The Burnside and Lumra | 
sites will be observed this afternoon 
and a return to the city will be made t 
by way of Proctor, the Boulevard and 
Congdon park. The residence ana 
grounds of Chester A. Congdon on 
London road were to be viewed, after 
which the party will inspect the Tri- 
anon farm of J. Uno Sebenlus. which 
Is reputed to have the most modern 
dairy in the state. 

At 7 o'clock this evening the mem- 
bers of t'ne Minnesota Alumni asso- 
ciation will meet at the Trianon farm 
and will be addressed by President 
George E. Vincent of the state uni- 
versity. 

The visitors, tomorrow, will be en- 
tertained by optional trips to Lake- 
wood, a boat ride or a visit to Meadow- 
lands, the agricultural community on 
the Coleralne branch of the Duluth, 
Mlssabe & Northern. 



VINTENT TO SPEAK AT 7 P. M. 



President Vincent will address Min- 
nesota alumni at 7 o'clock. Immedi- 
ately after the luncheon at Trianon 
farm this afternoon, instead of 8:30 as 
planned, because it is necessary for 
him to get a train earlier in the even- 
ing than was expected. Ex-Governor 
Llnd and Governor Eberhart will also 
talk. 

The Minnesota alumni are invited to 
meet at Trianon at any time during 
the afternoon for the reunion and get- 
together features of the picnic. The 
luncheon will be provided. 



PASSENGERS BLAME 
CAPTAIN FOR LOSS 
OF LIVES LN WRECK 



"It was 
Mr. Ross 
been an 
have put 



cued who reached here today. That 
Mrs. Ross reached shore alive Is due 
to the heroism of some unknown pas- 
senger who grasped her as she was 
sinking for the third time, atter she 
had been swept from an overturned 
life raft, and swam with her through 
the breakers to safety. 

"I sank three times," said Mrs. Ross. 
'"It was the life preserver which 
brought me to the surface each time, 
but I was unable to battle with the 
immense breakers that swept over my 
head. Once as I came to the top 1 saw 
my little boy just as he was going 
down. I grabbed him by the hair, and 
just then a big. strong man caught me 
and helped me get ashoie." 

Wauted to Leave Ship. 

Mr. Ross said that the passengers, 
from the first, asked to be put ashore. 
They even called to a passenger train 
pa.ssing from the cliff, he said. The 
train stopped, he said, but the captain 
would not allow the passengers to go 
ashore. 

as quiet as a mill pond then," 
went on. "and it would have 
easy task for the crew to 
ua ashore. But Capt. Faria 
said he had orders by wireless from his 
company to keep the people aboard. 

"The life saving crew from a sta- 
tion near the point appeared on the 
scene early in the day and offered 
assistance, but after keeping them by 
two hours, the captain told them they 
would not be needed. When actual 
debarkation from the ship did com- 
mence, however, they returned and did 
heroic work." 

Tito Boat* CapHlaed. 

"There were probably eight lost in 
all. but it will be some time before the 
exact number Is known," said Q, G. 
Schooner of San Luis Obispo. "Two 
boats capsized, one from the Santa 
Ro?a in command of Second Mate Heu- 
son and another from the steamer 
Helen P. Drew, which stood by us all 
day, waiting for a chance to help us 
get a line ashore." 

Among those too seriously hurt to 
leave the train was Miss Jennie Weaver 
of San Francisco. With another wom- 
an and four children she was sent 
ashore in a net attached to the surf 
line. Waves washed over them con- 
tinually on their passage to the beach 
and all were completely exhausted 
when they reached the shore, and had 
to be cut from the net. 



(Continued from page 1.) 

passengers discharged a pitiful freight 
of hysterltal women and half-clad, 
shivering men. Suffering and privation 
were written plainly on the faces of 
all, and it will be weeks and in some 
cases months before some of the vic- 
tims recover. 

All had been drenched to the skin 
in comipg ashore In the breeches buoy 
in the high surf, and none had had 
anything to eat since the noon meal 
yesterday on board ship, except a 
hasty lunch and a cup of coffee pro- 
vided by the sympathetic farmers who 
thronged to the beach from their 
nearby homes when the vessel began 
to break up. 

Many were too weak to leave the 
cars unassisted, and half a dozen had 
to be carried from the train on stretch- 
ers. Hardly one of the passengers was 
fully clothed. The greater part of 
them were wrapped In blankets. 

Tell of Terrible Experience. 

The rescued passengers were for the 
most part too wrought up to talk con- 
nectedly of their nerve-racking expe- 
rience. A few of the cooler spirits, 
however, were able to give a brief 
word picture of the wreck, the long 
suspense on the crumbling ship as It 
crunched to pieces beneath them on 
the rocks, and the terrifying passage 
through the boiling surf to safety on 
the beach. 

That no one will be able to tell ac- 
curately for some time how many Uvea 
were lost, was the opinion expressed 
this morning by three survivors who 
insist they saw one woman swept from 
a life raft and drowned. They say 
that many more might have perished 
in the numerous upsets that marked 
the journeys of tne life rafts to the 
shore. 

^'oman Saved by PaNsenger. 

E. K. Ross, with his wife and son, of 
San Francisco, were among the re8- 



from three to 
Owing to tlie 



of 
not 



the 
yet 



wreck 
obtain- 



WITNESS FOR GIRLS GONE 



(Continued from page 1.) 



ing some of the missing letters W. E. 
D. Stokes is said to have written Miss 
Graham, it expected to close its case 
with the testimony of the elevator boy 
at the apartment house where the 
two girls admit they filled Mr. Stokes' 
legs full of bullets when he called to 
recover these same letters. 

The sensation of the hearing yester. 
day was the discovery that Stokes' 
private detective had found a package 
of letters In the girls' rooms after the 
shooting, and turned them over to his 
employer. Only eight letters finally 
reached the district attorney and the 
defense declares that Stokes had held 
out others which he did not wish to 
become public. 

Detective* on the Carpet. 

As soon as Commissioner Waldo 
reached police headquarters this morn- 
ing he took up the case of the three 
city detectives who permitted James 
Cummlngs, the Ansonla house detec- 
tive, to remove the packet of Stokes' 
letters found in the apartment of Ethel 
Conrad and Lillian Graham three days 
after the shooting. 

Cummlngs testltted yesterday that 
the city detectives did not see him find 
the letters, and when hard pressed he 
admitted that he had "secreted" them. 
Counsel for the two girls maintain 
there were eighteen or more letters 
in the package. Only twelve reached 
the district attorney's office after they 
had passed through the hands of 
Stokes private counsel. 

Commissioner Waldo Instructed a 
deputy to get to the bottom of the 
part played by the police In the search 
and the transfer of the letters. 

"If anybody is guilty here," he said, 
•their own ball will be set rolling." 

♦•They're a Scream." 

Curiosity of the spectators regard- 
ing these missing letters was whetted 
to the keenest edge by Miss Graham's 
comment on them. 

"They'll make interesting reading 
when they are produced." she said. "I 
wouldn't dare tell you what's in them. 
You w:ouldn't believe me. But when I 
get out of thla trouble I'm going to 
use them. They're a scream." 

During his earlier examination of 



Mr. Stokes, Mr. Moore asked: "Did you 
not. down to the time of your visit to 
Lexington, entertain affection for Miss 
Graham.?" 

"Never." shouted Stokes. 
"During all that time what were your 
intentions toward her'.'" 

"Merely to be polite to her." 
Refuaed Her Money. 
Going into more detail regarding his 
talk with Ethel Conrad when she ap- 
pealed to him for help for Lilian Gra- 
ham, Stokes said: 

"I told Miss Conrad that Miss Gra- 
ham was an undesirable woman, and 
that I wouldn't give Miss Graham one 
cent, but I said I would give Miss Con- 
rad money for a nurse to look after 
Miss Graham. Miss Conrad wanted me 
to sign a note for >200 to allow Miss 
Graham to go abroad. I said I would 
not. I would give no agreement be- 
cause I thought Miss Graham a dan- 
gerous woman." 

Stokes said he offered to draw a 
check for $'200 to enable Miss Graham 
to get to Belgium to join her sister, 
whereupon, he continued: 

"Miss Conrad said, "Oh no, don't 
draw a creek, there may be some 
scandal about it. Give me the cash.' 
I said, 'all right' and gave her the 
money." 

That Lexlnston VlHlt. 
The defendants' attorney ques- 
tioned Mr. Stokes sharply regarding 
Ml.ss Graham's visit to his farm in 
Lexington. Ky. The defense had con- 
tended that the girl expected to find 
other guests with Stokes, and when 
she discovered that she was visiting 
him alone she left the following morn- 
ing. 

"Didn't she leave because you tried 
to insult her?" Stokes was asked. 

He was not allowed to answer this 
question, but he replied that she re- 
mained at the farm about three days. 
His attorney read the letter of invita- 
tion. In which Miss Graham's sister 
was asked to visit Stokes at the same 
time. 

"But you did entertain so-called 
fatherly affection for Miss Graham 
didn't you?" asked the girl's attorney. 
"I did feel kindly toward her," re- 
plied Stokes, turning to smile at the 
two young women. 

The prosecution closed its case with 
the examination of a policeman who 
first reached the house after the shoot- 
ing. He said the girls told him each 
of them had shot Stokes. 



cessful term June 30, in the Lutheraa 
church. The school has been conduct- 
ed during a period of four weeks, by 
Frank A. Gustafson of Augiistana col- 
lege. Rock Island, 111. 

The pupils were examined in both 
the catechism and Bible history and 
displayed, a great deal of knowledge. 
In the Bible history ninety-eight chap- 
ters have been studied during the term. 
A program was rendered by the schol- 
ars as follows: Song, school; Bibl* 
reading an9l prayer, Frank A. Gustaf- 
son; examination in the catechism, er- 
amination in the Bible history; recita- 
tion, "In the Shepherd's Bosom," Alice 
Larson; solo. "Summersong," Martha 
Johnson; recitation, "Thanks, Oh 
Lord," Clara Lockle; dialogue, "A Lit- 
tle While With Jesus." Alma Lockle, 
Hjalmar Helmer. Harry Soderberg, 
Gerda Lockle and Violet Johnson; reci- 
tation, "Sing! " Carl Hall; song, school; 
recitation. "Oh, Take My Heart," Arth- 
ur Lackie; dialogue, "The Lord's Pray- 
er," Martha Johnson, Hjalmar Malm- 
sten, Ivan Carlson, Theodore Stark, 
Anton Hall, Agnes Helmer and Carl 
Malmsten; recitation, "If God so Wills," 
Nathalia Soderberg; duet. "My Life Is 
a Wave." Clara Lackie and Nathalia 
.Soderberg; recitation. "A Child's I'ray- 
er," Edwin Form; remarks, Frank A. 
Gustafson; recitation, "Also a Picture 
From Summer," Cecil Form; song, 
school; benediction. 



ROBS MILL CITY HOTEL. 



HAD SUCCESSFUL TERM 



In Midway Swedish Parochial 
School Just Closed. 

Midway, Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Swedish parochial 
school, which has been held In the 
Midway schoolhouse, closed a very suc- 



Former Employe Said to Have Been 
Caught With the Goods. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. July 8. — Investi- 
gation by special detectives who for 
several weeks have been employed at 
the Radlsson hotel, resulted In the ar- 
rest of Harry Morris, on a charge of 
stealing silverware. Morris was for- 
merly a bus boy In the hotel and car- 
ried the dishes from the dining room 
to the kitchen. 

Morris was arrested at his room 
and in a suit case the police say they 
found the silverware, consisting of 
knives, forks and spoons with the 
Radisson mark. Morris was employed 
Thursday by the Dyckman hotel, but 
was discharged that night. 

The goods recovered were valued at 
$160, but H. J. Tremain, manager of 
the Radlsson, says that the value of 
the amount stolen exceeds $500. He 
says the articles have been disappear- 
ing for two months. A checking sys- 
tem for employes has failed to stop It, 
he says, and he determined some time 
ago to place detectives in the hotel to 
watch everyone. 

Morris was charged with grand lar- 
ceny. 

Morris said he bought the silverware 
from a negro. 





Chicago Passenger Terminal 



North Western Line 




Located on Madison Street, between Canal and Clinton Streets, in 
the heart of Chicago's business district, a short distance from termi- 
nal stations of all Eastern railways. 

The new terminal represents the perfection of passenger structures. 
In this structure have been combined all the best and most modern 
utilities, appointments and architectural beauty of the greatest 
terminals of Europe and America. 

Summer Excursions 

From DULUTH and SUPERIOR 



Funr Known to Be Dead. 

Surf, Cal., July 8. — Second Officer E. 
Heuson and three seamen of the 
steamer Santa Rosa of the Paclflc 
Coast Steamship company, which went 
ashore at Point Arguello yesterday, 
are known to have been drowned when 
a life boat capsized while the passen- 
gers of the wrecked vessel were being 
taken ashore by the crew. 

Early today unconfirmed reports 
were that a number of passengers, 
variously estimated at " 
twenty, are missing, 
isolation of the scene 
accurate information is 
aiile. 

The known dead: 

E. HEUSON, second officer, 

FRED JOHNSON, seaman. 

JOHN PSIFF'ER, seaman. 

E. W. JEBSEN, seamen. 

MiMled By Searchllflrbt. 

The Santa Rosa went ashore just be- 
fore dawn, at the mouth of Henda 
creek. It is supposed that a powerful 
searchlight used by a gang of railroad 
laborers who were working near the 
wreck Is the cause of the vessel leaving 
Its course, the quartermaster mistaking 
It for the light of the Point Arguello 
lighthouse. 

When the boat struck the injury did 
not appear to be serious, and Capt. 
Farla, believing he would be able again 
to float the Santa Rost, made no at- 
tempt to land the passengers. A sharp 
wind, rising soon after 4 o'clock, 
threatened to rack the boat to pieces 
and hasty preparations were made to 
take the passengers and crew ashore. 
At 5:30 a heavy swell cracked the ves- 
sel amidshipii and at 6 o'clock It split 
In two. 

There were 275 persons on board, most 
of whom had taken refuge In the for- 
ward section as the stern of the boat 
had received' the brunt of the attack 
of the waves. 

Carried Line to Shore. 

Third Engineer C W. Brown carried 
a line to shore in a boat, and when he 
effected a landing, after a desperate 
battle with the waves, aid had ar- 
rived on shore. A net was rigged on 
the shore line, and the passengers, 
women and 'children first, were taken 
from the floundering ship, three and 
four at a time. 

The disaster In which Second Officer 
Heuson and three seamen lost their 
lives occured Just before the vessel 



Round Trip 

Montreal, Que $36.00 

Portland, Me 43.35 

Prescott, Ont 34.90 

Quebec, Que 40.00 

Toronto, Ont 30.60 

Atlantic Ocean Trip 50.40 

Rail to New York, steamer to Norfolk; 
returning direct or via W'asbingtoa. D. C. 

Tickets on sale daily to September 30. Limit, 30 days ; some routes, 60 days. Liberal stopovers. 
Proportionate fares to hundreds of points in the Eastern states and Canada. 

Special pamphlets on Excursion Fares to the" 
EAST— also to CALIFORNIA— mailed upon request 



Round Trip 

New York $43.00 

Atlantic City, N. J 44.50 

Bar Harbor, Me 50.00 

Boston, Mass 41.60 

Buffalo, N. Y 33.00 

Concord, N. H 41.35 



302 W. SUPERIOR ST.. 
DULUTH, MINN. 



910 TOWER AVENUE, 
SUPERIOR, WIS. 




-*« » 



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GUARANTEE OF QUALITY AND PURITY 

Copenhagen SnuflF is made of the best, old, rich, high- 
flavored leaf tobacco, to which is added only such in- 
gredients as are component parts of natural leaf tobacco 
and absolutely pure flavoring extracts. The Snuff Pro- 
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bitter and acid of natural leaf tobacco. 

AMERICAN SNUFF COMPANY, 111 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 



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Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 



HOUSES FOR WORKERS AT THE STEEL PLANT 




CompanyFormedloMeelDe-'location Selected Is Just Here Is Where Many Work- 
mand for Homes Pointed Across the Bridge From the men Own Lots and Con- 
ditions Are Ideal 



DULUTH BOYS PREPARING FOR THEIR 

"ANNUAL SUMMER OUTING AT DEERWOOD 



"4" 



gifli fwi»» 



"• -t 



Out By Expert Ball 



When Charles B. Ball, the famous 
housing expert of Chicago, left Duluth 
laat '^•eek after telling the Duluth Com- 
mercial club and charitable and civic 
societies what was necessary to make 
Duluth a model city for workingmen 
to live in and urging upon everybod> 
the necessity of n^-vldlng at once for 
housing the thousands of workmen who 
will conu- here to supply the demands 
of the mammoth steel riant and allied 
Industries, he did not know that a com- 
pany was even then in process of f^r- 
ma^'lon which will build model homes 
for the w-rkers and charge them only 
{ per cent upon the investment. 

For twenty-five years Mr. Ball has 
been engaged in solving housing prob- 
lema He told the Commercial club the 
problem of providing for the many 
innusan.la who will come to Duluth In 
the Tiext year or two was too big for 
any one man to tackle and that men of 
large means should form a c^^rporatlon 
and build model homes for the ^-rk- 



Mamraolh Works. 



trated In the accomps nylng photograph. 
On the high, level plateau chosen by 
the housing cumpanj for Its operations 
is the fastest growing of the com- 
munities which hav* sprung up about 
the steel plant, wheie electrical smelt- 
ing win be done for the first time. The 
Steel corporation, after exhaustive 
experiments, has adopted the new pro- 
cess for Installation at the new plant 
This process will i educe the cost of 
steel production very materially and 
has resulted In the heads of the sub- 
sidiary companies b 'Ing called to New 
York for a conferet ce. the outcome of 
which. It Is seml-oTiclally announced 
will be the Immedl ite construction of 
eighty gigantic stru lures here. Instead 
of the forty-eight provided for In the 
plans accepted by the building de- 
partment of the cltr of Duluth. These 
forty-eight bulldlnrs now under con- 
struction will cost JIO.000.000. but the 
;nlarged plans will mean the outlay 
of perhaps $20,000.0 10. with other addl- I 



policy of the company to help those 
who help themselves and the fact that 

Carnegie will 



who help 

a man owns a lot In 
show that he Is deserving. The com- 
pany will loan him the money to build 
a home on his lot. charging him 6 per 
cent interest. In no sense is the 
building company philanthropic It has 
found that lots in Carnegie have 
doubled m price In the last year and 
<run8iders It will have good security 
for Its money, since Carnegie is to be 
the new steel plant city, and others 
are springing up on all sides. Tho 
.street railway extension will run 
through its mam business street and 
inr.u.5n .^ ^^^ ^j. twelve 




entering both cities. 

Another factor that entered Into the 
decision of the building company was 
the fact that the Harding Purchase, 
made by large interests for additional 
Tndustries adjoins Carnegie, so that the 
new town will have the steel plant on 





WHAT TO DO BEFORE THE DOCTOR GETS THERE. 



LOWER DECK OF BELT LINE 



BRIDGE CONNECTING CARNEGIE WITH THE STEEL PLANT. 



ers and be satisfied with a very mod- 
erate rate of Interest on their money. 
That very plan had been inaugurated 
before Mr. Ball advocated It here and 
the company had been Incorporated and 
l8 even now engaged In building. 

After carefully considering the ad- 
vantages of various locations as being 
ideal for the workers, close to the steel 
plant, but still far enough away to be 
out of reach of its smoke, gas. noise and 
■oot, with street cars to get to and 
from work, the new building company 
decided to erect its model homes about 
midway between the steel plant on the 



tlons still to cone. When the plans 
were finally adop ed tor the new steel 
plant, the Steel c >rporation decided to 
invest 125,000.000 In the enterprise and 
appropriated $10,100,000 for the first 
unit. From all ii formation obtainable 
at this time, the success of electrical 
smelting has resulted in the determi- 
nation to go ah. ad right away with 
the construction 'f an additional unit, 
and so manufactire enough steel here 
more cheaply thari even at the world- 
famous Gary plait to supply the de- 
mands of the entire Northwest and 
Canada. 

Under these plan* still more homes 



Minnesota side and the great terminal I for ^^e workers will be needed, and 
yards of the plant on the Wisconsin | ^ jg to meet tils demand that J^he 
side. This section will be traversed by 
the otreet railway extension from South 
Superior to the plant, which will cross 
the St. Louis river on the Belt line 
bridge on a lower level than the rail- 
way tracks. This street railway level, 
whloh will also accommodate vehicles 
and foot passengers, with the tracks 
for the street cars already laid, is illus- 



new company hj s hurried its forma 
tlon and begun business. After delib- 
erating upon thf town sites destined 
to have the mot<t rapid growth, the 
company decided in favor of Carnegie, 
where all the lot:* in the original town- 
site has been s >ld, and where three 
additions have b?en necessary to meet 



the demknds for homes. It will be the I construction 



one side and the terminal V^rds on the 
other, with factories on the Harding 
purchase along.side. . 

From the Belt line bridge, on both 
sides of Carnegie, along the belt line 
railroad. Is the natural l^^f t*on„ ''^^ 
other industries allied to the steel 
plant, and it does not require a prophet 
fo forsee that In a few years Carnegie 
will be a city of considerable size. 
Some Idea of the growth of this sturdy 
steel stripling is had from the fact 
that it Is little more than a year oiu, 
vet four lots have been deeded In Car- 
hegle to the school board of Superior, 
which will have a Lchool house ready 
for occupancy In the fall. Af^^f'^'n^ 
Carnegie the Twin City and Duluth- 
Superlor electric lines have purchased 
forty acres for terminals at $500 per 
acre It Is specified In the deed that 
the oroperty must be used for ter- 
mfnalL for an electric line to be built 
between the Twin City and the Head 
of the Lakes. 

These are some of the reasons why 
the home builders chose Carnegie for 
the scene of their dperalions and have 
chosen for their title the Carnegie 
Home Building company. Offices have 
been opened In the First National 
Bank building, and contracts have been 
let to F. L. Johnson & Co. for the 
erection of buildings, which are under 






TAKE CENSUS 
OF CHODREN 

Stale Law Requires House to 
House Enumeration Dur- 
ing Summer. 

Builders Protest That School 

Work Needed Is Not 

Advertised. 



and while Engli.eer Larson is out of 
ithe city the conclusion the boara 
reached last nlgl t was that Larson ha<. 
sent out the call for bids to certain ol 
the painting and plumbing firms Jn 



ment JO.OOO.OO 

8al« of bouses st Meiritt Kbool 918 00 



ExixntM prttTloualj reported $M0.34?.59 

Eiy«aui«» for June 12.1Z5.70 



$2SS,iTT.83 



242.TT4.29 



Oventrtft | U.296.44 

SlnklBs Pond. 

RecflpU pretlouMy mxnr*l 1133,786.89 

Exi>eiisM prnli>u»i> ttponed 43.025.17 

Exi-tusea for Juue a.386.8J 



46.411. !'9 



Balance 

OTtnlmfM M »lM»e. .. 



I ••«*•• a 



$ 87.374. it) 
. 68.269 '.•: 



ruluth is to have a school census 
taken before the opening of school. 
The census will be made by house to 
house canvass by enumerators to be 
employed by the school board. Ev-ery 
child between the ages of 6 and 16 wlil 
be enrolled on this census, together 
with date of birth and the name and 
address of his parents or guardian. 

AS there are nearly 13.000 pupils in 
the public schools of Duluth and about 
2 000 more in the parochial^,bcho_o],s. 



t>uluth under th? pressure of a neces- 
sity to get the work done. A number 
of bids were at the clerk's desk last 
night waiting o be opened, but In 
view of the protests made it was de- 
cided to return .hem If the bidders so 
desired, or at any rate to keep theni 
unopened until a special meeting or 
tlie board on n* xt Monday at 2 p. m. 
in President M igner's office, and to 
open them then. In the meantime no- 
tice of the call for bJds will be pub- 
lished in the m wspapers and sent to 
the Builders' Exchange to Insure gen- 
eral publicity. 

IMrector Cobl registered another 
kick on behalf of I'uiuth firms when 
the tiuestion of Che advisability of pay- 
ing a bill to I Fort Wayne electric 
company came ap- The board was of 
the opinion that the charge was unjust, 
in that it calU i for payment for re- 
pairing machin* s installed by the com- 
pany and guaraateed by them, and Mr. 
Cobb argued at length that If they had 
had a I>uluth firm do the work the re- 
sult would hav« been much better. 

McLeod & Sn ith sent a communica- 
tion to the bo ird Informing them of 
the necessity o' completing the sewer 
connections at the Jerome Merritt 
school In the ntar future. 

,A.lVrrJ.T:Ll\T.^i:°J^'°l Large Gathering at Methodist 

fortv-three pUtils living near Proctor, 3 ^ 

but "within the limits of Duluth. was 
referred to th. committee on schools 
for Invt stlgatU n as to Us validity. 

Applications were received from 
Misses E. M. lart and W. S. LjMiott 
for the positioi of school nurse. H. J. 



Net bounce * V-'^^H 

Add out»i»!idlng cb«ck» *-'^"" 

June 30. In American Exchange NaUonal 

Iwnk $20.8j^..8 

Tc this amount must be ad«led $100,000 which wn* 

tumeJ over U> Mr. Ccbb by Ihe ccunu treasurer m 

part of the approprluUon, making a Wtal of $120,- 

855 78 In the Xnrnk. 



Camp Miller, the boys' department 
summer vacation for boys will open 
Its fourteenth season July ^1 and con- 
tinue until Aug. 26. w,„„» 

Camp Miller has become a house- 
hold word in many homes, and th€> 
hundreds of boys who have attended 
during the past years have n^^hmg but 
words of praise for the good times 
thev have had. The object of the 
ramp Is healthful recreation without 
temptation, a camp where the boys live 
close to nature, give themselves up to 
play, acquire skill in sports, eat plenty 
of wholesome food and ^« «;^P, j""^ 
hours, and are taught high Ideals for 

"■''camp* Sillier is a place where boys 
of the restless age may live a happ> . 
rare-free, outdoor life, free from the 
ariiflclalitles and pernicious influences 
of Just hanging around the 'l/y. a 
place where all the cravings of real 
boy life are satisfied; a place where 
constant association with agreeable 
companions and a healthy moral at- 
mosphere make for noble manhood, a 
i.lacc where athletic sports harden the 
muscles, tan the skin, broaden the 
shoulders, brighten the eye. and send 
each lad back to his school or work, 
as brown as a berry and hard as nasls. 

Oamp Miller Is a camp of Ideals, not 
a summer hotel, nor a supplanter of tlie 
'lome. The principal reason for Its 
existence is to provide a safe place for 
parents to send their boys during the 
summer vacation, under every influence 
that will be helpful. The camp will be 
pitched on the banks of Serpent lake 
at rteerwood. Minn. A farmer In close 
proximity to the camp supplies all the 
milk, eggs, vegetables, etc. Imme- 
diately upon arrival at camp, boys are 
assigned to tents, and each group 
selects a camp name and yell, faeven 
bovs and a leader will occupy a tent, 
which will be 12 by 14, of white duck. 
The daily program commences at 7 
o'clock, when reveille is sounded and 
every boy appears In frdnt of his lent 
door for setting up exercises. This Is 
followed by a morning plunge at 7:30. 
Tlie flag is raised and breakfast is 
served at 8 o'clock, with chapel at »:30. 
\fterward8 come camp duties, games, 
boating, rambles, nature study, etc., 
and the morning swim at 11 o clock. 
The afternoon is devoted to athletic 
sports. At the 7:30 sounding of re- 
treat and lowering of the flag each 
tent has its turn at raising and lower- 
ing the flag. At night the big bonfire 
Is lighted, and this Is one of the most 
enjovable features of camp life. At 
9 -30 "taps Is sounded and lights go out 
for a good nine-hour sleep. The com- 
mlFsary tent Is In charge of a coin- 
peient chef and assistant, and the 
campers sit at small tables of twelve 
each. «wlmmlng Is given a large place 
at the camp, and every boy who goes 
Is given the opportunity to learn. A 
branch of the volunteer life-saving 
corps is organized at camp, and a 
special patrol Is on guard at all the 
swimming periods. Boys are allowed 
to go In at no other time and at no 
other place. All the leaders are present 
on these occasions. 

A shoot-the-chute. rings, etc.. add to 
the enjoyment of the swimming per- 
iods. _ , . .^, , 
For the boys who like fishing, black 
bass, perch, croppies and pickerel are 
to be had. Several fishing expeditions 
are planned to nearby lakes, and on 
these little trips boys will have an 
opportunity to make their own camp 
and do their own cooking. 

There will be a fleet of good row- 
boats and canoes, but no boy will be 
allowed to use the canoes until he has 
pa.xsed the swimming test and has per- 
mission from his parents. Instruction 
will be given In the proper use of 
boats and canoes. The mins-trel show, 
entertainment, corn roasts, marsh- 
mallow roasts. Ice cream socials, bas- 
ket and baseball, athletics, tiuolts and 
a host of other things go to fill every 
minute of the lime with healthful en- 
joyment. 

Camp Miller Kmblems. 
In the headciuarters tent will be 




THE PRIZE TENT LAST YEAR. 



found the camp llt.rary. Phonograph, 
magazines and writing tat.lets. An 
athletic contest for younger and ..Ider 
boys Is held each year, also an aQuatic 
meet and prizes are awarded the v,'n- 
ITers. To win the Camp Miller emblem 
is the ambition of every camper. It 's 
an emblem made in the colors of the 
camp with the letters C. M. on it, and 
it Is an honor well worth working for 
, win it a boy has to secure S'-'O 




SERVICES HELD 
FOR THE INDIANS 



points; pass first aid examination, o; 
sleep out all night and put up tempor- 
ary tent, 6; take part In entertainment 
5 take picture of animal. 5; name and 
identify ten trees, 5. identify twenty- 
five different kinds of flowers 10 prc^s 
and mount twenty-five different flowr- 
ers. 10; mount five different kinds of 
butterflies, 5; tie ten different kinds of 
knots, 5; listen to f(tory read and write 
up in your own words, 10, light a "re 
with one match, 3; find the «outh t>y 
aid of a watch, 1: Identify five different 
b rds, 5 puncttiallty at sett irg up ex- 
ercises knd retreat. 5; morning nlunge 
(not a .«wim), 2; punctuality at break- 
fast, dinner and supper 6. unknown 
point 15; punctuality at Bible studj. o. 
neat ten 5; run 100 yards, 14 sec- 
onds. 3; over 14 years, l-^"'' J«<;?"''^' 
pull up ten times, 3; over 1* .^f'^rs 
eight times; broad Jump, six feet. 3. 
over 14, seven feet five inches; high 
Jump, three feet, six Inches. 3; over 1? 
years, four feet. 4 Inches. 

Special points are given from tlnie 
to time for special things. Each night 
\he record of the tent Is given. a.>d 
gpeclal honors are awarded the hlghebt 
tent. 

It is also an honor to win a place on 
the Camp Miller hall of fame. A vote 
i8 taken on the following things, and 
the hall of fame occupies a prominent 
place in the club room; most popular 
boy best athlete, most courteous boy. 
camp humorist, most generous boy. 
brightest boy. boy with biggest pull, 
heavenly twins, boy who has done most 
for the camp, best natured boy, most 
popular song, best table manners, fa- 
vorite game, neatest boy, hardluck 
bov, mascot. , ,. 

the following prizes are awarded. 
Silver medal to the boy who wins the 
most points. He Is voted the best all- 
round camper. 

Camp Miller pennants to teh cham- 
pion athlete and swimmer In both di- 
visions, senior and junior. „,,,^ 
Pins to the members of the prize j 

*Camp Miller pennant to the boy 
catching the largest fish. 

Camp Miller pennant to the boy taK- 
ing the best group of camp picures. 

Pins to the tent that turns in the 
best string of cleaned fish. „„„,^. 

Pennant to quoit champion, senior 

^"pennant to first boy learning to 




NO FIELD 
DAY_MEET 

Many of Third Regiment Men 

Disappointed By the 

Decision. 

Company C of Duluth and 

Company F of Eveleth 

Well Represented. 



Camp Lakevltw, Lake City. Minn, 
July 8. — (Special to The Herald.) — 
Company drills and battalion school* 
occupy the attention of the Third in- 
fantry In camp. The weather continue* 
to be Ideal with a cool lake breeze. 
The regiment expected to have hut op- 
pressive weather the same as It had 
last year and as experienced by other 
troops this year, and the pleasant brand 
handed out Is a agreeable surprise. 

The morning and afternoon drill* 
vesterdav and today were devi.ttd to 
manual of arms, school of the j'olaler, 
s«iuad and stctton. bayonet exercises, 
extended urder and firing exercises 
from small arms firing regulations. 
This aftcrnoun the c.-mpanics in ad- 
dition will lake up advance and rear 
guard and plichlng shelter tent camp. 
Next week battalion and rfcglmei.tal 
drill and field maneuvtrs will be taken 
up. The total number of the regiment 
present In camp is 4l!5 of a total 
strengtli of 706. Company C of Duluth 
^vil « -mpanv K oi Kveleih tie f-'r the 
largest companies. The attendance by 
companies is as follows; A. 4.; B. 'id', 
C, 53; i', H: E, 41; F, 63; G. 43; H. 42; 
1. 47; M, 43; field stall band ar.d hos- 
pital corps, 62. 

The average attendance by company 
is a fraction of a man more than last 
year although the total strength Is less 
as the regimt.-nt has. but ten companies 
instead of twelve. 

Tomorrow morning at 9:30 divme 
services will be held by the rfglnieiital 
chaplain. Rev. Will Knitry of Amboy. 
The Third Infantry band will assist. 
The following is ll:e program: 
Overture — Sacred Fantasy Providence 
Third Infantry Band. 

Hymn — "Great Gou of Nations" 

iUgiment. 

Apostles creed 

Regiment. 

Prayer 

Chaplain. 
Hymn — 'Onward Christian Soldiers" 
Regiment. 

Scripture 

Sermon— 'Blood, the Determinate 

Thing" 

Chaplain Emery. 

Hymn — "America" 

Regiment. 

Benediction 

The carnp so far has proved a very 

orderly one. The first infraction of 

military discipline occurred yesterday 

when two men c»f C<inipany L> %vere 

laced in the guard huuse for thiealen- 

g a member ol the guard and rofu 



fii 



THE SHOOT THE CHUTES. 



swim. Watch fob to Uie boy who 
learns to swim at camp and who makes 
the best progress while there. 

Camp Miller is not a place simply 
to pass away the time. The day's 
program is well planned with health- 
ful activities that have an educational 
as well as a pleasure value. Short 



courses are conducted in first aid to 



Ing to surrender to the guard. A field 
officer's court-martial iias been or- 
dered for this aftern<ion at 1 30 to 
consider the cases. The second officer 
in rank m the regiment acts on this 
court, who in the present instance, is 
Lieut. Col. F. E. Ut:-che. 

>o Field I>ay Meet. 
No field day nicei will be lieM this 
year. As the time of the regiment in 
camp is so short, It was not consid- 
ered possible to devote half a day to 
this event. Many of the nit^n are dis- 
appointed as considerable interest was 
shown by some of the companies. 
Company F of Eveleth had planned 
on taking home the athletic honors 
again this year. 

The work on the rifle range Js going 
on as well as possible with the cur- 
tailed facilities on account of suspen- 
sion of firing on the short range. The 
Third battalion will complete the '200, 
300 and 500-yard ranges today. Next 
week the men will go back on the 600- 
i yard range, timed fire and skirmish, 
' and tiiose that qualify as sharpshooters 
will shoot on the >>«to and 1,000-yara 
targets for experts' decorations. 

An order has been Issued to station 
guards on station platforms to nrevent 
any accident from passing trains. 

Each one of the companies has had a 
tour of guard duty and wtlh Company 
H. the senior company of the regi- 
ment, which went on last night, a 
second tour will be started. Afttr the 
roster has been gone through a sec- 
ond time, the guard will be mounted 
by details from each company as in 
previous years. 
..., .- Capt. H. H. Neuenberg. Company H, 
nature was officer of the day last night with 




The library will contain books of use 
ful Information about outdoor life No 
bov can attend Camp Mil er and not 
come back greatly benefited. Secretary 
Norman D. McLeod who has had 
charge of Camp Miller for the past 
seven vears, will be the director again 
this season. He will be assisted by 
Mr Batchelor, physical director, and 
a number of older boys and young men 
who will act as leaders. 



T^ fv, firaf I quest of Mr. Berg, and entered upon 
consln reservation, but on Fond du Lac j management Tuesday, i- or ^ne iirsi ^^j^ ^^^ duties Immediately. Mr. Berg 
there were no snakes, but plenty of Ujme in five days cars are running , j^^^g i^^^j^ jj^-jng. ^t the ^^ aldorf-Astorla 
berries, hay and fish and work. L^- „ij ung and practically all the old U^ere since the wreck, having been 

The •V\'hlte Earth Indians began j^^^ ^^^.^ returned to work. J brought to New York to have Jiisjn- 

xi© hlmseir 




census W... -- „,„♦♦,, waa rA 

know-n as vet, and the matter was re 
ferred at lasi night's meeting to the 
committee on schools to work out a 
plan but in view of the fact that tlie 
state law calls for an enumeration of 
all the children In the city between the 
Iges mentioned, the records unfile 
with the school board are insufficient 
and a house to house canvass will be 
f^uoTT Last night it was Intimated 
Ihat the city would be divided Into 
census districts corresponding with the 
school districts and an enumerator em- 
Dloyed to handle each district. Clerk 
Ironson of the board put »n a vigorous 
protest against forcing much of this 
work onto his office, as he said that 
Xt this time of year they were up to 
their ears in work without any addi- 
tion. „ „ * 
Contraclors Protest. 
Director Cobb put In a big J^'ck on 
behalf of the contractors of the city 
on the way the school boards bids 
were called for, after a letter from Di- 
rector B H. bber of the American 
Heating company had been read in 
which Mr. Ober delicately hinted that 
ev-erybody was not getting a square 
deal In this regard. , . „ ^, , 
It appears that the bids for the work 
in qtiestion. vacation painting and 
plumhlng In the school buildings, were 
called for without the authorisation of 
the buildings and grounds committee. 



Gude petitioned for reappointment as 
truant officer, and Miss Nellie M. 
Stoughton for re-appolntment as in- 
structor to the teachers In play grouna 
work, folk dai clng. etc. Resignations 
from Nanna E. Crandall. domestic 
science teachei , and Alice Ebmer and 
Anita Andersoi. teachers, were ac- 

The 'question of a new school sjte at 
Woodland wai. broiight up and the 
building and grounds committee re- 
Dorted that tl ey had an appointment 
To go to Wo.dland either today or 
Monday to s. lect a site for a new 

'^'''The" committee on administration 
and finance reported »»?« ^^l® °//,i'; 
two houses pu chased ^'Ith the site for 
the Merritt scl ool. one for $500 and the 

^^^h^e mleJfng was very poorly attend 
ed. Directors, Magner. Cobb. Evered. 
Campbell and rrosby. only, being pres- 
ent. . „ _, 
Treasurer's Report. 

A detailed statement of the treasur- 
er's report, submitted by Director 
Cobb follows: 

Gi-aeral Fnad. 
Receipts pr«»iou»ly nvrifd $3^5,930.45 
June. adTsute on June appor- 

tionm«t ^Hli^ 

June, sulci and nas 1.541.37 

June t»l»nc« ot laUnM from 



bank 



20. tS 



Eiprnsw prwlousb mK>rt«d. .ISW.WS.M 
EiBtnses for June ee.ssi.a* 



1399.492. 04 



4S3.46S.5T 



Overdraft v_--- • J3.!>73.5S 

Keceipt* prwJouilx rvi«n.il .J207.5S8.M 
June advance on J u>e appcrticn- 



Quarterly Conference 
at Sawyer. 

Sawyer, Minn. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Rev. E. K. Copper, su- 
perintendent of the Duluth district, ac- 
companied by Rev. J. T. B. Smith of 
Sauk Center, arrived here and held the 
quarterly conference of the Methodist 
church. There was a large number of 
Indians present at the services. Dr. 
Cooper presided at the business ses- 
sion and Rev. J. T. B. Smith preached 
the sermon. The church has been thor- 
oughly renovated, a tower added, and 
living ruoms built on to the church 
for a parsonage. About $500 has been 
spent on improvements, which makes 
this a fine Indian church. 

The Indians told the preachers that 
the blueberries were ripening and that 
there would be a big crop. Indians 
are already picking the berries and ex- 
pect to reap a rich harvest. Haying 
has begun and a call for Indians has 
been made for log driving at Klm- 
berley. 

Joseph Baptlste, an old Indian 
preacher, was present at the meetings. 
He Is 75 years of age, and has been 
sick almost to death. He accepted 
Christianity some years ago. and 
preaches for the Methodists. Though 
iick he said that on &"unday he would 
preach to the Indians in their own Ian- 

Rev Mr. Copper baptized an Indian 
child, using the beautiful ritual of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

A Chippewa Indian, when asked why 
he had left the Chippewa River coun- 
try to coi.ie and live at Fond du Lac 
reservation, said that he left because 
there were snakes, both blue and cop- 
perbead and rattlesnakes, on the Wls- 



thelr revival meetings at Duane Mon- 
day and many of the Indians are going 
there from Fond du Lac and Odanah. 
Wis. 

MOVEMENT FROM 
FARMS CONTINUES 

Only 53.7 Per Cent of Popu- 
lation Now in Rural 
Territory. 

Washington. July 8.— The people of 
the Unltei States are steadily desert- 
ing the country and the farm for the 
turmoil and delights of the city and 
town, according to statistics made pub- 
lic by the census bureau. During the 
last ten years the percentage of peo- 
ple living m cities or other incorpor- 
ated places of more than 2,500 Inhabi- 
tants Increased from 40.5 to 46.3 of the 
total. Twenty years ago only 36.1 per 
cent of the total population lived in 
such incorporated places. 

In classifying the 1910 census re- 
turns, the bureau calls that porUon of 
the population In incorporated cities 
or towns of 2,500 or more inhabitants 
urban and the remainder rural. On 
this basis in 1910, 42,623,383 or 46.3 
per cent of the total, lived In urban 
tc-rltory and 49,349,S38, or 63.7 per 
cent in rural territory. 

MEXICANSTREET CAR 

STRIKE IS SEHLED. 



"" t'IJ' mLrgeriien't granted most of I Juries attended to. He himself was 
J'd%manTTf'"the"men, Including ^|J^>;i?-t^-<^^^- S"'^ ^^'^^^^^ 



City of Mexico, July 8. — Convinced 
that further opposition "would be 
futile, the striking car men have ac- 
cepted the terms proposed by tUe 



the deman — , ~- — , . . , 

an increase In wages, approximately 
60 per cent of that asked. 

The strike of workmen at the San 
Rafael paper mills also was sett.ed. 
the management granting Increases 
In wages. 

COLORED HERO 
IS REWARDED 

Pullman Porter Made Valet 

for life to Railway 

President. 

New York. July 8.— Because of his 
heroism in saving Uvea and helping 
the Injured in a railroad wreck on the 
Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. 
Marie railroad near Vergas, Minn., on 
June 2. "Dave" Mitchell, a negro Pull- 
man car porter, has been awarded a 
life position as valet for Louis S- Berg, 
president of the Kew Orleans. Mobile 
& Chicago railroad, whose wife was 
killed and himself seriously injured 

'%?%e"tlme*of the wreck Mr. Berg 
and hla wife were aboard Ihelr private 
car en 7oute to Canada. Owing to a 
washout that destroyed a section of the 
track the train was ditched and sev- 
eral of the cars were completely t>urned 
UD before relief trains could reach the 
scene of the wreck. Mr. Berg main- 
tains that but for the assistance of ! 
Mitchell all. including himself, would 1 
have met the fate of Mrs. Berg, who 
was burned to death in the car. \ 

Mitchell Is an Alabama negro, and Is j 
upward of 30 years old. He arrived In ; 
New York several days ago, at the re- 1 



JUNE BUILDING 
RECORDS GROW 

Philadelphia Leads, Chicago 

Is Second, Gncionati 

Third. 

Chicago, July 8.— There Is a marked 
increase In building operations 
throughout the country, the totals of 
the principal cities for June, showing 
an increase of 11 per cent. 

Permits were taken out In 55 cities 
for the construction of 17.419 bulldlngB, 
involving an expenditure of 160,825,918. 
according to official reports received 
by the construction news, compared 
with 16.811 buildings, involving a total 
investment of $54.)565,506 for the sajme 
month last year, an increase of 608 
buildings and $5,960,413 or 11 per cent. 
There were increases In 34 and de- 
creases In 21 cities. 

Philadelphia leads with 1.735 new 
buildings for the month, Chicago sec- 
ond with 1.081 and Cincinnati third 
with a total of 1,055. 



' r , [ r f ^ 



guard. . , . , _ 

The company field music is being 
given daily practice under the direc- 
tion of the regimental bugler. Prin- 
ciple Musician Fred Luwe of Duluth. 
Band CuncertN Popular. 
The band concerts rendered every 
evening after evening guard mount- 
ing are proving very popular. Isot 
only the men of the regiments are 
on hand, but many visitors from the 
city spend the evening In camp to 
witness the dress parade and enjoy 
the band concert. The audiences agree 
with the Judges of the band competi- 
tion in Minneapolis that the Third 
Regiment band Is the best In the state. 
The ceremonies last evening con- 
sisted of dress parade received by 
Lleut.-Col. F. E. Resche. The bat- 
talions were all commanded by cap- 
tains, the majors being spectators of 
the ceremony. The First battalion was 
in charge of Capt. Franklin, the Sec- 
ond was commanded by Capt. Caswell 
and the Third was under Capt. Neunen- 

The regimental commissary, Capt. 
R R Sigmund, reports that the appe- 
tites of the men are not as good a« 
usual according to the quantity of ra- 
tions issued. The comml.ssary depart- 
ment supplies meat, bread, coffee, 
sugar, canned goods, and ail the stand- 
ard artlcTes of issue. With the as- 
sistance (W Lieut. O'Brien, who hai 
been assigned to this department, sev. 
eral new regulations have been inau- 
gurated when Issue is made. Quarter- 
master sergeants only can draw the 
company rations and duplicate Itemized 
memorandums are delivered at the 
time This enables the company com- 
mander to keep an accurate check on 
goods supplied to the Company. 

Sunday Is visitors' day and the num- 
ber In camp will probably be greatly 
augumented. Many officers of tha 
First infantry from the Twin Cities 
are expected at camp to observe the 
work of this regiment, and the wives 
and sweethearts of the men will take 
this opportunity of getting acquainted 
with camp life. 

To Rochester, N. Y., and Return, 
$33.85, 

via the South Shore, for nieetlng of tba 
Mystic Shrine. For particulars apply 
to A. J. Perrln. general agent. 430 \V est 
Superior street, Duluth. Minn. 



TBE PALM ROOM 

At tbe SPALDING 






V08T DBLTOHTTUL AND LUXUHX. 
0U8 RESTAURANT IN DtJLUTH. 



CHICHESTER SPILLS 

LA<ttMl Aak j*ar Vrnatet for AA 
Ckr-«k««.t«r^ l»UMoaiBrma4/A\ 
l>nu la Xe4 Ud 4>«i4 meullicA^^ 
boiCT, sealed with Blu« R:! tf B. \/ ( 

T*k« BO •Iker. 3»jr •fjomr T _i 

Prvcslat. AUfotCin^ttEB-TtMm 

IHaVo.ND llR.iMU PILLS, for Ml 

yeirs knuwr. U Beit. Safest. Always Ke'.iU'le 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EYERYWHERL 




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' imfmiiiiiiii • #'■"• 'III 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH; HERALD. 



■H|Hlt» *»») | («l | (»»»»»»«»»««»J > (»»»») | C»»»»»»»»»«»l < »»»»J | (»» 




July 8, 1911. 



r iNf»- ») i (»»») t c* » -» »»»»»»» »»»*»»» i i (»»**J i c»«) | (***»*».*»*»*) < c) ) ()K*»»»J ( (»»»»»*»»»J i (»») | (»»»»« 



THE CARE-FREE LATE MASTERS OF THE HOUSE 

»»)i(»*)i(» »« - »*y«»»*» » »»ff»ttttttYi"tyy****** *************************** 



Cannon, Mann, Dalzell, Payne, Dwight, Hinds 
and Other Republicans Who Ruled the House 
of Representatives for Sixteen Year s and Were 
Tormented By the Democrats All That Period 
Are Now Having a Lot of Fun Making Life 
Miserable for the Democrats— Ho\7 Minority 
Leader Mann Worries the Life Out of the 
Democratic "Patronage Committee" — Re- 
minding the Majority of That D(»llar-a-Day 
Pension Bill— Sereno E. Paine's Interpreta- 
I tions of Democratic Tariff Bills, Fram the Mi- 
nority Viewpoint— Ex- Whip Dwii^ht Enjoy- 
ing Himself at Baseball Games While His 
Successor Wrestles With His Old Job— Dal- 
zell as a Leading Minority "Plotter." 

Written For The Herald By E. J. Edwards ^"Holland,;" 



- J Edward*.) 

WKrii tiie public schools of the coun- 
try !.'t loose in June their hordes of 
b>>^ ruiil girls on their summer vaca- 
ti.i- li > til,' i-omniunity in this whole 
Uuitf'i Slates could boast of a happier 
lot ■>! htinum t>finga than la that em- 
br . minority Republicans 

In .... ,; orient national house 

of representativfs. After having held 
th, , ijf power for sixteen consecu- 

ti', • s the Republican "boys' ot 

tlu .... ..^f \u. I'-nK^r carry the full re- 

■ponsibilities of statesmanship. They 
are is fr*'*- (vi-.i U em as "younK Amer- 
iiu V ili '•>" ;: ■• lil tiiis summer from 
the r. s nsibi'.me.-. of school duties. 

As a 'result of tins situation, it nat- 
ijra::. t Umws that such men as Ft*rmer 
loseph G. Ciinn<»n of Illinois, 
P.ivn.- of New York. John 
1 . ; Fennfvlvania, John W. 

Iiui.; New Y'Mk, Asher Hinds of 

Maiuf Jaiiies R Mann of Illinois, and 
other.s u[>ox\ whom mu'h of tlie respon- 
sibiltt) of a Republican house rested 
dun UK those sixteen years, are like 
boys It .)£ school. \Vhile thev have 
not .-SI. aped the full responsibility of 
Btatesruanship. nevertheless, being in 
the niinonty, occasions are rare when 
tliey . tually exercise it to the 

full their principal missions in 

llf. ■ • • mako all the trouble 

ti;. > Democratic majority 

T! i ..... fiin as compared to the 

8H thi-y f:<und themselves in for 

S!>, .. = ,:s wii-Mi they had to take 

tl: [lie opposition all tlie 

tlu. ituism of the country 

l>art u:'.if 

-Xl > !!> m the house of repre- 

se' s, whether Republican or Dem- 

oc! always lias three kinds of 

duties to perform; 

tt must pre.sent adequately the views 
of tie minority on all political ques- 
tlon.s and all (iu*^8tion3 of principle. 

W(t.n the majority Is split on any 
prop. »sjt ion the minority must be pre- 
pareil to assume the responsibility and 
by corfibiiiing with one side or the oth- 
er of the majority, become actually 
responsible for the passage or defeat 
at legislation. This rarely happens 
When tile majority is well organized. 

It r- • It all tintes be ready to 
embar 'e majority. 

Fon.i . Speaker Cannon once 

■umme.l up the duties of the minority 
UM follows: 

"It IS the duty of the minority to 
make the majority behave itself." 

Unfortunately, to the majority is 
not committed the duty of making the 
minority behavt- itself, hence it is not 
unuiiual for a figluing minority to go 
to extremes in seeking to embarrass 
the majority. The extremes, of course, 
are rarely ever unseemly, hut none the 
less effective I'ractical jokes play a 
large part in the minority's program. 
A numl>et of them have been played 
by th»' Republicans on the Democrats 
aireatly in litis se.ssion and they have 
been effe<-tive ones. too. 
Tke Chief Te««er of the Democrats. 

The minority leader for this con- 

Sress is Representative James R. 
lann of Chicago. Mr. Mann is one of 
the most oractical statej'men in the 
business By profession he is a law- 
yer, l^'iit his" pet hobby, next to put- 
ting the Democrats In a hole, is that 



of raising flowers. Mr. Mann is one of 
the mott versatir? members of the 
house. He engineered the pure food 
bill to its passage has been foremost 
in promoting legi.*<lation for the Pan- 
ama canal, passel the railrod rate 
bill through the list congress despite 
the badly split-up condition of the Re- 
publican party in 'he hou.se. has been 
a watchdog of the treasury." was a 
full-Hedged lieutenant of the Cannon 
organization in the rules tight. an<3 
in this session h is blossomed forth 
as a powerful tai iff orator. During 
the latter years of the Cannon regime 
in the house, Mr. Mann was the one 
member who kite v all about every 
lull that came up In that body. Hi.-* 
"object" and "res. rving the right to 
object" beoame a >y-word among his 
colleagues. Undoubtedly. Mr. Mann is 
the best walking encjclopedia on all 
kinds of legislation in congress today 
Needless to say. he acquired his 
knowledge by tireless application and 
by his ability to absorb and discourse 
cold, hard facts. 

So often did Mr. Mann take the floor 
in the Cannon da.vs that his remarks 
in the house for continued periods of 
time frequently re iched the high av- 
erage of three pa>. es of the Congre.s- 
sional Record dailj A few years ago, 
after a partieala ly strenuous ses- 
sion of congress. Mr. Mann was a 
member of a part\ including Speaker 
Cannon and Vice President Sherman, 
which visited the Panama canal and 
came home by way of Porto Rico. 
Arriving at Ponce the distinguished 
party was met on t he docks by a local 
reception committee. one of whom 
asked particularly to meet Mr. Mann. 
Upon being inttoduced to the Chicago 
congressnuin, he st.id: 

"Mr Mann. I am very glad indeed 
to meet you. 1 read all of your 
speeches in the la it congress with a 
great deal of inteiest." 

At this juncti re, Mr Sherman 
rushed forward an« extended his hand 
to the native. 

"You are the ma i I want to meet."' 
he said. "If you have read all of Jim 
Mann's speeches ir the last congress, 
you must have be m the busiest man 
in this whole dan ed Island." 
Mr M«iin aad the "Patronaflre Cotu- 
■ill fee." 

As against the L>^mocrats. Mr. Mann 
has been having trie time of his life 
since March 4. N. longer being held 
responsible for anj thing in particular, 
except to see that his party and the 
principles it stand 4 for get none the 
worst of it. he h is not been called 
upon to occupy the floor with the 
frequency that he lid in the last ses- 
sion As is well known, there are 
more than 20,000 separate bills and 
resolutions introdi ced in the house 
every congress. In the old days, the 
Republican rules committee, which 
was nothing more nor less than a po- 
litical body, had to separate the wheat 
from the chaff and permit only such 
bills to be considei ed as they believed 
to be for the good of the country and 
Incidentally the R* publican party. Mr. 
Mann had a big hind in this Job, al- 
though not a memher of that commit- 
tee, but the responsibility now lies on 
the Democrats. an<t he has more time 
to hunt for weak spots In their armor. 

One of his chiei diversions In this 
congress has neen to worry tiie life 
out of the Democratic committee on 
accounts, which ha* como to l>e known 
as the "patronage eonimittee." At the 







head of this committee la Representa- 
tive James T. Lloyd of Missouri, chair- 
man of the Democratic congressional 
committee As Is well known, the 
Democratic caucus decreed a reduction 
In the house payroll of |181,OuO an- 
nuaHy, based on the theory that pre- 
vious Republican administrations of the 
house had been unduly extravagant. 
There la no question that the caucu.i 
exhibited good faith In this actiorf and 
the dictum was accepted In good faith 
by the new Democratic members of the 
house, of whom there are a host as a 
result of the overwhelming Democratic 
victory la^t fall. But for some rea- 
son or other, the Democrats overlooked 
the fact that approi>rlation8 were made 
by tlie last Republican congress for 
the next fiscal year and that the only 
practical way in which the house pay- 
roll could be reduced would be by re- 
pealing the appropriation bills, or such 
part of them as were necessary, which 
carried the money for the offices tlie 
Democrats proposed to vacate. Conse- 
quently, when tlie committee on ac- 
counts came befi>re the house with 
some high sounding resolutions to re- 
duce the pay roll, Mr. Manns opportu- 
nity for fun came. He pointed out 
with great gusto the dilemma In which 
the Democratic house foun<l Itself. He 
led the newly elected Democrats to 
the top of the high mountain and 
showed them the Democratic off^-ers 
of the house burtlened down with 
empty offices which merely awaitea 
their beok and call. Inside of twenty- 
four hours, those innocent Democrats 
were beseiging the "patronage commit- 
tee' with demands for recognition and 
Chairman Lloyd almost wished he had 
never heard of economy 

Another practical joke that Mr. Mann 
"put over" on the "patron s;e commit- 
tee' was on the bill introduced by Rep- 
resentative Victor L. Berger oi" Mil- 
waukee, the lone Socialist of congress, 
providing that the automobile former- 
ly used by Speaker Cannon should be 
turned over to the house committee 
on the District of Columbia for the use 
of that committee in attending to Its 
buslnea.s in Washington. It will be 
recalled that Speaker Champ Clark ab- 
solutely refused to use this automobile 
on the grounds that it was undemo- 
cratic, and since his Induction into the 
offlre of speaker, the machine has been 
in storage In some unaccountable 
manner Mr Mann was asked by the 
officers of the house where he thought 
that bill ought to be referred. 

"To the committee on accounts, of 
course," J»aid Mr. Mann. 

When Mr. Lloyd saw that bill laid 
on hlB table, he picked up his hat, went 
home and packed his valise, and left 
for Missouri on the first vacation he 
has had in a long time. 

That Dollar-a-Day Pennlou Bill. 

There is pending in the house a bill 
introduced by Representative Ander- 
son of Ohio, which proposes a H-a- 
day pension for surviving Union sold- 
iers of the Civil war. Such legislation 
was proposed before the last Repub- 
lican congress by a Democrat, Ge... 
Isaac Sherwood of Ohio, but the Re- 
publicans refused to consider It and 
the Democrats howled generously be- 
cause of the refusal. Now that the 
Democrats are responsible, Mr. Mann, 
aided by Mr. Cannon, Is making life 
miserable for them over the bill. Thus 
far. the Democrats have refused to 
meet on a calendar Monday, when the 
hill could be considered. Whenever a 
calendar Monday which occurs on the 
first and third Mondays of each month, 
comes around, Mr. Mann attempts to 
help Mr. Anders-jn force the house to 







NONE GENUINE WITHOUT TOIS SIGNATURE 




/t^ 1<jzJ^of^ 




meet and consider his legislation. On 
June 2, Mr. Mann so disturbed the 
Democrats that Majority Leader Under- 
wood of Alabama had to take the floor 
and explain that the Democratic caucus 
had outlined the legislative program 
for this session of the house and had 
n.t Included a pension bill in it. He 
accused Mr. Mann of trying "to play 
horse with the Democrats," which was 
literally true. Nobody enjoyed ,the 
scolding any more tlian Mr. Mann, al- 
though his Republican colleagues 
laughed loudly at the i)rcdlcament the 
Democrats were in. Later, Speaker 
Clark had to bring the gavel down on 
Mr. Cannon, w^o had butted In with a 
few well-directed jabs under the 
Democratic libu. 

On a recent iileasure trip of a num- 
ber of coi-.gr«s*nen to Fortress Mon- 
roe, in which Mr. Mann and Mr. Can- 
non particljtated, it was proposed that 
a visit be made to the "plotting room." 
which is used In calculating the angles 
of fire necessary to hit a battleship 
with a sh»ll from a 12-lnch gun at 
any point in Hampton Roads. Mr. 
Mann Invited Representative Garner of 
Texas, the Democratic whip, to Join the 
expedition. 

"Not for me," replied Garner. "I 
came down here for a vacation, and in 
doing so I got away from a lot of 
■plotting rooms' around the capitol." 

There is no question in tiie world 
that Mr. Mann is an adept as a trouble 
maker, and for that reason he is mak- 
ing a success of his Job as minority 
leader. 

Chipper "Uncle Joe" Cannon. 

Former Speaker Cannon has not felt 
so care free and happy in years as he 
does right now as a high private In 
the Republican ranks. Not only was 
he speaker of the house for elglit 
years and thereby made the butt of 
all the criticism directed against the 
conduct of business In the house, but 
for seven years, previous to his first 
election as speaker, he was chairman 
of the house committee on appropria- 
tions, wiiich is one of the most ardu- 
ous tasks in any legislative body. 
When the Democrats captured the 
present congress. Mr. Cannon made up 
his mind tliat he was going to have 
a real rest. Consequently, despite ills 
"."i years of age, he Is getting fat, his 
cheeks are rosy, his blue eyes un- 
usually clear, and he is as chipper as 
a boy. Speaking of his long expe- 
rience at the head and front of things 
in the house, Mr. Cannon recently said: 

"A fellow gets tired of playing mean 
man all the time. It Is an irksome 
job, but somebody has got to do it. 
Now. I can whip In when I want to, 
say what I please, and what I say 
and do Is the expression of only one 
mere member of the house." 

Under the Cannon regime In the 
house, the responsibility was largely 
vested in the committee on rules, of 
which the speaker himself was a mem- 
ber. As already explained, th« rules 
committee was In effect ft political 
committee. In view of the trmendous 
grist of legislation constantly before it. 
it was not so. much a question what 
tlie leaders wanted to do, as -what 
they felt they were compelled to do 
In the interest of the country and of 
the party. In addition, the speaker 
and the committee both were con- 
stantlv embarrassed by members who 
were "begging that this or that bill 
should not be allowed to come to a 
vote. The most frequent excuse given 
by them was that they had committed 
tliemselves on both sides of it and did 
not dare vote at all. The result was 
that the speaker himself had to take 
the blame and in this respect Mr. Can- 
non undoubtedly received a good deal 
more blame as speaker than he ever 
deserved. 

Cannon Jabs ot the Majority. 

Several times <lurlng thi.s se.ssion Mr. 
Cannon has vigorously defeiidtd his 
actions when speaker, and he has been 
one of the main "plotters" against the 
Democrats. In a recent speech elud- 
ing the Democrats for their back- 
wardness in bringing up their dollar-a- 
day pension, Mr. Cannon said some of 
the Democrats in the present iiotise 
had come Into his district and grilled 
him good for having put his "auto- 
cratic foot on that legislation." 

"And say.'" he added, "I have some 
of you in mv mind's eye, and some of 
you in my eye right now. Were you 
deceiving the people then or are you 
going buck upon your promise now? 

When he was assured by Represen- 
tative ATtderson of Ohio that the Demo- 
crats would act on the legislation some 
time later in the session, Mr. Cannon 

sal>l; , . ,^ ^. 

"If you're going to do it, then my 
remarks do not amount to anything. 
It reminds of a boy I once met when 
I was In a campaign. I stayed a night 
with a farmer. He had a beautiful 
farm, and we were I'^pklrig over It the 
next morning and finally I said to 
blm: . , __ ,,,, 

" 'I have a farm down in Vermillion 
county; come down and see me and we 
win go out and look It over; bring this 
bov and bring the wife. I have a pony 
that I will give to this boy.' 

"The boy »>egan to pull at the 
father's coattall. Flpally the father 
said to him: 

" 'What is it. Chan?' 

"The boy replied: "'Father, ask the 
gentleman when.' 

The dollar-a-day pension bill is one 
of Mr Cannon's pet methods of getting 
the Democrats "riled." He also takes 
a great deal of delight in ridiculing 
the Democrats for their subjection 
to caucus rule. Nevertheless, as is 
generally known, he firmly believes in 
majority rule and also in the organi- 
zation of a militant minority. When 
he first beccame speaker of the house, 
the allegation was generally made that 
his predecessor had weakened the ml- 
noritv bv picking out members of It 
for choice committee assignments upon 
whom they could depend in an emer- 
gency. Mr. Cannon sent for Minority 
Leader John Sharp Williams, now sen- 
ator from Mississippi, and said to him. 
In substance: 

"I belive It is the dutv of the mi- 
nority to put the majority on Its good 
behavior, and to make It stav on the 
floor and face the music. I do not 
want it said that I ever tried to bribe 
the minority to do otherwise, and for 
that reason. I want you. John, to take 
ti^ responsibility of making the ml- 



"UNCJjB 70^ ' Q AH HON 






^AfO ^yi^/A/^J 




/J 



■Hr 



norlty assignments. I make only one 
condition, namely, that you shall do 
nothing I would do myself. ' 

DalBell'M CouraKeouH FlKht. 

John Dalzell of Pennsylvania, Is a 
name synonymous with stand-pattism 
on a high protective tariff. Notwith- 
standing the fact that the Democrats 
are now assailing the pet hobby of liis 
legislative carreer. Mr. Dalzell is hav- 
ing as much fun as any other Re- 
publican leader in tearing into their 
tariff propo.sals. 

The fact that tariff legislation Is 
now before the house recalls to mind 
the tariff legislation of the Republican 
congress when the Payne law was 
passed in which Mr. Dalzell gave evid- 
ence of his nerve by one of the most 
heroic fights over a rule ever pulled 
off in the house. 

It was necessary that the rules com- 
mittee should bring In a rule clipping 
the claws of the Democrats with re- 
pect to consideration and amendment, 
and especially was it neceasary in 
view of the fact a number of Re- 
publican Insurgents were Inclined to 
join with the Democrats In fighting a 
number of the proposals of the tariff 
bill. At that time, it was not an in- 
frequent occurrence that these insur- 
gents held the balance of power, and 
they were extremely anxious to re- 
serve to the whole house the right or 
amendment at all times. The rules 
committee itself was their particular 
object of attack. 

On the Saturday night before the 
rule was brought in, Mr. Dalzell's wife 
suffered a stroke of paralysis. Mr. 
Dalzell never left her bedside that 
night, all day Sunday, and Sunday 
night. On Sunday, Speaker Cannon 
himself was taken sick and called a 
doctor for the first time in his life 
after having told the doctor that he 
would agree to stay home on Sunday, 
but must be got ready for a twelve- 
hour session for the house on Monday. 
Under these conditions, Mr. Dalzell 
telephoned Mr. Cannon and asked him 
If it would be possible to relieve him 
of the rules fight on the following 
day. Mr. Cannon replied that he did 
not see how It could possibly be done, 
as Mr. Dalzell was the only man on the 
Republican side capable of leading 
such a fight. 

Monday morning found Mr. Dalzell 
In his seat. He was worn and wasted 
and on the verge of a nervous break- 
down as a result of his worry at home. 
In the speaker's room an attendant 
.sat constantly by the side of a tele- 
phone and every fifteen minutes sent to 
Mr. Dalzell's seat the report of the 
physician at Mrs. Dalzell's bedside. 
Throughout that entire day Mr. Dalzeli 
battled against the discordant ele- 
ments In the house and eventually won 
his fight. His wife's subsequent death 
and the strain to which he had been 
subjected seemed temporarily to have 
made Inroad.s on the proverbial "Dal- 
zell nerve," but in this congress Mr. 
Dalzell Is his old self again, and, with 
Mr. Mann and Mr, Cannon and other 
leaders. Is making no end of trouble 
for the Democrats. 

Dalxell'M Lone Leginlatlve Joke. 

The only joke Mr. Dalzell was evel 
known to perpetrate in his legislative 
career occurred at the time of the last 
vellow fever outbreak In Louisiana. 
As Is well known, practically all of the 
.Southern Democrats are state's 
rights men, and object to fed- 
eral Interference in local affairs. 
The entire state of Missls.sippi was 
practically dependent on New Orleans 
as a port of entry. Fearing the effect 
of quarantine on the commerce of his 
state, Minority Leader W'llliams in- 
troduced a bill in the house extending 
the authority of the public health and 
marine hospital service so as to cope 
with the emergency. The bill met 
with little favor among other Southern 
Democrats for the reason that prac- 
tically all of them lived in states which 
had ports of their own. Mr. Williams 
ftnallv concluded to ask the rules 
committee to help him get his bill con- 
sidered, he himself being a member of 
the committee. He appealed to Mr. 
Cannon, who expressed the opinion 
that the mere consideration of the 
bill might allay the excitement oc- 
casioned by tlie yellow fever outbreak, 
and therebv go far toward preventing 
a general panic. Representatives Dal- 
zell and Grosvenor of Ohio, the other 
Republican members of the rules com- 
mittee, fell in with the suggestion, 
the committee met. and reported out 
the bill. Representative Dearmond of 
Missouri opposed It. As the meeting 
broke up. Mr. Dalzell. who had been 
in the habit of presenting rules on be- 
half of the majority of the house, 
handed the rule to Mr. Williams and 
told him to bring it up. Mr. Williams 
protested, but Mr. Dalzell Insisted and 
Mr. Williams kept the rule. 

The rule came up in the house the 
following morning, being sponsored by 
a speech from Mr. Williams In true 
Dalzellesque style. He was clear and 
concise in his language, brief in his 
remarks, and displayed just a touch 
of arrogance which always character- 
ized Mr. Dalzell's presentation of rules. 
Of cour.se, Mr. Dalzell was committed 
to support the rule, but when he got 
up in his seat, he began, as had been 
Mr. Williams' wont, in criticising rules 
brought in by him. by calling it: 

"Another offensive rule which con- 
stituted an outrage on the house and 
the party." 

Mr. Williams jumped to his feet as 
though he had been sliot out of a gun. 
Before he could say anything, how- 
ever, Mr. Dalzell added: 

"Nevertheless, I am in favor of this 
rule. " 

Mr. W^llllams dropped back Into his 
chair as limp as a rag and the whole 
house had a good laugh at his expense. 

In this congress, Mr. Dalzell has been 
one of the main Republican strate- 
gists behind his party's oratorical 
guns in the tariff debate. He is usually 
reserved as one of the last speakers 
and his analysis of a Democratic tar- 
iff bill always brings joy to a Repub ■ 
Ucan mind. While admittedly one of 



:S0ffAI OJ9M2£JiJ^ 




the .able Republican "plotters," his 
specialty is rules and the tariff. 
Sereno E. Pa>-ne'N PleuMaut TaHk. 

Anotiier Republicaji leader who is a 
power In his party councils, both in 
the offensive and defensive, is Repre- 
sentative Sereno E. Payne of New 
York. Mr. Payne is tlie author of the 
Payne tariff law and one of the best 
posted men in either house of con- 
gress on tariff matters. By many, he Is 
regarded as even a greater authority 
than Mr. Dalzell, who represents the 
banner protective tariff district of the 
country, Pittsburg. Mr. Payne's special 
duty in tills session of congress has 
been to await the explanation of the 
tariff bills proposed by Representative 
Underwood from the Democratic ways 
and means committee and then to tell 
the house what they mean from a Re- 
publican point of view. Recently. Mr. 
Payne suffered an irreparable affliction 
in the loss of his devoted wife and 
hence has not been as prominent in 
house affairs this session as formerly. 
In the debate on the Democratic wool 
schedule, however, Mr. Payne again 
demonstrated his old time effective- 
ness and showed himself a master of 
detail. Like Mr. Dalzell, he specializes 
particularly on the tariff. 
Ba.seball Inatead of ConKtant 'Worry. 

Next to Mr. Cannon, the man who 
had the meanest job in the house in 
the last congress was Representative 
John W. Dwight of New York, the Re- 
publican "whip." With the Republican 
party in the last congress split to 
pieces, Mr. Dwight had the nasty job 
of not only trying to keep a quorum 
on hand, but of ascertaining the senti- 
ments of Republicans on this and that 
piece of legislation with a view to 
bringing it up for consideration. It is 
the invariable history of the house 
that after a landslide, such as was 
enjo.ved by the Democrats last fall, it 
Is a most difficult matter to keep the 
previous majority party on the job. Mr. 
Dwight made a practice almost every 
day of the last session of calling a 
quorum of the house to make certain 
that the Republicans were on hand, for 



^jE/^j^^/yO ^. J^y^/A/^. 



no congressman can stand the repeated 
publication of his absence In the Rec- 
ord. He worked early and late and 
got no thanks for it either. Tliis ses- 
sion all Mr. Dwight has to do Is to find 
out when a vote is going to be taken 
and have his Republican colleagues on 
liand to register their vote in opposi- 
tion to the responsible majority. Be- 
tween times he can go riding in his 
automobile or attend a ball game. In- 
stead of sending tlie sergeant-at-arins 
to the ball game to bring in Demo- 
cratic absentees, Mr. Dwight can now 
calmly await a visit from a Democratic 
sergeant-at-arms who Is looking for 
Republican absentees. He would not 
always find Mr. Dwight present, but 
wherever he is, Mr. Dwight does not 
have to worry as he did three short 
months ago. 

Representative Asher C. Hinds of 
Maine Is another Republican who has 
time to devote to his personal affairs 
Instead of wnrryine: day and night to 
keep the old Republican ship on an even 
keel. This is Mr. Hinds' first session 
as a member of the house, but for 
many years previous he was parlia- 
mentarian of the house, and as such 
not only had to remain in the house 
throughout the entire dally sessions, 
interpreting the rules, but had to refer 
all bills to their proper committees, and 
sometimes worked at nights digging 
up precedents for some Republican 
parliamentary plot then incubating. 
Now he is merely a congressman on 
the minority side, and Charles Crisp, 
a son of Former Speaker Crisp, la 
wrestling with his old job. The re- 
lations between the two are extremely 
cordial, and not Infrequently Mr. Crisp 
asks Mr. Hinds' advice on maltem 
which reach him for a decision. 







An Aisle in Our Fireproof 
Warehouse 



FURNITURE 

STORAGE 





DULUTH VAN 



AND^ 



STORAGE CO. 



PRINTING 



TlMt Satisfies All Our Customcrt. 
Are You One of Them? 

MERRin & HECTOR, 

PUNTRBS AND BINBCKS. 
r wh Or4erf a Pics.ont. 119 Wot Firti Street 




t-mmrm ■ i, ^ 










DEFECTIVEPAGEjl 






. . — — . . ^ 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 8, 1911. 



Xi'lUlHdLHhiDlff 



BIG MONTHLY PAYROLL OF 
THE ANACONDA COMPANY 



1 



.■'•fiipiitt 



W~ 



Fully $1,500,000 Paid Out 

Monthly t» its Miners 

in Butte. 

Strike of Ore on Ophir 

Richer Than First 

Reported. 



Butte. Mont.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald > — Somt- irtea of the im- 
mense anuunt of work carried on by 
the Anaconda Copper Mining company 
and the amount of money reuulied 
each month to pay the employe* may 
be sained frrrn the fact that at the 
present time there are slightly over U,- 
000 men in the payroll In the varloua 
departments of the company's works 
In the state, of whom nearly 6,000 are 




<».ssor dtcUned to acce )t It and ordered 
that a new one be prepared at once, 
KlvinK an his reason that there must 
be some Inaccurcles i.. it. The report 
showed that there ha » been a loss In 
operations of over $ ,000. The mine 
has been idle for sev *ral months, but 
according to reports the shaft has been 
repaired down to the 1.400 foot level 
and mining will be resumed in a short 
time on ground which Is not in litiga- 
tion with the Anaconla company. 
(talaeac IHtnlaf Vl»ltor. 
The supervisor ot n Ining and smelt 
li 



Ing for the Chinese government Is in 
thi.s district looking over the mining 
j.ropertles and the Washoe smelter, 
having been sent to imerlca to invt-s- 
tlgate into mining ci nditions and tne 
treatment of ore. He ays that his gov- 



DffFERENT 
DECISIONS 

By Federal and State Courts 

on Calumet & Hecla 

Merger. 

New Baltic Company Is Open- 

*mg Excellent Copper 

Ground. 



Houghton, Mich , July 8.— (Special to 
'^^^ Herald.) — The supreme court of 
ernment propose "o le"velop"the "mines ijhe gtate of Michigan has ordered a 
of the r 
modern sm 
pose tha 



ountry and to ^ rect a large, i ^^^^^j.,^^ ^^ ^j^^ ^^^^se of Chadbourne 
rS'fnte'nds'lo'spend'fhe lie/t V8. Calumet A Hecla Mining company. 
1 or more in Anaconda closely recently decided In favor of the de- 




men altogether will average ?3 '^ » 




ten days vi mi'-^r • - , ,. 

examining all the d. partments of the 
Washoe smelter. 

STRIKESlTART 
BIG SWEDES 

Good News Bay and Ruby 

Latest Sensations in 

Alaska. 

Seattle. Wash., July 8.— Good News 
Bay and Ruby are the last sensations 

in the north, in both places gold had ^ ^^ ^^ 

been found in limited (luantilles sev- j ^^^Ylved"" itT^deveU'pment machinery 



fendants by Judge Streeter In the clr ^^^ ^^^ 

cult court for this district, and In which | 

plaintiff sought to prevent the pro- 
posed merger of the Ahmeek Mining 
company with the Calumet & Hecla 
and other companies. The order of 
the supreme court restralna the defend- 
ants from carrying its consolidation 
plans into effect, and orders Judge 
Streeter of the circuit court to show 
cause why the Injunction sought in 
his (ourt should not be K/a"i«-'^-,„7,»r 
hearing is set for July IS. A similar 
suit L-Fought by G. M. Hyman in the 
federal circuit court for the Eastern 
district of Michigan was recently de- 
cided in favor of the Calumet & He^la 
In this suit <♦. M. 
the Inc'u- 
any 
con- 



$3.50 Recipe Free. 
For Weak Kidneys, 



Relieves Urinary *tnd Kidney 

Troubles, Backache, Straining, 

Swelling, Etc. 

Stops Pain in the Bladder, Kidneys 
and Back. 

Wouldn't It be nice within a week or 
so to begin to say gootf-by^ forever to 
the scalding, drlbbllruj. straining or 
too frequent passage of^orlne; the fore- 
head and the back-of*<he-head aches; 
the stlches and pains ^ th» back; the 
growing muficle weakness; spots before 
the eyes; yellow skin, elugglsh bowels; 
BwoU«en eyelids and ankles; l*'g rramps; 
unnatural short breath; sleeplessness 
and the despondency? 

I have a recipe for these troubles 
that you can depend on. and If you 
want to make a quirk reeovery, you 
ought to write and get a copy of It. 
Many a doctor would charge you f3.50 
lust for writing this prescription, but 
I have it and will be glad to send it 
to yotl entirely free. Just drop me a 
line like thi.^: Dr. A. E. Robinson. K 
»4 Luck Building. Detroit, Mich., and 
1 will send It by return mail In a 
plain envelope. As you will see wh»-n 
you get It. this recipe contains only pure, 
harmless remedies, but It has great 
heiung and palnconquerlng power. 

It wMll quickly show Its power once 
you use It. so I think you had better 
see what It Is without delay. I will 
send you a copy free — you caq use it 
and our« yourself at home. 



Mining company. 



Hymans sought to prevent the inc 
slon of the Osceola Mining comp« 
in the proposed Calumet & Hecla c> 
solidatlon. 

St. l.oal». 
The St. Louis Copper company has 



h«uses of the city have 




there is no question, as the copper 
minis are continuing to improve and 
cet richer at depth and experts have 
freduently declared that the mines are 
gcfoti format least the next hundred 

years. ^ . , 

Bwtte Central. 

The recent strike of ore on the^ 300- 
foot 
Bu 
oui 

S^r',?.ken "fr"om'* a ^pil^ hoisted^ to the 
shows 260 ounces of s,iUer 






llTte ^h;d''>>':st::inr;;r^or>e il^.-i^e^^I.rnV^Vln^lirevlously^m.ade 




a few miles avvay over ^"^ R^Vlatna 
divide and flow into t^t Salatna. 
Frank ManU-y and Tom A'^^*" .^f„ J^^' 



rather discouraging. The ground was 

much broken and carried nothing ap 

proachlng commercial value. The char 



Dltifcd in about two months. 
4 Test Shipment. 

A carload of ore h.^s ^^'^^ ,f Kk'J 

from the MouUon ""Vfort to a^cemln 
for treatment m an effort to a^^ceriain 
if tl.ere Is a P^^cess 'n use U^hat c.O 
which cin successfully , r^T ^h^ 



the 




^aV;;•^^uantity of iron from tl^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 
The ore shipped rxins a »«^» '-'"",.,,..! 1 ;„ vayx. 



Both Aiken and t^-unningham will pros- 
Ptet with drills, which will 'lajckly 
Ircve the value of the ground and the 



and if the iron can 



be successfully i 



Bedrock, so far 
unVov^redV'is very rich. The camp Is 



^eouated'from the zinc the Moulton 
win t" operated as a zinc I^ro^'^.^ ^"j 
The property belongs to Former 1'*.'^**^ 



^ 




operated if the ore can be treated 
lalt Lake. ^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 

A report comes frorn the Pf.^e^^^^g 
district of a rich strike In the B ack 
Friday mine, principally owned by Cin- 
Jt«n«H and New York captalists. At 
a po A !?"> feet from the shaft on the 
-ftHoot level a body of ore two feet 

countered. In tne i«u.^ 

•tthioh adjoins the Black *• r'*^*'- / _"', 

feet of I20 ore has been encountered 

In an old shaft 

The Tuolumne company has d'scon- 
tinuld sinking until the new surface 
lAant is in operation and as a conse 
plant 's. '"_ ^ position to increase its 



accessible the year round and has tele- 
grkplflc communication with the world 
WJ scene of thete strikes has been 
run over for raanj years and so have 
the tracks and straama of Good News 

^''l' concentrator Is under construc- 
tion at the Seattle- Alaska mine on 
Latouche .sland. It will .be used to 
concentrate some 3 per cent copper 
ore developed the -e 

Cliff mine 
now abo 
time d 
stamp mill was 



was taken In the exploratory cam- 
paign of a year ago. It has attained 
a length of about forty ftet and for 
the greater part is In copper ground 
of commercial grade. 

The Cliff Mining company has tem- 
porarily suspended shaft work arid is 
centering all activity in an Inves-tlga- 
tlon of the formation by means of un- 
derground openings. Results to date 
are not of a positive nature but m.ny 
be expected to show beher with 
greater depth, a con«^»tlon prorni.sed In 
fhe showing obtained In the drill holes 
1 int- f. ^^■,^t^/\ nrpvlouslv put down. The shaft is 

mine at V.Jdez h^^„ 0Pf7Vo„t around UO feet deep. Equipment con- 
,out one ye^r. <^.f'""^'"H,« thJel- hrsta of all necessary development 
"VlY'^was'lnnXd anrt\e'mln% mlVhinery. Including steam hoist and 
lan^d"k'J accost'" :' 12600 to the les- air compressor. ^^^^^^ 
ees operating ^'P ^o (une 1 the totM Michigan Copper Mining com- 

ivldends paid w.re ? 160^000 ana ine 1 nothing toward the de- 

''•-ri:c:nV"r^mf"'ci!ft';es''\^l\r'l^'r^^ ^trc^pmenVof"its. property, and, therejs 



J24,B00. brings the company's total to 

'The wild Horse cyanide mill located 
on Bull Hill will be remodeled and 
practically rebuilt by the United Goid 
Mln^8 company, ownfij. This Is the 
original cvanlde mill of the camp and 
has run for twelve years on \N Hd 
Horse mine low grade oxidized ore. 

Tne Anaconda cvanlde mill on Oold 
Hill has been restarted. Ore from the 
Morning Glory mine Is being trans- 
ported in an aerial tramway. 

Tlie Prince Albert mine on Beacon 
Hill, has struck ore In a phonoUtic 
formation carrying $157.60 a ton 
values. Some samples are rich In free- 
gold. The vein Is four feet wide, with 
values uniform across it. 

As the water recedes from the lower 
workings several Mg Cripple Creek 
mines will be deepened. The Hoosevt-It 
tunnel while making deeper mining 
possible has unwaiered levels and 
drifts In which vast wealth had been 
abandoned because of flooding. These 
reserves are now greatly Increasing 
the camp's product. 

MINING IN THE 

BLACK HILLS 



New Reliance Campany Re- 
sumes Operations on 
Annie Creek. 

Deadwood. S. D., July 8.— After sev- 
eral months repairing and renovating 
the reorganized company now known 
as the New Keliance Gold Mining com- 
pany has recommenced operations at 
the head of Annie Creek and Is in a 
position to make a steady run. The 
principal changes in the mill wtre the 
replacing of the Huntington .mills 
with stamps and the tailings will be 
taken out dry to avoid the slimes con- 
tingency that was costly to the old 

company , . „, 

Tlie mining companies that are at 

present shipping to Colorado are only 

waiting until the Galeoa smelter Is 




»9^ 



^r^' 



f 



— Ptioto br Fenni*. 



OPEN HEARTH FURNACE PLANT. REGENERATOR FOUNDATIONS. 




cents a ton at Denver, added to the 
hauling, adds from |6 to $10 a car. a 
considerable figure in lovv grade ore. 





the Tuolumne ore will be loaded on 
^r« «t the mine and thus a saving of 
«0 cent a t.^ made, the amount paid 




GIROUX SOON 
REAMTO SHIP 

Ore That Will Go Better 

Than 10 Per Cent 

C«)pper. 



baslJ. Their operations are resulting 
in the production of a small amount of 
mass and heavy copper with some 
profit to themselves and the compan>. 
South L.ake. 
The South Lake Mining company Is 
Installing development machlnerj' pre- 
paratory to shaft sinking. It will be 
necessary to determine the contour of 
?he rock ledge and this will be done 
with the aid of sand pipes, not a dir- 
flcult task and one that will ^onsume 
little time so that actual shaft work 
may be expected to be In progress by 
the end of the present moiith. The 
site Selected for the shaft Is 400 to 
500 feet distant from the several cop- 
per bearing lodes, a rather unusual 
situation but made so by the very 
heavy overburden overlying the sev - 



sooK Where around $15,000 a V^^r jud 
^^'"■" Xcti^n^'C t^w'l^e'^he'^Jrtsrnt 



The New Yor t Mining Age says: 
Those who h 

operating devv.v. ^. -- . ^g iiiu>.i> «*<» "^^ .- ..v.a»t -o-iii 

Consolidated Min*s company In Nevada [ At the. point where ;he ^haft will 

for the paa 

of '"*the I ' Adventure. 



elo>ments of the Glroux U'o^^i^^^JIJ ^, 300 feet thick In places^ 



Negotiations are pending for the 
lease of the Golden Slipper and Sum- 
mit properties near Hill City to East- 

^'"The^Bear Lodge district, northwest 
of here, is beginning to show resuts 
Chief among the properties 's the 
Warren Peak company. Manager Gen 
Bock Is Is making good progress with 
the machinery recently purchased aiid 
the air compressors are now ready lor 
the drills to be used in the big tunneL 
Ten vats have been shipped. rhcse 
vats will hold 150 tons each and are 
adaptable for cyanide purposes. The 
excavation for the stamp mill la near- 

^^ThT Hu\*ching3 Consolidated Is re- 
newing work and has called for bids 
Vo sln^ Its shaft 100 feet. It Is 
building a new shaft house and in- 

"^lU'^tL'^llVlM';^: ^i^rmxr.. Forest 
City claim is Improving with develop- 
ment. The shaft Is now down sixty- 
three feet and work In this direction^ 
has been temporarily stopped by the 
water. The drifts being run north 
and south are exposing some good 
looking ore, similar In character to the 
original ore found In the earlier work 
on the proper ty. 

Those Who Tnke Foley Kidney Pills 

For their kidney and bladd.-r ailments, 
and for annoying urinary Irregularities 
are always grateful both for the quick 
and i.ermanent relief they afford, and 
for their tonic and strengthenfng ef- 
»° feet as well. Try Foley Kidney Pills. 




{ 



—ytuAu li> Fenncf. 



OPEN HEARTH BUILDING COLUMNS. 



ror tne oa-t\wJ'rea7sTr7 informed by 1 down" It is but Uttle over 35 feet Fcr^ gile v>y a" ^^f^^^'^^"' 
what^'lo'oir; to' te' appajrently reliable ^ thick. 



■ (|i i II 



■•illklb 




S. S. & A. RY., 




rlRht under the law to purchase new 
pSerty and deduct the amount from 
the taxable net earnings. 
Pilut Butte. 

Work has been started at the Pilot 
Butte mine and after the water has all 
been removed from the shaft sinking 
will be commenced. Crosscutting from 
the 1 "00 foot level of the Black Rock 
mine of the Butte & Superior to the 
Pilot ground is progressing favorably. 
Vlnlntc neport- Filed. 

The East Copper Mining company 
has filed its report to the assessor for 




per ton. $16.31; gross value, $r3.6- 
253 '>4; cost per ton for mining. $3.. 9, 
total cost of mining. $340 400.59: cos 
Der. ton for treatment. $5.33; total cost 
of treatment. $478.82'J.50; smelter de- 
ductions, $184,202.19: paid for freight, 
selling etc., $226,983.87; cost of im- 
provements, $26,4)50.95. 

The Butte & Superior company shows 
net proceeds of $3,722.26. There were 
131.038 tons of ore mined, the yield per 
ton being $5.26. The cost of mining 
per ton was $2.50 and the cost of re- 
duction per ton. $1.65. .,. , 

The Butte-Alex Scott during the six 
months it was in operation showed a 
loss of $2,818.89. The previous six 
mcnths extensive development woTk 
was oarried on there being paid for la- 



LOW GRADE MINE 
YIELDS PROFITS 

Good Returns at New Port- 
land Mill at Cripple 
Creek. 

Cripple Creek. Colo., July 8.— The 
New Portland mill Is treating 10,000 
tons of ore, returning $3.50 a ton and 
is realizing at least $1 a ton profit. 
Thus one half of the company's divi- 
dend, amounting to $60,000 every 
Quarter, is derived from the low grade 
mine or dump ores. An equal tonnage 
of $20 ore Is being treated monthly 
at the chlorlnatlon or old Portland 
mill at Colorado City. The New Port- 
land Is operated by twelve men for 



slderable work nas been done, but this 
will be prosecuted as rapidly as pos- 
aible The cro^8-cut on the 1.400-fool 
level' 13 progres.-ing rapidly, and Is now 
420 feet and j rogressing at the rate 
of flv-e feet per day. It is expected 
that the first le id of ore will be struck 
wilhln 250 feet Judging from the d.p 
of the lead on the level above. The 
mine is now making only 450 gallons 
of water per mliute, but this w'ill prob- 
ably be increas.d slightly as the cross- 
cut progresses. 

• 

Honest Medicines Venus Fakes. 

President Tait's recent message sug- 
gesting an ai lendment to the pure 
food and drug- law In its relation to 
prepared medicines, does not refer to 
such standard medicines as Foley s 
Honey and Ta.* Compound and Foley 
Kidney I'ills, l-oth of which are true 
medicines careiully compounded of In- 
gredients whose medicinal qualities are 
recognized by the medical profession 
itself as the best known remedial 
agents for th« diseases they are in- 
tended to coui teract. For over three 

rou^rf/'ha^s^K:! a"^ra7da^"d%e^:S^d?To; ^t^t oTWTe vilues;iscau^.ht In second, 
coughs, colds and affections of the 
throat, chest and lungs for children 




and for grown persons, and It retains 
today its pre-eminence above all other 
preparations ol its kind. Foley Kidney 
Pills are equtlly effective and meri- 
torious. Sold by all druggists. 



ary treatment. The concentrates are 
shinped to the Portland plant at 
Colorado City along with the $20 ore 

from the mine. ,,,..,/-,,, wi^ 

The El Paso Consolidated Gold Min- 
ing company disbursed a dividend of 
1 cent a share, June 30. The amount, 



BULLETIN 



DETROIT, TOLEDO, CLEVELAND, 

BUFFALO— Popular Week-end 
Excursions by Rail and Lake, 
connecting with D. & Cst earn- 
ers leaving St. Ignace 2:00 P. 
M., every Saturday during June 
and July. Limit Sept. 15th. 

MONTREAL. QUEBEC, OTTAWA. 

NEW YORK. BOSTON, ALL 
POINTS EAST. Summer Tour- 
ist Fares with limit Oct. 31st 
and very low Short Limit (60 
days) Round Trip Tourist Fares. 
On sale every day, June Ist 
to Sept. 30th. 

STE. ANNE DE BEAUPRE- 

Annual Pilgrimage leaving Du- 
luth July 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd 
and 24th. Return Limit Aug- 
ust 31st. Rate $30.00. Stop 
overs at any point in Canada. 

We have special excursion fares 
in effect for all meetings and Con- 
ventions. 

For reservation and full particulars 
apply to A. J. Perrin, General Agent, 
430 W. Superior St. Duluih, Minn. 




Pttulu 



Feunav. 



STORE HOUSE AND MIXER FOUNDATIONS IN THE OPEN HEARTH PLANT. 
AS the heavy steel uprights which , and 150 f^et in -f h. Only s^ven - ^re^f^yj^..^^^^^^^^^ 
will support the superstructure of ^^e of the furnaces f^^ wj'^'J „^. The machine and ^^[^e, «»i«P«;X? 

Mg furnace building at the steel plant ^Thellow^tk of putting In JJ| P^^dUrra?" Vern'^^m^.f^teT^rr 
are put in place some idea of the tre- massive concrete f«^"<i^tio°B for the b^um^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ 

mendous size of the main building at building -f ^^^{[^Pjf f.^.^g^ up thi Tr^sent engaged on the work and it 
t.e Plant can . he _ohtained, Jhe ^e^stJu^ur^^hi^^^^^^^^^ 



■ mit^mmi t- 



structure is to have room for four- 
teen of the huge furnaces for the re- 
duction of pig iron and will be 1.2o0 
feet or a quarter of a mile m length 



'■^^wi'inlhe'picure c^n be plainly '.lngTe25y to" make steel at the Du- 
'''°'^^ from We8T/>uluth and the sltelluth .lant In eighteen months. 



seen 




^CAPSULES 

MiDt 



CATARRH 

OF THE 

BLADDER 

RsHsYBd IB 
24 Hours 



J 



I 



Each Cap-, 
sole bears the (mH1> 
name 49* 
BetDon of counterfeit* 



' Want Ads that get results arc invaluable. Want 
Ads that don't are expensive, but of no value. THE 
HERALD sunds supreme when it comes to Want 
Ads getting results, and everybody that has tried 
them knows it 



»- 



T 



V 



1 




r 




^ 



R 





10 



Saturday, 




THE DUJ-UTH HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 



LATEST 




'>»'^^ 



OF THE 




^ 



^DAY 



J 







8- 

r: 
1' 



standing of the Teams. 

Won. L'-'sc. 

. as 17 

- 32 22 

"SX tz 

.:t; 28 

: ; 32 

M 33 

(James Today. 

at Winona 
: at La Crosse. 
at Eau Clatre 



Pet. 
.691 
.393 

.5«5 

.418 
.400 



SOME HYDROPHOBICS--BY THE DOG • | 



TWO GAMES 
FORDULUTH 

Soi Boost Standing By Win- 
ning Double - Header 
From Eau Claire. 



Blancke Blanks Champs and 

Worman Also Twirls 

Good Game. 



Eau Claire. VVts.. July 8. — Duluth 
took both games of yeeterday's double- 
header frori, nimpa. the flrat con- 
test groins I. :... visitors by the score 
of 1 to 0. and the Becond by the 
■core of 8 to :;. B;an.jke outpltched 
MorroT\- l.i the first game, while the 

« nee was a batting bee in 

T^' . - - .'h kT-i'. -r-^,i all the glory. 

Mtiier and >^a.sy for the 

Box. The ^ ■■: L'Uer Kramer 

and Kii j,tuse<l the two games. 
The > 

FIrMt (xanie. 

Diil'i'h-— AH It II. PC A E. 

I'-- ' ■- b . . 4 It : .'. 'I 

.1 ■ ■ • 4 M 1 

-V + 1 111 1 

K 4 t) 'i y 

L- ■■ 4 1 3 _' :! 1 

M - . 3 1 :. 1 I) 

^'- 4 ') 'J. J i 

li ■c . . . Z '» '> i, 1 (» 

B....-- .» ,. 3 tJ M u 3 

T-' l^ 33 2 H 27 14 1 

K i . e— AB. R. H PO A. E. 

Ki k .«s 4 1 U 4 

-Moure .',') ;'- ») 3 4 1 

Souid t f a 3 «j 

Chat. ;.►■.;,:■. If 4 >> ■: 

»i- rud. rf 4 't 1 » 

i: . I:ng. lb 3 » 14 

Milk.- 2 2 1 « 

t;.-;../ .:,:; v./ti 1;!. :{ 2 3 

MoiTi-'W, p 3 3 « 

T.)-V- 29 |> 4 27 14 1 

8t Innings — 

Dului,, 00001000 1 — 2 

Kau 4:ia:re o o i) o — 

Sunimaiy. S^^ciitioe iiits — Miller, 
Mu-re. .^iHrk. Stolen base — Stark. 
Struck out — By Blancke, 3; by Morrow, 
1. Hit by pitcher — .Sours. Double play 
— Kick to Kading L.eft on bases — Du- 
luth, 5; Eau I'laire .5 Time of game — 
1:40. Uuii'lres Schuler and Lyman. 

Second Gnine. 

Duluth— AB. li H. PO A. E. 

De Hiiven. 2b . . 6 I 3 2 3 

J f rl-c ..4 2 

Uj . . . . r> 1 2 12 

IvLaii.t-f . if 4 2 4 2 

Lrti.er. 31i 4 2 1 1 2 

Ml!; ■ jf 2 1 3 1 

^' ss . . . . 5 l 1 2 2 1 

lU: .-. jve. c . . . 1 1 2 1 

Meiater. rf 3 1 

Wortnan, p 4 6 

Totals 87 ~8 11 27 15 1 

Eau Claire— AB. R. H PO. A.*E. 

Kick, ss 5 6 7 

Moore. 3b 3 2 X 

Sours, cf 4 1 2 

Chappelie. If ... 3 2 1 2 

Benrud, rf 4 1 

Kadiug. lb 3 3 9 

Stark, c S 1 4 3 

Scho'inhuven. 2b. 3 1 3 S 

Miller. V 

Oha.st^. p 3 3 1 

• D. Liv.3 1 tl 

•• Bailey 1 

Totals 33 2 9 27 19 1 

• Batted for Schooonhoven in ninth. 

•* Hatted for Chase In ninth. 

Summary; Two-base hits — Kadlng, 
M«neice Three-base hit — Miller. Sacrf- 
flce hit — Johnson. Stolen bases — Moore, 
Miller. Hits— Off Miller, 2 (In one in- 
ning, none out in second): off Chase, 9 
(in eight Innings). Struck out — By 
Worman. 1; by Miller. 1; by Chase. 2. 
Bases on balls — Oft Miller. 1 : off Wor- 
man. 3; off Chase, 4 Double plays — 
Schoonoven to Kick to Kadlng; Wal- 
llser to De Ha%'en to Meneice. Left on 
bases — l>uluth, 8; Eau Claire, 7. Time 
of game — 2:15. Umpires — Lyman and 
Schuler. 

redlegsIall 
before pirates 



Winona Takes Third Game 

From Superior By 8- 

lo-4 Score. 

Winona. Minn., July 8. — The Pirates 
easily defeated Superior yesterday, 
Dunbar being driven from the mound 
before the side was retired In the lat- 
ter part of the first, Winona winning 
by the score of 8 to 4. Four runs 
were driven In before Jensen went to 
tile mound. Balllies for the Pirates 
kept the hits of the visitors pretty 




BoT-futs or 

pop, y(A N 







IN QUARANTINE 




i 




I 

5 OPPOSE, you WA^aeo 

TO HA^E A G00i> 
Tif'iE. FOR THRt^ 

^\HJ> OF A TRIP 
\MOVjLD "too ?V.^U7 
^OOLl) ^0\) (i To 
EuS^OPt , OR ^OVLD 
you PR£'fE(^ To SPEH5 
YOUR. Tl^AE AT A 
Soi^t/ve.«^ PLACE \N ^ 

tH^ ^^ou^^TAms ? ~ 

OHKO,KY J>tAR 
SASP/\ReLLA^ YOvJ 

m 3>0UUTV\ AND 

ATTEND THt NMATER CA^H Vv/AL. 

M0RR»5 MuwyoM MA'S A UOT OF 
COIN, ^4E^AAKeS ^T EVeRy J>Ay- 



WHO INi^ENTeJ) 

rooAys fO(r,is 

rt<E AUTHOR. OF 
A RELKVtOM 
CALLED 'ABSO- 
toTE eu J0YM£NT 




?uT i4AiR I>yE IK^ 
Ky 3>R\M^V^/v\\^^ 

Wa WOST To ^ULu-. w 
A<AAv^A — 








COt'x^AvHy VMV-^V^ OW^ 0^ 0\J^ P^OKWVEV^T 
So<^VEX^t C^VVlLs-\H^ CV-A\\>tsSxo ^E A "^^^E 
^UT "CWE FVviKER^OMS CLA v^^ v\^'S> A FAX^E. 



rAE.VA W^ME STAT^TE-p A CHVtl6)^FA«tiA- 



well scattered aftt r the first inning. 
The .-score; 



Superior — AH. 

Bancroft, ss ;j 

Bennett, cf 5 

Landrv, If 4 

Dolan, lb E 

Hoffman, 2h 4 

Duchlen, rf ) 

Ford, c ; 

Lti)pold, 3b •) 

Dunbar, -> < 

Jensen, p ; 



Totals 

Winona — 
Orav.-s. rf . . 
Bewer, 2b . . 
Davey, «.<? . , 
Collins, If . , 
Swanson. cf 
Lelfheit. 3b 
Curtis, lb .. 
Anderson, c 
Balllies. p . 



. .3( 

All. 

• • • « 

. . . <1 
4 

. . .4 



. .4 
. .4 
..4 
..1 



R. 

1 
1 
1 
1 






u 

4 
R 

1 
1 
1 

3 
1 
1 




H 


PO 


A 





4 


I 


1 


3 





■ > 


1 





1 


8 




o 





O 


1 


1 








6 


2 





1 


2 








o 


1 





1 


— 


— r 





8 


24 


12 


H 


PO. 


A 





1 





1 


1 


5 


1 





4 


1 


1 





1 


2 





2 





o 


O 


18 







3 





1 


1 


1 



E. 



1 
1 








11 27 Vi 



Totals 3(» 8 

Score by innings — 

Superior 21001000 0—4 

Winona 403 0001 x — 8 

.Summary: Two-base hits — Leifhelt. 
Anderson. Three base hit — Swanson 
.Sacrifice hits — Gr. ves. L.eifhcit, Ball- 
lies. Bewer. Struck out — Bv Jen.sen. 5; 
by Balllies, 3. Ba«es on balls — Oif Jen- 
sen. 3; off Bailite.«i 3. Left on bases — 
Winona, 6, Superii r. 9 Hit by pitcher 
— Ford. Stolen bases — Bancroft, .A.n- 
derson. Time of game — 1:45. Umpire — 
Elliott. 



WATSON'S GOOD HEAVING 

BLANKS THE MEDICS. 



La Crosse, WLs. 
took the third gi> 
by the score of 3 
a great game and 
his mercy through 
well piayed. Scon 

Rochester 

La Crosse 1 • 

Batteries — Reyn<. 
Watson and Wals. 



July 8. — La Crosse 
me from Rochester 

0. Watson pitched 
had the Medics at 

out. The game was 

R H t^* 

• 000000 — ' 4 6 

1 2 X — 3 8 2 
Ids and McAleese; 



a shift in both teams. Score: R. H. E- 
Pittsburg ..200003000001 — 6 8 4 
Brooklyn ..010220000002 — 7 13 2 
Batteries — Steele, Hendrix, Ferry 
and Simon and Gibson; Scanlon, 
Knetzer and Bergen and Erwin. Um- 
'.jires — Freary and O'Day 

ST. LOUIS WINS ON LAST 

CHANCE BAHING RALLY. 



Philadelphia, July 8. — St. Louis won 
the game, 9 to 4. The visitors devel- 
oped a batting rally in the ninth in- 
ning and scored six runs on five hits 
and three errors Score: It, H. E. 

St. Louis 00110016 — 9 12 

Philadelphia ...0 000300 1—4 9 5 

Batteries — Harmon and Bresnahan. 
Chalmers and Dooln. Umpires — Eason 
and Johnstone. 



CHANCE'S TEAM IS 

SHUT OLT BY NEW YORK. 



New York, July 8. — The Chicagos 
were shut out by the New Yorks, Anie-'' 
holding Chance's team to five hits, of 
which only two were clean drives. 
Ames alj'o drove in New York's first 
two runs with a triple. Reulbach, 
though hit rather hard, pitched well 
enough to have blanked the New Yorks 
but for the errors behind him. After 
Graham batted for Reulbach in the 
eighth. Rlchter pitched the second half 
of the Inning. He was very wild, hit- 
ting two men and scoring anotlier 
with a wild pitch. Score: R. H. E 

Chicago 00000000 — 5 3 

New York 02101001 x— 5 % 

Batteries — Reulbach. Rlchter and 
Archer and Graham; Ames and Wilson. 
Umpireei — Klem and Brennan. 



well and Sweeney. Umpires, Egan and 
Sheridan. 



PITCHER GRAY WAS WILD; 
DETROIT ROMPS THE GAME. 



Detroit. Mich., July S — Gray was 
wild at the start of the game and his 
wlldness. together with lucky home 
run drives by Drake and Delehanty, 
enabled Detroit to beat Washington 6 
to 3. althougb the visitors ouLhit the 
locals?. Score: R. H. E. 

Washington 00 1100010 — 3 10 2 

Detroit 20020110 x — 6 8 1 

Batteries — Gray and Henry; Lafitte 
and Stanage.. Umpires, Perrine and 
DIneen. 



ST. LOUIS DROPS THE 

OPENER TO BOSTON TEAM. 




Standing of the Teams. 



Won. 

Chicago 43 

Philadelphia 44 

New York 44 

St. Louis 41 

Pittsburg 40 

Cincinnati 30 

Brooklyn 27 

Boston 17 



Lost. 
27 
29 
29 
31 
81 
40 
44 
66 



Pet. 
.614 
.603 
.603 
.569 
.5^)3 
.429 
.380 
.236 



WAGNER MOTORCYCLKS 




Aew end .Seeond-Ilaud W taeela. 
J. U. Kt^KKlK, 
107 Second Avenue Kast. 

Grand 1762-Y. 



Games Today. 

Cincinnati at Bo: ton. 
Pittsburg at Brooklyn. 
Chicago at New fork. 
St. Louis at Philidelphla. 




St. Louis. Mo.. July 8. — Boston won 
the opening game of the series, 6 to 1. 
Wood allowed but one hit and that In 
the last inning, besides striking out 
fifteen men. The score: R. H. E 

St Louis 00000000 1 — 1 1 1 

Boston 00023001 — 6 12 1 

Batteries — Lake. Mitchell and Krich- 
ell; Wood and Nunamaker and Wil- 
liams. Umpires. O'Loughlin and Con- 
nolly. 



won the first game of the series by a 
score of 4 to 3. Laroy, who started to 
pitch for the locals, wa.s knocked out 
In three innings, the only visiting runs 
being made off him Reiger succeeded 
him and pitched good ball, but was 
taken out In the seventh to allow a 
substitute batter. 

McGlynn. who pitched for Milwau- 
kee, had only one btfd inning. 

The score: R. H. E. 

Milwaukee 013000000 — 4 12 1 

St. Paul 00 000 3 00 — 3 6 1 

Batteries — Laroy. Reiger. Chech and 
Kelley; McGlynn and Marshall. Um- 
pires — Weddidge and Chill. 



HOMER WITH TWO ON BASES 
WINS FOR MINNEAPOLIS. 




BOSTON TAKES GAME 

FR')M CINCINNATI. 



Boston, Mass., Ju y 8. — By outplaying 
and outbattlng Circlnnatl, Boston was 
able to win by 5 to 4. Score: R. H. E. 

Boston 3 1 1 X — 5 10 1 

Cincinnati 3« 10 00000 — 4 9 3 

Batteries — Per iue and Rarlden; 
Suggs and Sever* dd. Umpires — Fin- 
neran and Rigler. 



PinSBI RG DROPS A 

LONG GAMt TO BROOKLYN. 



Brooklyn, N. Y., July g. — ^Brooklyn 
beat Pittsburg In twelve Inning-s by 
one run, but witii tlie bases full. 
Ferry hit Zimmei man and Tooley 
brought In the winning run. Hummel 
and Wagner were ;iut out of the game 
fur protesting dec sions, necessitating 



Standing of the Teams. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Detroit 49 23 .681 

Philadelphia 48 24 .667 

New York 37 33 .529 

(Jhlcago 86 32 .522 

Boston 37 34 .521 

r'leveland 35 41 .461 

Washington 26 47 .356 

St, Louis 19 62 .268 

Games Today. 

Philadelphia at Cb-veland. 
New York at Chicago. 
Washington at Detroit. 
Boston at St. Louis 

CLEVELAND ^ ^ ON 

PHILADELPHIA ERRORS. 

Cleveland. Ohio, July 8. — Seven error* 

by Cleveland allowed the Philadelphia 

team to win, 7 to 1. Mitchell pitched 

splendid ball as did Coombs, the lat- 
ter holding Cleveland to six hits. 
Mitchell struck out eight men. 

Score: R. H. E. 

Cleveland 00010000 0—1 6 7 

Philadelphia 02000005 0—7 10 1 

Batteries — Mitcnell and Fisher; 

Coombs and Lapp. Umpires, Mullen 
and Evans. 



WALSH IN FINE FORM; ; 

CHICAGO TAKES FIRST. 



Chicago, July 8. — Walsh's superb 
pitching behind the opportune hitting 
of his team mates, gave Chicago thq 
opening game of the series with New 
York, 5 to 3. Errors by the locals 
started the visitors' score. 

Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 22000010 x— 5 9 2 

New York 10000020 0—3 6 

Batteries — Walsh and Sullivan; Cald- 



Standittg of the Teams. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Kansas City 44 35 .55? 

Columbus 45 36 .556 

Louisville . . . ; 40 39 .506 

Milwaukee 40 40 .5oo 

Minneapolis 39 40 .494 

St. Paul 39 41 .487 

Toledo 37 43 .463 

Indianapolis 36 46 .430 

♦ 

Games Today. 

Toledo at Columbus. 
Indianapolis at Loul.ivllle. 
Milwaukee at St. Paul. 
Kansas City at Minneapolis. 

GAME LASTED BUT A FEW 
MINUTES OVER AN HOUR. 



Minneapolis July 8. — Cravath's home 
run with two men on bases in the 
eighth won the game from Kan.sas 
City after Brandom had pitched ex- 
cellent ball. Williams followed with 
another homer and cinched the victory, 
5 to 3 Errors and two hits helped 
the visitors to two In the sixth and 
three hits gave them another in the 
eighth. Catches by Williams and Sul- 
livan were fielding features. 

The score; R. H. E. 

Minneapolis . . . .0 5 x — 5 6 3 
Kansas City 00 002 010 — 3 8 1 

Batterit^s — Waddell. Patterson and 
Owens; Brandom. Rhoades and James. 
Umpires — Handlboe and Blerhalter. 

SIX HITS IN SEVENTH 

DECIDES FOR TOLEDO. 



Louisville, Ky , July 8. — Hughes' 
home run in the second Inning with 
two men on bases landed a victory for 
Loul.srllle over Indianapolis In the sec- 
ond game of the series. Both Cheney 
and Linke were in rare form and al- 
lowed but three hits each, all of the 
locals' hits being good for extra bases. 
The contest was the shortest played 
here this season, lasting one hour an4 
fourteen minutes Hughe.s' batting, a 
one-handed catch by Woodruff anq 
Hulswltt's fielding were features. 

The score: R. H. E. 

Loui.svllle 3 000000X — 3 8 

Indianapolis 00000000 — 3 t 

Batteries — Cheney and Hughes; Linke 
and Rltter. Umpires — Eddinger and 
Hayes. 

MILWAUKEE TAKES 

FIRST FROM ST. PAUL. 



St. Paul. Minn., July 8. — Milwaukee 



Take 
Your 



SoiQiner Vacation 



-AT- 



li;; ADAMS, 

DEERWOOD 

Pleaaant aurroandlaiCB, yood ae- 
ronuuodatlons, rates reasonable. 
C. H. ADAMS, Prop. 



Calumbus, July 8. — Toledo tore up 
the 3 to Columbus lead In the seventh 
on a combination of six hits, three of 
which came after Mahling's high throw 
to Butler with two out. Cook and 
O'Rourke got on base in the seventh 
but Yingling prevented the next three 
from advancing the two runners. Um- 
pire Owen.s was so much Improved 
this morning that an operation has 
been postponed. The score. R- H. B. 

Columbus 00100200 — 3 6 1 

Toledo 00000050 0—5 10 2 

Batteries — Cook and Rapp; Yingling 
and Walsh. Umpires — Ferguson and 
Owens. 

MAGDALEN 

WINS AT HEEEY 

Victors Over Ottawa Crew 
Take Grand Challenge 



Trophy. 



Henley-on-Thames, Eng., July 8. — 
Magdalen college crew, which yester- 
day defeated the Ottawa Rowing club's 
eight, today won the Grand Challenge 
cup, beating Jesus college, Cambridge, 
in the final by 2^ lengths. The time 
was 7 minutes and 20 seconds. 



Championship Match. 

Kansas CUy, July 8. — The day's play 
In the Missouri Valley tennis tourna- 
ment began with principal interest 
centered in the match between Miss 
Evelyn Seavey of this city and Mrs. T. 
B. Entz of St. Louis for the champion- 
ship of the Missouri Valley in women'Ji 
singles. Miss Seavey is the present 
holder of the title. Mrs. Entz Is state 
champion. The match will be played 
at 4:30 this afternoon. The semi-finals 
In doubles will be played today and the 
finals Monday. 



^K^ ^^"^ TtVE SUPERIOR. 
F^^4^ A v^A^ppy LOT 

huSyISgs 
queer character 

Raised in the Coal Mines, 

Tiger Boss Acquires 

Polish. 

Chicago, July 8. — Hughie Jennings Is 
the only grass-eating Tiger on the 
planet. The 99-horse power coach and 
manager of the Detroit team, through 
his vegetarian proclivities, has become 

renowned among the United States as 
tlie most picturesque side line expert 
in the American league. Hughie's fond- 
ness for his mother country once gave 
him indigestion, but Huglile asserts 
that his suCferlng at that time wad 
caused by the janitor of the park, who 
cut the greensward with an infected 
lawn mower. H. Jennings has refused 
to sign any janitors on his team, which 
undoubtedly accounts for the way In 
which the Tigers put over a three- 
year franchise on the championship 
lingerie. 

According to the habit acquired dur- 
ing the three years, the Jennings ag- 
gregation again constitutes the readlncf 
material on or about the toppermost 
part of the American league standing. 
Although H. Jennings never, since the 
day he first gave his exciting imita- 
tion of a lowing kirie In tlie offing, con- 
tributing to the scoring facilities of his 
team, the 'E-Yah" manager Is general- 
ly blamed for the man-eating manner- 
isms of his consorts. 

This season Hughie Jennings In- 
creased effectiveness of hi? jungle crew 
by special attention to his pitching 
staff. Lively and La Fitte were added 
to the team and forearmed against pos- 
slble weaknesses. Jennings once more 
took up his alarm clock activities on 
the firing line. Pessimistic fans create 
mirth among themselves by inquiring 
of each other, "Wliy is a manager?' 
A thorough answer of why that person 
is constitutes Hughie'.s life work. 
Tips the Sigrnals. 

In his own words Jennings accounts 
for his actions thus: 

"It Is not absolutely necessary that 
I eat grass blades which flourish on 
the diamond. It Is not required that I 
encourage the fellows with ground, 
lofty and high-class tumbling. But it 
helps. The game is never lost till the 
box scores are complete. Also, as the 
cannery would have it, there is metliod 
in my madness. 

"Every little movement has many 
meanings of its own. E. g., when I 
strip two blades offn the bosom of 
North America that always conveys the 
Impression to the man at bat that I 
am looking forward to a two-bag wal- 
lop. In a similar manner three blades 
betoken a desire for a three-base swat, 
and a handful of the fruit is significant 
of a home run." 

Jennings' early life consists mainly 
of a succession of anecdotes. The Tiger 
manager once worked in a coal mine 
at Pittston. Pa. At this time the pro- 
verbially goo* fairy, efflc'ently dis- 
guised as an itinerant tailor, appearei} 
In Hughie's life and offered the young 
man $5 to catch on a team that he 
numb^ed among his scattered assets. 

The head of the Jennings family, 
upon learning that his offspring, 
Hughie, was playing clandestine ball at 
S5 a eland, instituted a lecture course 
during which Hughie was principal au- 
dience. Though ably assisted by an 
untiring No. 7 negligee boot, a family 
possession hoarded In the woodshed 
for emergency cases such as then pre- 
sented. Pa Jennings' course of lectures 
proved fruitless and Hughie did some 
more clandlng, this time for |50 a 
month. That was in the 'SOs. Later 



Jennings went to Allentown to plaf 
ball. 

HuKhie Grows ReminifiPeat. 

"Success was mine." .says Hughie in 
reminiscence. 'But it was only a taste. 
•About the time 1 became convinced 
that the world held such few gifted in- 
habitants as 1 had grown, the team 
bu.sted and 1 iiad to confine myself to 
knocking up flites to worshiping school 
children. But one important thing did 
hai)i.>en at this period. 

'Jennings, st-nior." continues Hughie, 
"was tendered an invitation to lend 
himself to an orgy in contt-mplatlon by 
our team. 1 worked violently, assisted 
by two dear old ladie.s whotse fathers 
had lived a life of close associati>fti 
with the demon rutn, and wiien the 
or.sy was pulled oft Pa Jennings sat 
and marveled while twelve ot the des» 
pised ball players, including myself, 
related giddy .Sunday school memories 
whii.h we liad read at one time or an- 
other, and confined our libationis to 
pop, with an occasional imbibe of root 
beer. 

"Tears rolled down Pa Jennings' face 
and be signed the bunch up as a W. C 
T. U. auxiliary, and gave us each a 
round button with a white ribbon at- 
tached thereto. Father vvas won ovei 
to baseball. 

Baneball History Starts. 

"Tlien. ' says Jennings, if lequested 
"my life hi.story started on Its home 
stretch and it's still stretching. After 
playing in Baltimore and Bro(jklyn for 
some seasons, as all fans know, in tho 
cour.«5e of events I found myself at 
Cornell university, sporting a cane 
and a fraternity pin. 1 learned the 
wiles of a lawyer and I work at it now 
in the winter time. 1 may yet be- 
come a great barrister, as I am assured 
by those who have overheard my con- 
duct on the side lines, but I do baseball 
in the summer as a salve for my con- 
science." 

Another yam told by Jennings is 
how he learned to bat Into right field. 
"It was while I attended .St. Bonaven- 
tura college." says Hughie. "We 
played ball on the campus, which was 
laid out to the left of the chapel. I 
became disgustingly accurate in my 
attacks on the chapel windows, which 
suffered accordingly. A week after my 
advent on the diamond, it was in the 
early spring. I had penetrated all the 
windows and was forced to replace 
them at a great expense, and the out- 
come was that I had to learn to bat 
into right field." 

Jennings, after leaving Cornell. 
where he was graduated from the law 
school, signed with Detroit as manager, 
since which time E-Yah Hughie has 
permitted no grass to grow under his 
feet, chews the cud beautifully, has 
become a great l.ase line orator, and 
won three pennants for the team. 






-iif 



% 



\ 







1 

\ \ 

« 





REVISING THE 



BASE RUNNING 

Cobb and Collins Have Made 

Pilfering Popular 

Again. 

Cleveland. Ohio, July 8 —It is in the 
base stealing department that the big- ' 
gest difference between the old-time 
ball players and the present genera- 
tion is found. A comparison between 
the figures of twenty years ago and 
now shows a remarkable falling off. 

In 188u in the National league three 
men stole more than fifty bases. Harry 
Stovey led the American association 
with 90 steals. In 1887 Stovey broke 
all records by stealing 143 bases. Arlie 
Latham was a close second with 142. 
In the National league Johnny Ward 
led with 110 steals, the late Jimmy Fo- 
garty beinar second, with 102. In 1888 
Stovey made a record that will liardly 
be touched. He stole 156 bases. Five 
other American association players 
stole more tlian 100 bases. Dummy Hoy 
led the National league with 82 steals. 
Billy Hamilton came to the front as 
the American association's best base 
runner in 1889. He put 17 steals to his 
credit, leading Stovey by 2. Fogarty 
did the best work in the National, 
stealing 99 bases. Twenty-nine men in 
the two leagues went over the 50 mark. 
Since the advent of Ty Cobb and 
Eddie Collins base running has had a 
revival, but the two American league 
stars are the only players who show 
anything like the base stealing abil- 
Itltes of the old-timers. In 19o9 Cobb 
led. with 76 steals; Collins was second, 
with 67. Last year Collins attained 
his ambition and beat out Cobb, steal- 
ing 81 bases to 65 for the Tiger. 

Billy Hamilton, one of the best base 
runners of all time, who In three differ- 
ent years led the country in stolen 
bases, is of the opinion that base run- 
ning reached its height of perfection 
years ago. The veteran fails to see 
where there can be found any new 
tricks in the art of taking second on a 
pitch. It la the defense, the breaking 
up of steals, that has the field for de- 
velopment, according to Hamilton. 

"Worrying a pitcher, getting the 
lead off first, the quick start and the 
fall away slide into second," says Ham- 
ilton, "were all pretty well doped out 
during the old twelve-club National 
league, and, in fact, away back In that 
organization's infancy. Every year 
some chap bobs up who is more or less 
of a phenom in stealing, but it is fleet- 
ness and not anything new that makes 
him shine on the paths. 

"In my opinion base stealing has 
reached perfection so far as one man 
annexing an extra bag. New tricks are 
possible In the double steal or any 
other combination of the defense or 
where the ball is in play. Develop- 
ment must come In the defensive work 
In breaking up these combination 
steals. But it le now largely a case of 
arm and eye against the legs and dash 
of the runner." 

Some fans may argue that the catch- 
ers of the olden days were not as 
strong as those of the present time. A 
glance at the names of the catchers 
on the rosters of the two leagues will 
refute that theory. There never was 
any better catciiers than Ewing. Ben- 
nett. Clements. Ganzal. Flint. McGulre, 
Kelly, Carroll. Amos and Lave Cross, 
Bushong, Robinson and Snyder. They 
would make good today. 

• — 

To Rochester, N. Y., and Return, 

Via the South Shore, for meeting of the 
Mystic Shrine. For particulars apply 
to A. J. Perrin, general agent. 430 West 
Superior street, Duluth. Minn. 



r 



( 



*' 



I 



HOTEL 
HOLLAND 

.„ European,,. 

ABSOL17TELY FIRB-PnOOP. 

Olob Brcafctaat. Popular Pita* 

Loaclieoa and Dtasar. 

Mnalc at IMaaer, • to 8 P. K. 

BlVTERTAIBrMKNT laGHTLT 



T 







Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD; 



July 8, 1911. 



II 





LATEST 




OF THE^^?>? DAY 




,-^,«i^»»i^^^'^^>** 



RIBBING'S NEW STAR OF 

FISTANIA AND HIS RECORD 



lit" 



jii 



Here is the latest picture of Pal 
Brown, giving a very clear idea of the 
Increased muscular development of the 
boy who is looked upon by some as 
the coming lightweight champion of 
the world. 

Soin.- idea of the lads immense hit- 
ting ability can be gained by a glance 
•t the remarkably developed shoulders 
and also the size and suggested 
Strength of his hands, which are un- 
Sjrifv large and powerful for a boy 
of Hrown s physique. „, 

**I>ruvvn doesnt carry . an ounce of 
superfluous flesh on his budy H.s 
Btrength comes from the ^^"'P/''^^. 
qualtv of his muscles, which are long 
2nd elastic. While Brown has no hu^e 
and huleing muscles, muscles «"'• 
flber«. his body In action is beautifully 
"Sung- with t'he kind of "^l^^^^J^.J 
deliKhi the eye of the experience a 

^''h^ has a long reach and his legs 
are built for the marathon route. In 
some wavs his physique suggests that 
oHfatThnl Nelson' Brown is a tough 
wlr%- and enduring battler, and In a 
his fights he has shown wonderlul 
strength for a lad of his weight. 
"The^ revised and completed record 
of Brown, showing all of his ngnts, 
Is gi\ en below: 

Jan^'1— Kid Pavis. exh.. 6 r.. Hibbing. 
Jan to— John Berg. k. o 3 r Hiblang. 
Jan 30— Lou Gibbons, exh., 15 r.. Hlb- 

Feb."^ii— Kid Davis, exh., 6 r.. Hib- 

Mar?h 1-Kid Bell won. 10 r.. H|bbing. 
j^pjil io_Kid Faul. k. o., 7 r. Hibbing. 
^»^y ;io— Indian Kid, k. o.. 2 r.. Hlb- 

June *ir.-Kid Shea. k. o.. 2 r., Hibbing. 
Dec 15— Kid Davis, k. o., 7 r.. Hibbing. 

Jan. 2ft— Nick Constantine. d., 10 r, 

Hibbing. , », c ,. Mih 

Feb 15— Kid Qualey, exh, 6 r., HiD- 

March 20— Mike O Keefe, k. o.. 10 r., 

Hibbing. , ^ ir. r 

April :;5— Kid Brennan. k. c. 1j r.. 

Mi;"\o-Kid Lloyd, k. o., 3 r. Hibbing. 
June 15— Jack Delehunt. exh.. 6 r, 

Hibbing. , a on r- 

Aug. 10— Nick Constantine. a., 20 r.. 

Hibbing. ■, on r Hib- 

Sept. 20— Roy Temple, d., 20 r.. ti.\o 

Oct'"f— Kid Jackson, won. 15 r., Du- 

Oc\"'26— Billie Trenholm. d., 15 r., Hib- 

oJi*''3^d_Jack McGann. k. o.. 5 r.. Hib- 

Nov^Te-Ernie Potts, k. o., 5 r.. Hib- 
bing. 



THE PERCY PAPERS 

No. 1. 



Being Some Modern Sport Fables By P'^ce 



DULUTH CREWS SHOULD 

MAKE GREAT SHOWING 



Hushrs, Washinston 15 

Puvrell, !<t. liOUls 18 

Grmim. Waslilncton 18 

n. Collins. I5<.«U>n 11 

W. Mitchell. Cleveland 12 

Hamilton. St. Louto 14 

Kaler, netfLind » - - ,„ ,„, 

BlandUig. Cleveland H 1 8 40 30 101 

Ten Lendlns Base- Stealer*. 



4 8 29 40 113 

1 9 3.1 28 128 
4 10 49 40 136 

2 6 14 15 *S 
2 6 21 28 71 
2 7 20 35 71 
1 5 16 18 44 




jjov. 30 — Billie Trenholm. k. o., 7 r., 

Hibbing. ^, ,, ^ 1 r 

D^c. 24 — Blllie N neman, k. o., J r.. 
International Fi.lls. 

1911— , 1, „ 17 r 

Jan. 1:0— Chuck Larson, k, o, IJ r.. 

liuluth. , ^ o , Hlh- 

Feb. 1— Jack Lepi er. k o., 3 r., hid 

FJb"%— Jimmle Murphy, won. 11 r., 

Fe^i"\"9-Jack O'Leary. k. o.. 5 r.. Su- 

Fe^b""l2-Sie ( reenwald. d.. 10 r.. 

Hurley, Wis v « 1 r Vlr- 

March 7— Pete Sa^oy. k. o.. 3 r.. 

Klnia. Minn. . u 1, « a r 

yi^rch 20— Eddie (Ireenwald. k. 0.. 8 r., 

Hibbing. /-.„_^v d 10 r., 

March 2S— Tomm/ Garey. a., iw r-. 

M""'?l-Billie rriscoll. k. o.. 3 r., 
Mav'28-Kld Car.ey. k. o.. 4 r.. Hib- 
june" H-Denny Shyers, won. 2 r.. Ash- 
June"^20-Jimmie Oaine. k. 0.. 5 r.. Chis- 
june"58-Billie Alien, won. 15 r.. Hlb- 
bing. 




VETERAN BILLY SMITH 
TRYING TO "COMt^BACK^ 



San Francisco. Cal.. July 8.-Mysteri- 
ous Billy Slnith. whose name ^^f one 
to conjure with in fight circles fifteen 
years back, and who "^ie« very prop- 
erly have been introduced by Bill Jor- 
12 as -one of the hardest nut. to 



crack in 



the 



welterweight division.' 



Ill' '"'III"' 1ir'"lii Liiii: ^ 



,.,// } 



r 

i 




says he doesnt think he can co-e 
back, but that he knows it. All thU^ 
notwithstanding his name ha^s been 

K'chP^nic rin'the^ace of the cata- 

Ironhe that happened to James J- J^'" 
S?J^."an'dVa?Jst all ring preceden^t 

the chap who had the .^'"^j^arbadoes, 

f-d rather have a man who knows the 

'^%Vhicif show's^fhlJ;- smith has confi- 
dence in himself if "f^thi^g else. 
PleatT o« Confidence. 

Mv.'-terious Billy I'as been in t^an 
Francisco for some days and lias hn- 
ally settled down to .the task of get 
ting himself back into f^ape. He 
wtnt'i to take on some of the lads »n 
o,e four-round game, and is working 
iway across at Billy i^hannon's place 
t^th the end in view of seeing hi» 
Jame Ince'more on the sporting page^ 

Time was when bmlth was some 
*.haD Ind even though he belongs to 

lr£fn%-d^l-^^^u^«de^.%"^|trSo| 

SJrho^So\%a"bolS^ ^a-lT/ht^^iat 

*'Know"n''fa'r- and wide as a rough- 
•nd-tumble .scrapper, who was wi lin^ 
to win by fair means or foul. Bill> de- 
cries that reputation today and de- 
clares that it was handed to him sim- 
ply because. in self-protection. he 
routrhed it with Walcott. 

"^Give a dog a bad name.' you 
know •• «aid Smith. "Now. I was never 
f "particularly rough fiS^ter but they 
used to think that I was and the ref- 
eree was always inclined to give me 

the worst of it.' TJr,«tnTi 

Smith was burn back in Boston. 
If ass and was christened \N liliam 
?mos Sn" th. Always l^^^'^«'\^'%; 
Uike of an encounter, he came to be 
i bire-knuckle. and then a Bkin-glove 
fighter in the East. where he was 
known as Amos i?mith. 

In ISSfi, two years after he had 
.tarted as a professional, brajth came 
to Portland, Ore., and saw At to let 
himself be known as Billy bmith. He 
won some uf his bouts as a starter, 
and was so successful in cleaning up 
his oi.ponenta that the newspaper ira- 
ternity tried to place him. 

•'Who is this mysterious Billy 

Smith?" was the query. "Where does 
e come from?" iii„„ ui,„ 

••It was an easy step to calling him 
■Mysterious- Billy Smith, and the title 
has followed him to this day. 

He was* a light weight at that time. 
and his first match in i^an Francisco 
was a four-round bout with bpld^i 
Kelly before the California Athletic 

olub. .. ■._ .1 

"I got $6 for that bout, he said 
with a grin, "but as I. made $7d In my 
next match. I dldnt mind That next 
match was with Frank Purcell. He 
«ot the decision, but he weighed 160 
pounds as against my 130. ^\«>Sf»t 
didn't make so much diCference in 
those days. Today they argue over a 
pound or an ouuce, and they make me 

* Smith probably achieved more re- 
nown In his various encounters wltn 
Joe Walcott than with any one else 
In th^ game. He met Walcott nine 
times all told, and although the tally 
of the different bcuts shows to the ad- 
vantage of the colored man, It naa 



afraid of Eill>. „.„fc xv«ioott. 

Nine Bent.' ^ •*■.**«?.* .trflws 

smith got om decision. Anc dra>*s 

^".^^^^"^ 'hr\avr^-^I boxed Walcott 
••But.' he savs. „.ij , ve's club and 
many times beto: e O R^ui ke s cm 

,™ ™ Tk* T> fill r KP Wl B IIiliii<*fe »*»e • x*r„\ 

?h. breaks tlidn-t come my w-ay. NVal- 

^''"k-i.icott and I used to have some 
\\alcoti a"H,,* "° hpn we were on 
trrf'\t si-raos. Even w nen wc Y»t*v 
fh'r«ai";SBeth.r It w.. I .| same^ Be- 

of? style would ;atch the fighter of to- 

"^^-^The new fellows don't know the 
eame Stand of. and feint at them and 
Ihat'do^ they d. ? Why they Just sUck 
their hands up In front of their faces 
and leave the r bodies unprotected. 
SUll. it suits m-- the way they box to- 
day and I guess I can stand It ir the 
other fellows can. 

•I always war the aggressor. Do you 
know why? Well. I have always fig- 
ured that I could go faster forward 
than any other fellow ^o"l<5.^^^^P„,^5^^" 
ward, and why give him the advan- 

Tliere are i^ome unique ideas in 
training back of the veteran. For one 
thing, he doesn t believe that beer and 
ale should be birred from the training 

table 

"A fellow who doesn't d^lnk any- 
thing doesn't perspire.' he explained, 
■and when a fighter aoesn t perspire 
he Isn't In &o )d condition.' 

All of which will be cheering news 
to the boxer v ho likes his nip of ale 
or glass of beer. «„!,♦ 

Kid Lnvlgne was the greatest fight- 
er the world 1 as ever seen, according 
to Billy. Yo mg I'eter Jackson he 
names as the toughest bird In the 
Kame and he hands to Tommy Ryan 
the palm of bemg the one clever boxer 
who was equliped w-lih a punch. 

And such, li garbled form. Is the 
story of the alventures of Mysterious 

Billy Smith. , . . . 

"Money?" hu repeated, as he took 
his liat to leave for the training quar- 
ters "ves. I've made mont-y. $2oO,000 
In my day. And I had a good time, 
you can gamb e on that." 



ERCY had longings to be 
an athlete. So has John 
D. Rockefeller. Fate 
played true to form tn 
naming Percy. Percy. 
When he pulled his hand- 
kerchief he did a delsarte 
that would have made 
one of Madame Bernhardts 13.50 front 
row gestures look as clumsy and as 
Iwlcward as a hired girl deeply In love 
mlng to play a scientific game of 
liingpong with the hired man. 

Tndependence at any e>^n»^S^^^r^^^3 

scratched. varrv he had 

flat he had a shape like Tom Aa«-k^y 

-Ks„?«.£::«a;^-c5 

of tne siauKiii»:» '"6 imaK-lnation 

That muscles stood up on ^s back and 
Shoulders and said hello On^^^^^n^ 

Vlled their Uttle s^ntl recite, one or 
?^rnelghiors'S.ttle glrj^. who was uri- 
fortunately present, caught the^ ^^ 

iTrKiiB areument. rertj u«"f^"-"' 
time being the elocution disorder. 

ThTni. -: 'vender headlights and cur^- 
!^p^^^k^rl?.l■n'd\Vwl^s'on^ly -o-^ 

'^!'o? would-be perfectly safe in call- 
i^^Pe^se a protected Percy. Most 
of^th^m are protected by some kind 
?'rovlde"nce On the screened in porch 

brfn^g^hiSd T^Sisr.z\\}eye:^- 

en re"i^lng a throb story by Jack Lon- 
don was about the last turn In the ad- 
venture line for little /7^<;y^„^,, j^^ 
<>jom<» German with a lonuneBs i"» 
speculation, possibly b^er also once 

ri'!, ^'-A;c7^^wa"s^"hu'n"?^S"^s^o ^^e 

umSed from low lo high speed, and he 
clinched his slender white /'st <:rylng^ 
the time. "Mercy help me. 1 will be an 

athlete." ^ ^. „^ 

The Goat of the Gang. 

There is most times a gf>at in every 
(rang There were some radiant Rach- 
fls fn the bunch Percy clung to with 
desperation written on his thin feat- 
ures but they sent their smiles to the 
icehouse when Percy opened up on the 
weather talk and gave forth a angu d 
look that would nave raised pain in 
the sordid soul of a nerve agent sell- 
ing Pilgrims Progress in the Wall 

^^!^ran•s"soir•is a lonely thing. Back 
through the picturesque pages of his- 
tory we have had silent figures tread- 
ine their lonesome way in the mantle 
of the night, there with the big mope. 
Historians have Imputed grave soul 
aches to these soul singed guys; but if 
you dig to the bottom of the trouble 
you will find that some ensemble of 
loveliness was the cause of It all. 

Percy pranced out on the track one 
cav day. scaring several sparrows who 
were dotting the rail of the clnde? 
uath His legs looked like these mod- 
ern laths that are turned out by the 
avaricious lumber trust. But then re- 
flfcted Percy, Apollo was a skinny guy 
.Vnd Jim Corbett and R. Fitz.^immona 
also had the true classical outline. 

There was a goodly crowd l^^-^fnt 



Shrieked, chewing gum and chatting 
and throwing out their chests and then 
drawing them back again. Percy 
didnt have any chest to throw out. He 
had forgotten the PePsin and felt real 
nervous and distressed. In McGuffey s 
fifth reader I'ercy had read of N. Bona- 
parte feeling nervous and distressed 
when being Informed that Kid ^^ ell- 
ington was winning at Waterloo, bo he 
took ht.s trembling as one of the lodge 
signs of coming greatness and dre>v 
MS bathrobe around him like one of 
the naughty poster pictures of Ruth 
St. Dennis in the rajah jlance 

Percy hadn't been In athletics He 
had been in several charades and once 
Had addressed the Mothers' club on 
teaching boys to be gentle. He dldn t 
know that there are pains right down 
To t he very bottom of your lungs and 
that sometimes black specks fl> n 
front of your eyes and pains shoot up 
and down your legs like aspiring apes 
on a ringed pole. ... 

Jo RanK for Anihulnnce. 
AVhen poor l^rcy started in the mile 
run Jo rang for the ambulance, for Jo 
was human and also l^new that I ercy 
was needed around the house The 
big bronzed boy who had served as a 
human post for the sweet little thing 
ioTtage her lean act on. took the lead 
l^<i at the Bight of his strong stride 
and easy swini poor Perse did a teeth 
gnashmg let that would have made t»ie 
Floyd sisters, nail eeters. shiver for 

""iTfs no use to prolong the climax 
T>^r«,e was left at tHe post, almost. He 
did I Tope for about one furlong and 

s^^khnliS^^^co^'w^^ 

--aVo-ul r.jT.fl 'hVf d H to 

Ing saUs and Percy on speaking ac- 

''"TlTe^y "uf ted Percy's classical but bum 
BhISe into the runkbout and ran about 
Bi» blocks to the nearest doctors of- 
flce The doc was a modern one and 
had studied Henry Oe^'i^e but d ;ln t 
.^ Mr^l In Rinirle tax. He believed in 
mi\ng dSuble^ for he was a clubnrian. 
T^.erefore he told Percys mamnia that 
It was nervous prostration and an 
athlete's heart: talking P^^inly to him- 
se f he said Percy was a shine and 
juniped the track when the going was 

"""pf ny was ordered to stay in bed for 
six weeks and to flirt wltli eggs and 
mUk and nothing heavier than Ella 
Wheeler Wilcox's stuff, before Ella re- 
formed and took the literary pledge^ 
Several Dames that were the running 
pardners of Sister Jo came to see 
f'ercy He smiled faintly at them as 
the croaking soldier does in the last 
act and stroking his invagination on 
thP back until it purred, felt that he 
w^as a hero even if the bronzed brute 
had copped the medal. 

While Percy didn't get very Jar \n 
his first essay at the primer of athlet- 
ics he clasped his thin hands when he 
heard the newspaper said Percy also 
ran. for Perse wasn't a wise guy. 
Sentimentality had a strange hold on 
him and kept his mind lost In /oul fog. 
Anyway Percy was a hero with doc 
tor's consent and mammas approval, 
though papa paid the bills. He refused 
to Btay^iA bed after the five weeks 
were up though the dottor protested, 
needing 'the money, and looking wan, 
he strolled out and became a hero In 
ills own eyes. , ... 
All of which shows that a man with 
obtuse sense and no humor and a very 
strong Imagination and the right kind 
of a doctor, can feed the cravings of 
his gentle and unrippled vanity and 
longing o« soul on the marshmallows 
of satisfaction. ^ 



(BY BRUCE.) 

With four college men In the eight, 
Duluth has apparently the best pros- 
pects of winning one of the eight- 
oared events in the coming regatta 
since rowing was taken up in the re- 
organized association. 

In addition to the prospects of the 
eight taking down one of the races, 
there are the bantam and Junior fours 
both boats traveling mighty fast at 

the present time. r-/i^«o 

Walker, St. Pierre, Refus and Eddie 
Mapp are going fine in the bantam 
boat and it is safe to say that these 
boys will carry a lot of local confl- 
dtnce. The boat is going better than 
It did last season with Walker, Kerus. 
O'Donnell and Talboys in it. according 
to reports, and last season the Uuluth 
bantams came within an ace of copping 

In'^Tronsen, long John Quinn. Sole 
and Wallace Quimby, the junior foui 
boat has a lot of power. Also the shel 
has been traveling evenly on its keel 
."nd has been going fast. Thi.s four 
looks in the running for the monev, 
and with any kind of improvement be- 
tween now and July 21 there may be 
cause for cheering in the long stands 
that line the finish. . ,„,,..„ 

Duluth may have two junior fours 
in the regatta. The return of the , 
college men increased the size of the | 
s<iuad so that James K. Ten Kvck is , 
figuring on starting two fours in the 
four-oared event of the first day. m 
that event the four that has been row- 
ing together for the past month should 
stand much better chance. 

This season It is up to Duluth as it 
has never been up to the members 01 
any club in the Northwestern associa- 
tion. The officials of the local club 
realize this very keenly. St. Paul and 
Winnipeg have divided the lion's share 
of the honors for the past four years, 
with Kenora, P'ort Williams and I'ort 



riayere. Clube. 



<;. SB. 



1-iayrre. » iui». -- . - 

C0I4.. Detroit ^b J6 



». oiH>. uv\ nui -- 

ColUns. A-JiIeUcs *2 

I>.rd. Chl.ago J. 



Arthur occasionally sneaking in a 
victory. Duluth has been left out in 
the summer kitchen while the medal 
and glory meal was being faten. 

With a professional coach, the ot- 
flcials fetl that it is up to Duluth to 
show at least one win this season. 
The spirit of the thing has been on 
the men. They have worked hard and 
faithfully, through weather that at 
times has been trying on even the 
toughest of the old campaigners. 

Duluth men have learned many 
points ot the rowing game this season. 
Most of them have learned to reach 
further and have also learned better 
I blade work. In most cases there is 
not the deep digging and consequent 
I splashing that has been the hall mark 
I of manv Duluth crews. The men are 
' also swinging together. . 

This week fast time was cut out in 
a time row over the course by the 
eight. Those few who have been in 
fairly close touch with the work of 
the eight, believe that the boat is go- 
ing fast. At lea.«t it should be the dark 
horse of the regatta, and a good live 
dark horse at that. , , 1 

Taking logic by the hand and lead- 
ing it to a quitt corner for consulta- 
talion, it might be said that W inni- 
peg on the face of dope should have a 
stronger junior eight than St. Paul. 

Winnipeg lost the junior eight race 
last season bv -x scant three feet. Ihe 
two boats na"shed across the line al- 
most together. The winning of that 
race made the St. Paul juniors, sen- 
iors and left Winnipeg with eight 
youngsters willing to try again. 

Winnipeg generally comes back 
strong, and with most of the juniors 
back In the boat, there Is logical rea- 
son to believe that the Canucks w-ill 
make one of the hardest opponents for 
the local lads. , , , , 

The eight oarei brush should be one 
of the best races of the two days, and 
the winner should travel awfully fast 
over the old St. Louis course to pull 
down first place. 



lATa. i^nuago -■ — 

C'a'.lahaii. Chicago »" »J 



I. a:iaiiBu, vuii,«»>^ 

Cran-foPd, Detroit »» ;* 

Crcc. New York *- " 

IIiHppr. ISoston "* " 

Jaikson. ClfTeUnd " J» 

Bahcr, AUiloUcs Jf " 

Busli. Detroit ''° *' 

Ten L.enainB Hun-Gettera. 

Playern. Club». ^- " 

Col.b, Detroit *2 



«.-0liC, i>eiron. -- -. 

UPd. Chuago H H 

HU£!i. Detroit »f ll 

Mclntyre. ChlcHgo ._ 60 ii 

Jaokhoii, Cleiv^land " J^ 

Murphy, AthleUcB ^^ *! 

Hooper, lloslcn «* " 

Crawfinl. Detroit. »» " 

E. I'olUw, Athletics 60 4« 

Milan. WMianttcii 'o " 

Ten Lendins SluKKers. 

... . At. 1X3 111. TU 



Players. Clul« 

Cobb. l>ttr'lt 

Munihy. AihlcUa . 
Jacks- u, CU'TtlMid . 

Baker, ,\lhletlcii 

E. CiUlns. AtlileUos 

Cree, New York 

Lewis, Ef »ton 

Mclnlyre. Chicago 

DeHiauiy, Detroit H 

Crawtord. DeUolt 12 



2B 3H IIU. TB. 



.20 10 
.ly 5 
.16 9 
..IS 6 
.12 7 
.12 11 
.21 4 
.11 6 
T 
4 



170 
12» 
136 
128 
177 
116 
115 
lU 
lti« 

loy 



EB. 

55 
44 
43 

45 
32 
84 

■n 

28 

23 



.38t 
.30» 
.28« 
.250 
.;50 
.iSl 
.161 
.111 

AV. 
.95 

.40 
.3» 
.3» 
.39 
.34 
.8» 
.U 

:ll 

At. 

.103 
.90 

•w 

.•r 

.8S 
.70 

.75 
.T« 

.73 

.7* 

Kt. 

.687 

.-.51 

Hi 

.520 
.510 
.480 
,469 
.465 
.444 
lit 



American Association. 



Playeis. Cluba. 

Owi-n, Kiinsaa City 

Powell. Kansas City 

HigglnU'tham. LculsTllle. . 

Smoot. Kansas City 

Huuser, IinUhnap<'lls 

J. Sullivan, Kansas City., 
CrHvalb. iliniifapilU .... 

t;riin»haw. I^uisvUle 

Hickman. Tolcdc 

Stone. Milwaukee 

Ferris. MlnmapnlU 

O. Clymtr MsuueipoUs 



Uatttns 



U. AB. 

.14 22 

...21 52 

...25 55 

...42 118 

... 55 200 

...52 112 

...71 234 

...29 11» 

....'.4 223 

...38 !24 

....63 253 

. . .«4 280 



II. * lymtr j»i.i.uc.i»."i»» -- 

UonMuari. Mliuieapoll* 6i -£^< 



BIG LEAGUE AVERAGES 



.,64 244 

..70 277 

.71 274 

,..70 284 

,..70 284 

,.S7 124 

...67 240 

. .Tf 284 

.43 153 



National League. 

Batting — IncludfnK All -Men HIttins 
.aSO or Over. 

Playef? Clubs. « AB. B. H. At 

Ferry, PlttsUirg 10 7 3 

Wagner, Pittslmrg 64 244 43 87 



W»f ncr. Pittsburg 18 

Schulle. Chicago 19 



mere w aa u g,\j\j\"j v..*-..- ' . ., _ 
when the Rab Rj^h Athletic association 
pulfed Its field and /rack sports. 
Bronzed athletes and also Percy dis- 
ported themselves in bathrobes that 



BASEBALL 

TODAY AND SUNDAY 
ATHLETIC PARK 

FITWELLS vs. COLORED GOPHERS 




DEATH MAY 

FOLLOW FIGHT 

Brooklyn Pugilist Sustains Se- 
rious Injuries in New 
York Battle. 

New York. July S.— •Kid" Bolte. a 
local welterweight, is in the hospital 
today sufferlrg from a possible frac- 
ture of the skull, hemorrhages and 
other injuries received In a ten-round 
bout near midnight last night In the 
Rrlehton Beai h Athletic club. His op- 
ponent. ■•Fighting Jack- Lundy of 
Brooklyn, ha., been taken into custody. 

Lundy said that In the tenth round 
he landed a severe P^^ch on Bolte s 
law. then swi ng a right to the stomach 
and Bolte we it down. At the count of 
nine Bolte an se and finished the round. 
It appeared that later Bolte collapsed 
and three ho irs afterwards was found 
In a stable v here his companions had 
carried him. The authorities learned 
of the matter and Lundy was ar- 
rested. 




COLORED STARS HERE. 

Gophers and Fitwclls Will Open 
Series at Athletic Park. 

The crack colored Gophers of St. 
Paul one of the most famous colored 
baseball teams in the United btates 
will play two games with the strong 
Fltwell team at Athletic park, the first 
contest coming this afternoon, the bcc- 
ond game being played tomorrow aft- 

"ror^'several years the colored stars 
have played together, and ^^^jng that 
time they have defeated ^oi^Vonhers 
best teams In the sta-te. The G<^Pn«'''' 
have defeated the St. Paul league team 
and on their tour -through the North 

rt^{.p^%7es^o°;;afT;gr''e;a^;ronr?n"1hii 

^"^U°Vl\'.%nni7e been strengthened 
for the contest and the team should |^i.t 
up a very good game against tiie 

colored players. railed 
This afternoon's game will be called 
at 3:30 and the game tomorrow after- 
noon at 3 o'clock.^ 

FINALS IN CENTRAlT 

STATES TOURNAMENT. 

Ft. Louis. Mo.. July 8— f "fls In the 
slneles and doubles will be plajed 
ri?e^ foday in the Central States T^^nms 
tournament. R. M. Hoerr ofSt Louis 
who defeated Pr^nimond Jones, tit e 

holder for two years. »Vf Kansas City 
will play Jack Cannon of Kansas v.-uy. 
for the championship. peters 

Drummond Jones and C. S. * eter-s 
will play C. O. Gamble and Guy Oliver 
for the championship doubles. 



K. Clarke, Pittsburg 

Eambnd, ClnclunaU 

Siini.ri. Pittsburg 

Siigi^, Clnclii!iatl 

Hates, Cint-liiii-itl 

K. Miller, Bi'?ton 

.Myers. New York 

McLean. ClnclnnaU 

Sweeney, Boton 

Uooln. PliUade'.phla 

ITirzi'g. Ill ston 

Kresiialian. >*t. L<iits ... 
Magrce. PhUadclphla . . . 

Koiii'tcliy. St. Luuls 

Ltiderus, Phlladelplil* .. 

Lobert, PlUl.tdeliihla 

MiU'heai. Cincinnati . . . 
Hiblltzell. Clndnnaa .. 

L. Ui>yle, New York 

Klynii. I'ttsburg 

SchulU. Cliicago 

J. l»oyle. Chicago 

Sheckard, Clikngo 

Hofraan. Clilcagn 

Zinimermaii. CldragO ., 

Tlais, Philaddplila 

Walsh, Philadelphia .. 

Ellis. St. L< .'.Is 

.xturray. New York 

Klitrher, New York 

Saier. Chicago 

BridwcU. New York 

IKwhrr, Cluclnnatl . . . 
A. WlUon. Ntw Yerk. . 

Bvme. I'ilUburg 

I'Hskert. Phlla<lclrlU* . 

Kvans, St. Ltiula 

Teuney. Boston 

Paubert. BmoklT" •••• 
J. Miller. Pituburg ... 

Ad.inaF. PUtshu^l 

Mown-y, St. Luuls 

iHivvivy, Cincinnati ... 

C. Brown. Boston 

Tinker, Chicago 

Hummell. Brooklyn ... 

Ingcrti^n, Boston 

(Jraham, Chicago 

D<•^!ln, New York 

Oevcre, New Y'ork .... 
Slelnfeldt. Beaton . . . • 

Uoode, Chicago 

Stark. Brooklyn 

.Mclntlre. Chicago 

IluggliiS, St. Louis .. 
Hoolan. Phlla<UlpMa . 
T. CUrke, Clndiiiiatl. 

Carey. Plttsliirg 

O. Wilson, Pittsburg 
.VIerkle. New York. . . 

Wheat. Bri)oklyn 

Curtis. Ctikago 

BUsg, St. L<ui9 

Mclvcr. St. IX'UU 

Barger. Brooklyn .... 

Archer. Chicago 

Sncdgrass, New YoA. 

Bunh, Brooklyn 

Gcyer, St. Louis 



..51 I'.'l 35 67 
..18 41 T 14 



..19 
.15 



i6 10 I'J .336 
42 C 14 .333 



...66 225 44 75 

...61 238 2U 77 

...55 154 17 49 

...42 123 11 39 

...60 229 33 72 

...51 176 14 55 

...«0 219 36 67 

,...59 167 16 51 

,...65 244 49 74 

...68 244 40 74 

...65 244 31 73 

...89 215 43 64 

...69 222 34 66 

...66 259 44 



Koyle, New Ycrk 12 13 

.Magi*. Phllad«lphla 
Luderus. Pldladelphia 
R. MUler. BosKn .. 

,She<'kar(l. Chicago 

HcbUtaell. Cincinnati 6 

Zimmerman, Chicago 10 

Konetdiy, St. Louta 13 



136 
124 
110 



.17 

.11 

.15 

...19 



4 

8 
1 
5 
8 
8 
7 



8 123 



121 

109 
107 
117 
112 
107 



49 
54 

47 
49 
48 
32 
38 
40 
38 
33 



.557 
.523 
.516 
.504 
.4'.« 
.458 
. 4S5 
.452 
.439 
.438 



KUrk. T( ledo 

1». Hi'Ward. liOUlsTlUe 

liennox. Louisville 

J. WUllamf . Muinea: olli 

: Hyatt. Kaikaaa CSty 

I Ert Spencer. St. Paul 

' IViTing. Columbue 

H. Hliichujan, Toledo 

W. Kelly. SI. Paul - 

Oelz. IwUanapilU »» *** 

Aumy. St. Paul " ^86 

Lote. Kansaa Cliy «» .*»• 

Hayderi. LcmlsTlUe " f^ 

Caruch, Ttdedo " 70 

Ultter. ImUaiiaptllB »^ .''' 

'W. Hallnian. li.dlaiiapolli 7^ "» 

HohnhoiKt. Toledo 69 iii 

Kandall. -Milwaukee Ij *J^ 

89 
■.:82 



U'ongalton. Columbus '» 



I A. Jame*. Kansa* City 

ilKiwus. Ctlumbus 

LewU. MllWhukt* 

Sl:ir.»bury. LuuUviUe • 

I Slaglc, liOiilSTllle 

Breen. Milwaukee 

U». Butler. Si. I'aul 

Iw. Hlnclunan. Columbus 

I'aikard. Columbus .. 



..So 
...69 

.72 

...65 241 
. . . 18 38 
..33 91 
...34 lit 



H. 

9 
21 
21 
45 
27 75 
16 42 
58 95 
15 41 

31 82 
22 45 

32 88 
60 96 
43 81 
M 83 
:,l 91 
38 90 
49 1'2 
53 92 
14 39 
48 77 
59 89 
25 47 
28 68 
42 81 
36 87 
44 82 
22 M 
24 53 
48 84 
41 81 
38 85 
5<* 83 

9 2C 
45 82 
23 76 
29 70 



...Tl 
.25 



267 
53 



W. Butler. Toledo _. " 163 



Amepican League. 

Datting 



O. AB. R. 

.66 267 67 

.17 38 5 

.49 1C5 38 



213 40 C3 

27 2 8 

237 42 70 

22 



.23 

. .16 24 
..64 149 



82 13 
4 



3 
229 44 



58 
,...21 
....66 

....49 181 — 

....63 335 60 69 .293 

....53 203 25 59 .290 

....66 255 36 74 .290 

....31 121 24 35 .289 

..,.33 104 12 30 .288 

,...68 257 42 74 .28X 

..64 233 36 67 .2SS 

28 42 18 12 .286 

....15 28 4 8 .286 

...58 200 23 57 .285 

....65 261 49 74 .284 

...30 60 9 17 .283 

82 2.M 39 71 .283 

■.'...65 234 43 "56 .282 

.65 224 32 03 .281 

«4 249 35 70 .281 

60 225 31 63 .2S0 

59 204 30 57 .2;;» 

....18 43 4 12 .279 

63 230 32 63 .274 

..53 168 28 46 .273 

20 37 2 10 

...60 220 21 59 

62 222 24 59 

'.....57 217 26 57 

.44 114 10 30 



65 7 
90 13 



...60 

...18 

...26 

...60 241 52 

...63 234 48 

...58 180 38 

....54 184 24 

....50 17S 34 

...66 247 49 

...62 2.37 38 

....11 29 5 

. 15 .'>2 7 

50 1 

218 51 

..21 53 9 

..63 240 43 

27 5 



...18 



.13 
.10 
.11 
34 
.17 



H. 

115 
15 
65 
31 
9 
93 
85 
24 
33 
88 
85 
65 
65 
G3 
86 
82 
10 
11 
17 
74 
18 
83 
« 



24 

8 

52 

46 



.64 239 34 



. 64 195 26 51 
. ..C4 233 42 61 
.17 61 



.270 
.268 
.2«8 
.263 

.262 

.262 

262 



48 



44 

42 142 16 

47 198 35 

■lei 48 

139 24 



.66 
.44 



. .04 245 .■*4 



...16 
.11 



32 
32 



.44 167 10 



...1 



4 16 

61 230 29 60 .201 

2a 89 12 23 .2r.8 

v.. 12 81 8 8 .258 

58 230 39 59 .2.'i7 

...65 240 ?6 61 .254 

45 122 10 31 .254 

■■■41 131 28 33 .252 

64 235 26 59 .251 

....63 27 38 



...64 
,,.15 
...31 
...14 
...23 



^43 20 61 
28 2 7 
56 10 1« 

32 6 
5 



..19 164 18 41 

.04 228 32 57 

..40 124 11 31 

11 18 1 4 



.251 
.251 
.250 
.250 
8 .250 
13 .250 



lis - - 

Pitcher*' Record*. 

Pitchers. ctuU'^ O W. U SO. BB. H. 

R^lbach. Chicago 13 ' 1 JO *- Y 

Alexander. Philadelphia ..M 5 3 I08 83 11 J 

Malhewbon. New York "13 3 CC 24 U5 

Mclntlre. Chicago ■ ••■•■•1* ° 
Humphries. Philadelphia... t 

U.-ucke, New York » ^ 

Adam*. intt*burg J8 10 

Kitchle. Chicago !» | 

Camnlti, Pittsburg 18 U 

Marquard, New York 16 6 

Harmon. St. IxuU 20 10 



Feiry, Piltaburg 
Sallee, St. Louis . 
watae, New York . 
Kerfe. ClnclnnaU . 

Cole. Chicago 

Beebe, Philadelphia 
Crandall, New York 
C.eyer, St. L/iuls. . . 
Mr-ore. Philadelphia 



2 
1 
1 
4 

3 
5 
3 
5 
...10 2 1 
.21 6 5 



43 
14 



16 77 
9 48 .800 



.250 
. 250 
.250 
.250 

At. 

.875 
.833 
.813 
.800 



23 20 56 

55 23 104 

40 44 86 

GO 38 120 

66 39 66 

53 70 113 

12 20 



.750 
.714 

.700 
.683 
.667 
.667 
.60 



51 35 136 .643 



.10 

..17 8 

..10 6 

.. « 3 

..14 6 

..11 8 



44 14 89 

59 32 69 

30 29 57 

17 17 34 

38 20 68 

11 25 40 



Players. Club* 

Cobl). lletrolt 

Ci'.ldwell. New York 

Mrlnnes. AthleUcs 

Lajole. Cieveliind 

K. Walker. Wabhlngton . . . 

Jaikson, Cleveland 

1;. Collins, Athletics 

Uf'wan. St. l»uls 

C.alncT, Detnilt 

Mclntyre, CWcago 

.M urpliy. AthUtic* 

Sfnaker, Bos>t<n 

Ijisterly. Cleveland 

Callahan. CUcago 

Crawford, iKtrolt 

Cree. New York 

LivlngMon. AUilellos 

White. Chlc'go 

.Mullen. Itetrolt 

H. Ixird, Chicago 

Lapp. Athletics 

Baker, AUiUties 

WiUelt. Uelroit 

F!t7.gerald. .New York... 

Ilarl!=el. AUdetics 

(r:ss. St. I.-uU 

St/'piiens. St. Louis .... 

l>elehanty. I>ctr it 

Schaefer, Waih.nslon . . 

Ball. ClevelM.d 

B. Lord. .Uhlttlcs 

Miliin. \Vashln»:on 

IxiuKheny. Cliicago .... 

lytwl?. Boston 

Laiigc, Chicago 

Brockeit. New Y'ork 

Cliaw. New York 

Punell, Boston 

Hartzell, New Yoik 

Wolur. New York 

tirake, UetroU 

Fjigle. Boston 

Covlni'ton. lletrolt 

Lelivtlt. Washington . . . 

Hooper, B<l^•.( n 

Barry, Athletics 

01*cn, Cleveland 

Y'erkes. BosH n 

Thomas, Athletics 

Nuuemakpr, Beslua ... 
<;casler. Washlngtoa ... 

Bi'die, CJjlcago 

L. Oanlncr. Boston 

K. Gardner. New York. 

.'^mlth, Cleveland 

Meloan, St. Louis 

Lapirtc, St. LouU 

.Myers. Bf>st<;n 

Elberfeld. Wasldngtcu 

Knight. -New York 

1>. Jones, Detroit 

McBilIe. Washington 

Williams, Bostin 

fJraney. Clev-land 

ltl:-mlngham. Cleveland 

Slru'ik, .\lliletici 

AusUn. SI. Louis 

Zeider. Chicago 

01 irlng. Athleili-s 

Hemphill, N'W York.. 

Fluhtr, Cleveland 

Krr.use, Athletics 

Hughta. Washington . 

J. Ccllins, Chicago 

C. WaUier, W^isnlngton 1» -- - 

Hogan, St. Louis 45 153 18 

Plvvall. CV.'ve!.ind 68 /P4 /- 

Wallace. St. U.ulS 55 189 1« 

Tannclilll. Chicago "5 



39 3 
.56 213 20 
..51 191 39 
.28 8R IS 
.61 223 26 
.10 20 6 
..49 174 22 
..64 245 48 
..42 138 28 
..61 234 44 
. . 57 200 80 
..46 140 18 
..40 124 13 
..49 171 34 
,..52 193 30 
,..54 201 33 
.41 149 15 
..31 i* 2 
..41 157 25 
...57 225 29 
,..13 43 4 
...56 191 25 
,,.51 K7 23 
...50 166 36 
..66 244 25 
...49 108 24 
...69 258 43 
...51 168 25 
,85 120 23 
226 35 
83 19 
194 34 
42 7 
54 6 

27 a 

35 



Caspar, 



ClnclnnaU \l I 



21 10 8 94 76 111 



Suggs, Cincinnati 

Lelfleld. Pittsburg 

Ifeffer, Boston 

Uowan, Philadelphia . . . 
Chalmers. Phlli.dclphla 



.15 
,.19 
..13 
.. 9 

.10 



5 SO 33 107 

6 31 SB 120 



Swimming Meet. 



e 
4 

7 
3 
5 
4 

3 



58 38 135 



15 39 70 .500 



12 16 49 

23 30 55 

75 56 100 

30 31 103 

57 31 17T 

27 18 81 - 

,53 50 115 .437 

23 13 57 .429 

92 96 .41' 



6 26 25 107 
5 27 38 55 



A. C BELLERBY. 

The running high jump event in the 
international track meet will be con- 
tested for by Canfleld of Tale and Den- 
nis of Harvard, representing America, 
and A. C Bellerby of Cambridge and 
Dubois of Cambridge representing 
England. Canfleld and Dennis have 
made records of 5 feet, 9 inches, and 
Bellerby has a record of 6 feet. 9^4 
inches and Dubois has a record of 5 
feet 9\ Inches. According to this 
record Bellerby should win the event 
The competition starts July U n 
London. There are nine event in all. 
Ya"e and Harvard hjive sent some 
twenty men and Oxford and Cambridge 
have picked about the same number of 
representatives to meet the American 
^eam. 



New York. July 8.— Yale. Princeton. 

Cornell. Columbia; Brown Syracuse and 

Williams have entered men for tne an- 
nua l^LVcollegiate swimming cham 

Slonships held this afternoon at Sheeps- 
head Bay. Princeton la the fa%orlte 
but It Is expected the contests will be 
close enough to smash records before 
the possesllon of the point trojdiy is 
settled. The distances to be contested 
Ire one mile. 880. 440. 200 and 100 
yards besides t he diving con tests. 

Foley Kidney Pills are coniposed 
of Ingredients specially selected for 
?Llr'correctlve.%eallng. tonic and 

stimulating effect upon t^e kldne>s 
bladder and urinary nassages. Tney 
are antiseptic, antlllthfc and a uric acid 
solve nt. For sale by all druggists. 

TRUFSMOKE 

■A man who imokw Tfwi Smoke eaU htttw. 
Ijetter. B\e*v9 tcU«r— that • tru^ 



..16 

..18 

.10 



56 



7 
7 
4 
2 

Rucker. Brooklyn " ° 

Barger. Brooklyn J* » 

M. Brown. ( hicago •a 

E. Steele, Pliuburg 1* 

W. Steel, St. U'uls 20 

Bunis, Philadelphia 13 

GoldtD. 81. t<"uU J» 

B»ll. Brooklyn }» 

Weaver, Boston }" 

Ames, New York 1* » 

Fromme, Cincinnati " * 

Schardt. Breoklyn *• 

Ferguson, Boston * 

K. Smith, Clnclnn»U 1 » 

Matiem, Boston • 

Mcyuliian. ClnclnnaU 

Scanlon, Brooklyn -- 

Cunls. Chicago 15 J ^" 

T.vler. Boston 'J \ » .j 

C Brown. Boston • • • • • • 20 1 ^^ ",,-. 

Ten LeadlnB Ba»e-Stealer«. 

Players. Clubs. 

Murray. N*^ "^"^ 

Uevorc. New York 

Be9""her. Cincinnati 

Heraog, Bo«ton 

Merkl?. Ne* York 

Bales. ClnclnnaU 

Snodgrass. New York.... 
f>,l.ert, Philadelphia. . . . 

Mage*. Pldladelphla 

L Uoyle.^ew J^;";^^- R„„.G.tter.. 



62 
.625 
.600 
.000 
.000 
.600 
.556 
.545 
.538 
.500 



.62 
,..30 
...46 
...1« 
...21 
...12 
...14 

..47 



175 26 
74 13 



.500 
.500 
.471 
.462 
.462 
.444 



Henry, Waslilngton 
Stanage, Petroit . 

Turner, Clevtlaud 

Plank, Athletics ]> 

Lively, DeUolt " 

Roach. New York " 

Krapp. Cleveland ...^. .... .■■■■■}^ 



199 25 

....39 127 11 

64 223 23 

43 156 24 



44 

32 
40 
24 



■u^i - _ 

PltcherM' Record* 



3 
17 
15 
78 

47 . 
46 . 
64 . 
83 . 
44 . 
77 . 
10 . 
10 . 
52 , 
12 
65 
58 
26 
67 
6 

53 
73 
41 
69 
59 
41 
36 
49 
55 
57 
42 
27 
44 
63 
12 
52 
48 
45 
66 
45 
69 
45 
32 
60 
22 
51 
11 
14 
7 
9 
45 
19 
39 
07 
48 
50 
32 
56 
39 
11 
8 
10 
« 



A». 

.430 

.395 

.394 

.37b 

.376 

.373 

.,^71 

.37(1 

.367 

.365 

.363 

.361 

.353 

..3:. 2 

.348 

.346 

.345 

.344 

,.'40 

.?A0 

.340 

.337 

.333 

.3o3 

..'33 

.327 



. .70 266 

....72 2K4 

64 236 

24 54 

68 259 

64 219 

15 22 

...67 269 

72 .'»04 

33 122 

20 49 

41 155 

84 49 

....73 285 

56 204 

, 49 182 

48 179 

49 1P9 

70 

47 



264 
161 



■1 2T4 



, , 19 
. 72 



44 

268 



326 

320 

326 

324 

323 

318 

316 

314 

313 

.313 

.811 

.308 

,305 

.304 

,302 

[300 

.300 

.209 

.298 

.297 

.295 

.•.:95 

.293 

.290 

.287 

.285 

.284 

.282 

.281 

.280 

.280 

,279 

.272 

.271 

.271 

.270 

267 

.267 

.267 

.266 

.265 

.265 j 

.263 

.262 

.259 

.259 

.257 

.257 

.257 

.255 

. 2:4 

.254 

.2.'. 2 

,2^2 

.251 

.2.10 

.t'O 

.250 

.250 

.230 



.10 1 

. 4 1 

.22 11 

.14 4 

.14 6 

. 4 3 

.12 5 

, .17 10 

.21 12 

..24 12 

..19 7 

2» 11 



21 

4 

54 





2 

1 13 

2 24 



11 
17 
42 
74 
48 
41 
59 



Barbeau, Karisas City. 

Nil«. Tole*lo 

KUlifer. Miiuieaptills 

Maddox, KangiiB City 

Mahllng, Columbus 

IK.wney. Kansas <'ity 

Uecannler, St. P:iul 

CharlFS, Mllwaukfce 

: pelehatity, St. Paul 

1 J. Clarke, St. Paul 

IKiugherty. Milwaukee 

'C. Jone*. St. Paul 

ilJebhardt, Columbus 

' Woodruff. Indianapolis . . 

j Howell. St. Paul 

U»wcns. Minneapolis 

j BH'ngle. T<.ledo 

ItJardiier, Kansas Cltf 

I GUI. Minneapolis 

I Bcmis. Coluiubus 

T. Joms. Milwaukee 

Llnke. Indianap<'U8 

M. McCormlck, St. Paul. 

Pitcher*' Uecord*. 
Pitchers. Clubs. ti- W L. SO. 

Sltlon. Columbus 

, Falier. MlnneaiK'Hs . . 

I Cheney, Louisville . . . 

Owen. Kan-iis City... 

ICavet. Minneiip" lis 

: Wii ker. LouisvilU- . . . 
Altrck. Khiuias City. 
IKutrhcrty. Milwaukee 

\ Baski^K-. Toledo 

I Lcibhardt. Columbus . 
; Mc<ilynn, Milwaukee . 
r Powell. Kansas City.. 
: Lee Hard. CVilumbua ... 

U James. Toledo 

YlngUng, T.'ledo 

I Rhoade*. Kansas City 

' Cook. Coluuibus 

Brady. Toledo 

CuUing. Milwaukee .. 

Dowd. IndlanspollB 

iKicannlen?, St. Paul... 
HIgglnliolham. l^cutovllle 
\Ia«ldox. Kansas City. . 
.<iiUlgan. Milwaukee .. 
1 Kobertv.n. Indianapolis 
Lliike IndlanaiKilis ... 
PaUerson. Minneapolis 
Waddell, Minneapolis • 

Oeliring. St. Paul 

1 Chech. St. Paul 

I Packanl. Crdumbus . . . 

lO'Toole. St. Paul 

1 PeasttiT, MliuieapoUi . 
L KoUnson, Toledo .. 
Smith, Mlnneape,!!* ... 

iRUej'. Columbus 

lUroy. St. Paul 

Slaglc, Ui.i!»»111e .... 
Schllirer. Inillanapolu 

' Berger, Columbus 

Swann. Toledo 

Nlcholstn, Milwaukee . 
Webb. Indiannpells 
Brandon. Kansas City.. 

Merz, Indianapells 

Krt.h. Loulxvllle 

Leever. Mlnneiipolls .... 

iSIapnicka, Toledo ..... 

Lindaman. Louisville . 

SU-lger. St. Paul 

prieetiT. Louisville 



19 34 

55 76 

10 15 

25 46 

73 75 

53 81 

.H6 «6 



88 60 

4 6 
41 73 
36 82 
14 3? 

5 13 
25 41 

2 13 

40 75 

23 53 

22 47 

16 46 
25 43 
58 67 

17 41 
39 69 

3 11 

42 67 



AT. 

.409 
.404 
.3614 
.3T8 
.375 
.375 
.374 
.373 

3as 
.3e» 

.MS 

.343 
.348 
.340 
.329 
.32S 
.384 
.384 
.315 
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10 33 .750 



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31 139 

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23 114 

44 134 .500 
58 105 .500 
29 55 
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Dr. Konkler 

CHRONIC DISEASES 

A srECIALTY. 

Conanltatlon and Examination Free. 

504-6 Colnmbla Bids;.. Dulutli. Mian. 



G. W. L. SO. BB. 



21 65 

43 40 86 

4 28 41 77 

2 3 9 27 

8 35 28 104 

9 27 43 133 
6 26 29 85 
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Pitchers. Clube. 
Mitchell. Detroit . 
KinUay. Boston .. 
Works. Detroit .... 
Covington. l>etrolt 
La.'lttt-. Detroit . . . 
Bcaider, Athletics 
Crrgg, Cleveland 

White, Chicigo 

Krause. Athletics JZ « 

.Morgan, AlhleUc* 14 6 

Falkenlierg. Cleveland ■•••♦» - . .. 

(oombs. AthleUcs 22 12 6 86 60 

ronl. New Vork. 13 9 3 .4 32 

V. Young. CleveUnd 3 2 1 i^ ' 

Plank. AUiletUs 8 » » ' « ** 

.Mullin Detroit "8 5 38 f 

Wocd, Boston 22 11 7 111 ^^ 

Pap?, Boston » » ^ \> Tl 

Brrckrtt. New York 9 I I \i H 

Warhop. New York J? 6 4 31 14 

Wal^h, ChK-.go 2^ 10 7 125 31 

Johnson. Washington 15 5 4 ii ti 



2 1 

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1 25 42 
1 2b 21 

31 27 

37 27 

65 42 

22 19 

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30 46 

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HELD UP 



39 

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Players. < I'^l'*- gs 60 

Sht<k«rd, Chl-a«o jg ^5 

Ix)l*n. PhlladelphU ^ ^9 „ 

Bescher, Clndimatl JJ ^g 

Magee, Philadelphia J» ^j 

Knabe, Phlladelphl* ^ ^ 

Konetchy, St. I.ouls ^ ^^ 

Hoblltzell, Clndnnad J' ^^ 

Bates, Cincinnati, •;„ 43 

Paskert, PhUadelpbU \^ ^j 

I„vo«. ^- ;;\„din« Sli.K«*r-. 

Players. Club.. IB. SB, HU. TB. EB, 



.92 
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<»m»t«Ml. Chicago 

Walker. Washington ... 

Ksrgcr, Boston 

Vaughan, New York 

Harkness. CleveUnd 

uulnn. New Y'ork... 

W. James, Cleveland 

lUker. Chicago 

Caldwell. New York 

Fisher. New Ycrk 

K rapD, Cleveland 

Summers, I)e»ndt 

Clcotte. Bi«ton 

Hall, Boston 

Lange, Chicago 

Wlllctt, Detroit 

Donovan. Detroit 

I Young. Chicago 

R. Mitch?U, St. LouU.. 

Gray. Washington 

Lake. i?t. Loul» 

Sorit. Chicago 

Pelty. St. Louli 

West. ClevelMid 



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20 9 

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62 50 

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14 13 

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8 32 18 

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On the road when you ha^e 
started out for a pleasant drive in 
vour automobile is always ann^-y- 
ing You will always have trouble 
m this manner If you don't have 
your car put Into good ^of^*"f 
order bv having it overhauled and 
repaired at a first-class shop like 

THE IITERSTATE AUTO CO., 

' (INC.; 

B and 7 Cast First Str««t. 
Both Phonss 



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12 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 




»»<p» »»««»»««»f«««»»<i«»i < i«i ii ««»i i [«»««»>«»»»«H»» « r»<i««»«»«lil 

AT THE LYCEUM 



Whon Augustus Thomas. Ameri- 
can I'laywright. brought his best 
piece of work of Frohmaii. that usual- 
ly a.'stute manager refused it. The 
liuthor had confidence, however, and 
JL year or two later he induced a 
manaser to produce •"Arizona." and 
fn>m the night of its initial i>erform- 
»nce to the present day the play has 
«arned large sums. The story of 
Arlzttna is told so well that it would 
•eem that the play will continue in 
popularity. As "Arizona" has not 
peen seen in Duluth for several sea- 
eoi s th^re is much approval among 
lo atergoers that Gus A. Forbes 

h;- u .tjf-n it for the third week of 
h:< ."ummer engasemcnt in Duluth. 
The play will be new to the younger 
theatergoers and to the older ones it 
wilt be a pleasant revival. In 1900 
"Aris'na" hud earned more tlian 
i~ for its author. 

;.^,jna" is a melodrama of a 
rat!i:-r conventiorial sort but the 
Bianuer of its telling is not conven- 
tional, and the play stands by itself 
In the class of playwritinj? to whi-'h 
It belongs. The play tell-^ the story 
of lire at a United States cavalry post 
In Arizona Estrella Canby. daughter 
of a wealthy ranch owner, marries 
the colonel of the cavalry troops, a 
niaii much older than herself. A 
younger lover appears on the scene 
and the worries that result consti- 
tute the aory of "Arizona." Estrella 
deci«ks to elope with her lover but 
Is soved by a young lieutenant who 
Is devoted to the colonel, and who 
also loves Estrellas young sister. 
Bonita. In the saving Lieut. Denton 
is irisjudged by the colonel and he 
leav . >• the po.<»t. Later he is sus- 
pecti'd of mvirdering the rascally lov- 
er. But ih the end everything turns 
out happily. The play holds its in- 
terest because of the master toucli in 
tlie building of it. The people talk 
and act like real people: the dia- 
logue is unstrained and easy, the 
situations are convincing. A better 
melodrama than "Arizona" has prob- 
ably never been written. 

Mr Forbes will appear as Lieut. 
Denton, the wrongfully accused hero. 
It is a role in which this popular 
actor manager should appear to 
ipreat advantage In fact. "Arizona" 
•wil] provide as good an opportunity 
for ihe members of the company as 
ha:s the bill this week, and that 's 
sayir.g much, for it would seem that 
no play could be better adapted for 
stock playing than has "Wildfire." 
But in "Arizona" there is a list of 
fine r ■le« There is the colonel and 
Mr Cani>y. father of Estrella and 
owner of the ranch. There are Tony. 
thi chivalrous Mexican: Estrella, the 
tinhappy wife. and Bonita. her 
younger sister. In the New York 
production of "Arizona" a few years 



aero Elinor Robson appeared as Bon- 
ita. All of these are in addition to 
Lieut. Denton, the hero of the piece. 

The first perfornance of "Arizona" 
will be given Monday evening and 
the play will be continued every 
evening for a wee!: and there will be 
Wednesday. Saturday and Sunday 
matinees. 

During this week Duluthians have 
realized for the fir.st time the strength 
of the stock company which Mr. 
Forbes has brought to the city for the 
summer. Few of the traveling road 
show-5 give as fine a production aa 
Mr. Forbes is planning for each week 
of his engagement "Wildtire." which 



has been the bill 
given an elaborate 
tinely adapted t< 
strength of his 



or tills week, was 

Sf^tting and it was 

■ bring out the 

company. Every 



meml>er of the oiganization did his 
best and the result, has been an un- 
usually fine perf.>t mance and that 
Duluthians are ap.>reciating this fact 
Is proved from the large audiences 
which have greet. -d every perform- 
ance. In securing such actors as Ed- 
win Brandt. Westropp Saunders. Ray 
Phillips. Perry Golden. Frances 
Whitehouse and Jane Stuart. Mr. 
Forbes has shown his intention of 
providing a most excellent company 
for Duluth's summer amusement. 

The final performances of "Wild 
fire" will be given tonight and to- 
morrow afternoon and nignt. The 
new bill. "Arizonji." will be played 
for the first time Monday evening. 
• » • 

Mrs. Fiske and the Manhattan 
company in "Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh" 
is the attraction armounced for early 
in August at the Lyceum, and in this 
there is strong gratification for the 
management, as v ell as the public, 
which has been s t loyal to Mrs. 
Fiske and so apprt ciative of the art- 
ist who is the mo it dominant figure 
on the America'' .itage today. 

All who are intt rested in the bet- 
ter things of the stage, in the great 
good that the stag^ as an institution 
is capaiile of acco nplishing, in wor- 
thy effort ahvay.q worthily directed, 
and in intellectual ty as a moving 
force in the dram i and in the per- 
sonality, which is the greatest hope 
of the stage, will be Interested in 
Mrs. Fiske's coming engagement. 

Her new play Is the comedy in 
which she has rec mtly been so suc- 
cessful in New Yi rk, and it will be 
found entirely diflerent from any 
other play in which Mrs. Fiske has 
ever been seen here. Broad comedy 
has not heretofore been associated 
with Mrs. Fiske. bJt when her com- 
prehensive and comprehending art Is 
brought to bear upon that type of 
dramatic creation. the result can 
easily be predicted. New York de- 
clared the play a joy and Mrs. Fiske's 
work in the title role a revelation. 



AT THE EMPRESS 



The patrons of th') Empr-.V will be 

offered another excellent bill of vau- 

.dfiville commencing Sunday matinee. 
perard. the marvelous European 
heavyweight juggler, will be the lead- 
ing attraction tor the week, and he 
Comes to the Empress from wonder- 
ful continental success. Gerard is an 
exceptionally strong man and is 
•poken of as "the man who laughs at 
gravity's laws" His work consists, 
cliiefly. of the manipulation of can- 
non balls, which he does in a very 
thrilling manner and he is not only 
one of the strongest men in the world, 
but he Is a most skillful juggler of 
light and heavy objects. There seems 
to be nothing that dazzles him in the 
way of daring jugg'.erj-. 

Gerard is claimed to be one of the 



most perfect speci 
before the public a 
form and muscular 
been the inspiratioi 
artists. Jugglers ai 
men are no longei 
combination of tht 
far enough out o 
command immedia 
! of Gerard's accomp 
la queer thrill as 
highly sensational ; 
impossible. Any m 
four 50-pound cam 
vel In every sense o 
his many feats the 
first performs on ; 
alighting on the en 
weight of his bod: 
mendous shell bale 
end to spring upvi 



mens of manhood 
nd his magnificent 

development have 

I of manj' noted 

e many and strong 

a novelty, but a 

two Is something 
the ordinary to 
e attention. Many 
tishments give one 
nost of them are 
md border on the 
an who can juggle 
ion balls is a mar- 
f the word. Amons 
•e is one which he 
horizontal bar, 
I of a see-saw, the 
■ causing a tre- 
nced on the other 
ards Into the air 




GUS A. FORBES, 
Who Will Be Seen as Lieut Denton in "Aruona" at the L 'ceum Next Week. 



Gerard catching it on the back of 
his neck and balancing It there. This 
is but one of Gerard's remarkable 
achievements and the manner in 
which he handles 100-pound weights 
and heavy animate and inanimr.te ob- 
jects simply astounds his audience. 
Recognizing that comedy nowadays is 
one of the chief demands of the pub- 
lic. Gerard has secured the services 
of a real comedian, who is attired in 
a slightly grotesque garb, and who is 
said to be able to resist "chestnut" 
humor. There is quaint fun al)out 
this fellow and he Is careful to intro- 
duce his comedy at times not likely 
to detract from the scientific portion 
of the program. Gerard has secured 
magnificent scenery which is in keep- 
ing with the rest of the act and there- 
by has left no detail lacking that 
would tend to make his offering a 
genuine success, according to the ad- 
vance notices. 

There is a very pleasant surprise 
awaiting the patrons of the Empress 
In the character musical oddity, en- 
titled "In the Streets of Italy." which 
is to be presented by Geigers and 
Wallers. These performers transport 
their audience to the picturesque 
highways of the beautiful city of 
Venice and delight with selections on 
a variety of instruments. Including 
the Barbarian organ, so commonly 
used by street musicans in everj- city 
but seldom heard on the stage. Mr. 
Geiger also has several instruments of 
his own Invention and his manipula- 
tion of them is interesting and skill- 
ful. Miss Walter is a very handsome 
woman and her character songs are 
said to be gems. 

From Bonnie Scotland come those 
funny acrobatic comedians. Hill and 
Ackerman. Garbed in the kilts of a 
Highland clan and top boots of the 
army, these clever comedians offer a 
specialty that is full of pantomimic 
fun all the way through. Sensation- 
al acrobatic play an important part 
in this act and riotous mirth pre- 
dominates, according to critcs of 
other cities. "From the moment these 
clever athletes appear on the stage 
until the curtain falls at the close of 
their act. they keep their audience In 
shrieks of laughter with their breath- 
less somersaults, head spins, twisters, 
funny falls and marvelous gymnas- 
tics." says a St. Paul writer. "Hill 
and Ackerman are recognized as be- 
ing among the foremost performers In 
their line and their offering is good 
and thoroughly enjovable at alj 
times." 

Florence Hughes, who will make 
her initial vaudeville appearance at 
the Empress, should prove one of the 
big favorites of the week. Miss 
Hughes' vaudeville entree is looked 
upon as an event of no small import- 
ance for she has developed into the 
leading ranks of the legitimate and 
last season saw her in one of the 
stellar roles of "The Commuters." 
Miss Hughes has a personality that 
wins her audience from the outset, 
and her jovial maner and sweet voic« 
combine to make her a favorite. She 
sings with gesticulation but her 
comedy work for the most part con- 
sists of raillery which is based upon 
her buxom figure and amiable per- 
sonality. Her entertainment also in- 
cludes timely hits and pertinent wit- 
ticisms concerning the fads and foibles 
of her sex. Altogether Miss Hughes, 
it is claimed, will be one of the most 
entertaining artists it has been the 
pood fortune of the patrons of the 
Empress to hear. 

The added attraction for the week 
will be Dan Mason, one of the fore- 
most German dialect character come- 
dians of the American stage. Mr. 
Mason has been connected with such 
leading legitimate attractions as "The 
Man From Mexico." in which he 
created the eccentric German char- 
acter. He will be remembered also as 
the Gorman stocking merchant In 
"Naughty Marietta." under the man- 
agement of Mr. Hammerstein and as 
Count von Gugenheim in Broad- 
hursts "Why Smith Left Home." He 
will be recalled as the star in "Ru- 
dolph and Adolph." His last appear- 
ance throughout the West and Pacific 
coast was as Hans Wagner, the Ger- 
man brewer in "The Prince of Pil- 
sen." This season he has turned his 
attention to vaudeville and is pre- 
senting "The New Chauffeur," sup- 
ported by a company of two clever 
players. It is a cleverly constructed 
farce with a well defined plot and 
abounds with ludicrous complications 
and entanglements. The situations de- 
velop naturally and are played along 
legitimate lines, action is brisk, every 
line bright and the comedy clean and 
wholesome. Mr. Mason's character of 
"The Chauffeur" Is not a stage Ger- 
man but a real piece of character 
work such as he has been Identified 
with. 

The moving pictures will be of the 
usual high standard. A matinee is 
given daily at 2:45 and night per- 
formances at 8 and 9:30. Seats may 
be reserved one week In advance by 
either telephone. A special school 
children's matinee Is presented everv 
Saturday at 2:30. All pupils under 
14 years of age are admitted for 5 
cents. Special attention is paid to the 
comfort of ladies and children at all 
times. 



AUDITORIUM WILL 

CLOSE UNTIL JULY 16 



This evening and Sunday afternoon 
and evening will be the last opportuni- 
ties to enjoy the roller skating at the 
big Auditorium rink for some time, as 
after tlie program of Sunday evening 
tile building will be closed until July 
16. 

During the time the big rink Is 
closed the decorators will be busy, 
a large crew of floor surfacers will be 
put at work on the floor, and also 
an additional check and skate room 
will be placed In the rink. The Japa- 
nese style of decoration will be used, 
making the big building even more at- 
tractive than It Is at the present time. 
The work on the floor will make the 
skating surface absolutely the finest of 
any skating rink In the West. 

Two huge electric fans have been 
installed, and in addition the scioptl- 
con. one of the very latest designed 
machines for producing beautiful elec- 
tric effects, will be ready for the open- 
Ing. Some of the spectacular effects 
will be the aurora borealls rays, ocean 
ripple, moving clouds with disappear- 
ing moon, rain effects with driving 
clouds, and many other beautiful light 
Illusions. 

Manager Downing Is going to grive 
Duluth patrons of skating the same 
big features that are playing at the 
big rinks of the East. The Auditorium 
has been placed In the front rank 



m -» -» , ■ ■■ 




DAN MASON, 
In "The New Chauffeur" at the Empress Next Week. 



of roller rinks, and the policy of the I evening, with the big grand march 
management is to keep it there. number the feature for tomorrow afl- 

The program will be as usual this ernoon and evening. 



GOSSIP OF THE RIALTO | 



Though William A. Brady has saile-l 
for the continent to rest after a par- 
ticularly busy year, his lieutenants In 
hL« New York city office at the Plav- 
house are hard at work getting the 
tours ready for the attractions that 
are to bear the Brady standard during 
the coming sea*jn on the "road." 
Among the plays that are scheduled 
to be seen In Duluth during the sea- 
son of 1911-1912 are: Jules Eckert 
Gooman's drama of domestic life 
"Mother" which seems to have sup- 
planted 'Way Down East" in the af- 
fections of the theatergoer; tlie new 
farce "Over Night," which had a very 
long run in New York at the Hackett 
theater and was afterward moved to 
the Playhouse, Mr. Brady's own 
theater, to conthiue It sexislence until 
the end of the pa^ season, and "Baby 
Mine." which will be seen again in 
Duluth with the same company that 
caused so much merriment when the 
play was here In December. The Mar- 
garet Mayo farce Is now enjoying the 
phiudits of the English theatergoers 
and the coronation visitor as it is on 
at the Duke of York's theater, in 
London with Weedon Grossmith play- 
ing Jimmy Jenks. Holbrook Blinn is 
bound for the Pacific coast and en 
route he will be seen at the Head of 
the Lakes In the Edward Sheldon 
play of tlie minute. "Tlie Boss," which 
was seen by metropolitan theater- 
goers at the Astor theater. Shakes- 
peare lovers will be especially pleased 
to learn that Robert B. Mantell, an- 
other Brady star, is to return during 
tlie coming season to Duluth with an 
extensive repertoire of the Bards 
plays. 

« * « 

It required a trip down the bay as 
far as guartine and return on the i)art 
of William Collier before he and Lew 
Fields, his manager, had decided on 
the name of the comedy In which Mr. 
Collier will be etarre,! next season. 
Various titles ware sugge.sted by Mr. 
Collier, but none Had been agreed "upon. 
"Take my advice. Willie." said Mr. 
Fields, "an.l go a^ore. We can settle 
It all bv cal>Ie." \«hen Mr. Collier ex- 
claimed: "Thafs the very name for It, 
Lew. 'Take My ^Ulvlce.' " and "Take 
My Advice" will be the name of the 
new play. 

• • * 

On the eve of his departure for 
Europe Lew Fields signed a contract 
with Miss Jessie Bu.^^ley to play the 
role of Henoria Peck, the manicure 
girl. In the "The Henpecks" when It 
resumes Its run at the Broadway the- 
ater early In August. 

• • • - 

George C. Tyler, managing director 
for Liebler & Co.. Is now in Paris 
where he has gone to confer with 
Mme. Simone, who comes to America 
to play In English next fall. Beyond 
Louis N. Parker's adaption of Ros- 
tand's "The Lady of Dreams," which 
she Is to stage at the Century theater, 
no selections have as yet been made 
for Mme. oimone's repertorle. It is 
expected that the question of repertoire 
win be settled during the present con. 
ference. 

• * « 

John Alden has been engaged by 
John Cort for the role of Mr. Fordyce 
in "The Karl of Pawtucket,' In which 
Lawrence D'Orsay will be starred the 
coming season. 

« • • 

Laurette Taylor will resume her star- 
ring tour under the management of 
Cohan and Harris, when she will be 
seen in a new comedy from tlie pen of 
Miss Harriet Ford. 

« • • 

An Interesting offer has been made 
to Tim Murphy for eight consecutive 
weeks of his annual starring season. 
There is a ship broker in New Orleans 
who has fitted up one of the Missis- 
sippi river steamers as a theater, the 
dimensions of the stage and auditorium 
of which are approximately those of 
the Bijou theater. New York. He had 
hia own electric and heating plant 
aboard, of course, and cabins for ar- 
tists and artisans to the number of 
thirty. His offer to Mr. Murphy is 
to break his Southern tour at New Or- 
leans, move his productions aboard the 
steamer and. during the next eight 
weeks, plav the following river cities 
In this sequence: Baton Rouge. Nachez. 
Vlcksburg Greenville. Arkansas City. 
Helena, alemphls. Cairo. Paducah. St. 
Louis. Alton. Hannibal. Quincy, Keokuk, 
Fort Madison, Burlington, Muscatline, 
Rock Island. Mollne. Davenport. Clin- 
ton. Dubuque. Prairie du Chien. La 
Crosse, ». inona, Wabasha. Red Wing, 
St. Paul. Minneapolis, and. If success- 
ful a^ hoped, back over the same route. 
The promoter is evidently counting on 
the novelty In this for good adver- 
tising. Mr. Murphy has promised an 
answer in a few weeks. 

• • • 

Messrs. Cohan and Harris have ac- 
cepted for production In the early fall 
a four-act drama of American life by 
Henry Blossom. It is said to deal with 
the subject of local option In the Mid- 
dle West and is entitled "Brought 
Home." 

• • • 

Hale Hamilton and Miss France* 
Ring, who, respectively, originated the 



roles of J. Rufud Wallingford. the pro- 
moter, and Fanny Jasper, the stenog- 
rapher, in George M. Cohan's comedy 
"Get Rich Quick Wallingford." have 
renewed their contracts with Cohan 
and Harris and will continue to enact 
the parts for another season. 

• • • 

James K. Hackett's next tour wih 
begin at the Blackstone theater. Chi- 
cago, on Sept. 18. His offering will be 
Louis Evans Shlpman's dramatization 
of the late David Graham Phillips's 
story, "A Grain of Du.?t," which has 
been running in the Saturday Evening 
Post. Mr. Hackett, next season, will 
not have the advantage of the com- 
bined Brady and Shubert skill. Ho- 
will act as his own man.o.gor hereafter 
end appear on the Syndic-ate circuit. 

• • * 

Cathrine Countiss, during her season 
under the direction of Stair & Havlin, 
will star in F. Marion Crawford's 
semi-religious romance, "The White 
Sister." The original Viola Allen stage 
production has been secured by special 
arrangement with Lieber & Co. The 
tour of forty weeks begins at the 
Majestic theater, Jersey City, on La- 
bor day. 

• * • 

Joseph M. Gates probably will hn 
the first to start the new season's 
theatrical ball a-rolllng. with "The 
Girl of Mv Dreams." at the Criterion 
theater. The date for the opening of 
this attraction is Aug. 7. 'The Girl 
of My Dreams" already has enjoyed 
an entire season outside of New York 
that included long runs in Chicago, 
Pliiladelphia and Boston. John Hyams 
and Leila Mclntyre are the featured 
members of the cast. 

• • • 

After 151 performances in this city 
the engagement of "Everywoman" will 
come to an end at the Lyric theater on 
July 1. Laura Nelson Hall. Sarah 
Cowell Le Moyne, Frederick de Belle- 
ville, H. Cooper Clltte and other mem- 
bers of the cast will Immediately set 
out In search of a suiflcient vacation 
to last them through the coming sea- 
son. The engagement at the Lyric 
will be resumed about tiie middle of 
August. ^ 

• • • • 

"Louisiana Lou ' Is to be the title of 
the next play to be produced at the La 
Salle theater, Chicago. Harry Askin, 
manager of that house, Is at present 
In New York engaging the members of 
his cast. 

"Louisiana Lou" is the work of Fred- 
erick Donaghey and Addison Burkhardt. 
The score Is by Ben J^grome. Donaghey, 
who is best known as a newspaper 
writer and theatrical manager, is at 
present located in Chicago as the West- 
ern representative of Liebler & Co. He 
has tinkered upon numerous plays in 
the course of his theatrical career. 

Eva Fallon Is the most recent play- 
er engaged for the cast. Others who 
will participate are Bertrand Gran- 
ville, Sophie Tucker and Alexander 

Carr. 

• • * 

Jane Cowl and her husband, Adolph 
Klauber, the dramatic critic of the 
Times, have returned to New York aft- 
er a few weeks in Europe. Miss Cowl 
resumes the leading role In "The Gam- 
blers" next fall. 

• • • 

Joseph Oaites is to star Kitty Gordon 
In "The Enchantress." Fred De Gresac 
and Harry Smith have written the book 
and Victor Herbert Is to compose the 

score. 

• • • 

Miss Blanche Walsh, who for the past 
thr^ seasons has starred under the di- 
rection of A. H. Woods, announces that 
she will not be under his management 
during the coming season, as he is un- 
able to get her a suitable play. 

• • • 

Joseph Manning has been engaged by 
Cohan & Harris to play the title role 
in the Western "Get Rich Quick Wal- 
lingford" company next season. For 
some time Mr. Manning has been In 
vaudeville. 

• • • 

Miss BlUle Burke will end a season 
of over forty weeks in "Suzanne" at 
Spokane. Julv 10. Arrangements have 
been made In the transportation de- 
partment of Chas. Frohman's offices for 
Miss Burke's arrival In New York In 
time to sail for Europe July 15. On 
August 8 Miss Burko will sail from 
Liverpool to New»York In time to be 
present for the first rehearsal of her 
new play. "The Runaway," on Aug. 15. 



AUDITORIUM 

3rd Ave. East and 1st St. 

No Skating 

July 10, II, 12, 13, 
H and 15. 

Re-Open «Jul>^ 16 



fi 



July 8, 1911. 




New York. July 8. — R. G. Dun & 
Co.'s Weekly Review of Trade today 
says: 

Actual business is reduced by the 
extreme heat extending over a wide 
section of the country; otherwise de- 
velopments of the week are general- 
ly favorable. 

Inquiries for pig iron continue In 
excess of actual trading but there Is 
a steady buying in all sections of the 
country. The Improvement in the 
steel trade during June is Indicated 
by the monthly statement of the Iron 
Age, which shows a dally output of 
the steel plants In June of 42,791 
tons against 42,270 tons in May. 
There was some decline, however, in 
the output of merchant furnaces. 

Business in dry goods at wholesale 
continued quiet after the holidaj-s. 
In cotton goods the chief feature was 
the opening of lines of fine goods for 
spring at prices that show a closer 
margin of profit to mills than any 
named in several seasons. Ex/ort 
fTgures continue very favorable and 
the depletion of stocks in first and 
second hands is emphasized by the 
curtailment of production, which 
reached Its highest level this week. 
The probability of *a large cotton 



crop this year serves at this time to 
induce drastic curtailment at the 
mills to conserve limited supplies of 
the raw material, while purchases of 
goods are delayed in anticipation of 
lower prices. Secondary- distributers 
of dress goods are doing a fair fall 
business in rough fabrics. As show- 
ing the spotty condition of trade, it 
was noted that the largest woolen 
goods mill In the country is sold up 
for fall, while many of the worsted 
mills are idle. 

There Is more animation in foot> 
wear, due to the arrival of quite a 
large number of buyers in the New 
England market, but purchases are 
generally confined to current require- 
ments. The leather markets hold 
firm, but the recent holiday served 
to check the demand and shoe manu- 
facturers are now engaged in inven- 
tory taking. Supplies of sole leather 
are limited. The hide market con- 
tinues well maintained, with a fur- 
ther advance of Vic for packer native 
steers. Buying, however, has been on 
a more conservative basis. Native 
cows continue scarce and branded va- 
rieties are firm in price. The forelgrn 
hide markets are also strong and at 
the recent Paris auctions advances 
were secured for all varieties. 



OWEN PRAISES THE 
COMMISSION PLAN 



Makes Speech in Senate on 
Government of Munic- 
ipalities. 

Washington. July 8. — The commis- 
sion form of government for mu- 
nicipalities was advocated by .Senator 
Owen of Oklahoma in a speech before 
the senate yesterday. The speaker took 

the position that such form of govern- 
ment would be an agency for the re- 
storation of integrity and efficiency 
and the termination of corruption In 
city, state and nation, and the over- 
throw of the undue Influence of com- 
mercialism In government. 

Having declared that the great prob- 
lem of the present time Is the restora- 
tion of equality of opportunity, so that 
every man. woman and child shall en- 
joy a fair return for labor honorably 
and faithfully performed, the speaker 
considered the question in its bearing 
on the Integrity of government. 
Han National Value. 

"The commission form of govern- 
ment." said the senator, "has a national 
value and a direct bearing upon the 
integrity of the election of senators, 
because it is an important agency in 
overtlirowlng corrupt machine politics 
in municipalities and cities. 

"The proportion of inhabitants living 
In cities as compared to the inhabitants 
of the United States Is between 40 and 
50 per cent, not counting towns of less 
than 2,500 Inhabitants. If corrupt gov- 
ernment can be terminated in cities, it 
cannot survive in the states, or in the 
nation." 

The senator said that the commission 
form of government eliminates meie 
partisan politics in cities, towns and 
villages in the government of such 
municipalities. 

Give Home Government. 

It usually carries with it, he said, the 
initiative, referendum, and recall, giv- 
ing a home government, a popular gov- 
ernment. "It enables the people 
through the Initiative, referendum and 
recall." said the speaker, "to Initiate 
and pass any law they do want, in- 
cluding corrupt practices, prevention 
acts, veto any law they don't want, 
such as the granting of franchises of 
value without consideration. It en- 
ables them to recall Inefficient and dis- 
honest officials." 

Senator Owen said more than 200 
cities and towns have adopted some 



form of this Improved method of city 
government within the last two years. 

BULLDOG FIGHTS BIPLANE. 

Breaks Atwood's Machine and Halts 
Flii^ht to Capital. 

Atlantic City, X. J., July 8. — The 
curiosity of a bull dog e«pdangered 
the lives of Harry N. Atwood and 
Charles K. Hamilton, the aviators, 
yesterday afternoon and compelled 
them to abandon their proposed 
flight from this resort to Washing- 
ton. Just as their biplane started 
from the ground on the first of sev- 
eral attempts to get Into the air, the 
dog, running across the beach, poked 
Its nose Into one of the whirling 
propellers. The dog was killed and 
one of the blades of the propeller 

was slightly split. 

Hamilton succeeded In temporarily 
repairing the damage and another at- 
tempt was made to ascend, but it 
proved a failure as a stiff northeast 
wind was blowing from the ocean, 
making the air current exceedingly 
tricky. On a third effort to get Into 
the air, the biplane rose to a height 
of about 100 feet. Then the experts 
on the ground noticed that one of the 
propellers had a greater lifting po\^er 
than the other, and the machine 
sailed along a trifle unsteady. 

The biplane was hovering over the 
edge of the ocean when a sudden 
gust of wind struck it, and before 
Atwood could right the craft. It sud- 
denly plunged downward into the 
breakers. For an Instant the avia- 
tors were hidden behind a cloud of 
Boray, then a dozen life guards 
plunged into the surf and assisted 
the two men to free themselves and 
hauled the machine up on the beac'.i. 

Examination showed that the air 
craft had been damaged beyond Im- 
mediate repair so the aviators an- 
nounced that the flight was off for 

the time. 

« 

Kidney Dlscaseii Are Curable 

Under certain conditions. The right 
medicine must be taken before the 
disease has progressed too far. Mr. 
Perry A. Pitman, Dale. Tex., says: 
"I was down in bed for four months 
with kidney and bladder trouble and 
gall stones. One bottle of Foley's 
Kidney Remedy cured me well and 
sound." Ask for it. For sale by all 
druggists. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



AMUSEMENTS. 




Week Commencing 
Sunday Matinee 



The Distinguished 
German Comedian. 

DAN MASOii 
&C0. 

Presenting the Big 
Laughing Hit, 

"THE NEW 
CHAUFFKUR." 



The Frolicsome 
Scotchmen, 

HiLL and 
ACKERMAH 

Physical Feats and 

Comedy Acrobatic 

Comlques. 

A Cosmopolitan Mu- 
sical Offering, 

GEIGER and 
WALTERS 

"IX THE STREETS 
OP ITALY." 



Ui 

V 

03 
V 



V 



V 



< 

U 

W 

CO 



G 

E 
R 
A 
R 
D 



<i 



^ 



C/: 



k 



Suiiivan & Consid- 
Ine Vaudeville 



cAi 







The Plump Dispen- 
ser of Jollity, 

FLORENCE 
HUGHES 



In Comedy, Songs, 
Stories. 



SCHHEIDER'S 
ORCHESTRA 

EMPRESSCOPE 

New Photoplay. . 

MATINEE DAILY— 

10c 

Reserved Seats 20c 

TWICE NieHTLY— 

8 and 9:30 

lOc 15c 25c 



ORDER SEATS BY BOTH PHONES 



LYCEUIVI 



Tonisht. Siinilay Mat. and NlK*it 

••WILDFIRE'' 



ts.-Wad., 
. and Sun. 



Week Commencing Monday, July lO £;; 

THE FORBES STOCK COMPANY 

PreaentluK Aueruatus Thomaa' Greatest Americau Drama 

"ARIZONA" 

with the Entire StrenKth of the Forbes Oompanr* 

PRICES: ETenlnv, 2Sc. 35c, 50c| Matinees, all seats, 2Sc. 

Order Seats Xo^r! 

NEXT WEEK "BREWSTER'S MILLIONS" 






T i» T< i 9 



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I 



L 



( 









k 










; 


' 1 


1 
1 




1 


4 

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Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 



18 



COMPROMISE REACHED IN 
FIGHT FOR FAY CHILDREN 



AGRICULTURISTS LEAVING FOR 

THEIR TOUR OF INSPECTION 



ADDITIONAL 
SPORTS 



After nghtlng details of the settle- 
mtnt nearly the entire day, the prin- 
cipals In the matter of the guardian- 
■hlp of Charles 3£ircus and MadeUne 
Wlnnlfred Fay, ko/NTe compromised. 

Early this mdrningr, at the reijuest of 
Marcua L. Fay, the attorneys In the 
• ctlon got together and tried to com- 
Bcth parties objected to dlf 



and f«>r 




promise. _ — .^ - 

lerent parts of the ^e^reement 

Bome tltne it looked as- though t»i 

case would go back to be fought out 

'"Flrsf^one -.vould object and then the 
other until the attorneys almost came 
?o believe that It would be impossible 
to settle outside of court. 

The present agreement is said to oe 
Btulsfactory to all parties concernea. 

After the agreement had been signed 
Mrs. Katherlne V. Fay and Marcus U. 
Fay shook hands and chatted pleas- 
antly together. There were handshakes 
all around and the matter that was 
BO .iti' rlv fought at first was set- 
tlf.l. 



S 



THE A<iKKEME>T. 



t 



REEASE IN 
mm CASE 

William Munhall Is Set Free 

on Motion of Attorney 

for the State. 

Bemidji Bartender Is Sub- 
poenaed for Grand Jury 
Next September. 



Bemidji, Mn.n.. July 8.— .Special to 
The Herald. .—William Muahall, a bar- 
tendf. .f this city, was released and 
the cu.c .igainst him dismissed here 
thld morning on motion of the states 
attorney. Munhall hud been arrested 
as an accessory before the 'a^i/n con- 
nection with the charge against Major 
D F Dumas of Cass Lake of conn-ir- 
iTig to burn the K. E. Smyth building at 

^^Afu.r'thl^'acUon this morning Mun- 
hatl«^^s Subpoenaed to appea. before 
the grand ;ury on Sept. 12 and testif> 



Z That Katherin* V. Fay be and 
« remain auardlin ot Cliarlei* Mar- * 
Z cua Fay and Madeline WInnlfred • 

Jib It'ttV* 

« That the petition of Marcnn 1>. ^ 
^ Fay to have Mm. Katherlne V. * 
^ Kay removed i» Buardlan ot the * 
i children be dlrtmUned. ^ .. ^ * 

% That .Maroun li. Fay «haU ha%e * 
^ the oare and » untody of the chll- ♦ 

* dren durlns M«h«»«»l term» but that * 
^ (lurtnis their vacation periods, « 
^i^ they i«hall be with their mother, » 
^ Mrw. Kathertn • \. Fay. * 

That Mr. aid >Ini. Marcnw I/. * 
Fay will have the right to vl«lt * 
the children at all reasonable * 
times when tliey are In the imim- * 
tody of their mother and that * 
Mrs*. KatherlB- V. Fay nhall have * 
the jiame rlgiit when they are J 
living with llelr grandparent*. f 

That the el lldren Hhall be re- # 

* turned to their mother at once. * 
4le That when Mr»». Katherlne h ay * 

* han a permnn* nt home and 1" able * 

* iinancially to irovlde for the chll- « 
» dren. the court will make ■«»•;•■"- f 
« er directing that the children * 
^l^ nhall at all timet* be with their * 
^ mother. * 



* 

* 
* 

* 

* 



CENTRAL ^lit^c^r 

30 E\ST SI PKRItiR STREET, 
Din TH, Ml.N.N. 

New Classes In ¥ Y If V 1 A 

All Deparlmenis tl U Li 1 XV 




pressed his willingness to retire front 
his position if It is the desire of the- 
university rowing authorities to re- 
place him with a coach who can re- 
store the lost prestige in this brancli 
of sport. It is further stated that the 
-sentiment of old oarsmen is that in 



FAST PLAY IS 
IN PROSPEa 

Entries in Tennis Doubles 

Best in History of 

Boat Club. 

Mixed Doubles Tournament 

Will Follow Junior Cup 

Competition. 



Play begins today in the doubles 
tournament at the boat club with the 
strongest list of entries in the history 
of tennis at the club. 

Graff and Grady are a pair 




C. A. 



LUSTER. STANDING; PRESIDENT VINCENT. SEATED IN TONNEAU AND WEARING CAP. 



CANNOT FIND 




Accusers of Mr. Whitticr Say 

Five Boys Are 

Missing. 



took place at the home of the hrlde, 
Mi.«s Wilmina Egerton. at Tonlca, 111.. 
on Thursday June 29. 

Walter I>e' Merce of Puluth is visit- 
ing tiis grand parents here. 

Miss Jennie Bli<hop left Thursday 
for a months visit with friend.s and 
|-e!?»t|ve3 in Calumet and Manjuette, 

'" Born to Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Johnson, 
June 29. a daugliter. , ., ^ 

Kev. Hugo P. Selinger. pa.«tor of the 
West Duluth Baptist church will ex- 
change pulpits with Itev. Charles W. 
J;amshaw next Sunday evening. 

Thf Boy Scouts, under the leadership 
of Kev. Charles P.amshaw. will hike to 
I'engillv, starting Monday. They ex- 
pect lomake the trip in two days, and 
will camp at the lake a few days be- 
fore returning home. 

J. J Whyte left Thursday for Sas- 
katchewan. Can., where he expects to 
engage in business of some kind. 

Fre«l Neuman returned Friday morn- 
ing from a few days' visit In Clotjuet. 



the gra.. - ... 
In the investigation 
against Dr. Kumas. _^^,.,, 
Fullcrton In Bemidji. 

.<tate Fire M-Mshal 
and J 



of the charges 



Depaty 
Fullerton 



Sam F. 
C. Fielding of the 
»i..ir. .-ton aironcv. who worked up tl.e 
JiL?sarnstL.r Dumas, came here this 
«?,!rnin^ Ift^r a conference between 
tiLese nten ami Thayer C. Bailey of this 
luvfwho i^'s representing the attornej 
■enerals department m the I->""^a^ 

fase Munhall was taken ,*>V>f;^.Srce 
Cc>mmi>^sioner Simons ami the charg. 
«ealn-<t him was dismissed. It was ex 

Xined that the state h^« "^^.^i^^g^i't 
flence necessary to push the charge ai 

*'ilunhlll. Who was a witness at the 
unary hearing of Dr. l»unia/- an 



Girls Will Be Called to 

Testii) at Hearing 

Thursday. 



ALL DRUG STORES 
IN DULUTH 

Including WfMt Dulutb and I.nkeMlde 
i>lll be olo^fd from U to «::«) p. m. "u 
Tburaday, July lit, to enable all em- 
pluyeH to attend the liruggUtw' Excur- 
Mion. 



^V,^ tha^ h^hWdlelephone talk, with 
r Dumas nri^r to the fight at 1 upos- 
beTween officers and Mike Davis and 
-tin Bfhan. and that he had agreed 
,.t Davis and Behan^ to^cc^e^^o Be- 



prelim 

ml 

I>r 

ky 

Martin Behan 
to get Davis f 
mltlji to meet the 

^^ofh -FutS^on and Fielding refused 
to talk concerning the Dumas ca^^ or 
the prospects for the capture of Mike 

Davis. ^_ 

Jamea R. Keene lii._ 

London. July ?■— '«"'r«.I^-,^i^^"*':J5^ 
financier, is seriously ill in the Carlton 

hotel here. 



00 LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 



One Cent a Word Each »°««J?»®?- 
lo Advertlaement Lcm Than 1» CcBta 



St. Paul. Mlun., July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald. )— Five former Inmates of 
the boys" train ng school at Red Wing, 
wanted as witnesses by Ralph 
Whcelock and his attorney In the 
hearing on tii J charges against Supt. 
F. A. Whlttier, cannot be found. They 
were supposes to be In St. Paul or 
this immediate vicinity, and testified at 
the legislative Investigation. Officers 
from the wfflct of the board of control 
are looking f< r them with subpoenas. 
The bovs a e Daniel O Lear, C i^. 
Maxf.n. (»llver Depattl, Eugene Jen- 
nings and Pat iick Larkln. 

E P. Saniiorn, counsel for Mr. 
Wheelock, In unnounclng the failure to 
find the boy; . said it looked sus- 
piciously as I' they were "being kept 
under cover." 

Wlii QucHtion Girl*. 
The board vlli not sit in the hear- 
ing again until Thursday morning 
whfn, at the rei|uest of F. M. Wilson, 
attorney for Mr. AVhittler. several 
girls wiil be called by the complain- 
ant so that .1 woman from Pennsyl- 
vania, whose testimony Is wanted by 
the defense, -an be heard. The girls 
Frances Arnold. Edna Hustad 

Burns ana 




Henry Mundt of 214 Devonshire 
street has returned from a visit to 
his old home In Saginaw. Mich. 

M J Segal statistician of the health 
department. Is confined to his home by 
illness. ^ , 

Mrs. F. A. Hubbs, who was operated 
on for acute appendicitis, at St. Luke s 
hospital. Thursday morning. Is pro- 
gressing favorably. , -^ ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. John Miller of East 
Superior street are spending the week- 



was on again today before the register 
and receiver of the land office. Miss 
Johnson claims title to the land 
throtigh filing under the stone and 
timber law. while Swartout claims the 
title should be vested in him through 
the homestead laws. C. C. Teare rep- 
resents the plalntifr, while W. L. 
Caulkins and Capt. W. H. Smallwood 
are appearing for the defendant. 

♦— 

Cigar CauaeM Blase. ,, . _ 
The fire department was called to 
•>20 East Superior street about 11. la 
last night to a small blaze In the cigar 
store In the front of Al Salter's buffet. 
It Is supposed t« have bt en caused b> 
a cigar or cigarette stub thrown on 
fhe floor while still burning. The 
damage was slight. 

• 

Inspect Sewer Route. 
Several of the Duluth aldermen went 
to Gary yesterday afternoon to looK 
over the route of the «torm sewer 
which has been asked for at Gary, a 
new division near the steel Plant. The 
estimated coat of the sewer Is between 
$4000 and $5,000. The matter came 
before the couiicii last week, hut \%as 
laid over a week at the request of a 
numbe"^ of ald.rmen who stated that 
the downtown sections had a prior 
right to the use of the fund. 

Y. P. sTcTprcKS 

LOS ANGELES 

International Convention Will 

Be Held There in 

1913. 



OFHCERS 
AREEEaED 

Rev. John A. Anderson of 

Marinette Heads Swedish 

Epworth League. 

Prof. Wallenius Will Preach 
at Morning Service — Con- 
vention Ends Monday. 



well 

known to Duluth tennis followers and 
have plaved together since the days of 
the Endlon Tennis club. ^ They will 
have to meet Kennedy and Judd ana 
Washburn and Dlckerman. and some 
of the best matches ever seen in uu- 
luth are looked for when these men 
get together. The complete draw ng 
for the match follows: 

Preliminary. Flmt Draw. 

Robinson and Galll 

Cummings and J 

McGreevy I 

Dinwiddie and 

Chinnlck 
McLeod and Lone- 

gren 

McGregor and 
Kincald 

Trott and Helm- 
bach 

Lewis and Wright I 
Graff and Grady | 

W. Kennedy and 
Judd 

Stillman and Craig 



little likelihood of Yale's being able to 
hold its own with Harvard. 

The belief is held among iale me« 
(hat next fall the supervision of row- 
ing will be placed with a graduate 
council of oarsmen who will decide tn» 
character of the stroke to be taught. 
In this event. Coach Kennedy probably 
will be retained and he will teach th» 
stroke which will be outlined by tn» 
committee. . - 

NEARLY READY 
FOR FINAL ROUND 

Spring Tournament at Golf 

Club Is Drawing 

to Close. 

The spring championship tournament 
at the Country club is drawing to a 
close. 

Two men are in the semi-final round 
already, and It is expected that matches 
played this afternoon and tomorrow 
will see the men picked for the final 
round for the title. W. W. Walker 
plaved a nineteen-hole match with Leo 
Farmer, wlilch was one of the cleverest 
So far In the match. Walker going Info 
the semi-finals 1 up. 

R. S. Patrick defeated Dr. Cullum 
and reached the seml-flnal round by % 
score of 2 up and 1 to play. 

The remaining matches to decide 
those who will go into the semi-finals 
are between Ames and Tweed, an4 
Goodell and Sprague. 



^^' 



Ingalls and De 

Witt 
Conner and 

Rosenkrans 

Dr. Jones and 

Chaffee 
Gardner and N. F. 

Davis 

Barnes and Mullln 
Libbv and Rock- 
well I 



REPORT OF 

CITY TREASURER 



The monthly report of City Treas- 
urer Fred J. "Voss for June shows a 
balance of $474,913.22 in the various 
city depositories. Of this amount the 
wheelage tax fund is credited with 
$23,710.35 and the storm sewer and 
street intersection fund with $17,418.67. 

The detailed report is as follows: 

INTEKKST KUNLi. 

Balance Juue 1 $ 17.728. 3« 

Heieipta U'OOO.oa 



TMttl 

Dibbur»euniU 



...t 27 728 39 
... 22.3€2.50 



Balance, July 1 $ 5 3«5.8» 

SINKING KUND. 

Bal.ince. June 1 $130.452. "SI 

lUiUjiU 161.49 



Becker and 

Cheney 
Gravatt and Gra- 

vatt 




BUPEKFLUOUS HAIK, M*;'LES. 
warts removed forever. Miss Kell> s 
Manicuring and Massaging Parlors. 

131 West Sup erior street. 

BIS- 



La CLAIKE. BASKET BRAID 

cult colls of real human hair. 25 per 
cent off for one week only -"•-♦" 
Comfort shop, 20 West 
street, upstairs. 



Beauty 
Superior 



B U P E R F L U O U S HAIR.. MOL.ES 
warts, removed forever. Miss Kelly s 
Manicuring and Massaging Parlors, 



131 West Superior street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT IN 
brick building at 114 First avenue 
east. $2r. per month. Rental depart- 
ment. J"hn A. Stephenson & Co., Wol- 
vin building. ''-'■• 



Launches and all kinds of small boats. 
H. S. Patte rson. Cth Ave, west slip. 

FOR SALE— TEN-ACRE TRACT OF 
land Inside citv limits, terms to suit, 
land A-1. T 671, Herald. 



WANTED— CARPENTERS AT FIFTH 
street and Eighteenth avenue east. 
Good ftnisher.-s. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Smekar and Mrs. Jewell M. 



John A 
Groom. 

John Engerved and 
Setterstrom. 



art 

Sarah Sarf. Margaret 

Pearl Stillwell. 

They will testify regarding alleged 
corporal punishment in the girls de- 
partment at Red Wing before Mrs. 
Fannie Mors* took charge. ,, . , 

C J. Swendion of the board predicted 
this morning that the hearing will take 
a month, as tlie board, on account of Its 
other Auties, will not be able to sit 
consecutively , ^ ^ 

Buya Carried Slingshot*. 
A half-doz.m lead slugs tied in the 
corners of handkerchiefs and a rod 
with a big iron nut at the end of It. 
were some of the exhibits submitted by 
the df-fense /esterday afternoon. The 
sljgs were the Implements whicli eight 
bovs had gi thered to use in an at- 
tempt to escj pe in June. 1909. and to- 
ward G. I'otter. one of the boys who 
had been pu on the stand by the so- 
called prose* utlon to tell of beatings 
he had recei ed. when cross-examined, 
told in detail the story of the attempt- 
ed escape. , , 

Potter's eximination occupied a large 
part of the afternoon. Most of the re- 
maining tlm^ was taken up with the 
examination of Mrs. F. E. Childs^ wife 
of the stean fitter who testified Thurs- 
day Mrs. Ciilds had seen boys beaten 
every dav, three or four times a day. 
but neither Mr. .«anborn. attorney for 
the prosecution, who called her to the 
stand, nor F. M. Wilson. Whlttier's at- 
torney was able to pin her down to 
specific instj nces and most of her tes- 
timonv was stricken out. 

GaiOM PoiBtN for Whlttier. 
Attorney Wilson devoted himself to 
efforta to'slow that the beatings were 
not known ir reported to Whittler. or 
else that th< punishment was deserved, 
and to throw doubt on the credibility 
of the witn.TSSfes. To a certain extent 
he was suc< essful. 



end at Deerwood as guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Stephenson. 

Miss Lois Johnson of Eveleth and 
Miss Winnifred Beek of Chlsholm are 
spending their vacation with their 
uncle. Asa Daily of this city. 

S K. Poole and A. H. Relnhardt of 
Chicago are in the city, and tomorrow 
will leave for Lake Vermilion, where 
they will siiend a few days, making 
the canoe trip north of Ely. ,v,,^^ 

Fred S I'owers and a party of three 
friends of St. Paul, left yesterday for 
i:iy. from which place they will make 
the'canoe trip north. ^ , , ^ _^ „. 

C. T. Knapp of Chlsholm Is at the bt. 

^Tiuis J. Francis of Internatloual 
Falls is at the St. Louis. 

Frank Coffey of Hibbing Is at the 

*^F.*^'t. Olson of Chlsholm is at the 

^*T.**J. Singer of Fort Frances is at the 

J ^. stringer of Two Harbors is at 
the McKay. 



Atlantic City, N. J.. July 8.— Los 
Angeles, Cal., was today selected as 
the place for holding the 1913 Interna- 



FISHING 

and Boating. Chleken and Fluh Din- 
nerM our Hpeelalty. KIghteen mlleii out 
on Rice Lake road. lalaud Lake Inn Co. 



lional convention of the Christian En- 
deavor union. 

Children were declared to he the 

best producers of Po^^J?'^*! ^^fj^Le? 
the world, by Judge Ben B. yn"se> 
of Denver, al a conference today on 
-The lioy and How to Handle Him 
held In connection with the conven- 

^'Tn effort Is to be made •during the 
remaining days of the convention to 
etangeHze the casual crowd on the 
Hoard Walk and Atlantic avenue. Per- 
mus have been obtained and .twenty- 
five nairs of volunteers will hold 
BimuUaneous meetings eaci. noon and 
about 9 o'clock each evening at in 
Nervals along the great wooden wa> 
and also on Atlantic avenue, the main 
thoroughfare of the town. 

killedF 
a runaway 



Officers for the ensuing year were 

elected this morning by the Epworth 

League Society of the Lake Superior 

District of the Swedish M. E. church, 

which is now holding its annual session 

at the First Swedish M. E. church. In j^^.rie and Baker I 

the West end. ^-» Bree and Davlsl 

The officers are: Rev. John A. An- 
derson of Marinette, Wis., president; 
Elmer Lund, Wausau, first vice presi- 
dent; Miss Ellen Gunderson, Escanaba, 
second vice president; Miss Bertha An- 
derson, Wausau. third vice president; 
Charles Peterson. Duluth, fourth vice 
president; Austin Stromberg Escanaba. 
treasurer; Rev. Oscar Challrnan, Ash- 
land, secretary; and Andrew Lundgren, 
Superior, corresponding secretary. 

Services will be held tomorrow, be- 
wlth Sunday school at 9.45, 



Washburn and 

Dickerman 
Falk and Beecher 



Balanc*, July 1 $130.614. 00 

KllU: PKPAKTMENT KL'N1>. 

BaUme, June 1 $ 9.335. Tt 

Keielpls 20,302. «9 

Total $ 29.6.^8.1$ 

IiUbunteiui-ntii U.onS.tl 



Balance, July 1 $ 

POUCE UEPAHT-MUNT FL'NK. 



8 574. 9T 



RaUnc«. June I . 
Uecelpbi 



$ 10.433.41 
. ::0.'.!10.00 



Total 

IfiDliursieuienU 



j«.(;4a 41 

9.262. a 



man tropnj iv.» ^ _ ^^^ possession of 



in the tournament. , 

\'e^v Cup lionalea. 

K. Dlckerman has donated a hand- 



Balance, July 1 » 22,:'60.M 

UU HT FUND. 

Balanoe. June 1 1 4,«r.6 IT 

lUreJl.U MH'O 09 

Total I ».«5«.1I 

UibUirstmeiite 3.610.06 




Bnlance. July 1 $ 6,037.11 

WATliK FUND. 

H.ilance. June 1 $ 1.031. 79 

lUitii-ta 10000.00 

Total $ 11.031 T» 

2.-*e.59 



CITY BRIEFS 



Hanna Maria 



BIRTHS. 

TESSNI— A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. H. Yessni of 428 East Sixth 
street July 5. 

XUTH— A daughter was born to >ir. 
and Mrs. J. R. Kuth of 422 Twelfth 
avenue east July 7. . ,, ^ 

MAKl — A son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Maki of 119 St. Croix ave- 
nue July 1 

LAMI'l-I— .\ daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. A. Lamppi of 133 St. Croix 
avenue July 2. 



DEATHS AND FUNERALS 



D 



DAHLGREN— Word has been re- 
ceived of the death yesterday of 
Mrs Cyrus Dahlgren, wife of "Cy" 
Dahlgren. one of the Superior twirl. 
era in the Minny league. Mr. Dahl- 
gren was playing with the Red So.\ 
at Wiaona. when the news reached 
him Mrs. Dahlgren had been sick 
for some time. She lived in Supe- 
rior last summer. Mr. Dahlgren left 
Winona for the Twin Cities to take 
charge of th e funeral arrangement-?. 

Jionumehte direct from factory, no 
•tore rent, no agents; you save 2$ 
ner cent. Charles Benson, cut stone 
contract-'r. 2301 West Second street. 
or 'phont me. Lincoln 334. new 'phona 

MONUMENTS AT COST, to save expense 
of moving them to our new building 
at 230 E. Sup. St. P. N. Peterson 
Granite Co., 332 E. Sup. St- 



PRIZES EXHIBITED 
FOR HRE L ADDIES 

Proclor Planning to Give Me- 

saba Range Volunteers 

lime of Lives. 

Proctor. Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 
The Herah.) — The prizes to be given 
to the wir.ners at the Mesaba Range 
Volunteer firemen's tournament here 
at the am ual meet to he held soon, 
are on exhibition in the Proctor State 
bank and elicit many favorable com- 

Plaiis f« r entertaining the visitors 
are rapldb being shaped and It Is ex- 
pected the tournament will be the most 
successful ever held. A long program 
is races is being prepared. , .. ,, 

Thursda\ evening. June 29. at the M. 
E. parsonage at Chippewa Falls. Wis.. 
Rev F W Harris married Miss Grace 
Parker and Russell J. Martin, both of 
that cltv The bridegroom is well 
known In Proctor, having been reared 
and educated iiere. being the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Martin. 

J C Spencer, acting secretary of 
the' local Y. M. C. A., Is away on a 
short vacation. He is expected to re- 
turn about the 15th of this month with 
his bride The marriage ceremony 



Prlntlns and Bookbindlnr 

Thwlng-Stewart Co. Both 'phones. 114. 

♦ 

Sunday .School Ploalc. 

The annual .Sunday scliool picnic of 
St. Marks A. M. E. cliurch will be 
heid Wednesday, July 12. at Lester 

Park. 

• 

Flrevrorkii DUplny. 

The display of fireworks which was 
to have been given at the grounds of 
the Northland Country club on the 
Fourth, will be seen this evening. An 
orchestra and a band will furnish the 
music. The display will be one of the 
finest ever seen In the city. 

♦ 

City Report*. 
The annual reports of the various 
city officials and 4lepartments, bound 
in one volume, were delivered to the 
city liall yesterday. The book contains 
about 270 pages. They have been dis- 
tributed to the various offices. 

. • 

RrroverlnK From Operation. 
Mr. McCabe of 325 East Second street 
is on the road to recovery at St. Mary s 
hospital, where he underwent a serious 
operation several days ago. 

— ♦ — 

Shrlnera Leave. 
About Sixty Shriners left Duluth last 
evening for Rochester. N. \.. where 
thev will attend the annual national 
convention of the order. They were 
accompanied by the quartet and the 
patrol both of which will figure promi- 
nently In the convention program. 

• 

Dr. Lyman ^ . . . 
will reside at the Y. M. C. A., during 
the summer months. "Phone Melrose 
2697. 

Northland Prlntery. 

Good Printing. Call Zenith 494. 

• 

Groeer Bankrupt. 

A petition In voluntary bankruptcy 
was filed this morning with the clerk 
of the United States court by Hans 
Isaacson, a grocer of yirginia. in 
which he states that his liabilities are 
$•> 407 73 while his assets amount to 
$4'.893. of which he claims $3,083 ex- 
empt. 

• 

HomeMead Content. 

The land contest case of Stephen 
W Swartout against Mary J. Johnson, 



Jan Bosconelro, an Austrian driver for 
the Kruger Lumber company, was in- 
stantly killed in a runaway at I-IO J°- 
day His team ran away and while 
near the Northern Pacific depot at N'ew 
Duluth, Bosconelro was thrown out and 
his head struck a stump, hreaklng Ms 
neck He has no relatives In this coun- 
try so far as Is known. 

PRIYATKAr 
FOR ATTORNEYS 

Twin City Lawyers Wfll 

Travel to Daluth in 

Style. 

There Is some "considerable class" to 
Twin City attorneys. They are coming 
to the state meeting at Duluth in a 
private car. ^. ,,, . ^ 

It Is expected that there -will be 
about fifty In the party. 

The annual meeting will be held in 
Duluth on July 18. 19 and 20. 

In response to the inquiries sent out 
some time ago nearly 100 have an- 
nounced their intention to be here. 



followed by the »«^S"'ar,mornlng serv 
ice at 11 o^clock. Rev. C. WJallenlus of 
Evanston preaching. At 5 o clock. Rev. 
L Johnson will deliver a sermon and at 
g" o'clock. Rev. Axel Peterson, the re- 
tiring president and Kev. bwenberg. 
will preach. ,, , 

The convention will close Monday. 

POSSES~AFTEirMURDERERS. 

Crowds of Men Seeking Slayers of 
Sheriff Radcliffe. 

Eagle River. Wis.. July 8.— Over 200 
armed men are beating the brush near 
Conover, Wis., searching for two Ital- 
ians who shot and killed Sheriff John 
Radcliffe at Conover. as he was try- 
ing to arrest them on advices from 

Shtfrlff" Crofoot of Rhlnelander with 
a bloodhound Is with the Po/ses and 
anotlier bloodhound is expected from 
Ashland. . ^. „^ - 

The fugitives were seen last at 6 
o'clock Thursday night about two 
miles from Conover. It Is thought 
that they are making f^r Iron River. 
Mich. The men are wanted at Rhine- 
lander on a charge of white slavery. 



excellent 
this spring 



At the close of the junior tourna- 
ments U is planned to hold a mixe-l 
doubles competition, some 
plavers having appeared 
amcmg the women 

is progressme- •.■•'- " —i'' ,i,<„ «-neV 
games have iv-n played this week 



lone the women. ^ 

nav in the open singles tournament 

i!?ogresslng. and a large number of 



IfandlngsVo date in this branch of the 
play are: 



NORTH DAKOTA ROASTS. 



HOPE FOR W OMAN. 

Expected Mi's. Neopolitana Will Get 
Commuted Sentence. 

Sault Ste Marie, Mich., July 8.— -(Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Uriah McFadden. 
attorney for Mrs. Angelina Neopolitana. 
admitted this afternoon that he ex 
pected the death sentence of his client 
to be commuted within a few days to 
life Imprisonment. 

He declared that such an acUon was 
practically assured but that no official 
action had yet been taken. 

He added that he expects further 
that arrangements will be made 
whereby evin the life sentence will 
not be completed but that the woman 
will be pardoned eventually. 

— ♦— 

ElKkt Saved In I'«*L* ^^t* vi 

Washington. July 8.— The Marble- 
head. Ohio, life saving station reported 
to the life saving service here today 
that the station crew rescued eight 
men from the tug Lutz while that ves- 
sel was sinking in Lake Erie near 
Gull Island reef last night. 



Fargo, N, D., July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Hot winds sweeping 
over state today and grain is helng 
damaged. At 1 o'clock the temperature 
at the government weather bureau was 
99 in the shade with a prediction of £ 
to 3 degrees more before night. 

•— 

Senate Adjourns to Monday. 
Washington. July 8.— Before the vote 
on the free fiour amendment to the 
reciprocity bill was taken today, the 
senate agreed to an adjournment until 
next Monday, and all the amendments 
except the free meat provision, which 
was defeated, went over until that 

time. 

• 

THE INTELLIGENT RETRIEVER. 

Sacramento Union: The conversation 
veered round to dogs. 

"Well, Bumps, here Is a dog story 
that can't be beat. My friend John- 
son had a most intelligent retriever. 
One night Johnson's hou.se caught fire. 
All was Instant confusion. Old Johri- 
son and his wife flew for the chil- 
dren and bundled out with them In 
quick order. A>as. one of them had 
been left behind! But up jumped the 
dog, rushed Into the house and soon 
reappeared with the missing child. 

"Every one was saved; but Rover 
dashed through the flames again. What 
did the dog want? No one knew. 
Presently the noble animal reappeared, 
scorched and burned, with — with what 
do you think?" , ,. . „ 

•'Give It up," chortled eager listeners. 

"With the fire Insurance policy, 
wrapped in a damp towel, gentlemen. 



Preliminary. 

Kennedy, W. 
Banning, A. 

Falk 
Fraker, W. 

McLeod, A. 
Leseur, C. 

Hastings 
Klncaid, O. 

Gall 
Gude 

Harbinson. J. 
La Bree 

Grady 
Park, Dr. 

Barnes. A. P. 
Heimbach, C. 

Beecher 
Sellar 

Mullln, H. J. 
Lonegren, C. 



Firist Draw. 



I'ibbureeiuriitii 

Bilanoe, July 1 

PL'BUC WOUKK FUND. 

Balance, June 1 

Uet'eiptB • 

T'ltal 

llisbursenirnt* 



$ ICTUS 30 

. $ 3..'i41.53 

. . 3(1.187.54 

..% 3S.r.2!<.0T 
. . 13.41I2.9I 



H 



Balance, July 1 $20,036 

HKALTH l»EPARTMI^Ji.T FUND. 

Balance. June 1 $ 3.004.8$ 

UoctlpU 3.147. OS 



Fraker 



Gude 



Becker 
Cheney, 



Dr. 



Amundson 
Gravatt. W. 



I Heimbach 



Mullln 



Becker 



Amundson 



Total I 6,ir,i.$$ 

l»l»burM.'m«"iit« 1.4 4 J. 90 

R.ilance, July 1 $ 4.705. 9« 

MlINICll'.^L COIKT FUND. 

Balance. June 1 $ f-^*' *• 

Uiiibunwtnenta l.glb.lo 

Balance, July 1 » 2.422.3$ 

S ALA BY FV.VD. 

Balance. June 1 ' ^$*?J-5i 

Dl«liursemeol» 5.099.00 

Balance. July 1 $ 5,392.51 

I'UI.NTINO A>a) SUPPLY FUND. 

BaKwe. June 1 » l!l',« 

lle<-«U.t8 • ■<.('2«.ST 

'j»,,t^] ., $ 4.68*.9S 

DijibiirEeinenU ^•*'*t-^ 

Balance, July 1 » 2,C74.64 

UBUAKY Fl'KD. 

Balam-e, June 1 » , iS nl 

Kiceii>ta J.osi.n 

ToUl * 3,464.41 

Dl»bur»en.ent8 '-''•" * 

Balance, July 1 » 2,710.30 

PARK FU.ND. • 

Balance, June 1 ' 327.11 

]lec«lpt8 



g. 561. 76 



8 888.M 
8.8U9.94 



M. 



Davis, R. 
Mather 

Higglns, 
Libby 



J. 



J. R. 



Chinnlck 
Gravatt, H. 

Rosenkrans 
Washburn 

Dlckerman 
Conner 

McBride 
Wasted 

Gardner 
McLennan, 

Wilson, C. 
De Witt 

Craig 
McGregor 



Ingalls 
Gillespie. 



Davis, 
Judd 



N, 



Dr. 
F. 



Chinnlck 



I Washburn 
I Dickerman 



Gardner 



Craig 



j Ingalls 
Davis 



Total 

Ul»bur»ena«it« 

Balance. July 1 .■.;.;• ~.l.r» ^*** 

WATKIl AND LIGHT PLANT FUND. 
Balance, June 1 * ?,HI5 SI 

"•^r .•.••.v.v.\-.-\v;;:;:;:::;:::::::::::»«*;^"^ 



71.889.49 



l»i*bur*ement« 

Halance July 1 $22,445.5$ 

PERMANKNT 1MPR0\T:-MENT FUNIK 

Balance. June 1 ♦ o'ttV i» 

DifcbutsenitriiU ■_____. 

Balance, July 1 „-;-.v,:: $ t2.«i9-li 

GENKRAL FUND. 

Balance, June 1 ' Jo -Li » 

Utcetpts ^...tJU.W 




.$ 45.863. 7S 



Dubursement^"::::::::::::"::":---- »«»'<"'•'» 

^ PElm.o"ilNT IMi'KC.VKMK.VT RbVoLVlNO ' 
FUND. 

Balance, Jan. 1 $138,144 0| 

Receiptii 



VjMZ.Ht 



ToUl 

Itisbunementa 



Balance. 



..$173,207.01 
. . 12,:;6!<.5T 



julT 1 $1608.-'7.44 

s'tUKKT .N.^iNTCNA.NCE A.VD REPAIK FUND 
ialan.c. June 1 * ^Vl-^.i 



3.681 44 



VERY PROSY. 

Los Angeles Times: Prof. Brander 

Matthews of Columbia, in one of his 

brilliant addresses on the drama, said 

of an unimaginative and prosaic 

dramatist: 

"He it was. I am sure, who in nis 
youth, on being asked in examination 
what Shakespeare meant by the 
phrase 'sermons in stones, wrote in 

reply: 

" 'When passing by a tombstone, 
vou may learn the name aiid the 
dates of birth and death of the de- 
parted one. and also, from the in- 
scription a valuable moral lesson 
from his or her life. Walking along 
a road, you may see from the mile 
stones the number of miles to the 
nearest towns. and thus acquire 
ceoeraphical information. Heaps or 
atones by the roadside indicate that 
repairs fire to take place, r- -" 
inculcate a lesson in neatnesa 



Wright 

Ptalker 
Dinwiddle 

Rockwell 
Sinclair 

Robinson 
Stillman | 



Stlllrnan 



Morgan. G. "W, 
Graff 



and so 



COACH SAYS HE 
WILL RESIGN 



Balani 

Becrtpta _ 

STHEE'T LNT-ERSEC-TION A.ND STORM SEWER 
FITND. 

fBalan'-e. June 1 ' iT"ill sf 

Balance, July 1 llAli-^T 

Ttetal amount on hand In all fun.li. .. $474,913.$* 
DEFOSITED. 

FlraJ Natlcmal bank 1112.825. 59 

American Exchange National 

j.auk 12(1. .OOTT 

City National l*nk • . - ^i^'^If i? 

Nortlieru NaUcnal h»nk . . ^. . - . ^.201 17 
St. LouU tv.unty SUte tienk.... «0^-^ 

Western SUte bank 1^1 A 

Duluth State bank ^ • ■ 3,008.41 

Certificate of indebtednw* held 

In dnking fund. . . . . . . • ^.Tn'^ 

&.n(U held In linking fund *'-'*2?2 

Before deciding not to advertise, be- 
cause of the cost, figure the loss, by 
reason of changes in 8t>'^»- /;" Vl^ 
goods you would likely liave sold last 
year had you advertised them. 



New Haven, Conn., July 8.— The Yale 
alumni weekly announces that John 
Kennedy, the rowing 



coach, has ex- 




PARKER'8_ 
HAIR BALSAM 

CIceniTi and beentifh* the ball. 
ProntoM • liuniruknl growth. 
Kavar taX^m to Restore Oray 

Hair to ita Youthful Color. 
OwM Malp diMMM a, hair teUisc- 
jOcandQl-OC't 







1 


1 







tw- ->--.- -«ft»i# 



t 



4*- 





\ 




Tiaturday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

—ESTABLISHED APRIL 9. 1883— 

Published every evening excopt Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY. 
Herald BulMinjc. Opposite Postofflce Square, 
422 and 424 West Firs t St.. Duluth. Minn. 

EoteR>a i* secuuJ-cliiiM mittet at the Puluth piMtoffloe under the act uf 
t^_•n^{r^■M of &titroh 3, 1879. 

TEM5PHOXES — Bell and Zenith: 

Business Office, 324^ Kditorial Rooms. 1126. 

OFFICIAL PAPER CITY OF DULUTM 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

(By mail payable in advanoe.) 

§ally. three months $1.00 
ally, "ne month 35 
ally, six month.s 2.00 

Daily one year 400 

Snturilay Herald, one year 91.00 

M rekly Herald, uue year l.OO 

Remlit.uii-t^ maj !« made by rlieok. posljfflce order. itgUtered 
totter or etprt'^ unler Make all »euUttanre8 payable fo The HdralU 
Coitu>.ti).v r.Hf i>.w>.,ff|,-fi ;i iilr^-w in full, lin-luiliats state an 1 (.-uunty 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

Dai!y. one wt^ek | .10 

I>aiiy, ono month 45 

t>ail. one year 5.00 

Sulnii-ribers «rtll confer a famr on the clmiUtlon deparlmeiil by 
iallli>« ,Ji4. either "phone, an! making Kn.iwn any oonipUlnt of aertU-e. 

It Ija Important when desiring the aJdreia of your paptir changed to 
■Ire hiUi tl^e old ami new addresses 
^ — 

The Duluth Herald accepts advertising contracts 
With the distinct guarantee that It has the largest 
clriu!iitio» of any newspaper pubUshe>l in Minnesota 
outside the Twin Cities. Its value as an advertising 
medium is apparent. 




^»^^»^>^^^>^>^>^>^>»^>^>^^^>^>^»^^>^>^>^^^^^%^>^>^>^»^^^>^>^^>^^>^ 



trol thji 
enable 
clauses' 
Souther 
baseless 
"The n 
the gov 
such SI] 
deems 1 
able wh 
of the 
have en 
meaning 
tion." 

The 
and no 
lately n 
the sen 
the resi 
cations 
shall be 
for the 
branch 
if the ( 
quires ' 
state h( 
only wl 

The 
moil ab 
the Brif 
importa 
mitting 
providii 
senator.' 
ment ca 
passage 



t has any substance at all is that it would 

congress to over-ride the "grandfather 

that keep negroes from voting in many 

n states, and that argument is absolutely 

The Atlanta Georgian thus expresses it: 

eaning of the Bristow amendment is tliat 

ernment will have the power of prescribing 

ffrage requirements for the elections as it 

it. The Federal government would thus be 

en it so chose to nullify the suffrage laws 

Southern states — laws which these states 

acted from causes rising out of the truest 

: of the words self-defense and self-protec- 

Bristow amendment has no such meaning 
such possibilities. It gives congress abso- 
j control over the suffrage. As adopted by 
ite with the Bristow amendment included, 
•lution provides distinctly that the qualifi- 
of electors who vote on the senatorship 
the same as those prescribed by state law 
se who vote for members of the lower 
of the state legislature. That means that 
'onstitution of Alabama, for instance, re 
hat those who vote for members of the 
■use of representatives must be white, then 
ite people can vote on the senatorship. 
whole thing is a tempest in a teapot, a tur 
)ut nothing. We don't care a hang whether 
tow amendment stays in or goes out. The 
nt thing is the adoption of a resolution sub 
to the states a constitutional amendment 
g for the popular election of United States 
, and the conflict over the Bristow amend- 
n become important only by preventing the 
of such a resolution. 



; 6A'i/t I ask th« brave soldier who fights by 

my side 

In the cause of ttiankind^ if our creeds 

agree / 

— Thomas Moore. 




SOUNDING THE RIGHT KEYNOTE. 

Heartitst lelicitations to Arthur Capper, a Re- 
publican candidate for governor of Kansas who re- 
cer.tly made his announcement in a statement brim- 
«ning with pat and apt and vital thoughts, and who 
is beginning his talks directly to the voters. 

We felicitate him not so much on his candidacy, 
though he lias our best wishes in that, as upon the 
Bterling quality of the ideas on which he is basing 
his campaign. He realizes, as all men are coming 
to realize, that the people, m spending their ener- 
gies in seeking party supremacy which meant 
economic slavery to them and fat picking for Spe 
Ctal Privilege, have worse than wasted their time; 
and he is preaching the new and blessed doctrine of 
country first and party second, people first and 
bos>es not at all. 

Here are samples of the acid-proof principles 
he is advocating; "'The courageous Kansas voter — 
the man who, aroused from the sleep of party big- 
otry, votes as his conscience dictates, who realizes 
that there has been too much partisanship and too 
little i>atriotism: too much politics and too little 
love ot counry — is to my mind the ideal citizen. 

"When I read of the brazen purchase of whole 
counties of voters in Ohio, the shameless debauch- 
eries of Pittsburg and San Francisco, the filthy rot- 
tenness of Illinois legislatures. I rejoice that I live 
in decent Kansas; and whether it is within my 
party ov without, I denounce with all the emphasis 
I can command the system of politics which pro- 
duces Lorimensm and all the stench and corrup- 
tion that go with it. This system is the inevitable 
result "t an unholy alliance between political organ- 
izatiui^s — organized for public plunder — and busi- 
ness organizations seeking special privileges. 

"I rejoice that in this state we elevate the citizen 
above the party, and the citizen's rights above 
every other thing; that we teach a man that his best 
guide at last is his own conscience; that his sover- 
eignty rests beneath his own hat; that he should 
Stand upright and self-respecting, loyal to his state, 
loyal to his republic, earnest in his allegiance 
wherever it rests; and that no treasure can repay 
him for the surrender of the slightest right of a 
free, individual, independent American citizen." 

Congratulations to Kansas that these fine and 
burning words can be said of her citizenship. It is 
the best political doctrine and the most truly Amer- 
ican policy. A people holding those ideas cannot 
fail, cannot remain under the lash of corrupt boss 
ism or the leash of Special Privilege. 




THE BRISTOW AMENDMENT. 

Whether or not congress is in good faith in its 
dealing with the proposed constitutional amend- 
ment providing for the popular election of United 
States senators will be made clear when the meas- 
ure emerges from the conference committee. 

The difference between the two houses is in 
reality so slight that the split between them over it 
is very evidently the fruit either of profound stupid- 
ity or of a very cunning scheme to kill the direct 
election of senators while giving the members of 
both branches of congress a chance to go home and 
say they voted for it. 

The Constitution gives congress control over 
the election of congressmen, but that control never 
has been exercised. As the resolution providing 
for the direct election of senators passed the house, 
this provision was omitted, so that the full control 
of senatorial elections would be left under the state 
legislatures. 

In the senate Senator Bristow offered an 
amendment restoring this control, and it passed 
when Vice President Sherman, breaking a tie, voted 
for It. 

Apparently the house stands firmly against con- 
gressional control of senatorial elections, and the 
senate stands as firmly for congressional control. 

As we see it. the difference between the two 
houses is infiiiitesimal, and not nearly so important 
as the resolution itself, 

• The important thing is to take senatorial elec- 
tions out of the hands of the state legislatures and 
put it into the hands of the people. 

There is no harm in retaining the same consti- 
tutional provision as to congressional control that 
now applies to the election of representatives, be- 
cause congress never has exerted it and is not like- 
ly ever to do so. There is no harm, either, in 
eliminating that control, for the same reason. 

The only argument against congressional con- 



THE DISCREETNESS OF THE OSTRICH. 

There is an ancient story about the silly thing 
the ostr ch does when he is pursued. He sticks his 
head in the sand and then, because he can no long 
er see his pursuer, he fancies that he is safe. 

It is true that some iconoclasts have cast doubt 
on this story, and declare that the ostrich does no 
such th ng. The ostrich not being a familiar of 
this latitude, we are not sure whether the old tale 
or the new iconoclasm is correct; but for purposes 
of illustration the old tale is too good to lose. 
There are so many human beings whose mental 
process*, s are like that of the ostrich in the story 
that we shall always pretend to believe the old talc. 

What reminded us of this is the report from 
Washinjjton that the secretary of the navy has 
lately i.^sued an order providing that when reprc- 
sentativ ;s of foreign governments are being taken 
around on tours of inspection, they shall not be 
shown the navy yards and other storing places of 
our national brass knuckles and billies and slung- 
shots, fir fear they will find out just what our situ- 
ation W(»uld be in case of war. 

And that order comes about the time when the 
country is getting ready to receive Admiral Togo, 
the distmguished Dewey of the honorable Japanese 
navy. 

Perh ips the secretary had no thought in his 
mind thit this new order might be construed as a 
plan to jrevent Admiral Togo from doing any Jap- 
anese spying in our navy yard, but if Togo is at 
all sensitive he is very likely to draw that conclu- 
sion froTi it. 

Whe :her or not this order is continued, — though 
it seem.^ rather absurd when if any foreign nation 
wants t<» find out anything it can do so in twenty- 
four hoars, — it certainly ought to be revoked in 
Togo's favor. If it is not it will be taken as prov- 
ing a fe;.r of Japan which we are sure nobody feels, 
and an txpectation of future war with Japan which 
we are ture nobody has except possibly Mr. Hob- 
son, the ugh we haven't heard even from him on 
the subject lately. 



IDLE SPECULATIONS. 

One disadvantage of editorializing in a monthly 
magazine is that you have to get your stuff up so 
far in advance of publication that the irresistible 
current of events may make it folly by the time it 
reaches the eyes of its readers. 

For instance, the able and entertaining World's 
Work ill its current issue speculates thus: 

^^ hat will be Mr La Follettes altitude in 
case-— it would today seem the likely case — 
the i>rogrre.<sives are not able to prevent Mr. 
Taft s nomination for a second term? 

\\ ill they march out of the convention? 

M ill they go over to the Uemociats? 

\\ ill they raise the standard uf a new 
part: •' 

Poss bly when that was written these questions 
might have been interesting. Since it was written 
and before it got published they lost most of their 
interest. 

Taft will be renominated as the Republican can- 
didate for president. The "progressives" will not 
control more than a state or two, and probably the 
only La FoUette delegation will be that from Wis- 
consin. 

And the question what the "insurgents" in con- 
gress wdl do about it is hardly important enough 
to be interesting. 

It has become obvious that in their fight against 
reciprocity the "insurgents" have insurged against 
the people's best interests, that they are playing 
plain pt litics of a very petty sort, and that their 
real obj.'Ction to reciprocity is that it will strength- 
en Mr. Taft's political fences. They are fighting 
it for that reason, and for the further reason that 
they fancy their stand will help them with the 
farmers of their districts. 

Will they march out of the convention? Not 
many of them will be there to march out. 

Will they go over to the Democrats? The 
Democr its are doing very nobly without them. 

Will they raise the standard of a new party? If 
they do they will not have a handful of followers. 

Says the Toledo Blade, (Rep.): "If the pro- 
gressive i^-of the brand the World's Work has in 
mind — march out of the convention, where will 
they go? Surely, not to the Democrats. The 
Democratic party has proved itself more progies- 
sive than the La Follette-Cannon alliance. The 
new pa'ity idea has gone glimmering. To have 
such an organization, an original set of principles 
and con /ictionn is a first requisite. Those held by 
the La Follette clique today came to them from 
the lum )er trust. What the attitude of the sen- 
ator fro n Wisconsin is to be in 1912 will be pic- 
turesque, perhaps, but neither very interesting nor 
convinciig. Between the close of the extraordin- 
ary sess on of congress and the season of national 
conventions, the weeds will be hoed out of the 
progrressive cause. The country is fast learning the 
hollown< ss of the gentlemen who used the name 
most, who staked out the first claims to leadership 
in it. It calls for no prophetic vision to foresee 



that those who had decried special interest the loud- 
est and who took to the tall timber when their own 
special interests were threatened, will soon be most 
conspicuous by their meekness." 

And that's a true word. Progressives there are 
— the whole body of the people is progressive. But 
the word itself, by the actions of those who 
usurped its use, has become a species of political 
cant that hurts the cause for which its users lately 
professed to stand. 



DULUTH— THE CONVENTION CITY. 

Duluth is to entertain this summer rather more 
conventions than usual, and this is highly pleasing 
for several reasons. One is that nobody is going 
to be more pleased than those who attend these 
conventions. Another is that the best possible way 
to advertise Duluth is to get people to come here 
and look it over and go away to talk about it, and 
it doesn't make so much difference how they are 
got here. Still another reason, peculiar to The 
Herald, is that it has advocated the policy of get- 
ting for Duluth all the conventions it can possibly 
entertain. 

In point of fact, so surpassing are Duluth's at- 
tractions as a summer convention city that it ought 
to be having conventions all summer long and into 
the fall, and instead of having to go out after them 
the fame of these attractions ought to be so wide- 
spread that those locating conventions would be 
competing with each other for Duluth dates. 

At an earlier stage in Duluth's history, when 
other attractions were as great as they are now, 
there was one handicap — the lack of hotel facilities. 
That handicap is being rapidly removed, if it is not 
removed already. Several new hotels have been 
built in the past few years, and the older ones have 
remodelled and increased their capacity and qual- 
ity. Duluth now has five as good hotels as there 
are anywhere. There may be larger ones, but none 
better, not even barring those like the St. Dollars, 
where it costs you a fortune a minute to live. Ex- 
pensive luxuries do not always mean comfort, and 
comfort is what the Duluth hotels make a special- 
ty of. 

Duluth is THE convention city par excellence. 
It ought to see to it that its good accommodations 
and delightful summer climate are made known to 
all those who have anything to do with locating 
conventions in future summers. 



THERE ARE OTHERS—AND WORSE. 

The favorite occupation of the country press of 
Minnesota since April 19, 1911, has been lambast- 
ing the state legislature which did a very agreeable 
act by adjourning on that day. 

The legislature probably deserves, too, a good 
share of the harsh comments that have fallen to its 
unhappy lot. It overlooked many opportunities 
to be of real service to the people, and it spent a 
good deal of its time in fruitless jangling that 
achieved nothing but a harvest of shame. 

But as legislatures go, it was by no means so 
bad as a stranger might judge from the comments 
upon it. There have l»een vvorse legislatures right 
here in Minnesota, though theit lidv." been better 
ones both here and elsewhere. The '^rip of special 
interests never was so loose on a Minnesota legis- 
lature as it was on this one, though it was indubit- 
ably in evidence. 

But if it will do any good in behalf of the late 
lamented legislature — which surely, by the way, de- 
serves the chance that a special session would of- 
fer to prove that it isn't wholly beyond redemption 
— The Herald takes pleasure in testifying that there 
have been other legislative sessions this year that 
were worse than Minnesota's. 

For instance, the Tennessee legislature was dis- 
graceful from start to finish. A part of the mem- 
bers, enough to prevent a quorum, fled from the 
state during a large portion of the session and prc- 
vened the transaction of business. And when the 
session was finally about to be adjourned the legis- 
lature liberally voted each of its members $500 as 
■'expense money" in addition to the salaries and 
mileage allowed by law. 

Bad as it is, the Minnesota legislature wouldn't 
have dared to do an act so shameless. 



GOOD ROADS AND THE NATION. 

Senator Swanson of Virginia has introduced in 
the senate a bill providing annual appropriations of 
$20,000,000 for five years to be used in improving 
the post roads and rural routes of the country. He 
explained that his bill would open up a million 
miles of road to government aid, and that his plan 
would go far toward redeeming the country from 
the ignominy of having the poorest roads in all the 
civilized world. 

Good roads mean so much to the producer and 
the consumer that there is room in the work of get- 
ting them for everybody; and everybody, from the 
nation down to the state, from the state down to 
the county and from the county down to the town- 
ship, ought to join in that work. If co-operation of 
that kind could be established, it wouldn't be long 
before the country that now has to admit with 
shame that it has the poorest roads in the world 
would be able to boast that it has the best. 

And every dollar wisely spent in good roads 
will return enormous dividends to be divided be- 
tween the producer and the consumer. 

Slowly, it is true, but nevertheless truly, the 
states are awakening to the need that they enter 
on the work of road-making on a large scale. Min- 
nesota, which has been distributing driblets of state 
aid for years without making noticeable impression 
on the situation, has lately awakened, and the peo- 
ple at the next election will vote on an amendment 
to the Constitution authorizing a state road tax of 1 
mill a year. In the meantime, under the Dunn bill, 
it has provided a comprehensive system of state aid 
and state supervision which needs only a more 
liberal allowance of funds to make it of enormous 
value. 

The government is heartily welcome to partici- 
pation in the vitally important work. Senator 
Swanson's bill should be made the basis for an 
earnest consideration of the subject on the part of 
congress. 



Just the same the N. E. A., isi^'t in it for scrap- 
piness with the D. A. R. -:. 



At least. President Taft's plan to take his politi- 
cal advisers to sea with him is in keeping with his 
early record in the presidency. 



Heat sufferers in other cities may regale them- 
selves with the thought thai' there are only 142 
shopping days left before Christinas. 




July 8, 1911. 



THE OPEN COURT 



(Rcaden of The Herald ure invited to make free use 
of tills column to express their Ideoa about the topic* 
of general Interest, but dlscuaslons of sectarian relig- 
ious dirferciiLea ar« barred. Letters should not ex- 
ceed 300 worda— Uie shorter the better. They must be 
written on one side of the paper only, and they must 
be accompatiled In every case by the name and ad- 
dress uf the writer, though these need nut be pub- 
lished. A aigued letter U alwan mora effecUve. ho»- 
evet. ) 



ONE WHO DID NOT 

GO ON STRIKE. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

By the handbills the Baliers' union 
are passiner around, it looks as if the 
men working in Gaaser's bakery are 
poor, underpaid men, subject to pub- 
lic sympathy, and on that account peo- 
ple should not patronize the bakery. 

As for myself, I have been known 
In Duluth for the last twenty-four 
years as a baker, and will let the 
public judge as to my abilty in my 
profession. Do you think I am work- 
ing for Mr. Gasser for the fun of it? 

In the bakers trade it is difficult 
to say what a man's wage should be. 
A man who knows his business is 
worth four times more than an in- 
competent one, even if he be a strong 
union man. The men working in Gas- 
ser'a bakery are ail competent baker.s, 
they are working for the interest of 
Gasser's bakery, but also for their 
own. Don't you forget it. 

FIIED HOFLER. 

Duluth July 7. 

LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP— 

AND THEN LEAP? 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Will you allow me to express mj 
opinion of marriage? This Is a sub- 
ject of much interest to all. especially 
the young people who are considering 
the question of choosing a liXe mate. 
or in other words getting Tiiarried. 
We should never be in haste to take 
this step for if a mistake is made, ii 
may be a serious matter, and affect our 
whole life's happiness and prosperity, 
and we ^hould give this much earnest 
thought and consider well the step 
we are about to take. If we make a 
wise choice at this time we will have 
made the most Important contract of 
our whole life. 

I remember a wedding I attended 
when I was a boy. The groom was a 
promising young farmer, and the bride 
was a wealthy farmer's daughter. The 
parents and every one were satisrted 
that this was a suitable match, and the 
young people seemed to be proud of 
each other. Everything looked joyous, 
but as they stood up before the clergy- 
man to be married the girl commenced 
crying bitterly as though her heart 
would break. Her husband that was 
to be and her friends felt very badly, 
and they gathered around her and 
asked what made her cry. They soon 
pacified her and she told them she had 
never thought of this before she stood 
up before the minister. There it came 
into her mind that she was taking the 
most serious step of her life. After 
she was pacified the ceremony was 
completed. 1 do not know how this 
match came out, but I will guarantee 
this young woman made a royal 
worthy wife. Marriage vows are held 
far too lightly these days. It was not 
so 100 years ago. Then a boy's and a 
girl's trotli was held more sacred than 
the marriage ceremony is today. The 
marriage and divorce laws in effect to- 
day are a disgrace to our country. A 
rightful marriage Is the most neces- 
sary and important act of every per- 
son 8 life, and the Creator intended this 
to be so and all we see in life and in 
nature confirms this. We talk about 
the Mormans in Utah, but how much 
better are those who get married to- 
day and get divorced tomorrow or 
next week. Now let me ask. dear 
reader, what would become of this 
beautiful world If it should renounce 
the marriage law.s? I will leave it to 
you to answer as you will, but I do 
say that an earnest and happy mar- 
riage is the best and most essential 
compact of our entire life, and it can 
be made very happy. Very sincerely, 
CHARLES A. HARRIS. 
Two Harbors, July 7. 

• 

The Enda of the Earth. 

In the days of the old sea vultures, 

when the sail was spread for the 

quest. 
There was in every ocean the hope of 

an unknown shore — 
Beyond the Orient gateways a farther 

East to explore, 
And ever a West unreached beyond the 

Isles of the West. 

And their hearts grew great in the 
thought that the world in which 
they were born 

Was wide as the heavens are wide and 
knew no limit or bound. 

And that ever beyond the farthest a 
farther might still be found. 

Westward below the evening and east- 
ward behind the morn.* 

Now we know our little earth we have 

come to the end too soon 
Of the ways that were once so long 

and the seas that were once so 

wide; 
And the gulfs of space en-ring us, we 

are bounded on every side 
By the starry deeps of the night, and 

the pathless blue of the noon. 

The way we took to the southward 

leads us again to the North, 
And the star that beckoned our quest 

is the same that calls our return. 
Shall our hearts grow small with the 

truth that, of old men perished 

to learn? 
Shall we call it a home or a prison, 

from which there is no way 

forth? 

When man wins truth from the years, 

the loss with his dreams he pays; 
But In time the knowledge he won 

but leads again to a dream. 
And the wonder ever remains; and a 

mystery more supreme 
Than the distant promise of old, is 

hidden in homely ways. 

For the spell of the unfound shore has 

gathered above our own; 
And the magic of old sea dreams is 

treasured in wayside flowers; 
And tidings of love Immortal ar« 

whispered from vanishing hours; 
And the secret of unknown beauty 

trembles at heart of the 

known. 

The music the world once heard we 
hear in a softer key; 

And a meaning the old world missed 
awakens In ancient song; 

And the dream that the old world 
dreamed the ages for us prolong 

In the sound of the wind, and the rip- 
ple of waves, and the call of the 
sea. 

Too small have wfe found our home? 

But see! though we reach the 

bars 
That close the ends of the earth, what 

w-anderings wait us still — 
Always a journey left to the country 

over the hill. 
And In every heart a pathway that 

reaches beyond the stars. 

—SYDNEY ROYSE LYSAGHT. 



THE SENATORSHIP. 



Thlaka. 

Greenbush Tribune: Dan Lawler of 
St. Paul is going to run for Senator 
Nelson's place next year. Dan thinks 
he can beat Knute. Dan thinks lots 
of things that don't come to pass. 



A PoMlbllity. 

St. Peter Herald: Daniel Lawler says 
he will be a candidate for the United 
States senate under the terras of the 
Keefe bill, and believes he will be 
able to defeat Senator Nelson. There 
is a possibility, and it is not extremely 
remote, that neither Mr. Lawler nor 
Mr. Nelson will have his name on the 
ballot at the general election. 

Lawler and Othera. 

Mora Times: Dan Lawler, former 
mayor of St. Paul, has announced him- 
self as a Democratic candidate for the 
United States senate at the next pri- 
mary election under the new law pro- 
viding for the popular election of 
United States senators. Dan is a good 
fighter but ho will hardly cut much 
figure In the campaign. He is at outs 
with all the Democratic leaders who 
no doubt are planning on uniting on 
some strong candidate to pit against 
Knute Nelson. Lawler may mix up 
matters enough, however, to make it 
easier for Knute to win at the gen- 
eral election if he succeeds in pulling 
through the Republican primaries. 
There are rumors to the effect that Jim 
Peterson of Minneapolis aspires to be 
the progressive Rej>ubllcan candidate 
against the senator. Another candi- 
date frequently mentioned la State 
Senator Gunderson of Alexandria. Sen- 
ator Nelson's home town. He is a 
much stronger man than Peterson and 
would have the support of a large ele- 
ment of moderate progressives whose 
support Peterson could never get. 

Above HlR Conntitiieiits. 

Anoka Union: Thousands of good 
Republicans would be pleased to see 
Senator Knute Nelson laid upon the 
shelf, because his constituents are be- 
neath his consideration. 



AVIU Not Be niMappolnted. 

Litchfield Independent (Dem.): Dan 
Lawler of St. Paul announces himself 
a Democratic candidate for the United 
States senate to succeed Knute Nelson, 
and adds that he expects opposition. 
He also will not be disappointed in his 
last surmise. The Democrats of Minne- 
sota are not looking for a standpatter 
to go to the United States senate, and 
we figure that Dan is in this class. 

A 'WorA for Knnte. 

Cambridge Independent Press: Slate- 
making in a political way is a sign of 
the times. There are any number of 
men in Minnesota ready and willing to 
take a try at succeeding Knute Nelson 
next year but they are waktlng for the 
lightning to strike first. Uncle Knute 
has not yet said whether or not he will 
be a candidate to succeed himself, but 
If he decides at the last minute to re- 
main in the race he will make him- 
self felt and heard from one end of 
Minnesota to the other. 



Uneonventlonalitleii. 

Chicago Tribune: "I'd enjoy your 
conversation a great deal more, 
Weerius, if I didn t have to listen to 
it." 

"The reason I don't ask you whether 
or not this Is all-wool goods. Mr. Sel- 
lers, is that I want to save you from 
lying about It." 

"Yes. we like our new cook very 
much, Mrs. Ipdyke; she has told us of 
ever so many funny things that hap- 
pened when she was working for you." 

"I know, of course, old chap, that 
you're fishing for an Invitation to go 
with us in our yachting trip, but it 
won't do you any good. 

"From the way your curtains smell, 
Mrs. Whackster, I judge that your hus- 
band smokes rather cheap cigars." 

"I've often wondered, Throggins. how 
you ever managed to smuggle yourself 
into good society." 

• 

A PUtltude. 

Washington Star: "Father," said the 
small boy, "what is a platitude?" 

"A platitude, my son. Is a statement 
whose truth you are compelled to ad- 
mit uttered by some one whom you 
do not personally admire." 



Dan'a Second Attempt on Knute'ii 
Scalp. 

Minnesota Mascot: Dan Lawler will 
contest for the United States senator- 
ship again.st Knute Nelson next year, 
at least that is what Dan is reported 
to have said. 

Lawler is the man who bolted James 
Gray, the Democratic candidate for 
governor, last fall. Dan is a "regular" 
Democrat. But Just now it seems that 
a whole lot of Democrats do not see 
wherein they owe Dan any support, 
considering "the manner in which he 
treated the nominee of the party last 
fall. They can not. that is many of 
them can not, forgive Dan that he 
went over to the other side and helped 
defeat Gray. ^ ^ 

The brewers did not want Gray 
elected, the saloons did not want Gray 
elected, the '•Interests" did not want 
Gray elected, Dan Lawler did not want 
Gray elected — and so the people, of 
course, did not elect Gray. 

Showed Hla Strengrth. 

Fairmon: Sentinel: Dan W. Lawler 
declares that he will run for the senate 
in opposition to Knute Nelson. The 
little Norwegian has been largely 
shorn of his strength through his Bal- 
llngerism and other unpopular va- 
garies, and might be beaten by Lawler. 
Lawler however, is far from being 
Minnesota's strongest Democrat. 

• 

Pointed Param-aphs. 

Chicago News: With many a man 
economy begins at home and ends at a 
downtown cafe. 

After a man has been touched he 
begins to realize that he was hard hit. 

Many a married woman envies her 
cook because of her salary and even- 
ings off. , .J ... 

The artist who Is married to a 
blonde makes most of his angels of 
the brunette type. ,_.,.,, 

A woman may say what she thinks 
of a man to his face and still Indulge 
in a lot of back talk. 

If a girl is In love with a poor man 
she can't understand why some women 
marry for wealth. 

It's easy to be popular. All you have 
to do is to make other people believe 
they know a lot more than you do. 

* 

la This \%'hat Inaurgency Cornea To? 

Harper's Weekly: If La Follette is 
the leader of the Insurgents, they have 
ample cause to mourn the untimely 
death of Dolliver. For it is hard to be- 
lieve that if Dolliver were alive today 
he would sign his name to such a docu- 
ment as La Follette wrote out and pre- 
sented to the senate as his view of 
reciprocity, he being the insurgent 
member of the finance committee. La 
Follette is in favor of reciprocity. Of 
course he is. Hear him: 

"I believe in reciprocity. I believe 
in reciprocity with Canada. The mu- 
tual give and take of tariff concessions 
between our country and our world 
neighbors, along the lines laid down 
by Blaine and McKinley, is a policy 
that has In view the best welfare of 
all concerned." 

He will, then, cordially support the 
bill in hand? Oh no! Not at all. 

"But 1 protest against this proposed 
revision of our tariff by executive man- 
date. I protest against this diplomatic 
bargain that is masquerading in the 
guise of reciprocity. It Is not reci- 
procity." 

If Mr. La Follette knows any way 
on earth to initiate real reciprocity or 
indeed any kind of reciprocity, save by 
a "diplomatic bargain," he has an im- 
portant discovery which he ought to 
tell us about. Instead he goes on to 
tell why this particular "diplomatic 
bargain" is so outrageous. He, of 
course, tells us it will hurt the farm- 
ers, but he is most Indignant because 
it will help the packers, the millers, 
and James J. Hill's railroad lines. He 
apparently objects to helping these In 
any way. As to the publishers, he ob- 
jects to Its helping them because It 
won't help them in La Follette's own 
way, which Is a way that hasn't the 
slightest chance of brtng adopted. In 
fact the only kind of reciprocity La 
Follette wants is a kind which has 
no chance. 

♦ 

A Proverbial Tragedy. 
The Rolling Stone and the Turning 
Worm ^ ,,. 

And the Cat that Looked at a King, 
Set forth on the Road that Deads to 
Rome — ^ ^, 

For Youth will have its fling. 
The Goose will lay the Golden Eggs, 

The Dog must have his Day, 
And nobody locks the Stable Door 

Tin the Horse Is stol'n away/ 

But the Rolling Stone that was never 
known 
To Look before the Leap. 
Plunged down the Hill to the W^aters 
Still 
That run so dark, so deep; 
And the Leaves were stirred by the 
Early Bird 
Who sought his Breakfast where 
He marked the Squirm of the Turning 
Worm — 
And the Cat was killed by Care! 

— Arthur Guiterman In Life. 

• 

FUolet. 
I swat at the fly, 

But he sees me first; 
To kill him I try. 
I swat at the fly. 
But. durn him! he's spry 

This insect accurst; 
1 Bwat at the fly. 
But he sees me first. 

— New York Evening MalL 



Stay-at-Home Travelers. 

It was hard to stifle a feeling of envy 
as I watched my friend, the professor, 
waving a farewell to me from the deck 
of the departing liner. I wondered why 
fate hadn't ordained that I too should 
spend a summer In Switzerland. It has 
always been one ■« the passions of my 
life to travel. Tifc^tourlst trains, th« 
great ships in dock »nd the gay. hur- 
rying vacationists have always filled 
me with a wistful yearning that I hope 
some day will be satisfied. Just now 
my limitations both of time and of 
purse keep me pretty steadily at home 
and on my daily job. 

But I am not going to grumble or 
even be unduly envious of the profes- 
sor. He has no monopolies of oppor- 
tunities. There are various happy ex- 
pedients possible for those of us whose 
lot It may not be to cross the ocean 
or the plains, who are denied the priv- 
ilege of actually looking on strange 
cities or famous scenes. 

We can get many of the educational 
advantages of travel without leaving 
home if we know how. Do we realize, 
for Instance, that the public library la 
full of fascinating books of travel, with 
Illustrations copious and beautiful? Do 
we know that for a penny we may buy 
reproductions of the finest works of art 
that man has ever created? After a 
few evenings with a beautiful book on 
V enlce I once felt almost competent to 
^y'^T\^^ stranger about the canals of 
the 'Queen of the Adriatic." And If X 
have never yet seen the Slsttne Ma- 
donna, I shall, at least, know it when 
I do see It, for a copy hangs on the 
walls of my sitting room. 

Moreover, there are always interest- 
ing sights In our Immediate vicinity t| 
we have eyes to behold them. How 
many of us really know the history, 
the traditions, the landmarks of our 
own locality? A man spent several days 
In a small New England village and 
voted it a dull experience. He did not 
know that a building in that village 
contained the actual flag that the men 
of the place carried in the flght at 
Concord bridge. His host let him go 
away without even telling him of this 
glorious relic. Other people had come 
hunc'reds of miles to look upon so hon- 
orable a banner. 

After all, those who sound the mean- 
ing of what lies within the range of 
dally experience are richer than those 
who may have toured all the conti- 
nents to return with dull mind.^?. "Sir." 
said Dr. Johnson to a fine gentleman, 
who had just returned from a long 
holiday In Italy, 'some men will learn 
more In the Hampstead stage thm 
others in the tour of Europe. " Which 
reminds us of how Agasslz was offered 
a check to enable him to pass a sum- 
mer abroad, but declined It, saying he 
preferred to spend the time in the 
study of his back yard. 

It Is worth while to remember that 
the most beautiful character this earth 
has ever known spent thirty years of 
his life in a Galillean village so small 
and mean that Its name became almost 
a byword on the lips of men. He never 
journeyed beyond His native I.and. The 
great centers of population. Rome, 
Athens, Thebes.He never visited. Yet 
His life was rich and full beyond com- 
pare and the blessing of It cojues down 
to you and me and to our children after 

U.S. 

Even if I am not with the professor 
on the high seas, then, I am not go- 
ing to get soured on my own chances 
for happiness this summer. There are 
good books to read and intere.sting 
places to visit and people whom it is 
worth while to try to know better. I 
will be a stay-at-home traveler. And 
fall shall find me. by the grace of God, 
a more Interesting and more contented 
man. 

Did you ever read that quaint old 
poem of Christopher Harvey'.s, in 
which he declares that, though ho 
lacked the opportunity of traveling Into 
foreign countries, he found sufficient 
field for exploration in his own little 
world? ( 

I.s It fft 

To labor after other knowledge so 

And thine own nearest, dearest self 
not know? 

Travels abroad both dear and danger- 
ous are, 

Whilst oft the soul pays for the body's 
fare; 

Travels at home are cheap and safe. 

• • * 

He that doth live at home and learna 

to know 
God and himself, needcth no farther go 

THE PARSON. 



■ 1^ 



A MOMENT WITH THE WITS. 



Kansas City Times: "Looking at that 
knob? That's my bump of caution." 
"Born with it. were you?" 
"Kicked by a mule!" 



Baltimore American: "Mrs. Pmart Is 
very clever about concealing her 
moves, but there Is one person who 
can always make her show her hand." 

"Who Is that?" 

"Her glove dealer." 



Fllengende Blaetter: Unskilled STiot 
(to gamekeeper) — I'm awfully sorry I 
shot your dog. 

"Don't you worry about that. sir. I 
left my best one at home in case of 
accidents." 



Detroit Free Press: "They say she 
has never quarreled with her hus- 
band." 

"Then she must get up and close 
the windows herself every time It 
rains at night." 



Harper's Bazar: 'Is there anything 
worse than living in the suburbs?" 
asked Howard. 

"Yes," replied Mr. Patreck of Hack- 
ensack, "there is. Living In the su- 
burbs of the suburbs." 



Punch: Gladys (to aeroplaning 
friend) — I do love to see the gulls 
flying about! 

AeroplanJng Friend — Oh, come away; 
do! I can't stand watching them I Tliey 
oughtn't to be out In this wind. 



Washington Herald: "That fellow 

cut me out in a very underhand way." 

"Yet you are going to the wedding." 

"Yes; I may get a chance to soak 

him with an old shoe." 



New York Press: Eve — Adam, I want 
you to remember one thing. 

Adam — What's that? 

Eve — That when I am looking the 
eyes of half the world are upon you. 



Judge: Globe Trotter — I guess Jinks 
hasn't been around very much. 

World Belter — Why do you think 
so? 

Globe Trotter — I have heard him 
speak favorably of two hotels. 

Philadelphia Record: Blobbs — Bjones 
always looks so pensive when he 
speaks of his ex-wlfe. 

Slobbs — Well, If you knew the 
amount of alimony he has to pay I 
guess you'd think she was rather ex- 
pensive. 

New York Sun: "I haven't recently 
heard you expressing the hope that 
your rich old uncle might shuffle off." 

"No. He married a young woman not 
long ago and I'm busy hoping he may 
live forever." 



Philadelphia Record: Mrs. Wigwag — 
When your husband takes you to the 
theater, does he ever go out between 
the ftcts? 

Mrs. Guzzler — Well. I wouldn't ex- 
press It In just that way. He some- 
times comes in between drinks. 
• 

Reflectlona of a Bachelor. 

New York Press: Summer girls 
mostly have very wintry heart affairs. 

It's a holiday outing when a man 
goes off with his friends, and hard 
labor with his family. 

It's a great extravagance to have 
any money In your pocket, because 
yoii can't help spending it. 

Nobody seems to know how to go 
out and swim when It means leaving" 
a prettv girl back on the beach. 

A wife can learn to trust her hiw- 
band about most anything except the 
reason he brings hMT home a box of 
flowers. 






- ^ 



-t 



■^r 



M- .,< — _ft^ 





Satxirday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 8» 1911. 






TWENTY YEARS ^.GO 



Taken From iht Columns of The Herald 



•••Ai a mtetiT.i -f the I»uluth 
Blreei Railway t : :.y today, which 
was aitendexl by Tni»ma« Lx)wry and 

g" ttinuel HllL It was agreed that Mr 
ha»* Fhould continue as manager un- 
til Aug 3. Luihtr Mendenhall was 
«iected vice president, vict JAnJ ^^ il- 
Son of MUmeapoUs, reslifned. 




Mr. 



overheard 



E r;ici.fc.rdP'>n. Hfury 
H. Jones, Henry Nolle 
son 



reer 
ary. 



•The Union, which ber*-n 
as an after -ioon paper In 



its ca- 

Febru- 



suspendfed p iblication yesterday. 



■ ■m iiii» I 



•••Thomas Braiey. a younR carpen- 
ter n-.et with a serious accident last 
©\enins He attempted to step upon 
the trailer of the street car linr. ^""^^ 
he was caught by the corner '^f ^"« 
oar and dragged down He i» »eri 
ously injured, but nvaj recover. 

•••Construction en the Port Arthur. 
Duluth & Western road has reached 
the township of strange. ne*r the head 
S? Whiteflsh lake TWO of the t .ree 
trestle brldjfes to be built at the laKe 
are about completed. At the iaK.e 
the line is IMO feet above 1-ake su- 
perior. 

•••Rev H. G Mc.\rthur and wife 
of Fort Atkinson Wis., are visit ins 
their son. H. B. McArthur of West Du- 

luth 

•••Mr and Mrs. M T Silverman are 

organ iTiny a banjo, guitar and mando- 
lin club in West Duluth and are meet- 
ing With great success. 

•••Mrs George McNeil of Bayfield is 
being entertained by Mrs Frank Osier 
cif West Duluth 



—Last evenint Miss Fannie C. Ed- 
son, cousin of I P ^^^^^■«''yi 5^[ 
Duluth and Suj erlor friends an ex 
curslon on the Estelle to ^^e^t *u- 
,,^ti-.r and thenv around the horn 
There were over fifty in the company 



• ••The seats lor 
Lyceum theater >n 
in the Spalding 
of the month. 



the opening of the 

Aug 3 will be sold 

about the latter part 



and nut 



re- 



•••A good many Dtiluth people 
member t W «cKlnney who was a 
re!srdent here during 1887 and US»^ He 
is now assistant general ma-^^^^P' J^^ 
the Benton Har >or Improvement com- 
pany, an orgarLlzaiion to bo..m 
fruit shipping tillage of Benton 
boT. Mirh Fo- a short 
leaving I>uluth. he was 
bonk at Gladstone. Mich 

Odd Fellows 

at the West 



time 
cashier 



the 
Har- 

after 
of a 



but now. please God. we 11 pray for 
Kaiser, and the Germans, too 

E:aBU«l>*"eB P«t %• HomU 

An Englishman, who had 
the last remark of old Biddy O Sullivan, 
pulled up his horse by the side of the 

Americans "Back here i'^ai,^'^*, ^''^J 
grandmother?- he asked insolentlj. 
Whether it was an intuition that tne 
Engashnian meant to convey a sneer 
the American*, or whether It was just 
general antipathy and distrust for 
the -oppresser." the old woman blurted 
out at blm. "'Shure an' if twas your 
grandmother the like.* of you was g»- 
ing to see. 'twould be bell 
Killarnev you'd be going to!" 

The sharp answer of the 
woman wa.x toj much for the 
and he started off down the mountain 
side at a swift gallop As long as he 
was within hearing Biddy O Sullivan 
shouted at the top of her old cracKea 
voice. -Hurrah for the Germans 
Hurrah for Mr Kaiser' and God grant 
him long life to drowned every moth- 
ers son o' yex"" _i._„ 
The English press noted with alarm 
the warm reception the German war- 
ships reoeiv«d In Queenstown harbor 
last July The men. women and chil- 
dren of the lo^RTi formed themselves 
int » an Immense reception committee 
and perhaps none were more pleased 
and astonished than the German 
ors as they marched thrc-ugh 
streets of Queenstown. with the 
demonPtratitn of welcome and 
will The w >men and children 



t>r..rr.oters of German coloniZHtion »n 

I Ireland, that It would perhaps be 

i wiser to bring colonists from the 

southern slates of Germany where the 

neoule were of a similar belief in mat- 

1 Vers"^ of reUglon with th3 Irlsh^ but It 

was soon demonstrated to the saiia- 

' faction of the Initiators of the scheme, 

that the bugbear of religious intoler- 

as dormant, or In fact could be 

be non-existent In the south 

of Ireland, and that Germans 

parts of Germany wou'.d be 

welcomed. In the north 

where there is a strong 

existing 

nlsts 



ance 
said to 
and west 
from all 
equally 
Ireland 

llgl..us bltlerness - ,„..,„ 

have thus far refrained from 



col' 



old Irish i settling. 

Britisher | -.^^ present population of Ireland 
about three milium, but the area 

can easily support three 



the country 



•••At a meeting of the stockholders 
of the Cumulative Investment com- 
panv. the following directors were 
elected: S L Selden. W K Wright. C 



V <3 . 
H Mc- 

conduc- 



•••Zenith Cltj lodge of 

N L SuTr.n;erfl*ld treasurer 
Minn. aecretar>: J. "^ iUiams 

tor. 

•••Cards are mt a^^nouncinf the ap- 
proaching marriage of '^^ atson » 
M?,?re arfd Miss Jessie, daughter of Mr 
and Mis Ezra A Tyler, to f^cur .<^° 
Tuesday. July : 1. In the First Metho- 
dist church 




iT f 




sail- 
the 
Irish 
good 
kissed 
the hands of the astonished sailors, and 
pinned clusters of shamrocks on their 
unifi'rms Many of the old peopK 
thought that the deliverers had rome to 
release them from the English yoke 
This act of enthuslaailc welcome was 
perhaps the nucleus of the German 
scheme of colonization in Ireland 

In the stxteenth century the German 
Palatines from the south of Germany 
colonized in the county of Limernk. 
many descendants of the Palatines still 
live m and around Umerick it is in- 
teresting to meet people in LinierlcK. 
with the fuil Fweet broeue of the wcKt 
of Ireland, with such names as Ebhart, 
Schmidt, and Howei!«ner 

In GermanVs limited area, a popu- 
atlon "t f>y rt<«f>,00'> is very near to over- 
crowding, and it is ne.-es.^ary to find an 
outlet for the increa.slnc pn;>ulation, 
GrmuiM < olonUer«. 

marily suggested ta the 



that ntimber without overcrowd- 



ttmes 

While England views with suspicion | 
th* German colonization scheme, it l« j 
hailed with enthusiasm by tiie irisn. 
The thrift and industry of the Germans, 
will give a stimulus to the Irish peo- i 
pie which they have not had for cen- 
turies owing to the harsh and impos- 
l."ble tyranny they have been laboring 
under. 

Since the advent of the sons of the 

into Ireland, a atlmulus Uas 

tu the Irish cause of Home 

right of the Irish to govern 

is practically assured, and 

said with'ut exaegeration 




of 
re- 

the 



Ernest 

by the 

Double- 



this book 



is no boy 
Is a good. 
Illustrated by a 
animals almost 



Fatherland 
r^?fT given 
Rule The 
themselves 
it may be 



citizens into 



pr; 



that the advent of German 

IheVreen isle, has been a potent lactor 

in bringing this abuut. 

German appreciation of the warm 
welcome accorded her sons, was illus- 
^ated i^ the Tier Garten in Berlin re: 
centlv when the crack military bana 
t.iaved the Irish national airs. The peo- 
pie' 8tO"d up from their seats, at 
lunch tables, and sang 
Dear" to the tune of 

^^Whlir^ihe English and Scotch and 
Welsh coasts are fortified against in- 
vasion the Irish coast has been I'-ft 
J.ractrcally unguarded One English 
newspaper bysterically suggests 
fea.«^ll»llity 'and prol.abllity » 
in the event of 



ROLF IN THE WOODS By 

Thompson Seton lllustraied 

author. Garden City. N. i. 

day Page * Co. $1,50 net. 

The boy who doesn't enjoy .^^^ . 

at ail. but an imitation. It 

redblooded story, lavishly 

man who can make 

growl out of the 

printed page. Never hag Mr ,,^f{f"* 

double talent for writing and i.luslrat- 

Ing shone to such good purpose 

When Rolf Kittering crawled out oi 
an attic bedroom window to escape his 
brutal uncle, there was no refuge for 
hlm except the camp of ^^s 'r"^*"^; 
friend. Md Quonal- tsie Indian, who has 
Initiated him Int.^ the mysteries of 
training a coon dog. Having thus 
erally taken to the woods, his 
lion In woodcraft became not 
a matter of play and choice, 
existence, and the story of 
outduors of the right with 

% 



lit- 
educa- 
merely 
but of 
his life 
the mon- 
ster snapping turtle, of the journey 



by 
de- 
the 



of how 



the 

Hail Kaiser 

*^he Wearing of 



the 
of Ger- 

mohilizlTig 



to the great North W oods. and 
the boy came to know the intimate 
life of the wUd creatures, will con- 
sume anv boy with uninterrupted in- 
terest The most exciting pan /** 
where Rolf puts his knowledge Into 
practice as a scout during the war oi 

181" 

Into this book. Mr Seton has put 
the accumulation of thirty years 

study in the wilds, and he has 
It iiilo a thrilling story 



of 
woven 



of "Columbia Glacier.— Alaska s Typ- 
ical Ice Tongue.' by Lawrence M-*^- 
tin and a statement regarding the 
Kahn Foundation for the Foreign 
Travel of American Teachers, by I ree- 
Ident Nicholas, Murray Butler In the 
Review's Civil war anniversary series, 
this month s contribution is an au- 
thoritative account of the dramatic 
part played by the Signal Corps 
Gen A W. Greely. In the editorial 
partroent. "The Progress of 
World." especial attention is given to 
the recipri>city and tariff-revision de- 
bate in congress, to the retirement of 
President Diar of Mexico, and to the 
significance of the coronation cere- 
monial in England 

• • • 

In the July number of SuccMis 

Magarlne. Inls H Weed s article. The 

I Cattleman Today." shows the evolu- 

I lion of the cowpuncher Int.. a business 

I man with a national organization. 

Rheta Chllde l>orr checks up Llla 

I Flagg Young's accomplishment m an 

artlcfe "'The Woman Who Teaches 

Chicago" Dr. Alexander LamV>ert s 

paper, "The Relation of Alcohol to 

Disease.'" is an authoritative contrl- 

' buiion upon this important subject, 

Mary Heaton Vorses article^ The 

i Price of Clothes." calls attention to 

' the great discrepancy between ttie 

cost of manufacturing ready-made 

clothes and what the public pays. 



ing climate of the Vatican and th« 
ever-lessening list of available can(?l- 
dates make a series of highly »nt«re*t- 
mg topics It !»• worth noting that 
the article immediately following, wrtl- 
len bv the Rev Canon Barry, an ortho- 
dox historian, voices decidedly oppos- 
ing views, under the Utle of "The Pope 
and Democracy," Theve are several 
other seriously suggestive .l.;ai>e.s In 
this number, among them 'The tier- 
man Drift Toward Socialism. a sur- 
prising statement of half-realixed facUi 
William C l>rehcr, "The L nllmited 



by 



rranchise." by Max Eastman, 
Chemistry of Sleep." by Dr 
Eastman, an article full of 
tlve suggestion as well as 
ai'alysls Historical papers 
tributed by Gamaliel 



and 'The 
Fred W. 
construe - 
a curious 
are con- 
Bradford. Jr., and 



war. 



many. - .^ .. 

In Ireland, "whore any loe 

would find support and assistance. 



of England 



By Charles E. 
Small. Maynard 



The first Ume that I saw Procior i 
K- •• «-as at a I»emocratlc convention 
ti. . .->embled :n Louisville to nom- 
inate a candidate for Judge of the 
Kentucky court of appeals I was a 
dt legate of a rural constituency. 
tkough not old enough to vote. We 
all had a love feast when Knott made 
ft brilliant speech withdrawing the 
' I'- Kavanaugh and moved to 
inatlon of Bob Hardin 
.us It was a fine speech, but 
far f: .-lu an oration There 
ing sj.ectacuiar 
conversational 
words that 

The 
work 
sftt d 
across 

T wna IT! T r.**l TlCt*n lO Jlir . 

half 



ma.n-. 
inak 

uau 



f!' 



a 
.s 
with 
end 



rea'l 
candi- 



■was 

Elijah 

in the 

elected 



elected 
I have 

news- 



man 
Knott 



was notfc- 
about it It was in 
tone, but the choicest 
could have l>een pl-ked 
convention got through with its 
about five minutes after Knott 
.wn, and some of ^.^ adjourned 
the street to the W lllard hotel. 
There I was intr(.Miuced to Mr, Knott 
and there he entertained al>out 
•core of us with anecdote that m-as 
•Implv delicious. 1 fell m love 
hlr t.^en and loved him to the 
• • • 
In thise days Kentucky elected 
oongressmen the fir.st Monday In Au- 
Kim. the odd year after the term had 
begun In March previous, and I shall 
never forget how happy 1 was to 
that J Proctor Knott was our 

r congress In the Fourth dis 
I was in the "bloouy old Third, 
•ii the Democratic oandidate 

the verv old lion of I»em>cracy. 
Hise Beck was nominated 
Ashland district Of course we 
•vervthmg. but they stole one dls 
trict and kept It, . 

Knctt was trlumphantlj 
Since he died the other day 
read notices of him In numerous 
Papers, some of em Kentucky papers 
Sind no one had his career right He 
m&B elected to the Fortieth congress 
mad re-elected to the Forty -first con- 
iiress He would have been continued 
K congress had he been capahle of 
•hakini hands for a vote He was 
out four years, giving place to a 
with a voice and a stature 
«me back, and could have continued 
to congress till the day of his dea h 
had he elected to do so 1 strove ^ .th 
him to that end. but like Benton Mc- 
MlLin. he thought that the J^ay to the 
Unit.d Slates senate wa.* through the 
executive mansion of his staie,^ and 
he was elected governor in l^ho. it 
was his political undoing 
• • • 
But It Is not Proctor Knott the 
statesman that I am going to tell you 
about, but Procior Knoti the man 
The j»econd time 1 saw him was at a 
circuit court In Adair county 
oer Dabney was there, and o, 
licking fun they did 
not wit that has a 

atings and cauterizes, but it was the 
rery unction of humor, that captures 
even the victim of it There 
much difference between 
Knott and Tom Reed as 
tween acid and ointment 
tated. Knoll soothed. j, , „* „,„* 

I have writ miles and miles of stuff 
about Proctor Knott's speeches. Near- 
ly everybody knows him by 
luth si.eech alone, that, even 
Vein, is not nearly so good a speech 
as that on paving Pennsylvania ave- 
nue But Proctor Knott wa.« a prreater 
thinker than he was a poet or a hum- 
orist Above all he was a Democrat 
with a big D. a doctrinaire with a big- 

fer r» He was Jurist enough 
ustice of the supreme 

republic 

• • • 
The weakness of Knott was in his 
■very opulence. I know of none in pub- 
lic life at this time, unless it »>e ^laT•- 
tln Littleton, who approache^^ /"-'^^.l" 
copiousness of vocabulary What * Qit; 
ferenre there was in the speech of 
Carlisle and that of Knott ' One was 
arctic the -^ther tropic It 
Impossible to expurgate one 
llsfe's speeches; it would be 
emasculate one of Knott's 



had ever read the 
of Elijah Hise on 

reported in thii - 
He slapp»ed me on 

•'You scamp, have 

Is the grandest of 

and the greatest 

speech ever made 



Spen- 
the rol- 
make! It wa^ 
virus to It and 



w as as 
Proctor 
there is be- 
Reed Irrl- 



the 
in 



I>u- 
ihat 



for chief 
bench of the 



ould be 
of Car- 
cruel to 
Knott was 



and gorgeous; Car- 



the tulip, splendid 
lisle s is strength. 

• • • 
The last speech I heard Knott make 
1 was his guest so to speak He asked 
mv dear old friend Jim Hopper, about 
the ablest man 1 ever saw. and me to 
hear the argument. It was as profound 
a discussion of the subject of taxation 



as I ever hea: d and i wish it had 
been printed at it fell from ^^*^ "^' ,J 
was absolutely entranced by t. e 
genius and tht eloQuence of the mati. 
ff every comn unity, ^re't and small 
in our repuUlc would follow th- 
philosophles o:' this wonderful man. 
Who m ght ha -e been companion ^ith 
Plato we wo, Id not only reap the 
fullness of G .shen. but we would 
have the delig its of ^'topia 

He made tl at speech In the sam- 
room where I had heard hl.m the first 
time I ever saw him ^e walked 
across the street to that same hole, 
and 1 congratulated him on the eftor 
I asked him if he 
dissenting opinion 
that railroad case 
teenth B^n Monroe 
the back and said 
you rend that "! It 
all state pai ers 

Democratic slump -, ,..<-». i 

And that is tiue. That opinion of Old 
Llge" Hise ou*ht to be a text book iTi 
every sihool. No lawyer can afford to 
be Ignorant of \U and every statesman 
ought to be icqualnled with the las. 

half of it. 

• • • 

But I wouM love to say something 
about the mai. A l..ng time ago when 
I was a starveling newspaper man in 
Louisville 1 was a member of the 
•Patch-Work club, that met at old 
Joe Alexande's taxem. and never had 
Its like between earth and sky. Ill 
bet It was the only hotel in the world 
that would h.ive tolerated us. Chaucer 
lived too soon. We sat in the chairs, 
while the guosts stood up and around. 
We discussed with sublime Ignorance. 
enormous vociferation, and tremendous 
dogmatism, tvery question that ever 
Pt..«teied the reason or agitated the 
imaiflnation of man or woman. I am 
sorrv and shumed to say that some of 
the members drank red llcker and in- 
stead of pationizing the hotel bar we 
went half a stjuare south, and drank 
at old Duffy's, who was known to be 
the meanest man in Louisville, and 
certain It Is that he had the best i 
wliisky in that town 

Proctor Ki ott was one of our ' honor- 
ary" members, and he was a perpetual, 
a perennial delight. I shall not at- 
tempt to tel the story of Lije Plnk- 
ston s dog except In sections — the be- 
ginning and the endlngof it. It Is an 
eternal shan e that William Shake- 
speare and Sen Jonson did not hear 
Proctor Kno t tell It. 

• • • 

Mavhap il was like this: Elijah 
Pinkston liv -d in the Salt River hills, 
and he was an authority on dogs. One 
Sunday mori in the voluptuous month 
of late OcH ber when the frost had 
kissed the ! rees. and they had re- 
turned mast in glorious abundance. 
Mr, Plnkstoji had ^ for audience some 
neighbors and he was 'orating unto 
them" about the splendid prospect for 
the sportsman, who chased the var- 
mint by da; and stalked the varmint 
by niicht. 

Suddenly :here came into that pres- 
ence a boy I nd a dog, the latter a regu- 
lar snarlevjow, such as Marryat pic- 
tured. The boy drawled: "Mr. Pink- 
ston. father sent me over here to gii 
your judgment of this ere dog," Lig- 
stopped in the middle of his oration 
to a.sk "What does your daddy think 
of that ere dog"" The boy answered. 
"He 'low he's a right down clever 
dorg." Of CI urse that was a mortal af- 
front to L ge. that anybc*dy should 
pass sentence on a dog without first 
getting his "•Judgment."" 

Li?e lurred to the boy and said 
"And so your dad thinks him a good 
dorg" Hist him up. my son. hist him 
up.""' The bey straddled the cur locked 
Ills fingers under the brisket, and 

■ hlsted"" hi n Then Llge made a 
speech In vhich he discovered mor^' 
bad quailti»s in that dog than all the 
tongues of Babel could utter, I cannot 
nndertake io repeat tt, but the close of 
Mr Pinksn n's oration, as repeated by 
Knott, was like tlilei: "And look here, 
men. when* ver you see the dew claws 
hang on a dorg as low as they do on 
that ere d 'rg you can bet j'our bot- 
tom dollar he"ll set on his haunches 
till he w.ars out a thousand tails 
barkin" up a tree there's nolhln' In" 

One of ■ he greatest of l>enK>crata, 

■ ne k.f the most admirable of men. left 
our scenes when Proctor Knott died. 



FIRE WASTE IN UNITED STATES 



Fire Loss $250,000,000 AnnuaUy-Per Capita Loss Near- 
ly Ten Times That in Europe-Fire 
Marshal Laws Needed. 



By 

rre«ldetit Merrkast 



POWELL EVANS. 

■■d E»su« Cuinpasy, PWladelpkla. 



(The wnUT ii( tlu» ani.-lr t» ••!'• "'•' 
t)Tf piT^eolk'n and Usniranr* p>uui.:i<'. 
u..iial A»»KU«Uim of M»nur»riun»rH, 
H«ritware .u.s..aiitl m and tlie NUl""!" 
CiwdU Uar. A fire mar.Ual U» i 
mai.y i>I tU> hli'»» rweiiLlj i<»i">ed 
loglalaturii. Thf ir-rt«t f»i-ior5 
Newark <l'e umoUnem lo tlto 



Jtrwi 



—.\.^: '? Uie 

. ,.; t,..r Na- 

tbe .NaU.'ual 

Ai»ufi»t:.i|i of 

Such nintKiiliai 

th» l«w.:.'yl»--.l» 

in Ne» Y.'rt *i'd 



(Elxclutii«(> 



St-rvict^ the t^urvev Prose 
Bureau.) 

The entire fire waste of any coun- 
try' Is a K«e which is distributed over 
the people at large by 
is what we pay for 
property together with 
up without insurance 



must allege that he finds the fact* as 
stated, but this should be set forth 
and not in a phrase. The 
should be signed by the 
indorsed by the broker. 
to he fire marshal. If at 



in detail 
statement 
applicant, 
and sent 



about 
sum 



twenty-four 
a certain 



a tax This 
insurance on 
what is burned 
How larKe is 
this loss which ordinarily attracts so 
little attention? The 10 -year aver- 
age of fire losses in the United States 
and Canada up to 189 8 wbjb 
12">0.0a0,0(t0. For 190. the 
was Iil5. 000.000; for 11»0S. $241,000.- 
000 for 190St. $204,000,000. and for 
IQIO X'>34 000.000 ln.«urance author- 
ities " average the loss at $250.000 000 
a vear. and they have ample author- 
ity for doihK so. The United States 
geodetic survey bureau estimates 
$400 000.000 to be the amount of tne 
fire waste including the cost of fire 
department and patrols A loss of 
$200,000,000 means $^.00 per minute 
for even" minute in the 
and ever>- hour we bum 
percentage of human life. We ha\e 
recently had an excellent sample in 

' ^Another element which many 

shrewd business men do not count is 

the interruption of business A man 

who pavs 1 per cent insurance Is 

paying on the risk, so measured of 

his building burning. If hi* ^^''^''l^ 

takes fire he loses something further 

through the interference of his 

ness which has bankrui 

merchant. , . „.^ 

In regard to these totals have "we 

anything to quarrel about or 

inevitable? In six countries 

em Europe the per capita fire l^^ [^ 

.13 cents while ours is $3. or almost 

ten times as much. If we have all 

thi«? waste here, with all the damage 

it is doing, which does not exist 

oth<r countries, the most 

Question is. Why? We 

wuod in construction 

too many badly built 

other criminal cause 

dirty housekeeping, not 

homes as in our places 

Fortunately all this is 

How shall we improve 
We have today authontauve infor- 
mation about how to ^"iJd/.'fht a^d 

how to prepare and ^^^^J^'^^^1^^^ 
ed is more concert 



the time of the 
in adju.stment 
was false, let 
penalty that 
senting a 

A;)plications 
a rating bureau 
er a transcript 
building and of 
in the way of 



loss it can be shown 
that the allegation 
the man suffer the same 
he does today for pre- 
false statement for credit, 
for insurance go to 
which gives the brok- 
of the defects of th« 
what they would give 
a reduced rate if 
Improve those comfltions. The 
er should pass the transcript to 
fire marshal If by maklne $1 
Improvements a saving of $200 in 
premium can be effected then 
marshal should be able to compel 
to do It. 

After the state machinery is per- 
fected we need to look after the 
municipal ordinances. In almost 
every city in this country there is no 
mandatory limit on the bad condition 
which buildings may be kept, A 



THE BIG LEAOUE. 

Van Loan. Boston; 

& Co. $1 net. ^ . 

Here are nine rattling good base- 
bail stories— live, well written and 
gripping The man who wrote them 
knows bas.-ball. and l>e knows how to 
tell a story The tales are not of even 
merit, naturally, but n<)ne of them are 
dull, and several of them are baseball 

classics. 

• • • 
THE BUNGALOW BOYS By Pexter 
J. Forrester New Vork: Hurst & 
Co. fiu cents. 

This is the first of a new up-to-date 
series coftcerning the absorbing doings 
of Tom and Jack Dacre and their 
chuuis of Audubon academy. The lure 
of the big woods and the call of the 
rod and gun are delightfully set forth. 
The story deals with IKe in the wi der 
parts of Maine. Wild as the region into 
which the buys penetrate, accom- 
panied by theli professor, turns out to 
l.f, they find that there are bold, uti- 
scrupuious enemies even there. >ate 
Trulliber and Lis s .n Jefl prove to lie 
formidable neighbors in more senses 
one. For instance the lost lead 
which Is one of the objects of 
quest Is associated In a 
strange way with this Tr"l»l»7'',/""J 
his evil companions. The plots of 
these mt-n are. however, frustrated in 
a clever manner by the boys: but not 
without involving Ihemselves in grave 
difficulties. Danger. too. threatens 
them, as notably when Tom 
oned In tne mountain cave 
prospect of being speedily 
help does not soon come. 
from which aid finally proceeds Is as 
mysterious as the character of the 
hermit who for a lime t& mlb- 
b> the l>oys for an ene 



• • • 
And now comes the vacation season. 
when the out-of-door.s calls to us tn 
tones that will not be denied 
our reading is done in the open. 
far as possible, while as 
of reading — well, no 
matical fiction need 
stories of love and 



tlian 
vein, 
the boys' 



on the 

in which he 
eijulpment and 
and a continuation 
Inson's discussion 



is impris- 
with every 
drovrned if 
The source 



lonely 
you i taken 



ta n 



brok- 
the 

,000 
the 
the 
you 



Of Books and Writers. 






in- 



busi 
many a 



are they 
in West- 



in 

important 

use too much 

and there are 

buildings An- 

of fire waste is 

so much m 

of business. 

changeable. 

matters" 



marshal 
condition 



said 
3,000 
with 
filthy 
with com- 
maklng the 
need 

is no rea- 
force should 



irood building ordinance should cover, 
first, how to put up and protect a 
new building and It should require 
that old buildings be gradually Im- 
proved. The assessor should inclose 
two blanks which the property owner 
should pass on to the fire 
semi-annually, alleging the , , „ 
of his buildings. If he has broken 
any law let him bear the 
Ex-<~"hief Croker of New York has 
that of 12.000 fires in 1909. 
came from faulty compliance 
the tenement laws and from 
cellars and hallways filled 
bustlble material After 
citizen go on record we need inspec- 
tion of property. There 
son why the active fire 
not use a portion of Its time In 
famlllariting itself with the very 
t>lacee It may be called upon to pro- 
tect and at the same time stopping 
disorder and carelessness before fires 
•start We should take the position of 
the Chinaman who pays the doctor 
as long as he is weir 
stop this thing Instead 
of the victim af terwards. 

Hay Fever and S«mmer Colds 

Must be relieved yulckly and Foley's 
Honey and Tar Compound will do 
TT M Stewart. loS4 'Wolfram 



life 



ed to go 
to warn 
i^iumey 
produces 



ne€ 



of 



uni- 
The 



MANY GE RMANS IN IRELAND 

Warm Feeling of the Irish People For the Sons of 
the Fatherland— Welcomed As the Sav- 
iors of the Country. 



■V\*hat we 

action. ^^. _ 

In the first place, we T^ant a 
form fire insurance policy. 
American Bar association is decidedly 
of the opinion that It is necessatr- 
The basis of credit in almost every 
merch^Mnt's sale of a bill of P->ds is 
the assurance that the money not 
paid is protected by insurance poli- 
cies Therefore the contract should 
be readable by all men and identical 
in essentials with the same kind 
contract every>»'heT«. If you 
thousand accounts all 
try. you have not 
every instrument -- 

a uniform policy and It 

simpler than it is today, 

that should unite to 

contract are the com- 

laws of the Ameri- 

the state insur- 

fire under- 



It. 
street. 
Chicago writes: "1 have been greatly- 
troubled during the hot «un-.mer 
months with Hay Fever and find that 
bv using Foley s Honey and Tar Cora- 
pound 1 get great relief Many others 
^ho sufffr similarly will be g^ad to 
benefit by Mr. ?--iewartB experience. 
For sale by all drugguits. 



By LILLIAN SCOXT TROY. 



•V^"S^^»« 



Lfondon. July S. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — The English public are in- 
clined to view with alarm the figures 
of the last census, which show that j 
there are 80.000 male citizens of Germ- I 
any resident in the British Isles, 20,000 ; 
of wh( m are in Ireland While ' 
Germans are tn disfavor In England. ] 
they are welcomed as the saviors of ! 
the country In Ireland. A little Inci- 
dent which came under the writer's 
personal notice recently, tends to sho^v 
the warm feeling of the Irish j.eople 
for tlie sons of thf Fatherhand. Com- 
ing through the Gap of L>unloe. on the 
road to the Lakes of Klllarney. a wom- 
an possibly SB years of age. came out 
of a little cottage by the roadside and 
addre.-sed a party of An.ericans. who 
were riding down the sleep incline. 

"Grod bless you. childer. and Amerl- 
ML too." she said. 

TIow did you know we were Amerl- 
oans. didn't you think we were Eng- 



llsh? one of the number asked. 

"Shure. tls by the honest faces, we 
knows th. Americans from the Eng- 
lUh,' she said, simply. "None of us 
around he 'e likes the English." 

"But you really do like the Ameri- 
cans'."' suirgesied the writer. 

•An wly wouldn't we, they're our 
own^" sht answered. 

The old woman told us that the peo- 
ple were very much excited over the 
news tiia- the Germans were coming 
over to Ireland to settle there One 
jokingly told her that 
goitig to bore a hole 
lot her sink beneath 
then come over and 
free. The old soul 
in an attitude of 
"Praise be to Goil. 
for that lame wurrldl An' what did 
you say ''* --ame w^as. that's coming 
from G* "■■ She was told that it 

was tht 

"Ood I less that same Mr. Kaiser' 
We do b- praying for the Americans, 



of 

have a 

over the coun- 

time to investigate 

or rider. ThePP 

should be 

should be 

The interests 

draw such a 

mittee on uniform 

can Bar association 

ance departments the ^^ 

writers' organizations and r.-presenia 

lives of the combined trade 

tlons of this state. The 

buver the seller, and counsel are a 1 

Seeded to produce a proper contract 

Sound, honest inspection ol 
financial condition of insurance 
""_..„.„ needed so that a policy will 
state brand of solvency 
should 

a fire marshal. 

get an accurate record 

which today nobody can give 

__.. »^.mm>niF>a have to »"o« 

The 
by averaging ♦"•- "'"-"' '■'-' "•*' ' 




The John C 'Winston company. Fhila- 
delphla, announces the forthcoming 
r.T,V,liVation of "The Story-Life of 
^Vashlng^m," bv Wayne Whipple,..au- 

tnor of "Th'^e Story-Life "^ V^'iVluLiratld 1 Vatican 
r>00 stories, compiled in two illustratea | , ,, 
volumes, the work of a hundred 
thors, the story of "SV ashingion s 
la told and entertainment and 
strucllon are promised in lavish quan- 
tities, ^ ^ ^ 

Wlien Jack London signified bis in- 
tention of sailing round the world lo 
a r.0- foot boat, he received many let- 
ters—a thousand or more, he „8a>;»_"» 
his "The Cruise of the Snark (Mac- 
inillani— fromTeople who f'thfr jsvant- 
wiih him or felt it their duty 
him ajjainst making such a 
Manv of these letters he re- 
in his l>ook in a chapter en- 
titled •Adventure." I'erhapB the most 
1. t uiTiiiKiTi» is one from a "■wanderer over 
penalty, 1 ^'^^^^^^fi^^. ^'^-irlu.r having written 

several pages trying to get to,*''*; I''^';}^ 
of his letter, at last achieved the fol- 
lowing attempt to dissuade Mr London. 
•Still 1 am neglecting the point I set 
out to write you about. So wilJ say 
at once that It has been stated In print 
that you and one or two others are 
to take a cruise around the world 
little 50 or 60-foot boat. 1 there- 
cannot get myself to think that a 
man of your attainments and experi- 
ence would attempt such a j>roceeding. 
which Is nothing less than courting 
death in that way. And even »t vo" 
were to escape for some time, your 
whole person, and those with you, 
would be bruised from the ceaseless 
motion of a craft of the above size 
even If she were padded a thing not 
unusual at sea I am not a landlubber, | 
and I have sailed every sea and ocean. | 
Although not wishing to offend, it 
would be madness to take any woman 
outside the bay. even, in such a craft ; 
In general, however, the letters which j 
the author received were not of this 
character. They were mostly ardent 
pleas Bottlne forth the writers quaU- j 
flcatlons lo be one of the party, A\ 
»trlklng communication Is that from a 
certain 'ndlvidual who, after telling 
how much he would like to go on tne 
voyage, winds up with, "I can assure 
vou that I am eminently resi>ectahle. 
but find other respectable people tire- 
some." As he had expressed a great 
desire to accompany Mr. London, m: 
London says that he is still w-ondtrlng 
whether or not he'd found him tire- 
what the deuce he did 



Even 

so 
for the kind 
involved, proble- 
ai)ply. We want 
adventure, full of 
action and incident — stories of live 
people One such story Is the complete 
novel m the July Lipplncotls; "From 
the Car Behind. by Lleanor M. In- 
gram, author of those successful 
books "The Game and the Candle and 

Sianton Wins," Like her other stor- 
ies "From the Car Behind " has to do 
with motoring, especially motor trac- 
ing The love Interest Is captivating, 
the action tense, the humor abundant, 
the mvstery l<.ne-sust«.ined. It is 
the sort of tale one must finish ai 
one reading, lor nowhere m It does 
there seem a place where one Is will- 
ing lo lay It asiJe All the characters 
are Intensely human, being neitner 
holv saint nor wholly sinner. In short, 
the" novellette has all the ear-niarks 

of a "best-seller." and it is I'retty 
, sure to take rank as such when 11 is 
I brought out in book form 

The Popular Science Monthly foi 
July contains the following articles: 
"Pasteur a Study in Greatness. by 
Prof Fernando Wood Martin "Con- 
cealing C.doration." by Al>b««tt M 
Thaver; "Expansion of the I sefulness 
of Natural History Museums.' by 
Thomas H Montgomery. Jr ; "The 
lory and Varieties of Human >P<'ech. 
by l»r Edward Sapir; "I niverslty 
Standards and Student Activltieji. by 
Orris Leslie Klliotl. "The Psychology' 
of Mental I'eficiency." by L»r. Bird i 
Baldwin; "Jacobus Henrlcus 
Hoft • by Prof Harry C. Jones 
Amherst Idea." "The Catsklll 
duct." ".Scientific Items." 
• • • 
Ferrero the Italian historian, opens 
the July Atlantic with a keen ^iscus- 
sion of the government of the Roman 
Catholic church today. The dlfflculii.'S 
which successive innovations in the 
I.raf-tlco have made In 
au"! choice of a pope, the superhuman 
?i* 1 KnrB Which are the portion of a man 
^*'*arwai^ chosen in old age for the task I by Leo Crane 
S governing the world, the effects oflmary features. 
imprisonment in tlie hot and try- issue. 



Charles M Harvey, the former writing 
about "Lee and His Army, and the 
latter following "The Trail of the 

Argonauta ' 

• • • 
The leading place in the Engineer- 
ing Magazine for July is Kt\»'" to a 
profusely Ulustrated review, by Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Waller B. Tardy 
r% N of the methods of scientific 
m'ai'iagement of ship ban<lll'^K ^^'P 
coalinK fire-room operation, and gun- 
nery whVch have made possible the re- 
markable Increase in the efficiency 
the United Jitaies nav> within the 

few vears After the recent 
prlctice scientific management experts 
kcompanying the fleet pronounced 

batileship the finest example 

enlitic management they had e\ei 

Commander Tardy's ariicie 

thorltative exposition ol 

of naval officer-* 

province, methods 

^s'Sce rli^irl- m'entiTne-d-a furtl^er" In- 
itrument of Robert L, Sireeter's papers 
eiailment OI ^^^j industry. 

deals with blast-furnace 
ilie making of steel. 
of Kollln W Hutch- 
i,f the modification 
of mining inethods by electrical ma- 
.hinerv tbi«^ installment covering elec- 
t?/c c^Y-cultlng and drilling ap- 
paratus. ... 



of 

last 
l»attle 
erts 
the 
of scl- 
seen. 
Is an au- 
achievementa 
in this field, as to 
and results. Among 
leature* of impor- 



Prof. 
Hls- 



van't 
; "The 
Aque- 



A Striking symposium or the recent 

.uV.reme courl decisions begin., the 

issue of the North American Re- 

'trhich^^ in all respects. Is « num- 

her of — i'^'-->,-^r-tim Vtfd "the 
which they write are: 

••The Judgm-nl," by Judgf ^JT-^^r.^f, 
C.rowuP ' The Reason," by ^j"^ >"i*™ 
Grosscup, Eft eel," by John Lar- 

Record," by Frederic R Cou- 
by James M 
by' Samuel Un- 
seen at once that 
luind authorities 

constitutes in itself =lVhT.mas*Hardy'' 

bunal "The Poetry of Thomas H«ray 

^charming essay by the yourig Lng- 

Mfred N >ves, who champions 

' master as a real 

S Isaacs 



July 
view 



tribulors to 
heads under 



J. Bryan: 

kin; ••Th»> 

dert; "The yuandry. 

Beck; "Ti-e Remedy, 

termyer It will be 

Kuch a group of first- 



is a 
Ush 



prose 



poet . 
;.oel ""p^rofessSTrbram-S Isaacs make, 
an able plea for Judaism under the 
?in.« '-is JudaUm Necessary Today? 
English writer on sports. 



the 
la- 



The famous 

P A Vatle. has a paper on 
edv 'of Golf, " which is at 
lainlng and serious^ ^ 

Articles in the current 
Harper's -^'eekly are. 
English Speech," by H 
Watson; -'Uncovennp the 
the Maine: " "Some Phases 
crn Cotton industry." by 
den Harrlman; "Academic 
Simeon Strunsky A 



"The 
once 



Trag- 
enter- 



number of 
Flowers of 
B Marriott 
Mystery of 
of tlie South- 
Mrs J. Bor- 
Oinger." by 
fine fiction story 
with tlie other custo- 
go to make up this 



i^nBuMjf^Tv^ 



ppiffTBPSBIJiDfPS 



Providence Building, 

Fonrth .\veDDe Wes! and 
SHpcrior Slrcel. 



going 
In a 
fore 



'VS'^e ought to 
of taking care 



ARTICLES VALUELESS TO YOU 

but worth eood round dollars to others can be turned into 
dollars w^th the help of a 30c or 40c Want Ad in the For 
Sale Miscellaneous'' column of The Herald. Other do it- 

why not you? 



WHOLESALE 

JOBBERS AND 
MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH. MINNESOTA. 



up. 



associa- 
state. the 



the 
com' 



have 



l.anies Is 

carrv Its own 

Besides this eyery^«t.te^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

of fire waste 
Even 

insurance companies have to guess it 
the facts they 



Iroa FeaclBK, 4»c ■ foot and 
\*lre Guard* »«r Wl»do*»a 

CrliimaB Paraflae Paint for founda- 
tion walU and Iron work. 

Wayne Gnnollne Pumps and Tanks 
f«r anmses. 

QUAYLE'LARSEN CO. 

14-16 West Su»»erior Sireot. 



. . have. 

redressed before It Is 



of the travellers 
the kaise * was 
in Englat d and 
the wave*, and 
declare 1 "eland 
raised he * hands 
prayer, aid said: 



wrong cannot he - - . _ 

wrong .^^^ obstacle to the pass 

marshal laws is the ques- 
to pay the bill The 
charge it to the 
' The latter de- 
take it out of the 
while farmers' mutual 
Let the hie fellow 
It " By dividing the cost between 
and the tax le\->- more 
would succeed In passing 
fire marshal laws. 
The next thing required is a pro-er 
HceMlng of brokers. Once licensed 
"r^ouM be re<,ulred to do certain 
things. Arson comes fr-.m the abilt5 
to get improper insurance too easily 
The applicant for insurance, when he 
go^ to a broker for a policy, should 
make an allegation of 
value and of the total 
force at the time. The 



understood, 
ing of fire 
tion as to who is 
people say. "Let us 
insurance companies, 
clare. "You must 
tax lev>'." 
companies say. 

pay 

the companies 

states 

salutary 



When nothing dse wiO 
ttart dirt Yoa KNOW 

SAPOLIO 

WILL DO IT 
Works Without Waste 
CLEANS-SCOURS-POUSHES 



some. c»r 

mean." 

• • • 

Inciters dated Rome, to friends in 
th.* country from C. X. & A. M. Wil- 
liamson, authors of "The Golden Sil- 
ence " and other charming books, te.l 
of a retreat from their Italian villa 
near there to a house further up 
tlie mountains where tiiey will be 
to work without quite so many 
turbances from visiting friends. 
'V\'lUiamsons are building their 
villa according to their own 
and It Is to be very secluded, 
verv delightful place. At present 
are spending the season In 

• • * 

Dr, Woods Hutchinson, the emin- 
ent writer on subjects relating 
culture, and author of 
entitled "We and Our 
be brought out In the 
day, Page & Co,, is spending 
mer In Europe. 

• • • 

Alfred Ollivant. author of Bob. Son 
of Battle." and many other 
books, has written a new 
titled "The Taming of ^ , _ , _ 
which is to be brought out in Septem- 
ber by Doubleday, Page & Co. 

• • • 

Returning to the characters of "Rob- 
ert Elsmere." one of the early novels 
on which her great fame l.s founded. 
Mrs. Humphry Ward has written a new 
book to be brought out in the fall by 
Doubleday, Page & Co.. entitled "The 
Case of Richard Meynell." 



in 
able 
di8- 
The 
new 
ideas, 
and a 
ti'.ey 
London. 



to child 

a new book 

Children." to 

fall by Double- 

the Bum- 



Buccessfu! 
novel en- 
John Blunt." 



Refiable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a 
Jobbing and Manufacturing Business. 



Stridly 



ASBESTOS. 
H. Krieger Co. 



BAKERS. 
Crescent Bakeiy. 

BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 

BREWERS. 

Dulodi Brewing & Malting 
Fitger Brewing Co. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Scitz Company. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 
Clyde Iron Works. 

GLASS. PAINTS AND BUILD- 

ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 



Co. 



the insured 
insurance In 
broker t'^day 



BOOKS & MAGAZINES 



Reviewed on 



this p.age 
curt-3 at 



can be se- 



EDWARD M. STONE'S 

BOOK «T*»BE. 
SSI V^'eai !.ui>«'riwr St., Dnlntk. 



Anong the Magazines. 

The principal features of the July 
number of the Review of Reviews are 
a timely character sketch of >lr Wil- 
frid Laurler. Britain's Geratest Colon- 
ial Premier." bv Alexander Harvey: a 
well-informed article on Germany s 
remarkable campaign for Indu.stria! 
supremacy, by Frederic Courtland Pen- 
field an up-to-date study of the con- 
dition of the Japanese na-ry. by Adach 
Klnnos'jke. an Inquiry into the care 
of women In American state prisons 
by Jeanne Robert: T-ractical sugjfes 
tlons for the preventicn 
by Guy Elliott Milchell 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 

MANUFACTURERS. 

Bridgeman-Russell Co. 

CEMENT AND PLASTER. 
D. G. Cutler Co. 

COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 
Fitssimmons-Palmer Co. 

CONFECTIONERY. 

National Candy Co. 
(Dttlutfa Factory.) 



of 

a 



forest flres. 
description 




^^ •» 



-r 



,■^ ^ ■ ^- 4 



DRUGS. 
Letthhead Drug 



Co. 



DRY GOODS. 
A. Patrick ft 



Ca 



GROCERS. 
Gowan-Pcyton-Congdon Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Well- Co. 
Wxigbt-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 

HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomson Co. 

Marshall-Wells Hdw. Co. 

WHOLESALE AND MAN'PS 

OF MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Chhstensen- M ecdenhall- 

Grr^azn Co. 






PAPER. 
Duluth Pajjer & Sutionery 
McCleilan Paper Co. 
Peyton Paper Co. 



Ca 



T 



i«~ -"^j * ■ 



* ■■ ■ 



f 



- I I 



— t- 




IlllllD^HI 



TP 





laaMMpAMUHMMS^ 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 8, 1911 





L^,^^^^^/^. 




"Jaiifyliiinl" 



n 1 f n t 

dir. ■■ 



vi 1 
Moii 



w 
Of 

of 



P€*ii3 ti.i ia 
bor lust a 
Its 
Jo . 

An 
pr. 

TO; 

w. ■■ 

Oti 

In 

Gr 
dr- 

lies surj^' 
Of iri'-l-: 

Bi>- 
ch' 
of 
ket 



HREE hundred of society's] 
young Riatrons.debutantes 
and even some of the! 
jrotjng fulks still in school 
and short frocks, are | 
busy rthearsing pretty 
'^"ngs and dances for the 
1 it-ty musical comedy 
which is to be put on at 
t; tatt-r Thursday and Fri- 
-'7 and.2S. The pro- 
. 1 !u oenefit of the Chlld- 
nd is under the manage- 
■ if the board of 
^..;ution at which 
-! presidtnt. 
I brilliant oriental mu- 
rh r^ie soene "The Isle 
The Harvest 



*mperor s 

:irone, at 

ir.f.flle.j Dy the law 

for himself a wife, 

I !i Jar-anese maidi-ns 

have assembled in the 

' iiy I'ii'ssom prove; each anl- 

:h the inspiring hope that slie 

.sen future empress of the 

and of Prvatns " 
...crican yachting party hap- 
id in tlie fl.'Wer-covcred har- 
is the public celeliratlon is at 
en. to the amazement and 
I rl Neville, in command of 
-covers his long lost little 
> <theart. •Sang Foy. ' and 
tu woo and win her. 
r's with sixty Geisna 
fd in a semciri-le. 
powder puffs and 
i.tssories "making up" 
«r tlie arrival of 'His 
-ty" — all si7»ging ihe 
('pening chorus, "We 
To Love. ' 

: ims all through the 
.» .>ti.ts of musical special- 
and danct'd by various groups 
"I ' ..yng matrons. 

Ill parts have been as- 

...nent scdoists an.J the 

been filled. The names 

emperor are being 



and 



■■ss 

'.-eret. 

^Is !n the 



w 



glv»M 



war canoe crews 

•nr the races to be 

• k are practicing 

k and are really training 

aake tlieir crews perfect. 

ttkly dances at the main 

ho the Diiluih Boat club are 

keepiiitc ^ii> in popularity and numerous 

picnic partit.s liave been given at the 

annex during the week. The bathers 

have us«d the bathing facilities more 

thiip week than at any time during the 

eurnmer and informal parties have 

danced at this branch every evening. 



€vent$ of Tnterest 



The lawn party given last evening 
at the re-sidenie of Mr. and Mrs. O. A. 
Duncan by a group of East end girls 
was one of the prettiest affairs of the 
season. Tlie beautiful grounds lent 
tiiesnselves vlelighifully to such an af- 
fair and with hundreds of Japanese 
lanterns. artistically arranged, the 
place was a veritable falr^^land. The 
affair wa.-^ a benefit party for the Play- 
ground association and the commit- 
tee raised about $150. There were 
graceful little folk dances bv a gr<>up 
of high school girls in the ravine and 
a pr^-ttv Maypole dance by some of 
t: • -er girls on the lawn. La 

Bi orchestra, stationed in tlie 

liou>t. played dance music for the 
young people to dance on the veranda^^. 
and cakes, candies, flowers, ices, etc., 
were sold by the girls during the even- 
ing to the 300 guests who called. 

The hostesses were: Mi.-ses Marv 
Frlck, Louise Prick. Margaret Flor- 
ada. Lucille Bradley. Grace Farmer 
Forsyth of New York. Emmelvn Mc- 
Doufe-a'!. Carolyn Marsb.a:!. Marjorle 
Morrow. Margaret MoKindley, Judith 
Hartley. Lurothy L>owse, Marie 
d'Autremont. Elcey Cole. Dorothv 
Moore. Eugenie Le Richeux, Marie 
Christensen. 

« '* « 

C»ne .pf the most enjoyable parties of 
the season for the i»eople of the vounger 
society set was given Wednesday 
evening at the Country club, with Fred 
VVolvin as host. The dancers enjoyed a 
well selected program of dance music 
played by La Brosses orchestra and 
the appolntnifnts were very simple, 
the pretty frocks of the girls adding a 
dainty touch to thv scene. Thtre were 
about eighty dancers chaperoned bv 
Messrs. and Mesdames A. B. Wolviri 
J. B. Cotton. A. W. Hartman, T. Y. 



Duluth-Grown 
Flower Show 

— In the cast show window of 
the (;iass Block Store Mondnv, 
will begin a display of Dulutli- 
grown flowers of various kinds. 
The e.xhibition is bv amateur 
gardeners, and all i)uluthians 
Interested in flower culture are 
invited to make entries to the 
show, whether they be large or 
small. 

— It is desired that flowers ^e 
brought to the store earlv Mon- 
day morning, and exhibitors 
are retiuested to leave their 
name and address with their 
collection. 

— :^mall entries are as welcome 
as large ones. Bring them 
early Monday morning. 

M &m Block Store 

Panton © White Co. 



FUR STORAGE 

The only absolute protection 

COLD, DRY AIR 



20 deg. 
Are and 

all the 
call. 



below freezing; muth. 
buTKlar proof. W'e tako 
risk. Have our furrier 



NORTHERN COLD STORAGE 
AND WAREHOUSE CO. 

I'boDess MelruMe OSS; Granil OSS. 

Agenfs: COLUMBIA CLOTHING CO. 

Diiluth aud Superior. 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 



Moles and 
mov»-d. 



Warts permanently re- 



KNAUF SISTERS, 

-■* >VoMt Superi<ir Street, 
Sec«*-i<l Door V.wi»t of GiddtoKa. 




largely due to his efforts. He took a 
prominent part in the "Prom" show 
whi« h was repeated commencement 
wttk. 

« « • 
Mrs. Oliver Overby was hostess at her 
home Thursday evening in honor of her 
son. Oliver, in celebration of his six- 
teenth birthday anniversary. The even- 
ing was spent with music, games and 
dancing, after which 
served. The guests 
.Misses — 

Hildegarde Pear- 
son, 
Mary Wolfrom, 
Evaline La 
Flam me, 
Messrs. — 
Ewald Brlnteson, 
Irving Tnompson, 
Arthur Htden- 

berg, 
Frank Buresh. 

• • 

Miss Hulda AfHler 
garden party Wednesday evenli.g at the 
lome of her parents. 118 Michigan ave- 
nue. Gam.es and music were the diver- 
sions of the e\enlng. Supper was 
served for the following guests: 
Messrs. and Mesdames — 



a light lunch was 
were: 

Clara Wolfrom. 
Margaret McDer- 

mid, 
Olive Overby. 



Oscar Overby. 
George Overby, 
Carl Pearson, 
Roy Gonyea, 
Joseph Quesnelle. 

entertained at a 



CONSTANCE MATHER. 

Miss Constance Math(*r is going Into 
the Arctic region on a philanthropic 
mission. She is a daughter of Samuel 
Mather of Cleveland ai d a descendant 
of the old Mather fami y of New Eng- 
land. When Dr. Gronfell was in 
Cleveland last winter telling of his 
work in Labrador, h« so interested 
Miss Mather th.at she tle<-lded to make 
tl-.e trip to the Labrador c«iast on his 
hospital tender Vale. Miss Mather, 
who is only IS, will be gone about two 
months. She will vlsl Mrs. Grenfell, 
She makes the Journej partly on ac- 
count of her health. 



Charles Gustaf- 
son. 

Misses — 

f^vodla Olson, 
Selma Granfors, 
Lily Larson, 
Hildegard Miller, 
Agnes Wedh(dm, 
Esther Granfors, 
Etna Akermnn, 

Messrs. — 

Peter Stenberg, 
George Anderson, 
Alvin C>lson, 
r>an Olson, 
Mr. Olson. 



Alfred Stenberg. 
John Miller. 

Alma Olson, 
Delia Olson. 
Minnie Shoherg, 

Minneapolis. 
Alfrida Olson, 
Felma Miller. 
Victoria Miller. 

Oscar Strand- 
mark. Minne- 
apolis. 

Herman Olson, 

John Olson, 



Cole. 
Miss 



C. A. Luster and 



the Ci untry 
About flfty 



Vannie Turr'sh 
ing party Mon- 
club for 
couples 



W. C. Brown, 
lloatson. 

« • • 

Misses Marie and 
were hostesses at a dan 
day evening at 

their g;iests. 
c.aiiced. 

« « « 

Mrs. Walter Turle of 2216 East Su- 
perior street was huste »s at a prettily 
appointed luncheon ye.*terday at lier 
home. The table was set with eigiit 
covers. 

« « « 

Mrs. H. Abraham of :422 East Third 
street was hostess at an Informal after- 
noon tea Wednesday at her home for 
three visitors in the cltv'. The honored 

fuests were Mrs. M. Lo ?b og Ligonier, 
nd.. Mrs. A. H. Bu.vbav m of I'hiladel- 
phia and Mrs. J. M. Gidding of New 
York. 

« • • 

Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Zimmerman enter- 
tained at an informal dinner party Mon- 
day evening at the ca e of the main 
house of trie t'uluih Boi.t club. Covers 
were laid for five. 

• « • 

Mrs. John Nafe of 42 > Third avenue 
east entertained at a i hildren's party 
Monday afternoon at her home in honor 
of her little daughter, .'ivian, in cele- 
bration of her i»th bir:hday anniver- 
sary. Marguerites we e tne flowers 
used in decoration a. id a birthday 
luncheon was served oa the lawn at 
which covers were laid for the hostess 
and the following guests: 
Misses — 

I»orothy Fee, 

Florence Sec- 
combe. 

Lillian Quinn, 

Pearl Wendlandt, 

Lulu Bennett, 

Eleanor OLeary, 

Gertrude Sec- 
combe, 



For Motor Parties 

A trip to Superior will be found 
most enjoy;U>le. The BIIIIuk'm Park 
Driveway and Tower Avenue Exten- 
Mlon to South Superior are in splen- 
did condition. (ioliis or rrturninfc 
yon can get an excellent luncheon 
or dinner ai the 

HOTEL SUPERIOR CAFE 



meddings 



Er lily Lannigan, 
Moiia McCullagh. 
Fiances yuinn. 
Mi rgaret Ben- 

leit, 
Ernestine 

'J'Leary, 
Lois F4>rbes, 
Bessie Sable. 

• • * 

A party of sixteen chaperoned by 
Dr. and ^Irs. Charles McFadden and 
Mr. and -Mrs. Stewart Foirier enjoyed 
a picnic Tuesday. 

« « « 

Mrs. EL C. Alstead was hostess at 
two tables of bridge W-^lnesday after- 
noon at her nome, 218 ^Jorth Fifteenth 
avenue east. 

* * * 

A party including the following peo- 
ple enjoyed a picnic luncheon at the 
Si'irit Lake branch of the boat club 
Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Bees. 
H. Ketchum and two cl 
Mrs. Herbert Gravatt, 
John Nafe and daught 
and Mrs. Wm. Gravatt 
Edward Deetz, Miss 
Mrs. Wade and Ralph 
City, Mich. 

« • * 

Mrs. C. L Spence of 4 026 East Supe- 
rior street entertained a', dinner Thurs- 
day evening in honor of her hister. Mrs. 
C. W Forrand of Forsythe, .Mont. 
« « * 

Mrs. T. H. Tague and daughter. Bon- 
nie, were the guest of h jnor at a fare- 
well party given at th j home of Mr. 
and Mrs. John McNanara. Sunday. 
They left Monday evening for Spokane. 
Wash., where the wedding of Miss 
Tague to Strom Rhodt s of this city 
will take place at the home of her 
father. 

The living rooms were prettily 
trimmed with red and white carnations 
Iridal poster, hearts, cipids and wild' 
used in p ofusion in the 



J. F. Nauffts, 
n, Mr. and Mrs. 
lldren, Mr 
Mr. and 
?r. Vivian 

Mr. and 

Uma Krusche, 

Wade of Bay 



and 
Mrs. 

Mr 
Mra 



flowers being 
dining room. 

Games and 
diversions of 
were: 
-Messrs. and Mesdames— 

J. H. Sullivan, T. H. Tague. 

I>. A. McRea, John McNamara 



musjc weie 
the evenirig. 



the pleasant 
The guests 



Mrs. T. F, 

Falls, Minn. 

Mi.'jses — 
Elizabeth 

O'Connor. 
Mae Lydrin, 
Mary Maloney, 
Mary Garvey. 
Bertha Brown, 
Clara Stark, 
Eva McNamara, 
Alice Anderson, 

Messrs. — 

Strom Rhodes, 
J. F. McGovern, 
W. F. St rout. 
John Jorgerson, 
Fred Jelinlck, 

« « 

A party of West 
spent an enjoyable 



Sullivan of International 



Ce elia Chil- 
is trand, 

Emily McNamara. 

Helen Nelson, 

Kathryn 
J)riscoll, 

Sadie McNamara, 

Mj rtle Sullivan, 

Bonnie Tague. 

Ar -hie Powers, 
Stt wart Dear- 

1 orn. 
Ralph La Eonte. 
J. ). McNamara. 
• 

end young people 
day at Rice Lake 



In the party irere: 



Cli ra 
Edna 



Peterson. 
Loff. 



Wulfred 

August 



Iverson. 
Jolinson. 



Tuesday 

Misses- 
Mabel Bjorlin, 
Ethel Johnson. 

Messrs — 

Herbert Peterson, 
Arnold Wallen, 

* * 

Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Dunning re- 
turned this week from a month's trip 
in the East, accomapnied by their 
daughter. Miss Anabelle Dunning of 
Vas.sar, and Arthur Dutming of Dart- 
miiuth. They attended commtncemen' 
at Dartmouth, where Mr. Dunning 
finished four most su 'cessful years 
graduating with honors. During th^ 
last year he has been editor-in-chief 
of the ' Dartmouth," a dally news- 
paper, the succewB of v hich has been 



united in marriage Miss Pauline Pap- 
berg and James Wade Montgomery, 
both of this city. The service was read 
at 8 o'clock in tne presence of a few 
friends. They left for a trip to Win- 
stead, Minn., and later will reside here. 

• * • 

An announcement which will interest 
Duluthlans is that of the engagement 
of Edward Robert Hess of Merchant- 
ville. Mass.. formerly of this cltv to 
Miss Clara Elizabeth Wirth. daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henrv Wirth of Bos- 
ton. Mr. Hess left Duluth a few years 
ago for the East. While here he was 
connected with the American Coke & 
Construction company as cashier and 
was very well knowTi among the 
younger circles. 

• • • 
Duluthians will be Interested In the 

following announcement of the ap- 
proaching m.arrlage of Miss Josephine 
Kalman of St. Paul, who is also well 
known In Duluth society circles: 

"Miss Josephine Kalman. a well- 
known society woman of St. Paul, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Kal- 
man, is to marry Richard Edward 
Blacque, Bey, first secretary of the 
Turkish embassy in Berlin. Formal 
announcement of the wedding is to be 
made within a few days and the cere- 
monv is to take place in the autumn. 

"Miss Kalman met the Turkish sec- 
retary In Berlin while she was the 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Scholle 
of St Paul. Mr. Scholle was then one 
of the secretaries of the .•\merican em- 
bassy at the German capital. Miss Kal- 
man and her mother recenll.v returned 
from a European trip on which the St. 
Paul girl was presented at the several 
foreign court.**. 

"Although Richard Edward Blarque 
Is a Turkish subject he is not a Turk 
by parentage. His father was French, 
his grandfather a French royalist who 
fled from France during the revolution 
and s<^ught refuge In Turkey. Rich- 
ard Blacque's father was minister to 
the United States from Turkey during 
the administration of President U. S. 
Grant. His mother was of Scotch de- 
scent and was born in the United 
States. He is a graduate of Gottingen 
and Bonn universities, Germany, and is 
considered one of the m'St progressive 
members of the young Turks." 
• • * 

Announcements have been recelveo 
here of the wedding of Mrs. Fannie 
Caldwell, formerly of this city to Ar- 
thur Hunter also of this city. The 
event took place Monday, July 3, at 
the home of the tirides brother in 
Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter 
have gone East on their wedding trip 
and will return to Dulutli about the 
last of this month to make their hom6 
here. 



a lour 



on the Octorara for Buffalo. From 
there they will motor to Rochester, N, 
1 , to the Schrlners' convention, and 
from there they will take 
through New England. 

• • • 

Miss Addle Smith of 27 South Twen- 
ty-first avenue east is visiting friends 
in Deerwood. 

• • ♦ 

Dr and Mrs. Charles McFadden are 
chaperoning a party of young people at 
a house party at Lake Vermilion for 
a ten days' outing. 

• • • 

Miss Ida Bogan is at Meadowlands, a 
guest at a house party for the holiday. 

• ♦ • 

Mrs C B. Aske and daughter Marian 
of Lakeside left Monday for a week's 
visit In Minneapolis. 

• ♦ • 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bvrnes of Phil- 
adelphia were at the Spalding early in 
the week, guests of H. A. and J. j 
Courtney. Mr. Byrnes is vice president 
of the Union Casualty Insurance com- 
pany of Philadelphia. 

• • • 

Misses Ada and Eva McCullough, for- 
merly of this city, who have been at 
Seattle. Wash., for the past two years, 
are In Duluth spending the summer. 

• • ♦ 

Miss Addie Kiichli is expected home 
^bP last of the week from Houghton. 
Mich., where she has been visiting 
friends. 

• ♦ • 

Mrs. A. M. Longstreet of 9 Chester 
terrace returned Monday evening from 
Minneapolis, wtiere she has been the 
guest of friends for the past ten days. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund F. Zimmerman 
have returned from their wedding trip 
to the Twin Cities and are at their 
flat, 514 East Fourth street, for the 
summer. 

• • • 

Fred Smith of Eveleth spent the 
Fourth with his father. S. L. Smith of 
4309 .McCulloch street. Lakeside. 

• • • 

Mr. .-ind Mrs. George H. Gamble of 
Lakeside had as their guest for over 
the Fourth, their son, John Gamble, of 
Virginia. 

• • • 

Mrs. R. J. McLeod and daughters, 
Jane and Florence, and son, Roderick, 
of Hunter's F^ark. have returned from 
a week's outing at their farm, "High- 
land Lodge." 

« • * 

Miss Etta Roberts of 
avenue east has gone 
where she will spend the 
the summer visiting at different 

• • • 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Barton Smythe and 

little son, Luther, of the Barrington 
apartments, are at Solon Springs for a 
week's outing. 

• • ♦ 

Mrs. A. H. Overman of 1222 
Third street has returned from a 
visit In St. Paul. 

• * « 
Mr. and Mrs. J, A. Scott left 



227 Seventh 
to Montana, 
remainder of 
points. 



East 
short 



Many Duluthlans will be interested 
in tlie announcement of the marriage 
of Clayton Van Kuren Smith, formerly 
of this city, to Miss Rachel Elise Camp- 
bell of Salt Lake City. Mr. Smith left 
Duluth for the West about four years 
ago. In regard to the wedding, which 
took place on Wednesday, June 28, the 
Salt Lake City Herald printed the fol- 
lowing: 

"A very attractive marriage cere- 
mony took jdace yesterday at high 
noon at the home of the bride's par- 
ents, Mr. and .Mrs. Robert S. Campbell, 
149 North Main street, when their 
daughter. Miss Rachel Elise Campbell, 
and Clayton Van Kuren Smith were 
married by Frank R. Taylor. Only the 
immediate family and relatives were 
present and the Clive stringed orches- 
tia in the hall played the wedding 
march as the bridal party descended 
tl;e stairs. The bride, who was unat- 
tended, wore a beautiful blue broad- 
cloth suit and little blue poke bonnet 
and carried a large bouquet of Ameri- 
can Beauty roses tied with blue tulle. 
The ceremony was performed in the 
bay window, which was a bower of 
pink and white roses, ferns, and smi- 
lax. 

"The living room and hall were 
banked with red roses and the dining 
room, where the wedding breakfast 
was served, was beautiful in pink. 
The table, covered with a handsome 
lace cloth over pink, had for the cen- 
tral decorations a large basket of La 
France roses tie«". with pink mallne and 
crystal candelabra and lights shaded 
in pink illuminated the table, where 
covers were laid for twenty. 

"The bride and bridegroom went at 
once to the Hotel Utah, where they 
will remain for a week before going 
to Las Vegas, Nev., where .Mr. Smith is 
manager of a mining company." 

* * * 

The marriage of Miss Ellen Horgan 
and Joseph A. I'age took place Tues- 
day morning at the Cathedral. Father 
Limmer performed the ceremony in the 
presence of a small number of friends. 

The bride was gowned in white voile 1 
made over silk with Irish point lace ' 
trimmings and her bouquet was of j 
brides roses. She was attended by Miss i 
Elizabeth O'Connor as maid of honor ! 
who wore a pretty gown of embroid- 
ery. 

After the ceremony a wedding break- 
fast was served at the home of the 
bride's brother, Frank Horgan, 206 
Thirty-second avenue east. 

Mr. and Mrs. Page left on the Hur- 
onic Tuesday evening for an eastern 
trip and will be at home at Cusson, 
Minn., after Sept. 1. 

« * « 

A quiet wedding ceremony took 
place Saturday evening at the rectory 
of St. Pauls Episcop>al church when 
Allan G. McWhlrger and Miss Alberta 
Johnson, both of Hibbing, were united 
In marriage by Dr. A. W. Ryan. After 
the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. McWhlrger 
left for a three weeks' visit in 
Richvllle. Minn. The bridegroom is 
connected with the Oliver Iron Mining 
company. 

• • • 

At the rectory of St. Paul's Episcopal 
church Tuesday evening Dr. A. W. Ryan 



MADAME WARDE 

announces that she has bought the 
stock of the "Ye Gifte Guilde,- which 
consists of Baskets, Pottery and Nov- 
elties, now selling at greatly reduced 
prices. 



Cndagemeitts 



Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Coleman of Lake- 
side announce the engagement of their 
daughter. Helen G.. to Gilbert Haven 
Ayling. M. D., of Illinois. The wed- 
ding will take place early in Septem- 
ber. 

• * • 

The engagement has been announced 
of Miss liose Bud .Segelbaum, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Segelbaum of 
Minneapolis, and Carl Shapiro of this 
city. Miss Segelbaum is well known 
here. having attended the normal 
school and visited friends at various 
times. 




The Nipple Can't 
Collapse on the 

TEARLESS" 
NURSING BOHLE 

This ridge, on eld* of neck 
absolutely prevents It. bjr 
allowing air to enter, under 
nipple, as milk Is drawn out. 

Prevent* Colic — Baby has no chance to 

swallow air. 

Eaall7 Clenned — Owing to the shape of 
bottle, and the w^lde mouth. 

Anjr Good Nipple fits it. 

Full directions with every bottle. Se« 

that you get them. 

10c Each — \t All DruKstots. 

F. H. RHENO COMPANY, 

tlU9 Fifth Avenue. Chlcaso, 111. 



events Planned 



The girls from the F. A. Patrick 
factories are planning a musicale to 
be given Friday evening of next week 
at the Young Women's Christian assi- 
ciation for the benefit of the "Geneva 
Fund. ' With this fund the girls want 
to send a delegate to the Y. W. C. A. 
convention to be held at Lake Geneva 
en Aug. 15 to 25. Their first benefit 
for this purpose was a stereopticon 
lecture given by Dr. M. S. Rice of the 
First Presbyterian church. 
• • • 

The regular Sunday afternoon ves- 
per services for the members of the 
i'oung Women's Christian association 
will be held at the home of Mrs. J. J. 
Wangensteln of 121 St. Marie street. 
Hunter's Park. The memViers who at- 
tend the out-of-door meetings, meet 
at the Y. W. C. A. at 3 o'clock Sunday 
afternoons. 

• * * 

Tne members of the Linnaea society 
will be entertained Tuesday afternoon 
by Mrs. J. H. Jern and Mrs. A. W. 
Llndstrom at the home of the latter 
on the corner of Ogden avenue and 
Twelfth street, Superior, Wis. Those 
who wish to go together can meet at 
1:30 o'clock at the corner of Third ave- 
nue east and Superior street. 

This meeting is to be held for the 
purpose of discussing the organization 
of a society in Superior. 

• • • 

The "\^''est side auxiliary of the First 
Presbyterian church will be enter- 
tained Tuesday at the summer home 
of Mrs. James Crawford, at Fond du 
Lac. The ladies are asked to board 
the Columbia from Fifth avenue west 
at 9 o'clock. 

« * « 

The members of Circle No. 6 of St. 
Pauls Episcopal church will be en- 
tertained Monday afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. R. M. Atwater. 1914 East 
Second street. 



Personal mention 



re- 

the 
Jef- 



Barbara, Cal.. 
of Miss Esther 
Mrs. Pentecost 



Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gillette have 
turned from their wedding tour in 
East and are at their home, 1810 
terson street. 

• • * 

Mr and Mrs. Frank Brooks of 20221^ 
East Second .street are at Solon Springs 
for a few days' outing. 

• • « 

Miss Chase of Santa 
who has been the guest 
Adams, is visiting with 
Mitchell, 2220 East Superior street, for 
a wtek. Mrs. J. B. Adams and Miss 
Esther Adams are In Minneapolis for 
a week's stay. 

• « • 

A. H. Comstock and Charles Andrews 
spent a few days at Deerwood. Minn , 
the first of the week; 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. N. F. Hugo and Miss 
Annie Hugo of 2407 East Third street 
went to Minneapolis Monday in their 
automobile for a few days' visit there, 
returning Wednesday. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. MacHarg of 322 
Tenth avenue east have gone for a trip 
down the lakes on a freighter for two 
weeks. 

« • • 

Mrs. Franklin Staples of Winona, 
Minn., arrived Mondav to le the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Billson of 1531 
East First street. She is very well 
known here, having visited here many 
times. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas \. Merritt and 
two sons of Twenty-fourth avenue east 
aud Fourth street left Tuesday evening 



Sun- 
day tor a wtek's visit in Minneapolis. 

• * * 
Mrs. E. Hill and Miss Alice Holahan 

of 1212 East Third street have gone 
down the lakes on a freighter for a 
two weeks' visit in Saginaw. 

• * » 

Miss Bessie Bunting of Chester Ter- 
race, has gone down the lakes on a 
freighter. 

• • • 
Robert Smith of Winnipeg Is In the 

city the guest of his parents. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chan Smith of East Fourth street 
for a few days. 

• * • 

Mr and Mrs. AI Winkler returned 
Sunday from Coon Creek. Minn., 
where they were married last Wednes- 
day. The bride was a resident of that 
town and Mr. Winkler is a member of 
the Winkler Bros.' Candy Manufac- 
turing firm of this city. They will re- 
side at 2622 West Third street. 

• * « 

Mrs. Carl Spence of East Superior 
street has as her guests Mrs. C. W. 
Forrand and children of Forsythe, 
Mont. 

« * * 

Miss Clara Meining has returned 
from a visit with her brother, Henrv 
C. Meining, in Little Falls. Minn. Mifs 
Louise Meining will be home from Cal- 
gary, Alta., Can., this morning. Mrs. S. 
H. Boyer and children and Mrs. Stephen 
Welch are at Cedar Lake enjoying an 
outing. 

• * « 

Miss Florence Clarke and Miss Verna 
Alexander returned Monday from the 
Thomas normal school at Detroit, Mich, 
where they are graduates of the music 
course in this year's class. Miss Lena 
Fleer also returned from the same 
sohool where she finished in the domes- 
tic science and arts class. 

• • • 

Mrs. G. W. Bunn and Mrs. C. W. Ol- 
cott of l>alas, Texas, are the guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Palmer of 1532 East 
First street. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs*. Joseph Huebsch of Mil- 
waukee are visiting Mr. and Mrs. C. C 
Huebsch of the Portland flats. They 
are on their way home to Milwaukee 
after a six months' tour of the West- 
ern states. 

• • ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Lieh and 
two children are visiting Mrs Lieh's 
mother, Mrs. E. Ward of Fortieth ave- 
nue west. 

• • • 

Mrs. Rosa B. Gorby and daughter 
Lucile of 521 East Fourth street will 
leave tomorrow for a trip down the 
lakes to Buffalo on a freighter. They 
will be gone three weeks. 

• • * 

Mrs. Levy Stevens of Saskatchewan 
is visiting friends here for an indefinite 
period. 

• * * 

Mrs. Walter Spearin of Third avenue 
east has been called to Houghton, 
Mich., by the illness of her mother. 

• • • 

Israel Bergstrom. who has been In 
St. Mary's hospital for the past six 
weeks, was removed to his home Mon- 
day very much improved in health. 

• • • 

Miss Elizabeth Congdon was hostess 
at a luncheon party yesterday at the 
Congdon residence at Thirty-second 
avenue east and London road. 

• * * 

Mrs. J. L. Mullln. 2115 East Superior 
street, was hostess at a prettilv ar- 
ranged bridge party of four tables 
yesterday afternoon at her home. The 
decorations were in pink and white. 
I sweet peas being the flowers used. 
The honors were carried by Mrs. H. F. 
Sal yards, Mrs. John Q. A. "Crosby and 
Mrs. C. W. Stilson. 

• * « 

The members of the Woman's Re- 
lief Corps were delightfully enter- 
tained Thursday afternoon at a card 
party at the Memorial hall of the 
courthouse. Five hundred was played 
and the prizes captured bv Mrs. 
OLeary Mrs. G. W. Preston and Mrs. 
Frank Fix. 

« * • 

Mrs. George Jensen entertained 
yesterday afternoon at an informal 
tea, given in compliment to Mrs. John 
Mayland of All)ert Lea, Minn., and 
Mrs. John Galwicks, of St. Joseph, Ma 

• • ♦ 

Mrs. Richardson, who has been the 
guest of Mrs. C. W. Elston of 1609 
East Superior street, left Wednesday 
for her home in Minneapolis. 

• * * 

Mrs. C. W. Stephenson and son of 
South Bend. Inc., arrived on the Min- 
nesota Tuesday and were guests for 
the day of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Elston 
of 1609 East Superior street. 
« * * 

Mrs. C. H. Thornton of 1514 East 
Third street and two children have re- 
' turned from a few weeks' visit with 
relatives at Fond du Lac. Wis., and 
Mrs. Lucia Judd McAuliffe of Winnipeg 
has arrived to spend, the remainder of 
the summer here as her guest, and the 
guest of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. C. 
E. Judd of Chester terrace. 
• • • 

Mrs. P. S. Anneke of 523 East Sec- 
ond street has as her guest for the 
rest of tho summer. Miss Ellen Rause- 
mer of St. Louis, Mo. Miss Elsa Cel- 
larius of San Francisco, Cal.. is ex- 
pected Sunday to be a guest at the 
.Vnneke home for several weeks. 

• » * 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fregeau's guests. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Smead of Minne- 
apolis, have returned to their home. 

• « * 

Mrs. H. F. Salyards has as her guest 

her niece. Miss Aneta Harris, of Devils 
Lake, N. D. 

« « * 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. KIston are ex- 



today 
for a 



pected nome the first of the week from 
their wedding trip in the East. Mrs. 
Elston was Miss Ethleen Fee. 

* • * 

Mrs. Edmund Rice and Miss Rice of 
Laurel avenue, St. Paul, have come to 
Duluth to spend a month here. 

* * * 
Miss How of St. Paul arrived 

to be the guest of friends here 
few weeks. 

* * * 

Mrs. M. H. Stanford of 1415 East 
Third street has returned from St. 
Paul, where she has been visiting for a 
month. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Z. D. Scott of 2125 East 
First street have returned from a two 
months' trip abroad. They visited Lon- 
don, Eng.. and the countries In the 
northern part of Europe. 

* * * 

Miss Lillian Downes has gone to 
Minneapolis for a short visit. 

* • * 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Ellis of Bir- 
mingham. Ala., are visiting Mrs. El- 
lis' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Z. D. Scott 
of 2125 East First stieet. 
« * * 

Judge and Mrs. H. A. Dancer, 2314 
East Superior street, have as their 
guests. Judge Dancer's mother, Mrs. 
Dancer of Chelcie, Mich. 

* « • 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray D. Handy of 1922 »4 
East Superior street have as their 
guests. Mr. Handy's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. R. Handy of Minneapolis. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Cobb of Brainerd 
r.'-e in Duluth to spend tlie summer 
and are at home at 2105 East Fifth 
street. 

* * * 

A. N. Seip and his sister. Miss Seip 
of Washington. D. C, formerly of this 
city, who have come to Duluth to 
spend the rest of the summer here, are 
at Chester terrace. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Underbill of 417 
Twenty-first avenue east left Tljursday 
evening for Rochester. N. Y'., to at- 
tend the Shriners' convention. 

* * * 

Mrs. L. Klein Van Alstine of this 
city has returned from a few days' 
visit with Mrs. Van Alstine's parents, 
Mr. and .Mrs. N. B. Black of Grand 
Forks, Minn. Her sister. Miss Char- 
lotte Black returned with her for a 
few weeks visit here. 
• • • 

Mrs. George Dion and children Miss 
Depen and Miss AUard of Hancock, 
Mich., who were passengers on the 
Octorara. Monday, are guests of Mrs. 
John Irvine, 429 Fourth avenue east. 

* • • 

T. Dion of Hancock is visiting his 
son. Frank J. Dion of West Second 
street. 

* « • 

Mrs. Charles May and son, Thomas, 
of Gilbert, Minn., who have been vis- 
iting Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Pfeifer of 
212 East Third street left Monday for 
Iron Belt Wis., to visit relatives. 

* * « 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Pellerin have 
gone to San Bernardino. Cal., where 
they will reside in the future. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. James O'Meara. Sr . 
and .^riss Mabel O'Meara of St. Paul 
arrived today lo be the guests of friends 
here and In Superior. 

* • • 

Mrs. M. L. Copeland of East First 
street is spending the summer with 
relatives at Pembroke, Canada. 



Mr. and Mrs. 
wanda. Pa., are 
with their son, 
at their summer 
river. 

* ♦ ♦ 
Jfiss Arline Higgins of 412 

avenue west is spending a few 
at Minneapolis. 

♦ ♦ • 
Mrs. A. McPhail of 307 West Second I 



John Sullivan of To- 
snending the summer 
Francis W. Sullivan, 
home on the St. Louis 



Second 
weeks 



street and Mrs. G. H. Parker of Medora, 
N. D., left Tuesday evening on the 
South Shore road for Charlottetown, 
P. I., Can. 

* « • 

Mrs. John Miller and daughter, Misa ; 
Adelaide of 2121 East Third street, 
have returned from a week's visit In . 
North Dakota. 

• * « 

Dr. W. A. McClaren, Melville Mc- 
Claran and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruce 
Liggett have returned from a trip to 
Minneapolis in Dr. McClaran's car. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Reed, .Miss Bertha-- 
Heed and Reginald of 4121 Mc«-ulloch.. 
street. Lakeside, left yesterday for 
Rochester, N. Y., to attend the Slirinera' 
convention to be held there next week. 

• * « 

Miss Jennie Crowley and Miss Flor- 
ence Denny are enjoying an outing at*. 
Bay lake, 

♦ * * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. O'Gorman and. 
family of East Third street are spend, 
ing a month at Solon Springs. 

• • • 

Mrs. R. P. McDermott of 316 Ninth - 
avenue east had as her guest for a few 
days this week, Mrs. Nell Leacock of * 
Chicago. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs .Earl Kingsley and' 
gui-sts will leave Sundav on the 
steamer. America for Tobins Harbor, 
Isle Royale. for a tv.o weeks' stay. 
They will occupy the two new cottages - 
just recently completed at the summer 
resort there. 

* « • 

Mrs. James Gary and familv of Hib- 
bing, who have been visiti:.g Mrs. 
Gary's sister, Mrs. R. T. Serrurier of 
tlie Portland fiats for the past week, 
are now settled on Park Point for the 
summer. 

« * * 

Senator S. D. Works of 
and family, were in Duluth 
They are here to take the 
Senator Works is one of 
prominent men in public life 
southern part of the state, and 
known in L)uluth. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Miss Jessie Rollings and Miss Anna . 
Koehler of 218 Second avenue west 
have gone to the Twin Cities and Lake 
Minnetonka for a vacation outing. 

• • • 

Miss Myrtle Tibbetts has returned 
from Minneapolis, where slie has been 
the guest of Miss Alice Graham for the 
past two weeks. 

* • ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Sermon have 
returned from a three months' visit to- 
Montreal and P^aslern Canada. 

• * * 

Mrs. James Hendrioksen of 814 East 
First street is entertaining Mrs. H. B. 
Ruettell and children of International 
Falls. 

* • « 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Zimmerman, 
1614 East Third street, are at the 
Brule, guests of H. G. Stone of Chicago 
at his summer home. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Ryerson of 26ir 
East Third street have returned from- 
an outing at Champ lake. 

* * * 

Miss Lena Barsness ind Miss Mar- 
garet Willia:ns have returned from* 
Hibbing, where they spent the Fourth*, 
with friends and relatives. 

• • * 

Mrs. John Peterson and children of 
425 Ninth avenue east have gone to - 
Rockhount, Wis., for a few 

* • • 

Mrs. E. J. Mehlhorn has 
Davidso.T, Sask., Can., where 
spend a few weeks with her daughter,. 
Mr.«. R. L. .Myrick. She will visit 
Portland, Seattle and Vancouver en. 
route. 

• « • 

Mrs. Harold Foster and little daugh- 
ter Beulah. and Miss Clara Bcler, 
spent the week in Minneapolis. Mrs, 
Foster will later visit relatlvts in the 



Mankato, 
Thursday 
lake trip. 
the most 
in the 
is welL 



weeks. 

gone to 
she will- 



YOUR COIVIPLEXIOIM NEEDS PROXECXIOIV. 



Dr. C. Tclix fiouraud $ 




FERD. T. HOPKINS. 



Oriental €ream 

. Protect Your Coirplexion During the Summer 

Every woman who spends the Summer at 
the seashore, m the mountains or at some- 
fashionable watering place should take with 
her a few bottles of GOURAUD'S ORI-- 
ENTAL CREAM to improve and beautify 
her complexion and protect her skin from 
the burning sun, bleaching winds, and damp 
night air. It has been in actual use for over 
half a century, which proves its superiority. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL CREAM 
cures Skin Diseases and relieves Si:nburn. 
Removes Tan, Pimples, Blackheads, Moth- 
Patches, Rash, Freckles and Vulgar Red- 
ness, Yellow and Muddy Skin, giving a deli- 
cately clear and refined complexion. It has- 
the highest recommendations and cannot bc: 
surpassed when preparing for evening attire. 
For Sale by Druggists and Deiiartment Stores. 

Send 10c in stamps for a book of Gou-- 
raud's Oriental Beauty Leaves, a handy lit- 
tle volume of perfumed powder leaves- 
which can be slipped into the purse and- 
used in any emergency. 

Proprietors, 37 Great Jones Street, NEW YORK 




• 1 



I » 






T-*- 



4 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD, 



Koutheni part of the stale and will 
Mr Foster at Camp Lakeview. 

• • ♦ 
^ W. White and little son 

of Oklalsoma «-ay ainvf.l 

vKsIt Mr. and Mrs F. N. Allen 

;.>i,i East Third street for two or 

months. 

• * ♦ 
C S Kugler of Bayard. Ohio, is 

- her rtaugi.ter. Mrs. R. B. Abbott 
( West First street. 

• • • 
Lillian Grey of St. Paul Is vlslt- 

Jennie Moody of 8 Chester 



join 

Mrs. 

Bhen l1 
today to 
of 5: 

tin el- 



and Mr. and Mrs. A. 

left yesterday . for a 
Isle Roy ale. They will 
Washington clubhouse 



M; 



Vi 
V't 



[\i'. 



* " '|^ II 



re- 

the 



J. A 

street. 
111., IS 
at the 



IF 



InK Miss 
terraie. 

• • • 

Mis-* Kdith VauKhn of Chester terra'-e 
has returned from a trip to Southern 
Illinois. 

Dr and Mrs S. H. Boyer. Miss Helen 
Bullard and Miss Belle Welch have 
turned from a twu weeks visit at 
Boyer summe^^ home at cedar uaKe. 

Mrs H. Mattock'of 'woodland who 
has iM^n ill at her home for the past 
week I.-* slowly recovering. 

\V S Dieler of Ritchie. lU.. has re- 
turned to his home after a few da> s 
visit with his daushter. Mrs, 
ItfcJaughey. 613S East Superior 
Sllss Klla Urmston of Qum'>. 
Iiere lor a several weeks' stay 
McOaushey home. 

• • • 

Mrs Rachel Duff, who underwent an 
opeiatim at St. Marys hospital some 
tinu ai?o. has h.-en removed to her 
h'rti.- at 20 Seventh avenue west, bhe 
Is onvalesclng rapidly. 

• • • , 
Mr and Mrs. Ward Ames. Jr., and 

Mr and Mrs. M.^rion Miller are at 1-aKe 
For»»st. the week-end guests ot Mr. 
and Mrs. Don McLennan. 

• • • , 
Mr^ Charles d'Autremont Is expected 

Ivv; ■ S-;nday from a three weeks 

VijU m the East. 

• « • 

J A. Morris of New York is In the 
City, the Kue<.t of his slster^«. 
H. I>iy and Mrs. S. F. 

Monday. 

• • • 

M--; L E Denfeld and daughter. 
BliV.^n.U-na Denfeld of Maine, are the 
gu .- .s of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Denfeld 
of Hunter's Park for the remainder of 
the summer. 

• * • 

Mr and Mrs. D. L. Falrchlld of SOa 
F :'w.'nty-flrst avenue east are in 

Iv.. . i'OllS. 

• • • 

Among the Duluth women who left 
with their husbands last evening for 
Bochester. N. Y.. to attend the ^'hl•ln- 
ers' invention were Mr.« A. P. Cook, 
Mrs W. D Underhill. Mrs. John H. 
Norton. Mrs. H. L. Dresser. Mrs. Hairy 
l>uv!.^■nbein and Mrs. C. O. ApplehaKon 
The latter, with her husband 
thre» weeks wttli friends in 
tun. Chautauqua and Warren. 

• » • 
Mrs. Fred A. Sermon has 

f run a three month.s' visit in 
»nd Eastern Canada. 



F. Williamson, 

W. Hariniiin 

weeks vi5»lt at 

.stay at the 

while there. ^ ^ 

nuluth society pe-ple ^'" !;f '"^fj;; 

t^^;^ }:i Tr. 'an^ M^ ^'V ^«^£' 
^ ^J^i^lI^^lXvf^h^i^r^.^iu 
Chapln, and is a 8l»ter of Mrs. R. P- 
Dowse ^ ^ , 

«f^ or,<i Mrs Ha '.en S. Clark have 
ar? ved "S DuTuth 1 'om their wedding 
*rlp Ind will maki their home here^ 
Mrs. Clark was 'or'^.ff'y ,^i'«^ J^,*'*^ 
rnve Gould of EvansvlUe. Ill; ""/'•^ 
wedding took placn there Thursday 
e/ening June 22. at the home of the 
brides brother, Judje Gould. 

Mi<«s Margaret Gleason of London, 
Ont is visiting 1 er uncle, Michael 
Sreason of li^ *^Tw.mty-elghth avenue 

Osca. Mork ind daughter Doro- 



from which 
Relation to 



4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 



gogy work. The subjects 
the pupils may choose are. 

1. ".Vttention and Us 
Education" 

2. 'The Concept. ^, ». « . 
3 -Formal Discipline in Education. 

"l»evelopment of the Teacher. 
'•Lo^ical Methods. • .,,„„■. 

• Teaching of Primary Reading. 
"Doctrine of Expression In Edu- 
cation." 

8. "Geography 
Grade.*!." 

9. "Recitation." . „ 

10. -Growth and Development. _ 

11. "The Period of Childhood. 

• • • 

Several of the normal students ©n- 
tertulned guests from out of town dur- 
ing the Fourth of July vacation. 

Mi.-:s Murphy of Tower was the guest 
of her sister. Miss Allle Murphy. 

Miss Gordon of Tower was the gu?st 



in the Intermediate 



spent the Fourth 



of her brother. Harvey Gordon 
Ml.ss Ruby Halghs sister of 

land, Minn 

city. 

Mr Parish and 

wabik and Mi.ss 

mldji were guest» 

Fourth. 



Good- 
In the 



Reusswig 
a Bowers 
t the hall 



of 
of 
for 



Bi- 
Be- 
Ihe 



Miss 
school 



Alice 
because 



Lang 



of 



Mrs. 

thy have returned from 
visit in the Twin C ties 
ern part of the sta'.e. 

« t' • 

Miss .\manda Br-cke 
la visiting Mr. and Urs. 



a tliree 
and the 



weeks" 
south- 



has withdrawn from 

illness. 

• • 

There was a regular session of school 
todav to make up^r the holiday on 
Monday, July 3.^ ^ ^ 

Th*» regular house meeting at 
hall was held Wednesday evening 



the 



Miss Jessie Todd of the 
was a visitor on Thursday 



1909 class 



Miss Eugene Stapleton, who was 
drowned In Chub lake on Jul>' 3, grad 
uated from the normal with the 

of 1909. 

• • • 

Dr T D. Bancroft, one of the few 
men now living v.ho witnessed the as- 
.s.isslnation of Abiaham Lincoln, gave a 
very Interesting talk to the pupils 
Thursday morning on the assassination 
of President Lincoln and the capture 

of Booth. 

* « • 

About thirtv of the students of Tor- 
rance hall enjoye.l The Herald excur- 
sion to Two Harbors, 
chaperoned the girls. 



Miss Godfrey 



A few of the faculty 
of the excursion to 
Among them were: 
Lumm and Freeman. 



took advantage 

Two Harbors. 

Messrs. Morse, 




of Minneapolis 
John A. Hector 



jf 10^9 East 



Sixth 

* 



street. 



Paul 
with 



Miss Gladys Liggett of St 
arrived today to SJend a moiUh 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bruce Uggett of 
Park Point. 

Mr. .ind Mrs *C. H- Parsojis 

East Fifth street returned 
a two months" v: "dt 
Chicago and Southern 



Mrs. D 
Wadhams, until 



of 516H 
Friday from 
with friends In 
Michigan. 

• • • .J 

Mrs Perry Starkweather arrived 
th?rmornin7fron> St. Paul for a tew 
days' stay here^ ^ ^ 

Mr and Mrs C ourtenay Dinwiddle 
h ive' a^ their gu. st. at their cottage 
on r-ark Point. MH.s Maude Merrltt 
Clarksville, Term. She 
for several weeks 




A. 



in 




imi''i(M)i^k miH0fi^ 



will be 



of 
here 



Park Pcint Dotes 



will pa.=i3 
Bingham- 
Ohio. 

returned 
Montreal 



Mrs W A. 
from a two 
Bokegama. 



.Vnderson has 
weeks" outing 



returned 
at Lake 



H»-nry 

street 
where 



* 
V > 
ha.^ 
she 



Mrs. 
perior 
perior, 

home. The Misses Seitz have gone 
Bolon Springs to spend the summer. 



. itz of 1414 Ea.'Jt 
moved to South 
intends to make 



Su- 
Su- 
her 

to 




Ml. and Mrs. C A. Marshall of 1113 
East Superior street are in Minneapolis 

for a few days. 

• • * 

Mr and Mrs. L. S. Loeb of 1123 East 
Buperfor street motored down to Min- 
jieapMiis yesterday. 

• • • 
aiL.s=; Josephine Thue. who has been 

the guest of Mr. and Mrs C. Frank oi 
819 North Sixtieth avenue west for the 
pa.st two weeks, l^ft today for her 
h t! >• in Madls.m Wis. 

• • • 
Mrs C. Frank and daughter left 

We Inesday for Colfax, Wis., for a visit 

With relatives. 

• • • 
M. McCabe of 92". East Second street. 

who underwent an operation Tuesday 
at St. Mary"s hospital. Is doing nicely 
and wi:; be able to be out in a few 

d,ays. 

• • • 

Misses Mildred and Mlnda Frost of 
Portland Or., have arrived to be the 

fuests of Miss Margaret Shaw, 721 
asi Second street. 

• • • 
Mrs John H. OLeary and little son. 

100.5 East Superior street, left yester- 
day for a three weeks' visit at Calu- 

tnet. Mich. 

• • • 

Miss Pearl Peterson, 14 East Second 
Street, Is the guest of relatives In 

Ashland. 

• • * 

Mrs. J. T. Shea. Miss Mary Heleii 
Rhea and Miss Margaret McDermott of 
Indianapolis are the guests of Mrs. M. 
J B\rnej5 and .Misses Kaiherine and 
Bessie Stark, 503 West Third street. 

• • • 

Mrs. Edward Donahue of East 
Third f^treet has returned from Brain- 

erd, Minn. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Crosby and 
Bon Howard, have returned from a 
Short slay at Crosby, Minn. 

• • « 

Mrs. Hoadley and daughter. Miss 
Helen Hoadley of Boston, Mass.. are 
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Ash 
of Hunter's Park for several 
'I • • 
and Marie Cheska of 
who had just returned 
D. were called back 
tlieir mother. Wednes- 



Mrs Stewart H. od and son Donald, 
of Twenty-eighth street accompanied 
bv her sister. Mi is Harriet Miller of 
Winnipeg, will have today on the 
steamer Huronic for Harrl.-'ton. Cm. 
Ml.ss Miller has b» en the guest of Mrs. 
Hood for several lays. 

• • • 

Mrs P. S. KinKsley of Twenty-first 
street' entertained Monday at luncheon 
for .Mrs. Mcrihane of Minneapolis The 
guests were: Mr. George Lindberg. 
Mrs E. T. Hughes. Mrs. Norman Mi.^a 
Grace Norman an 1 Miss Idah Waller. 

• * • 

Chester Harris, n of 3119 Minnesota 
avenue returned Wednesday from St. 
Paul, where he fpent the first of the 

week. 

• • • 

of youag people entertained 
at the annex of the Duluth 
Friday evening. Those pres- 
Miss i:ileen Keaough. Mis.s 
of Superior. Miss Ethel 
.\ arion p:ngalld, Mlsi 
Alta Hallock Miss Margaret Gude. 
and Theresa Gu le: Harry Erlanson 
Amos Bljork of Superior; VSarren 
Gude, Edwin Gordon. Sumner Herrell 
and Wilkinson I'indlay of superior. 



First Presbyterian— At the First 
Presbyterian church, Second street and 
Third avenue east, there will be serv- 
ices at 10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. At 
the morning service the pastor. Reb 
Robert Yost, will preach on the theme 
•A Pilgrim and His Heavenly Host " 
The .subject for the evening will be: 
•X King and His Spiritual Advisers ' 
The Bible school will meet at noon and 
the Christian Endeavor meeting will be 
held at C:45 p. m. There will be 
mid-week .service Thursday evening 
'7:45. ^ „ 

The musical program follows. 
MORNING. 
Organ prelude— 'Lead Kindly Light 

Duei-^"''rhe Lord Is My 



a 
at 



A party 
Informally 
Boat club 
ent Were: 
Mabel Crosby 
Gordon. Miss 



A.rthur Abraha nson of Cloquet .«pent 
the Fourth with Mr. and Mrs. Adrian 
of 31-9 Minnesotji avenue. 



Miss Idah W iller 

street has left for 
where she will s >end 
iier parents. 



of Twenty-first 

Litchfield. Minn., 
the summer with 



* • 
Mrs Camnbel and Miss Campbell 
have taken" the Hood cottage of 
Twenty-eighth street for the sum- 
mer. 

• • ♦ 

Mr and Mrs. W. T. Maynard and 
son. William, ■ f , Tenth street are 
spending severa days at White Bear. 
Minn. ^ ^ , 

Mrs A. Roberts of 1601 Minnesota 
avenue, who ha.H been visiting her sis- 
ter Mrs. Harrb of Los Angeles, has 

returned home. 

• • • 

SYdney Ballon of Thirtieth 
has returned from a several 
business trip in St. Paul. 
» ♦ • 

spending 
with her 
home at 



street 
days' 



\rho has 



^ 



■*i » iit 






Mrs. 

ktreet. 



M. 

is 



weeks. 

* 

Mi.sses Sophie 

the Y. W. C. A.. 

from Bowdle S 

by the death of 

day- 

• ♦ • 

Ml.ss Anna Foley of the Y. W. C. 
ft leaves Thursday for Chicago, where 
she will pass her months vacation. 

• • * 
Mr and Mrs. E. A. Vivian, 1301 East 

Third street, are in Minneapolis for a 

week's stay. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. N. E. Lugoff and fam- 
ily \\f> East Second street, have re- 
turned from a three weeks" visit in 
Chicago. They were accompanied 
fiome by their son. Leonard, who ha.i 
been attending the Northwestern Mil- 
itary academy. 

• • • 
J Fearer. 510 West Second 

visiting in Spooner. Wis. 

• • • 
Miss Frances Ohr of St. Paul, is the 

Ruest of her sister. Mrs. Ethel Hardin 
Of the Y. W. C. A. 

« « • 

Dr. and Mrs. S. C. McCormick have 
returned from a few days' visit with 
Mr and Mrs. A. H. Wilkinson at Bay- 
field. Wis. 

Miss Fidler of Minneapolis returned 

home Monday after a visit with Mr 

and Mrs. Horace Reyner, 42. East 

Becond street. Mrs. Fred Elliott 

little daughter who have 

Iguests for several days, 

evening on the 

Arthur. 

« • * 

Katherlne McHale and daugh- 

Evanston. 111. are the guests 

and Mrs. C. A. Monroe, 23 West 

street. 

• * • 

George R. Layboum of 1432 
East Fourth street, left Sunday for 
Minneapolis to attend the civic cele- 
ttratlon and visit with her relatives. 

• « • 

Mi.«3 Pearl Tresise and Miss Theresa 
Beatty are visiting with friends In 
the Twin Cities. 

• « • 

Mrs Signer Haataja and daughter 
Lily of 1712 Jefferson street have gone 
to California to reside. 
■^ « « • 

Mrs. Hal Hoble and Miss Jane Con- 
way are the guests of friends In Min- 
neapolis. 

• * • 

Miss Mary Early has returned to 
Minneapolis after a two weeks stay 
iwlth her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Charle.s 
Early, 302 East Third street. 

• * « 

Mrs. Frank North. Mrs. Wlghtman. 
Miss Mae North and Miss Lizzie John- 
son of Vassar, Mich., are the guests of 
Mrs. Henry Laxermer. 623 East Fourth 

•treet. 

• « • 

Louis Hoople is passing a couple of 

rireeks with his father. R. N. Hoople, 
n Minneapolis. 

« « • 
Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Dowse. Mr. and 
Mrs. George Stone. Mr. and Mrs. H. 



Mrs. Foster who has been 
the winter in New York city 
sister, has returned to her 
Thirty-eighth s reet. 

Mr. and Mr.s. Qulgley of Ohio spent 
the first part of the week with Mr. and 
Mrs W. E. Junes of Thirty-seventh 
street. ^ ^ 

Miss Ranklns.m of^ 3724 Mlnnescjta 
avenue was called to Iron Tuver on ac- 
count of the ill less of her father. 
• • • 

Mr and Mrs. Dennis, who are occti- 
nytng the Bur»:ess cottage, spent the 
Fourth at Soloi Springs. During 
absence. Mr. and Mrs James 
the city took tl e cottage. 

Horace Robei ts of Missoula. Mont , is 
visiting his uncle, A. Roberts, of 1601 
Minnesota avenue 

• « V 

of 



their 
Carglll of 



« * 
Smith 



• 
Mr and Mrs. H. Smith and family 
Superior have iaUen the Foster cottage 

for the summer. 

♦ • ♦ 
Evelvi Williams of Toronto, 
spendiug the summer with her 
H W. Williams, of Thirty-first 



Miss 
Can.. Is 
J.rother, 
street. 



Mrs. M. N. 
Twenty-ninth 



of 

ottage 

the summer. 

soon by their 



• * * 

Hanna and children of 
street returned Thurs- 
day evening f r )m a two weeks" visit In 
Milwaukee wit i Mr. Hanna s parents. 

• • • 
Miss Mabel and Freda Schletter 

Lawler. Iowa, have taken a cottage at 
3701 Minnesota avenue for 
They will be Joined 

father. 

• • * 

Wlllard and Gladys Morris of Port 
Arthur are sp. n.llng several .lays with 
Mr and Mrs. Williams of Thirty-first 

street. 

• • • 
Mrs D Mclennan of Twenty-fourth 

(street enterta'ned yesterday afternoon 
for her daugh er Ma.leline's 11th birth- 
day. The little guests were: 
Misses — 

Ruth Brown, 
K a t h e r in j Os- 
borne 



West 
Shepherd ". . 

Smart 

Miss 'Reynolds and Miss Bartholomew. 
Response — "Come Unto Him" .Han.scom 
. )ffertory— "Prayer" ^^ eber 

Solo • 

Philip Gordon Brown. 

Organ postlude Verdi 

EVENING. 

Organ prelude • • . • -ElKar 

Trio — "Now the Shades of the Even- 
ing Fall " Mendelssohn 

i >frertory— "A wakening" . • • Engelmann 
L)uet — "Jesus, Thou Joy of Loving 

Hearts " ; ■ • v; • ' ^"^^^^ 

Miss Reynolds and Mr. Brown. 

Organ postlude Lemare 

• • • 
Union Charch — The services of^ the 
Union chur- h are held In the K. I . 
hall 18 West Superior street, .»5un.lay 
morning at 10:50 and in the evening at 
8 o'clock B. V. Black Is the pastor. 
The subject of the morning sermon 
win be "The Magnet of the Soul." The 
evening theme will be "Intuition Ratti- 
er Than Impulse." Sunday school will 
be at noon. The lesson topic Is "The 
I'ath to Perfection." Christian Ln- 
deavor society has suspended its meet- 
ings for the present month. Mid-week 
service will »>e Wednesday evening In 
the hall at 8 o'clock. 

• « * 

First X«rweirt«B Lutheran— At the 

First Norwegian Lutheran church. 
First avenue east ami Third street, the 
pastor. J. H. Steni.erg. will preach In 
the morning <>n "Be Merciful" and in 
tl\e evening on 'Peace." both services 
In Norwegian. The Sunday school will 
meet In Chester park In the afternoon, 
where an address will be given on the 
subject, "Be Kind to the Animals." 

• • « 
First MelhoUUt Kpiscopal— At the 

First Methodist Episcopal church. 
Third avenue west and Third street, 
the pastor, M. S. Rice, will preach. 
Morning services will be at 10;30 
o"clock. Theme of sermon, "The Con- 
flict Between Religion and the Church. 
Evening services will be at 8 p. m., 
theme of sermon. "Moses" Success" At 
9:30 a. m. the men of the church are 
re.juested to meet for a short consul- 
tation In the church parlors. Sunday 
school will be at noon. W. S. Moore. 
8Ui.erlntendent. Epworth league will 

be at 'i p. m. 

• • • 

Rndlttn Methodist Episeopal — Rev. 
John Walker Powell will preach at the 
Endlon Methodist Episcopal church. 
First street and Nln.neenth avenue 
east, at 10:30 a. m., on "The Fellow- 
ship of His Sufferings'* The sermon 
win be followed by communi.)n. Bible 
school will be at noon. The musical 
program is as follows: 

Organ prelude aP"''"'^ 

Response— Lord's Prayer .....Shepard 
Anthem— "Fear Not. O Israel -g^-^^j. 

Offertory' *.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.".".'.*.".. . .MacDowell 
Sylo— -For the Mountains Shall 

part ''^r" -guff el.' 
Postlude 

First Baptist— At thl.s church Phil 
Bevls. secretary of the \. M. L. A., \Ma 
speak In the morning and evening. 
Rev Mr. Sayle.s. the pastor, w'^^ ^''C 
turn in time to lead the mid-week 
prayer meeting. The musical program 

'^"°"'^^ MORNING. 

Prelude WV V*' •'" 

Anthem— "Come Unto Me .. 
Solo — "The Ninety and Nine 

Mr. Hancock. 
Offertory 

^"^«""^'' EVENING."" 

Prelude— "Evening S'^n»"-- 
Anthem— "Gently Lord, Oh 

Lead Us" ■ • • 

Anthem— "Incline Thine Ear 



pastor's assistant, will preach. Sunday 
school at 11:30 a. ni.,wilij>e conducted 
by Mr. Gustafson. The Sunday s hool 
at Hermautown will also be conducted 
by Mr Gustafson. Prayer meeting at 
will be 7 p. m. The regular evening 
services will be conduced by the pas- 
tor. Rev. C. G. Olson. 

• • * 

First Christian Selene* — At First 
Orthodox Christian Science churcii. 
Burgess hall, 312 West Fi.r.st »l'"«;e_t. 
service will be held at 10:4o a. m.. the 
subject being "God Alone Is Our 
Judge," from the text, "For the Lord 
l.s our Ju.lge. the Loidls Our Lawgiver, 
the Lord Is Our King. He Will have 
us." Isa., 33-22. The mid-week 
ing will be held on Thursday 
at S o'clock. Reading room 
First street, is open daily except 
day, from 2 until 5 o'clock. 



meet 
evening 
310 West 

Sun- 



will preach 
m. Sunday 
m. Epwoith 



• • • 
Bethesda Norwegian Lutheran — At 

Beiliesda Norwegian Lutheran ,«-'''Hi'y.'l: 
corner iiXth avenue ea.st and Illin 
street, the pastor. Rev. Theodore J. 
Austed, will conduct services .Sunday 
forenoon at 10:30 o'clock in the Nor- 
wegian language, and In the evening at 
7 43 oclock In the English language. 
Norwegian Sunday sch.jol will meet at 
'. a m and English Sunday school at 
noon, Lutheran Young People's society 
will have Its business meeting 
church Monday evening. July 
S o'clock. The ladies" 
annual picnic in 



First German Methodist Episcopal 

church. Fifth avenue east and sixth 

street, the pastor. Rev. W . A ^^^'s^, 

al 10:30 a. m. and « .JU p. 

.school will meet at 5>:^0 a. 

league al 7 p. ni. The 

Ladies' Aid society will meet at the 

me of Mrs. M. Poleske. Superior. 

Wis.. Tliursday, j ly 13. at i. p. m. 

Grace M. E— At Grace MelhodLst 
Episcopal church, Rev. George t--.,^"/- 
oway, pastor. Sunday services will be 
i.eld at i0:30 a. m. and 8 p. m. In tiie 

morning Rev. J. A. K'-'^e^ ^V^V' Bovll! 
and in the evening. Rev. V\ . G. Boj le. 
Sundav school will meet at 12 AL, U. IV 
Forward, superintendent. 

• • • 

Theosophleal Society— The Theosoph- 
ical society will hold classes for mem- 
bers every Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings during July and August at 8 
o'clock In room 2s W inthrop block, 
corner First street and Fourth avenue 
west, avenue entrance. The date or 
study classes will be announced 



OUTLOOK IS 
MOSI^ROSY 

Automobile Manufacturers Are 

Optimistic Over the 

Fall Prospects. 



Some Reductions Made 
the Prices of Stand- 
ard Cars. 



m 



PATHHNDER 
CARLEAVES 

Will Take Notes on Condi- 
tion of Road to 
Hibbing. 

Bad Places Will Be Repaired 

Before Race en 

July 16. 



■^»7 



the 



( 



in the 

1 0. at 

aid will have Its 

Chester park, Thurs- 

day, July 13. The Ltttle Girls' society 

will have a midsummer festival at tlie 

church, Wednesday evening, July 12. 



end 
omitted 



Bethany Norwegian Danish Methodist 
KplMcopul— At the Bethany Norwegian 
Dani.-^h Methodist Episcopal churrh. 
Sixty-fifth avenue west and Polk street. 
Rev C G. Gunderson of Superior will 
preach at 10:4.') a. m. and 8 p. m.; sun- 
day school will be at 9:45 a. m.. and 
Epworth league at 1 p. m. 

St. Paul's Episcopal — At this church. 
Lake avenue north and Secon.l street, 
there will be services as follows; H a. 
m holy communion; 10 a. m.. Sunday 
school; 11 a. m.. morning prayer, litany 
and sermon; 7:30 p. m., evening prayer 
and sermon. The topic of the mjrnlng 
sermon will be: "Man's D>mlnati.>n 
the Animal Creation, the Cause of 
Kindness to Such Creation. Hospital 
board meeting will be held at 5 p 
at the h.>spital. The Girls' Friendly 
clety will meet Thursday at . :30 p 
in the guild rooms. 

The musical program follows: 
MORNING. 
Recessional — "How Wondrous and 

Great" * • • • ■ • ' _ 

Te Deum. In B flat.-....-. .Maunder 

Litany hymn— "Savior. When in Dust. 

to TllPt;** ' 

Hymn— "Ten Thousand Times Ten 
Thousand" • 

Mary Syer Bradshaw. 
Anthem— "The Sun Shall Be no 



public 

'^sV Stephens— At St. Stephen's Ger- 
man-English Lutheran church, corrier 
Sixty-seventh avenue west and Ka- 
lelgh street. Walter Slevers, pastor, 
ttiere will be services Sunday evening 
at 8 o'clock conducted In the Englisli 
language. At St. Stephen's east end 
language. At St. Stephen's East 
Fifth street, services will be 

tomorrow. 

• • • 

Lester Park M. E — At the Lester 
Park Methodist Ei»lscopal church, cor- 
ner of Fitty-fourth avenue east and su- 
perior street, the pastor. Rev. Chas. R. 
Oaten, will preacti and conduct serv- 
ices tomorrow. At 10:30 In the morn- 
ing the theme of the sermon will be, 
•The Whisper of God, " and at 8 o'clock 
In the evening, "Tne Under Average.! 
Man," being the third in a series of 
Sunday evening addresses on "Common- 
idace I'eople." Sunday school meets at 
noon, and the Epworth league 

o'clock. 

• • * 

First Church of Christ — Regular 
services will be hel.l at the church 
^« southeast corner First street and 
of Ninth avenue east at 10:45 a. m. and 
Hi-"*! 7 45 p. m. The subject being -Sacra- 
ment." This Is the i?emi-annual c .m- 
uiunion service. The Wednesday even- 
ing testimonial meeting is held at 8 
ocl.ick. Free reading room at 411 '^l; i ,,„_j,..ong 
worth building is open daily, except •'"^'^"';*"^ 
Sunday ' '" " •" *" 'i •> »" ^"^ '"^'^'* 



at 7 



m. 

so- 

, ID. 



4 p. m. 



of 



_ More" 
Woodward 
the Heav- 



and 

Chanted 
of Je- 



De- 
. Mendelssohn 

.West 



. .Th. Lach 
. .Morrison 
. .Campion 

. . . .Jensen 
Elliott 

.Schumann 

Gently 
. . .Hawley 



Recessional — "Children 

enly King" • 

EVENING. 

Processional— "How Wondrous 
Great" 

Canticles • • • • • • • • 

Hymn— "How Sweet the Name 

sus Sounds" •.•••■ ,' 'ri,Vl-" 

Anthem-'The Day Is Past ^'id^'Jll rnce 

'Leon Cooley and choir. 

Orison — "Peace. Perfect Peace . . 

Recessional— "Children of the Heaven- 
ly King" ;•;•'; 

Pllicrim Church— At PilKrlm f^^ngre- 
gational church. Rev. Alexander Milne, 
pastor, will j.reach in the morning <.n 
•The Law of Kindnes.s" and in the 
evening on "The Warning Against False 
Leaders." 

The musical program follows. 

MORNING. „ . , 

„„,,, ,„ Handel 

gob'-'-Cailes't' 'Thou' Thus". . • -Mietzke 

Ouet — "Ave Verum • • i^acome 

Mr. Nafe and Miss ^^'^^^%l;^„„^^ 

Anthem Bach 

Postlude ..••• ^^^"^ 

EVENING 

Prelude • • 

Solo — "One Fweetly 



Rhelnberger 
S.ilemn Tli ought" 



and 

been their 

left Monday 

Huronic for Port 



Mrs. 

ter of 
Of Mr. 
Second 

Mrs. 



Annie RedMayne. 
Leona Ca'si'ly. 
Dorothy Ballou. 
Charlotte Marvin. 
Florence McLen- 
nan. 
Beryl McLennan. 
Mllbourn Wnilte. 



Helen McLe'>d. 

Marion Hunter. 

Jessie Davl.*^, 

Nora Newett. 

Fanny Mar in. 

* • • 

Mrs Colin F. rfrown of 2505 Minne- 
sota avenue *'as hostess yesterday In 
honor of her laughter. Ruth Forbes, In 
celebration o! her 6th birthday anni- 
versary. The guests were: 
Mlsse.s — 

Signie Hendrlck- 

K a t h e r ii e Os- 
borne, 



Himmel 

Offeriory" •.•.'.'.■.'.'.■.■.;.■.■.■. • —,-,'^'^^*'^^'' 
Clara B. Morton Is organist. 

Aeeond PresbyterlanlAt the Second 
Presbyterian church Rev J. A. McCall 
win preach at both services. At the 
mornlnsr service, 10:45 o'clock, his .sub. 
J^ct wlfl be "A Three-fold Estimate of 
Character" At the evening ''ervlce. 
7 45 o-c lock, his subject will be "Seek- 
ing the Ghost of Lost Opportunities. 
Sunday scho.il will 
Christian Endeavor^ at ^ 

Lutheran — A t St 

church. Lake 

and Third street. Rev. 

E Shcwell. pastor, morlng services 

K. »^«=^*'jq'.3}) a. m. Sunday school 



Briggs 

Miss Prosser. 

. Foote 

^ Choir?' Sop'r'a'n'o.'Ml'ss Lo'til'se Prosser; 
contralto, Mrs. R. C. Buck: tenor. John 
C. Nafe; ba.ss. Harry O. G«f,'^'"^V,^^: 
ganlst and choir director. Faith H. Rog- 

«"• • • * 

Lakeside Presbyterian— At the Lake- 
s;Ide Presbyterian church. Forty-fifth 
avenue east and McCulloch street, the 
pastor. Rev. H. B. Sutherland 
preach at both morning and 
services. Sunday sch.ioi 
12 o'clock. The Christian 
i cietv will hold Its 
services at 6 p. m. ^ 

the 



from 10 a. m. to 

• • • 

St. Paul's — At St. Paul's Lutheran 
church, corner of Twentieth avenue 
west and Third street, there will be 
morning services commenc'ng at 11. 
The sermon will be preached in the 
English language by Rev. Walter Slev- 
ers Sun.lay school will meet at 9:45 
a m. The Luther Guild will meet 
\Ve<lnesday evening at the church par- 
lors. Choir reliearsal will be held Fri- 
day evening at the church. 
• • • 

linmanuel — At Immanuel's Lutlieran 
church, corner of Fifty-seventh avenue 
west and Roosevelt street, there will 
be no services Sunday. The congrega- 
tion Is Invited to attend service at St. 
Paul's church, corner of Twentieth 
avenue west and Third street at 11 a. m. 

• • • 
Trinity Pro-cathedral — At Trinity 

pr. (-cathedral. Twentieth avenue east 
and Superior street, Rev. Arthur H. 
Wurtele. dean and rector, services for 
the fourth Sunday after Trinity will 
be as follows: Holy communion, 8 a. 
m.; Sunday school and Bible class, 9:45 
a. m.; morning prayer, litany ami ser- 
mon. 11 a. m., the subject will be, 
■"Mercv." an.l the preacher. Bishop 
Morrison. The musical program fol- 
lows; 
Organ prelude — "Song to Evening 

Star" Wagner 

Processional hymn — "O Saviour, 

Precious" McCartney 

"Venite, Gloria and Chants" .. .Barnby 

I'Te Deum" In B Hat Von Boskark 
Litany .solo — 'One Sweetly Solemn 
Thought" Ambrose 
C. H. Smith. 
Hvmn — "Art Thou Weary ".. .Bullinger 

Offertory solo — "My Redeemer " 

Gounod 

Miss Mattox. 
Recessional hymn — -Jerusalem, The 

Golden" Le Jeune 

Organ postlude — "Fanfare". .. .Du Bols 
W. C. Smith Is organist and choir- 
master. 

• 4t 



E. J. Filiatrault. who has been in 
East studying the automobile pros- 
pects for tlie coming season, has the 
following to say concerning the con- 
ditions there: 

"After talking over conditions in 
general with s.jme of the most promi- 
nent automobile manufacturers In the 
East. Detroit and Buffalo, also Cleve- 
land, I find that their views are very 
optimistic for the season of 1912 In the 
automobile line. , , , it, 

-I also had the opportunity of talk- 
ing with Mr. Meyers of the Meyers & 
Sons company, bankers, who are ex- 
tensive loaners ot money to the promi- 
nent automobile manufacturers, rela- 
tive to conditions tor iyi:i, and. using 
the terms of Mr. Meyers— the condi- 
tions for isn2, are very promising m 
all lines of business, and before Sep- 
tember first a noticeable difference 
will be apparent throughout tlie coun- 
try. He is very optimistic In his views 
[..r the coming year in all busine.ss lines 
in general, basing his opinion on the j 
enormous sale of automobiles for i-'iL 
and tlie great number of orders which 
are coming into the manufacturers for j 
191' Mr Meyers believes that it is 
very apparent to the observer that 
everybody in general has sulflcient 
money to meet all their re<iuirements. 
and while there is a seeming lull In 
tiie various lines of business centers, 
ju.lging from bare facts and from con- 
clusive proofs, it is not going to remain 
permanently. The shake up by the 
fe.leral government which is going on 
at the present time with the large cor- 
has i>ut a temporary halt on 
et. but this will not 



An automobile driven by E. J. Flll»- 
traut left this afternoon for the range, 
the purpose of the run being to take 
notes on conditions of the road at dif- 
ferent point.s. that drivers who go Into 
the Duluth-Hibbing run a week from 
Sunday will know the actual condi- 
tion of the road. 

There are one or two bad places that 
are being repaired at the present time. 
Outs'de a few rough spots, the road 
is said to be in excellent condition. 

Entries must be made for the race 
this week. The offer of the cup ha« 
lieen withdrawn and |100 in money of- 
fered in lis stead as some of the own- 
ers have stated that this would be more 
satisfactory. This amount will twlca 
over cover the wear and tear on tlrea 
and al the request of those who desire 
to enter, the j.rize was changed. 

The race will be run a wtek from 
Sunday morning. Any driver and any 
stock car is eligible and ther.^ 
entrance fee. Both Duluth and 
motorists are welcome to enter. 
The cars will be sent away at 
vals, the time ot 
ing on how 
scout car 



is no 
range 



will 
evening 
win meet at 
Endeavor so- 
weekly devotional 



be 
6:45 



at 
p. xn 



noon. 



• * 
St. John's Enarlsh 

John's English Lutheran 

avenue north 

J. 

win be at 



Trinity 
Fourth 
services 
Flags tad 



win meet at 



Rosemary Barry, 
Beryl MeLennan, 
Madeline McLen- 
nan. 



this 

and First 
services will 



11:45 a. m. 
• » • 
Central Bapslst — At 

Twentieth avenue west 

street Pastor Milton Fish. 

h/ as follows: 10 a. m., prayer meet- 

^nK 10:30 a. m.. worship and .sermon. 

•E.i'ulpped for Uie <^anipalgn, 

'con\munl.jn; noon, Sunday 

m B. Y. P. U. •""''♦«n=^ 



m. 



Masters — 

Dale Hartzdl, 
William Ol en, 
Robert Ols. n, 
Kenneth Larson, 



Leslie Lar.'on, 
Donal.l Brookes, 
Douglas Brown. 



NORlilAL NOTES 



worship 
tlons." 



and sermon. "Two 



Bethany Swedish 

Bethany Swedish 
Twenty-third 
street. C. G. 
be at 10 a. i 



Lutheran— At the 

Lutheran church. 

avenue west and Third 

Olson, pastor, services will 



* • • 
Trinity Norwegian — At 

Norwegian Lutheran ch"rcn 
avenue east and Fifth street, 
wUl be conducted • by O- J- , -,„.,es 
at 10-30 a. m. Sun.lay school classes 
wni meet at noon. The Dorcas society 
will meet with Mrs. Tilder Tuesday at 
8 p. m. . . • 

St. Mark's— At St. Mark's. A. ME. 
church Fifth avenue east and Slxin 
, ^ sfreet Jonathan Brewer. pa8t..r. there 
chjirch I ^'^[j^*' j^ preaching both morning and 
evening. At the "'«>''n\ng serWce at U 
o'clock the theme will be. vacation. 
The True Rest." At the ^«^-«"*"£,f,*''^: 
ices at 8 o'clock, the theme win be 
• T^ere Is Death in the Pot." Sunday 
school win meet at 12:15. Mrs, Geo 
Adams, superintendent, 
praise services led by Mrs. 
will be held at 7:30 p. m 
win sing at both services. 
Mehlel. organist, Harvey 
director. _ . ,. 



" 11:20 a. 

school: 7 

8 p. m.. 

Resurrec- 



St. Andrew's Chapel— At St. Andrew's 
chapel. Park Polr.t mission, there will 
be Sundav school at 3 p. m. and even- 
ing service at 8. the subject being "The 
Value of Mercy." and the preacher. 
Dean Wurtele. Music will be under the 
direction of Miss Margaret Gude. 
• • • 

Swedish Temple — At the Swedish 
temple, Twentv-second avenue west 
and Third street. Rev. Swaney Nels.jn. 
pa.^tor, services will be at 11 a. in. and 
7:45 p. m., the morning subject being 
"The Lordship of Jesus." and the even- 
ing subject. "Joseph, the Interpreter or 
Spiritual Vision." the eighth sermon 
In a series on "Evenings With Joseph." 
Sunday school will meet at 10 a. m. 
conducted by A. Thoren, superinten- 
dent; Young People's meeting wUl be 
at 5 p. m. The temple choir under 
the direction of Prof. N. E. Erlcson 

will sing. 

• * * 

Lakeside Mission— At Lakeside Swe- 
dish Sunday school mission, 816 Furty- 
seventh avenue east, there will be Sun- 
day school tomorrow morning at 10 
o'clock. A. Stoltz is superintendent. 



last long. 
'Si)eaking of comlitions in the 
foreign markets, the demand for Amer- 
ican products is greater at the present 
time than it has ever been. 

Factories AH Busy. 
"I had the pleasure of visiting a 
number .jf the most prominent factories 
and find that they are all very busy 
at work, finishing up the balance of 
their 1911 product, and extensively 
operating on the production of their 
1912 cars. , ^ 

-The E. R. Thomas Motor Car com- 
pany was found to be a very bu.sy and 
prosper.jus establishment: more men 
have been ad.led to the operating force 
since the organization of this company 
under the management of E. P. 
r'halfant and George FItzsimmons. Ihe 
new 1912 models will be ready for de- 
livery in August. The price of the 
1912 line will remain the same as that 
of 1911 $4,000 for a fully e'4uipped slx- 
cyllnder, seven-passenger, C4-horse 
power touring car. 

"The Chalmers Motor company an.! 
the Hudson Motor Car company, located 
at Detroit are also very busy places. 
The Chalmers Motor company is com- 
ing out with the regular 3o-h.>rse 
power Chalmers, which formerly sold 
for 11.800. This car fully equipped Is 
going on the market for 1912. at $1,500. 
The Model 36, or Chalmers "40 built 
in two four or five-passenger cars are 
going to be sold for $1,800, fully 
equipped. Both of these models include 
demountable rims. 

"The Hudson Motor company Is of- 
fering for 1912, a car that will deliver 
38-horse power — 118 Inch wheel base, 
36 bv 4 tires, foredoor, in the tounng 
and tony tonneau types; fully equipped 
with top, glass front, speedometer, 
gas tank, gas lamps. demountable 
rims etc., for $1,600— formerly this 
car equipped as above sold for $l,8oo 

thereby showing that In comparison 

with the season of 1911 a Substantial 
and marked reduction in price has 
been made in the production of these 
high grade cars for 1912." 

Mr. Filiatrault had the pleasure 
doing considerable touring 
away, through New York 
speaks well of the 
falo and Albany 



Inter- 
each Interval depend- 
many cars are entt red. A, 
will start two hours In ad- 
vance of other cars and confetti 
be thrown from It that the others 
not lose their way. 

The timer, starter and other official* 
for the race will be .selected this week 
and notice will be given later as to 

who they are. , a *^ ,.„r, 

Permissi.>n has been granted to run 
through the smaller range towns at 
high speed and the authorities 
promised to establish 
pie off the track. 



lines and 



win 

will 



have 
keep 



1 



slmul- 



track 
_ -seven 
entered 



Motorcyclists; 



Motorcycle Notes. 

Chicago wUl be introduced 
taneously to its new $40,000 stadiutn- 
mot.°rdrome and night motorcycle 
racing today and toinorr.)W. rne 
magnificent new board track Is ready 
for the opening and it is said that Its 
construciLm assures maximum speed 
with a minimum of danger. 

There will be night races, seventy- 
five big arcs having been hung around 
thc^ onl- third mile track The grand 
stands completely encircle the 
and will seat 30.000. Twenty 
motorcycle racers have alread> 
for the events. ^ 

The following sanctions have been 
issued by Dr. J P. Thornley, chairman 
of the competition committee of the 
Federation of American 
Race meet. Detroit, Sept. 2 
Springfield, Ohio, Aug. 1 
Denver, July 9; race meet, 
July 22 and road race, 
July 21. , , » 

Two hundred and thirty-five 

iwo nun ^^^^ j^ twelve hours— 

of more than an hour. 

of Pine River, U is., 

a motorcycle between Pine 

Chicago. 

A motorcycle agent at S'^'^a^l""/^*-* 
has est'mated the cost of operating • 
m*rtorcy??e at less than one-fifth cent 
per mile. , » • 

To prevent speeding on r'^a'^' f"**^ 

Motorcycle club 



o; race 
; race 
Akron, 
Miami, 



meet, 

meet, 

(Jhlo, 

Fla.. 



mllea 



over a strange 
with one stop 
Charley Paterson 
did It on 
River and 




Frank A. Gustafson. the 



Song and 

A. S. Mason 

The choir 

Mrs. Samuel 

L.. Plttman, 



German Methodist Episeopal— At the 



Four weeks of the summer school 
term have already elapsed. Only three 
more weeks 'emaln. 

• « • 

Mr. Owens has given the theorv of 
education cli ss a list of topics from 
which to wrl e their theses. The pupils 
have about four weeks in which to 
prepare the theses and this wUl con- 
stitute an e.-^sentlal part of th© peda- 



GARAGE 



ELECTRIC VEHICLE,6AS0LINECAR 

QI'JICRAL RCPAIRS 

ELECTRIC SERVICE ft REPAIR CO. 

•22 l!aet S u per to r •treet 



©HBBSTmiNl EMDEMOK iCDTES 



Endeavor in Duluth, 



ALLEGED WHITE SLAVER 

HELD TO GRAND JURY. 

Pembina. N. D.. July 8.— (.Special to 
The Heral'l.) — William Osker. at the 
preliminary hearing held here on a 
charge of white slavery, was bound 
over to the federal grand jury, and in 
.lefault of $1,000 bail, will be held In 
the Pembina county jail. Osker was 
arrested here on his arrival from Emer- 
son Man., having come Into that city 
from Winnipeg in company with a girl 
whom he claimed was his daughter. 
The girl is held under $500 bonds as a 
witness. 



of 
while 
state, and 
roads between Buf- 
The state of New 
York has constructed a state high- 
way extending from Albany and New 
York to Buffalo, which is of macadam- 
ized construction the entire distance 
At this time the scenery between Buf- 
falo and Albany, passing through Cale- 
donia, Batavia, Lockport and Roches- 
ter, and the various other towns, Is 

beautiful. . «, -o- i. 

The crop conditions m New York 
state as viewed by Mr. Filiatrault are 
not as good as In Minnesota. The corn 
In Minnesota and especially in the 
farming community tributary to Du- 
luth is farther advanced in growth 
than the corn crop in New York. 
Wheat, however seems to be very 
well advanced, and crop conditions 
point to a very successful season. The 
farmers at the present time are very 
busy cutting hay and the large red 
juicy cherries which fancy prices are 
i^aid for in Duluth at the present 
time can be had for the asking In 
New York state between Buffalo and 
Albany. The apple and peach cropl^ 
also seem to be very good; while this 
class of fruit is not ripe at the pres- 
ent time, nevertheless the season 
promises a heavy crop in this line. 

STORM KILLS TWO AND 

DESTROYS FIVE BOATS. 



of the 
club r»- 
a fifty- 



The Marion, Ind. 
has a new club house. ^ 

The women who are members 
Stockton, Cal., Motorcycle 
cently accompanied the club on 

mile run. _^ 

Injured by Cultivator. 

FllendaTe N. D, July 8— (Special to 

TlS Herald, i^imon Bader fell under 

The "«7 niyator and was lacerated 

He also had one arm 



a corn 
by the 
broken- 



teeth. 



< = 



A "CURE"? FOR 

BALDNESS 



is 

hi 

is 

question. 

and hence. 

It is a result 



week 



Christian 

of July 9, 1911- 

The study tomorrow win be "David, 
.Reference I Sam. xvll-32-51). It Is the 
seventh m the series of studies of the 
great characters of the Bible. 

Following meetings have been report- 
ed to the Local Unlcjn: ,*.„»/;„ 

Lakeside Presbyterian society at 6 p. 
mm the Endeavor room. Miss Francis 

^^^-;;^tm'lns't^V Presbyterian society 
wni hold an Installation service f-y the 
uurpo^e of ushering their new officer 
imo'^offlce: William Ritchie Is the new 
president of the society, succeeding J. 
T IC©rr 

Regular Sunday afternoon service at 
County Farm is to be In charge of the 
First Christian society. 

Union Church Disciple* ■oclety ha« 



ing 
if the 



m fall- 
checked and 



discontinued services for the remainder 
of July, but will resume the first Sun- 
day in August, when their annual elec- 
tion of officers will take place 

Lakeside Presbyterian society last 
.Sunday held their service on the church 
lawn. This society recently elected the 
following officers to succeed those now 
In office: President, Stanley Lamb, 
vice president, W. W. Wells; corre- 
sponding secretary. Miss Annie M. 
Hicken: recording secretary Floyd 
I.awson; treasurer. Carolyn Blackmar, 
assistant treasurer, Evangeline Steven- 
son; organist, Ruth Prosser. , ^^ , , 

Miss Annie M. Hicken. Duluth dele- 
gate to the international convention 
now in session at Atlantic City, left 
Tuesday to join the Minnesota delega- 
tion. It isexpected that she win pre- 
sent her report of the gathering at the 
next local rally. 
I 



ArchbLsliop Goine Abroad. 

Milwaukee, Wis., July 8. — Arch- 
bishop Sebastian G. Messmer Is to 
spend part of the summer in Europe, 
partly because he is not in the be.st of 
health and partly because he wishes 
to visit relatives. He will leave some 
time after July 20. The length of 
his stay has not been determined. He 
will go first to Switzerland, where his 
relatives live, and it is probable that 
he will spend the entire summer 
there. 

Hlaea' Elmploye B«r»ed. 

Ashland. Wis , July 8.— Frank Web- 
ster barn boss of the Hlnes Lumber 
company at Cusson. Wis., was burned 
to death. 



Wheeling, W. Va.. July 8. — Two 
deaths, the wrecking of five motor 
boats on the Ohio river, and a narrow 
escape from destruction of the Pitta- 
burg-Cincinnati packet. Queen City, 
were caused by a severe storm that 
broke over this city early this even- 
ing The storm broke after numer- 
ous minor electrical disturbances 
throughout the day. and the terrific 
wind was accompanied by almost a 
cloudburst. 

On the Ohio side of the river, near 
Brtdgeport. Fred Young, a mill work- 
er, was feeding his pigs when a small 
run overflowed almost In an instant 
and carried Young and his pigs in a 
violent torrent down the hillside into 
Bridgeport, where they were lodged 
under a stone culvert Young was 

dead when his body waa found, but 

the pigs were alive. 

Dorothy Maxwell, aged 13. while 

bathing, was blown out Jn midstream 

by the wind and drowned before help 

could reach her. 



The above expression is one which 
usid frequently in connection >.ith 
hai^ oreparatlons. Just exactly what 
''^milnt'^by it in each instance is^a 
Baldness ia not a disease 
does n.it permit of a cure, 
invariably to be traced 
to the dandruff gerni and If the con- 
dUion has become chronic, that is. U 
there is complete atrophy of the hair 
fomcles a ''cure- is absolutely im- 

''Tpproaching baldness, seen 

hair may always be ^, . 

foHlcles are not atrophied 

the hair may be induced again to 

^"^This is accomplished by regular ap- 
plications of Newbro-s Henuc Id. 
^ - the scalp and kills tne 

The destruction of 
the germ does away with the accumu- 
atio^T^ of scarf akin and thus -»"J; 
inates the most common enemy l» 

scalp Infested with aan 
than a delicate plant 
ash heap. The scalp 
clean and free from 
best remedy for do- 
me this is Newbro's Herpicide whlcn 
re^elve^ the hlgheat Indorsementt 
from professional men. the stage and 
the best people everywhere. 

Herpicide Is sold and guaranteed Itt 

sire bottles by all druggist* 

obtained at all first -clae« 

and hair dressing par- 



^ 



which cleanses 
dandruff germ. 




grow on 
druff any 
can grow 
must be 
dandruff, 
this 



a 

more 
on an 
kept 
The 



one dolar 
Applications 
barber shops 

*° Address The Herpicide Co.. 

R.. Detroit. Mich., enclosing 10c m 



Dept. 



or silver 



postage 
booklet. 

Lyceum pharmacy 
[store, special agenU 



for sample •■n* 



and L«enox druS 
for Duluth. 





• •^ m 



- 



■*-r 




"' ■ 'If^ ■ I I t. ■ ]! I LJ^ ' ♦ 



I 

i 




IRON RIVER 



Iron Itiver, Wis.. July ». — i:«ijetial to 
The Htrald.) — A steady down pour of 
rain on the Fourtn prevented carrying 
out of program. The Iron River team 
and the Owls of Ashland played a 
erame between showers. Six innings 
were played when the Ashland boys 
Quit to take the train for home. Then 
the score stood 9 to 7 in favor of iron 
River. ^ ^ 

The boarjl of supervisors of tne 
town of Iron River passed upon the 
application for liquor licenses. There 
■were thirteen applications before the 
board and all were granted. 

The Iron Kiver mill closed for re- 
pairs last Friday night. It is ex- 
pected the repairs wlli be finished in 
about three wt-elcs, when it will re- 
sume operations. 

Louis .Mitchell, aged 75 years, father 
of Chcvrlts Mitchell, died at the letter's 
farm northwest of this city Wednes- 
dav nlsht about 6:30 o'clock. 

Prof and Mrs. W. R. Rood left last 
Tuesday for their former home In ilil- 
ton. Wis. Mr. Rood has decided to ac- 
cept the management of a new com- 
pany whlcli Is In process of organiza- 
tion at Milton and engage In the rock 
phosphate fertilizer business with \\ is- 
consm a.s its territory 

Rev. A. A. Krug. pastor of the Trin- 
ity Evangelical cnurch of this ilty left 
early last week for Napervllle. 111.. 
and later in the week friends in this 
city received cards announcing his 
murriage t>n the ■J.'>th of June to Miss 
Jessie Nora Cowles in Naperville. 

Mis.H Mae McNully, who taught for 
two terms in the Iron River schools a 
few > ears ago was married last Thurs- 
day evening to John O'Connor of Su- 
perior. 

Mr. and Mis. Newlond left on Tues- 
day of last week for their old home 
in Norway, where they expect to re- 
side permanently. 

Postmaster Hall received a telegram 
■Wednestlay evening announcing the 
dangerous illness of his lather at New- 
berry, Ore. 

Rev Mr. Day is organizing a Boy 
Bcout platoon. Dr. Johnson will speak 
to the Scouts next Monday night on 
•'First Aid to the Injured. ' Plans for 
camping are under way. 

R. A. Steckbauer came up from Min- 
neapolis this morning to look after 
business matters. 

The ball game on the Iron River 
^rounds last Sunday between the Ash- 
land Brewers and the local team was 
woii by Iron River by a score of 1» 
to 3. 

Leroy Browne was in this city last 
Tuesday on his way from Hayward 
to Grand Rapids, Minn. 

Next Wednesday at 3 p. m. the reg- 
ular meeting of the W. C. T. U. will be 
held at the Congregational church. 

B. F. OlHara, wlio has been located 
at Belle I'lains, Iowa, since leaving 
here about a year ago, arrived in this 
city last Friday. 

Mrs. L>. Aust and son of Cloquet. 
Minn., are visiting In this city at the 
home of l-.er parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
i>an L'iamond 

The family of Mr. Hackett, operator 
at the Northern Pacific depot arrived 
In this city last week and will make 
their future home here. 

Joseph Weckert left last Monday for 
Solon Springs, where he will visit for 
a few weeks with his parents. 

The Congregational 
meet with Mrs. Hans 
day. July 13. 

Eauxase Clark left 
Virginia, Minn., where 
a position as setter in 
Curtis Jackman fell 



Warroad where he 
of the day. Mr. Mii 
some prominence as 

J. A. Kennedy le 
International Falls 
appointment as de 
customs. 

The Northwestern 
pany have moved tt 
in the new Stuart bl 

Frank Stuart is ht 
vacation visiting wi 
and Mrs. F. H. Stua 

The Baudette Con( 
awarded the contra 
of the cement walks 
property. 

J. A. Rose spent tl 
road where he help 
feat Roseau at bast 
7 to 6. 

A. J. Rowan has I 
patrol. His district 
Clementson and fro: 
16('-30. 

Chief of Police Du 
brand new uniform. 

The tire cases that 
to trial at Crooksti 
tied by the railroa 
cents on the dollar. 

Mrs. J. F. Collins 
by her mother and ' 

Sing Muncey of LI 
spent a few days o: 
ing with his brotl 
Muncey and family. 



made the address 
idelton has gained 
i public speaker, 
ft Wednesday for 
where he has an 
puty collector of 

Cedar & Tie com- 
thelr new offices 
jck. 

me on his summer 
h his parents. Dr. 
rt. 

rete company was 
:t for the laying 
around the school 

\e Fourth in War- 
ed that town de- 
bull to a tune of 

een appointed fire 

is from Indus to 

n Clementson to 

ndas is wearing a 

were not brought 
<n are being set- 
1 company at 50 

is being visited 
irother this week, 
oydminster. Sask., 

this week visit- 
er. Agent L. F. 




Ladles' Aid will 
Moxness Thurs- 



last Sunday for 
he has accepted 

a sawmill. 

off a handcar 



from Du- 
spend a 

Superior 



on the Northern I'acific tracks one 
night last week p.nd broke two ribs by 
the fall. 

John Folmen, assistant plalnins mill 
foreman and family spent the Fourth 
In Wf.shburn visiting friends. 

Misses Rose and Lily La Lond of Su- 
perior are vlsiti.Tg with relatives and 
friends in this city. 

Mrs. l>anlel Cuming returned home 
Tuesday morninjj after a three weeks' 
▼Istt with frienis at Alpena. Mich. 

John J Rhodes came down 
luth Thursday morning to 
few days in this city. 

Miss Liia Miles went to 
"Wednesday to ."iilend the wedding of 
Irene Hulty to Ordall Sandahl of that 
place. Miss Miles taught a couple of 
ter.ms in the Iron River schools a 
couple of years ago. 

Miss Leona La Chants of Superior is 
visiting in this city the guest of Miss 
Julia O'Brien. 

Mark Hes.sey was down from Inter- 
national Falls to £pend the Fourth at 
borne. 

John "H. Fltzpatrick returned Satur- 
day morning from a business trip to 
Alpena, Mich. 

Miss Martha Stansbury of Superior 
is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Byron Ripley. 

T. F. Mackmlller and Isaac Hubbard 
left Wedn-r-sday on a trip to Chicago. 

Miss Judith Hedquist is spending this 
week with friends at Ashland. 

J ick Herbert and Fred Brown spent 
Tuesday In Sup:;rior. 

W. E. Tripp was In Washburn Sat- 
urday 

James Tobin of Duluth was in Iron 
River Thursday. 




Twig, Minn., July t.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — The FourtH of July passed 
off verv quietlv here, the only celebra- 
tion being held by the Grand Lake 
Sunday school, a picnic on the shores 
of «.;rand lake. 

Tne Twig baseball team was defeat- 
ed l-l to 10 at the Fourth of July cele- 
bration at Canyon. The rain which 
came down all dav made the grounos 
in such shape that fast ball was im- 
possible. The vl8ltor^^ had the game all 
the way up to the seventh inning, when 
several errors turneii the tide and the 
game ended with C;.nyon four scores 
to the good. The ba:teries were: For 
fwlg, Clauson and Nickelson; for Can- 
von, Grandy and Harris. After the 
game dancing was engaged in during 
the evening. ^. , ^ , 

Mrs. Robert Carlsoi was at Chisholm, 
Minn., visiting with friends and rela- 
tives last week. 

August Swanson and son, Henning, 
were in Duluth on business last Mon- 
day. „ 

Miss Ida Trotz went to Florence, 
Wis., last week, where she will spend 
some time with her sister. 

Alvin Loe, who has been spending the 
past year here with his uncle and aunt, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Carlson, left for 
Knife River, Minn., last week, where 
he will join his father. 

John M. Wnlin and Oscar Ellison 
have purchased hay nowers this year. 

Having has commenced here now and 
the farmers are rejoicing over one of 
the finest hay crops grown here for 
several vears. 

John Peterson and Charles Engman, 
who have the contrict to grade the 
Mud Lake school site have commenced 
work. 

Miss Tina Clauson >f Duluth took in 
the Fourth of July c< lebratlon at Can- 
von. 

Hammond & And.'rson have com- 
pleted their sawing o( shingles for this 
season and are now irectlng a lumber 
sawmill at the locstion at Martin's 
Siding and will al8>) engage in this 
business. 

John Nickelson celebrated the Fourth 
of July with relatives and friends in 
Duluth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt rt Mace and two 
sons of Duluth, who have been visiting 
for some time with Mrs. Mace's par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. G\ st Bergstrom, re- 
turned to their home Monday. 

Religious services were held both 
afternoon and evening last Sunday at 
the Grand Lake sch( olhouse. 

Several people Iron here took In the 
Barnum & Bailey clr> us at Duluth last 
Saturday. 

The annual school election will be 
held In the Grand Lake town hall Sat- 
urday, July 15. 




town 
phy- 



Baudeite, Minn., July S. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Paul Early of Indus, 
Minn., is spending a few days visit- 
ing with his uncle, J, A. Kennedy and 
family. 

ReifKie Middleton spent a few days 
In Croukston the latter part of last 
week visiting with some of his old 
school mates. 

William Smith Is arranging for the 
erection of a modern store building 
on his lots on Main street. 

Miss Nettle Smith, the soloist at the 
Lyceum, is away on a three weeks va. 
cation among friends In Western Can- 
ada. 

E>r. B. F. Osborn has arrived In 
and has begun practicing as a 
sician and surgeon. 

Bert Middellon arrived from 
Arbor, Mich., on Saturday last, 
has just completed a successful 
ond year in his law course. 

Mrs. F. E. Johnson and two children 
returned Friday evening from a six 
weeks visit with friends at the Twin 
Cities and Ada. Minn. 

George Perkins of this place met 
w^lth tin amusing accident on Mondav 
evening. George sleeps in a tent and 
before retiring placed a roll of 
in a loaf of bread for safety. He 
woke up in time to see the last 
Crumb.s of the loaf and the money 
appearing down a calf's mouth. 

Jack Hackett of Hackett. .Minn.. 
tn town the other day and said that he 
had sent a challenge to Duluth to row 
Ten Eyck and up to date had received 
no acceptance. 

A. J. Hilden has moved bis familv 
here from Oslo, Minn., and will make 
Baudette his permanent home. 

There was a fire Tuesday morning in 
the Lafave building near the station. 
Before the fire department could ar- 
rive the building was destroyed. Sev. 
eral buildings in the near vicinity were 
saved only by the quick action of the 
department. The cause of the fire Is 
unknown. Little insurance was carried 
on the building. 

Tony Hoover spent the first three 
days of this week in International 
Falls trying to help the Rainy river 
baseball team defeat the Falls agerega- 
tlon. Three games were played. In- 
ternational Falls winning two. 

C. R. Middleton spent the Fourth at 



Fond du Lac, Minn. 
to The Herald.) — Miss 
and Miss Llda liothwi 
Sunday at the Palm 
friends. 

Mr. Werenberg of 
ducted services here 

Mrs. Duncan Clow 
are spending the sut 

Mrs. P. J. Roberts 
vacation at Fond du 

John Dumas of Dee 
first of the week visit 

F'lorence Murry of 
a few days visiting f 

Mrs. Nelson of St. i 
ly lived here, is renev 
ances and Is a guest 
Peter Rask. 

Morris Hogstad of 
with his parents, Mr. 
Sunday. 

Miss Hllma Peters* 
day in the city. 

Mrs. Howard left fr 
Thursday to visit frie 

Mrs. M. H. McMahoi 
her sister, Mrs. B 
Wash. 

Miss Anna MacM 
spent the Fourth wit 
C. Hewitt. 

Miss Margaret Cji 
Wlnnifred Tower j 
Wednesday. 

E. E. Raussaln spen 
Cloquet. 

Mrs. Alice Blomberf 
Thursday to visit rel; 

Miss "Agnes Marti 
spending her vacatloi 

Miss Cella Durfee 
Thursday. 

Miss Hilma Peterso 
Miss S. A. Smith at N 
day. 



July 8. — (Special 
t Marie Starkeson 
II of Duluth spent 
iT house visiting 

New Duluth con- 
ast Sabbath, 
and her children 
imer at Fond du 

is spending her 
Lac. 

r River spent the 
Ing friends. 
L>eer River spent 
lends at Fond du 

•aul. who former- 

•Ing old acquaint- 

of Mr. and Mrs. 

Duluth visited 
ind Mrs. Hogstad, 

'n spent Wednes- 

r Aberdeen, S. D., 
nds. 

has as her guest 
lack, of Spokane, 

illen of Duluth 
ii her sister, Mrs. 

nt visited with 
tt New Duluth 

t the week-end In 

r left for St. Paul 

tives. 

n of Duluth is 
at Fond du Lac 

was in the city 

n was a guest of 
JW Duluth Thurs- 




$60 
just 
few 
dls- 

was 



Gilbert. Minn.. Jul 
The Herald.)— Gilber 
Fourth in fitting styl 
grand parade. The n 
led the procession, 'j 
rled by G. A. Walla 
war veteran. The vl 
officials rode In au 
floats, representative 
fraternal orders, and 
meat. The oration oi 
llvered by Rev. Short 
dress by Mayor Cosgr 
for the sports were 
judge, and Messrs Le 
btarters. The Gilbert 
furnished the music, 
thirty events pulled 
prizes given. A spec^i 
to entertain the child 
safe and sane Fourtl 
dent marred the day; 1 
of a race, a running 
ran into the crowd, 
slightly. Everything 
ly and according to 

Mrs. Lane of Stock 
iting her daughter Ml 

\V. F. Sullivan of 
Gilbert the Fourth. 

Mrs. H. L. Nlchols< 
to join her husband 
Crosby. While here 



y 8. — (Special to 
celebrated the 
>. First came the 
arshal of the day 
'he flag was car- 
:e, Gilbert's Civil 
Ilage council and 
tos followed by 
3 of the various 
the fire depart- 
the day was de- 
i and a short ad- 
)ve. The officials 
Mayor Cosgrove, 
>uc and Bowman. 
High School band 
There were over 
off and liberal 
1 effort was made 
ren and proved a 
Only one accl- 
n one of the heats 
horse bolted and 
njurtng one man 
went off smooth- 
schedule. 

)ort. Ohio, is vis- 

9. C. L. Newberry. 

Hlbblng was in 

n left this week 
at their home in 
-hey made a host 



' -^- 




of friends who wish them well In their 
new location. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Colvin spent the 
Fourth with relatives in Duluth. 

J. B. Thompson of the First National 
bank has left for Minneapolis where he 
will engage In business. Mrs. Thomp- 
son and the children will Join him 
shortly. 

C. B. Nimmo of Detroit, Minn., was 
here this week. 

E. L. Pryor took a leave of absence 
this week. He is relieved at the D. & 
I. R. station by Mr. Carlson of Minneap- 
olis. It is said Mr. Pryor expects to 
bring his bride with him when be re- 
turns. 

E. C. Jones and wife went to Duluth 
Saturday. 

Jas. Crane and J. F. Bronley spent 
the Fourth in Eveleth. 

G. J. Roop. W. H. Radermacher, 
W. F. Lawrence. J. B. Thompson, 
E. L. Pryor and Fred Myers went 
to Duluth Saturday night in the latter s 
Buick car. 

Pat Boyle went to Duluth with Chas. 
Hoel in the latter's car to spend the 
Fourth. 

J. W. O'Neill of Eveleth spent the 
Fourth in Gilbert. 

Geo. L. Pinther of Eveleth was here 
this week. 

Otto Haehnke and family have moved 
to his residence in Duluth. 

R. S. Hartley is the owner of a Ford 
auto. 

Mr. Berry, a former Iowa university 
football star, is here as foreman for the 
Tastoret-Lawrence company. 

The little daughter of Matt Rogers, 
Gilbert location, had a birthday party 
this week. 

Thos. Sullivan of Ironwood, Mich., 
visited his brother John, at the Schley 
mine Thursday. 

L. L. Sutton of the Mesaba Telephone 
company, Virginia, was here the 
Fourth. 

Louise Haskin of Genoa location was 
In Gilbert this week. 

C. L. Newberry and son Lorln, left 
for Buffalo, Minn., this week to attend 
summer school. 

I>r. and Mrs. Strathun of Elba, Minn., 
were in town this week. 

Messrs. l>uklow, Frank Hall and A. 
J. Noble returned from their fishing 
trip. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Noble of Virginia, 
spent the Fourth in G'lbert. 



ALBORN 



Alborn. Minn.. July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Margaret Nordin, 
who has been employed at Elmer, 
Minn., the past few months, has re- 
turned to her home here to remain a 
short time. 

Miss Ivy Hayes of North Dakota ar- 
rived In Alborn Sunday to spend the 
Fourth of July with her aunt, Mrs. 
Schelln. Miss Hayes departed for her 
home Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Thompson of 
Proctor were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. F. Kenney Tuesday. 

The baseball boys gave a picnic at 
Picnic lake last Tuesday. Owing to 
the rain the crowd was not as large as 
expected. 

Capt y. G. Johnson was a recent Du- 
luth visitor. 

Miss Juita K. Satterlee. who was the 
principal in the Alborn school the past 
year, finished the school term last week 
and departed for Montevideo Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Wortler are again at 
the home of Mrs. A. Olson. 

Mrs. J. F. Kenney spent Wednesday 
in Burnett 

A good game of ball was played on 
the Burnett diamond Sunday between 
the Alborn-Burnett team and the Proc- 
tor All-Stars, which was won by the 
former by a score of 5 to 4. 




Negaunee, Mich., July S. — '-Special to 
The Herald.) — Alfred Olson is home 
from a business trip to International 
Falls, Minn. 

Miss Viola Parker has returned from 
a pleasant visit with Trenary friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hausler and 
party motored to Escanaba and return 
Sunday. 

Mrs. William Gates and children of 
Lansing are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
W. R. Burns. 

Domlnlck Dlsotelle. a former resident 
who has been located at Coleraine, 
Minn., is here on a visit to relatives. 

George Cranston and wife of Minne- 
apolis are In the city visiting her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John Rock. 

Mrs. T. B. Hall and two sons, former 
residents, now living in Detroit, are in 
the city on a visit to R. E. Drake and 
family. 

The special meeting of the fire de- 
partment called for Monday evening 
was postponed until next Monday night 
as a number of ^e members were un- 
able to attend. 

Clark Everest, former manager of 
the Munlslng Paper company, and well 
known resident of this city, arrived 
Saturday from Detroit and is the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Earle. 

J. H. McDonald, former principal of 
the Negaunee high school, now super- 
intendent of the Rapid River schools, 
spent the Fourth In the city, return- 
ing to his home Wednesday. 

"The Negaunee people who attended 
the Methodist church Sunday school 
picnic at Presque Isle Tuesday had a 
good time in spite of the fact that the 
weather during part of the day was 
disagreeable. 

Capt. John P. Christopher, who has 
charge of the Catherine Mining com- 
pany's property west of MIchlgamme, 
spent the Fourth In Negaunee. Capt. 
Christopher was a resident of this city 
for some years. 

The remains of Prestl Giuseppl, who 
was drowned at Gwinn while swlm.- 
mlng, was brought to Negaunee for In- 
terment, the funeral being held Mon- 
day afternoon. The deceased was 21 
years of age. 




Aitkin, Minn., June 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — "W. S. Cluff and daugh- 
ter. Miss Hazel, have returned from a 
visit with friends In the East. 

Maurice Peake and family have gone 
to White Earth to visit Mr. Peake's 
sister, Mrs. Hardman. 

Mrs. Ands of Markesan, Wis., Is the 
guest of her sister. Mrs. J. B. (3llmore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Delemater of St. Paul 
have been spending a few days in Alt- 
kin at the home of their daughter, Mrs. 
W. F. Murphy. 

Arthur Safford has returned from a 
trip to Montana, having decided to not 
locate there owing to the climate and 
water. 

Miss Maud Allen Is home from a trip 
to Minneapolis. 

Miss Frances Quinn of Bralnerd is 
the guest of Dorrts Gwathmey. 

Peter Kyme died at the home of his 
parents In Dean Lake township last 
Sunday of infantile paralysis at the age 
of 12 years. 

Mrs. Fredrlka Jeppson died last Sun- 
day at the home of her son In Farm 
Island. Mrs. Jeppson. "with her hus- 
band, came to Altkln county twenty- 
three years ago from Sweden. The fun- 
eral was held Monday and the remains 
laid in the Aitkin cemetery. Deceased 
is survived by her husband, one son, 
Emanuel Jeppson, and one daughter, 
Mrs. Ida Bailiies, of this place. 

The annual school meeting will be 
held Saturday. July 18. and three of- 
ficers win be elected. 

Announcements have been receivsd 



here of the marriage of Miss Gladys 
Moore and Mr. Galle Cleland at Burke- 
ley Cal. The bride Is well known In 
Aitkin, having lived here with her par- 
ents for several years and graduated 
from the high school during that time. 

Felix Leblance and Miss Beatrice 
Seeley, both of the town of Hebron, 
were united in marriage last week by 
Justice F. L. Rolph. 

Frank Rlchter and Miss Mabel Baker 
of Dean Lake were married Monday at 
the Methodist parsonage. Rev. A. L. 
Richardson officiating. 

Mrs. C. H. Warner gave a shower at 
her home last Saturday evening for 
Miss Carrie Klee. whose engagement to 
Harry Funston has been announced. 

Mr. and Mrs. James .Velson of Vesa- 
lle, Cal., are here visiting their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. E. E. Seavey. 

Peter Jevne, accompanied by his 
little son, arrived here the first of the 
week from Elgin, 111. and after a few 
days spent with his father at Ude has 
been renewing old acquaintances after 
an absence of ten years. 

Miss Ethel Forman has gone to Mil- 
waukee, Wis., to spend her vacation. 

Miss Toan of Seattle, Wr'ash.. arrived 
here Sunday to spend a few weeks with 
her sisters, Mrs. J. B. CJalarneault and 
MIPS Nan Toan. 

Mrs. G. E. Butler has returned from 
Minneapolis. 

Miss Laura "Watson has gone to Su- 
perior. 



pany In the construction of the new 
county bridge across the St. Louis river 
at this point. 

The Duluth, Mlssabe & Northern 
Railway company has an extra gang 
at work on the branch line between 
Brookston and Culver. The roadbed 
will be put in first class shape. 

Mrs. Fred Steffen has been confined 
to her home by illness this week. 

Percy Vibert of Cloquet, who recently 
received an appointment as ranger for 
the state forestry commission, was in 
the village Thursday. Mr. Vibert's 
territory comprises parts of St. Louis, 
Carlton and Itasca counties. 

J. E. Diesen of Cloquet, county at- 
torney of Carlton county and owner 
of Diesen's addition to the village of 
Brookston, was transacting business 
here Thursday evenln. 

John BJorlln, who is spending the 
summer in "Superior with his family, 
was looking after his farmstead near 
here the latter part of the week. 

Mrs. J. H. Raubert came up from 
Lakewood Thursday for a few days' 
visit at the Keable home. 

John Larsen Jommen returned 
Wednesday evening from a few days' 
business trip to Duluth. 

Leonard Ryan came up from Duluth 
to spend the Fourth at his home here. 




Spooner. Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — George Nelson of Inter- 
national Falls is in town renewing old 
acquaintances. 

Our Fourth of July celebration was a 
success. The parade in the forenoon of 
merchants' floats and civic organiza- 
tions was the best ever seen In this 
portion of the state. In the afternoon 
our aggregation oj ball tossers here 
defeated the Roosevelt aggregation to 
a tune of 9 to 4. The display of fire- 
works In the evening was of a good 
variety. 

A protest by the mills of Spooner, 
Beaudette and Rainy River has been 
sent to the war department relative to 
the damming of the waters of the 
Rainy river at International Falls. The 
water is being held back and the mill 
companies are unable to get their logs 
down for the summer sawing. It is 
claimed that the Rainy lake has been 
raised three feet and a half while the 
Lake of the Woods is at a lower stage 
than any time in Its history. 

The Canadian Northern railway is 
erecting a fine large new station at 
Rainy River, Ont. 

The large show at Rainy Wednesday 
was largely attended by citizens of this 
place and vicinity. 

Milton Robertson, formerly of this 
place, is now located In the barber bus- 
iness at Wallace, Idaho. 

Harold Hanson spent Sunday in Fort 
Frances. 



BROOKSTON 



EVELETH I 

Eveleth. Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — M. Shroeder of Minne- 
apolis, who has been visiting at Vir- 
ginia and other range points the past 
week, visited local relatives, Wednes- 
day afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Treddlnnick have 
been enjoying a visit from Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Treddlnnick of Ironwood, .Mich. 

Mrs. A. E. Pfremmer, daughter Flor- 
ence, and son, Ralph, arrived Sunday 
evening from Florida to make their 
home here with A. E. Premmer. 

Richard J. Sundberg, formerly editor 
of the Eveleth Star, visited local ac- 
quaintances Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Lyons are 
enjoying a visit from Capt. and Mrs. 
T. Brewer of Ironwood, Mich. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Shea of Chandler 
avenue, have as their guest this week, 
William Shea of Montana, a brother of 
Timothy Shea. 

Mrs. Thomas Devine of Stevens 
Point W^is., who will §:iake her home 
at Btwablk with her son, Eugene, 
has been visiting Eveleth friends and 
relatives. 

The shirtwaist dance given Sunday 
evening at Gilbert by the Jewish club 
of that village, was well attended by 
Jewish residents of this city. 

The Ladies' Aid S'oclety of the First 
Presbyterian church held a meeting 
at the home of Mrs. M. E. Ferris on 
Jones street, Thursday afternoon, 
which was well attended. 

Mrs. Morris Oreenburg, a former 
local resident returned to her home 
at Cuyuna the fore part of the week, 
after a short visit here with relatives. 
Her son, Morris, will spend the sum- 
mer here with relatives. 

Mr and Mrs. A. J. Ladin have left 
for Cass Lake. Minn., where they will 
reside on their homestead. 



Brookston, Minn., July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Brookston's safe and 
sane Fourth passed off according to 
program and there were no accidents. 
Rain In the morning and evening did 
not dampen the spirit of the day nor 
spoil any of the events scheduled. The 
winners of the program of sports are 
as follows: 100-yard dash, free for all 
— N. Hlrsch, first; L. Hornbeck, second. 
50-yard dash for boys under 14 — George 
Poupore, first; Alex DeShaw, second. 
50-yard dash for girls under 14 — 
Gladys Tester, first; Celllna Keable 
and Florence Dunphy, tied for second. 
100-yaid dash for girls over 14 — 
Blanche .Stein, first: Leah Keable. sec- 
ond. 440-yard dash — O. Hallinger, first: 
S. Wilton, second. Standing broad 
Jump — L. Hornbeck. first; N. E. Lund, 
second. Running broad jump — L. Horn- 
beck, first; N. Ekiund, second. Hop, 
skip and jump — Earl Tester, first; 
Rowe McCamus, second. Hurdle race — 
Rowe McCamus, first; others failed to 
finish. Fat man's race — Hans Sand; 
first; others failed to finish. Married 
woman's race — Mrs. S. K. Duff first; 
Urs. Rowe Mt>Camus, second. Wheel- 
tarrow race — Carl Larson, first; O. Hal- 
ling^, Second. Log rolling match won 
by Jos. LaPralrle. 

Jas. Richardson Is acting as village 
marshal while John DeShaw is taking 
a vacation of several weeks. 

Chas. Roberts was fined |10 and costs 
in local Justice court Thursday for hit- 
ting Ben Peterson n the head with a 
tea cup in the Peterson & Fell board- 
ing cars stationed here. 

Mrs. A. F. Hutchins and children left 
Tuesday morning for an extended visit 
with relatives near Bralnerd. They 
were accompanied by Mrs. Thomas, who 
had spent several days here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Blair are the 
proud parents of a baby girl, which ar- 
rived at their home on the Fourth of 
July. 

Olaf Ekiund spent the week with 
friends at Elj'. 

Misses Grace and Lyla Maddy of 
Grand Rapids, have been spending the 
week at the John DeShaw home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Donley were In Su- 
perior. Monday, attending the funeral 
of their brother-in-law, Mr. Laughney 
who died rather suddenly last week ' 

Edward Murray was sentenced to ten 
days in the county jail Monday for 
touching a bed fellow for |4. The 
money was recovered and Murray will 
have a few days for reflection. 

Miss Ida Burns of South Range, ■\^'■is 
has been the guest of her cousin. Miss 
Ruth Donley, this week. 

Miss Rose Orsen of Minneapolis vis- 
ited with her parents Mr. and Mrs 
Henry Orsen, at the homestead near 
town the first of the week 

Chas. DeWitt returned Wednesday 
from West Duluth where he spent the 
Fourth among relatives and friends 

Miss Alma Shogren returned to lie* 
home at Scanlon, Sunday, after spend- 
ing several days nere with Miss Blanche 
Stein. 

Chris Lee. who has been employed at 
Knife River the greater part of the 
summer, has been mingling among local 
friends this week. 

P. J. McMahon and Jos. Dougay were 
Iti^ Cloquet on a business mission 
W ednesday. 

The local baseball team defeated Hill 
City Sunday by a score of 10 to 9 by 
a grand nlnth-lnnlng rally, in which 
three runs were score after two men 
had been retired. The Pease Hardware 
team of Superior also met defeat here 
on the Fourth by a score of 8 to 7 
Both games were fast and Interesting 
from start ^o finish. 

J. B. Thlry, who owns an eighty-acre 
tract of land six miles south of the 
village, arrived Wednesday from Pine 
City to spend several days on the place. 
Mr. Thlry expects to locate permanent- 
ly at Pine City, where he will engage 
in the automobile business. 

C. T. Larson Is gathering a nice 
crop of cultivated strawberries. The 
berries are large and of a delicious 
flavor. Mr. Larson set out about 1,000 
new plants this summer, and next sea- 
son expects to be able to place a great 
many berries on the market. 

Home-grown new potatoes for the 
Fourth of July, and to prove the asser- 
tion, N. J. Tompkins, who has a farm 
near Congo station, brought In a nice 
lot of spuds fresh from mother earth 
Tuesday morning. 

W. D. Stevens returned Thursday 
from a few days' stay In Duluth and 
Superior. 

A car of bridge planks was unloaded 
here this w^eek. The planks will be 
used by the Continental Bridge com- 





Munger, Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Munger celebrated Tues- 
day. In the afternoon a picnic was 
held and in the evening a dance was 
given by Oscar Brussell, who has built 
a dancing pavilion. The music furn- 
ished consisted of three pieces and peo- 
ple atteded from far and near An- 
other dance will be given there Satur- 
day evening. 

A. Brink, Charley Carlson, Albert 
Mirier, Peter Stransky, Matt Stransky, 
Fred Morton, Ferdinand Dlckert, Gust 
"Westburg, Mrs. Leader, Mrs. Charley 
Carlson, Miss Etta Dahleen and Miss 
Trutx were Duluth visitors the past 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Krause, Ida and 
Henry Miller, Miss Ida Schnelllng, Har- 
old Swanson and Mr. Meling of Duluth 
were Munger visitors this week 

Ruth Daniels and Sarah Butler of 
Pike Lake spent Thursday with Marie 
Miller. 

Herbert Dahleen spent the Fourth at 
Millers'. 

Ten Munger people attended a dance 
at Pike Lake Monday evening. 

The Canadian Northern has complet- 
ed its depot and car house here. 



KELSEY 




M#^^M«#««N#^%MAMMM^>^ 



Kelsey. Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Miss Hattle McKay en- 
tertained informally at her home Fri- 
day evening. Refreshments were 



served. Those present were: Misses 
Emma Wleveg, Tessie Channer, Bes- 
sie Sass, Peart Mathews. Myrtle Stanly 
and Beulah Sass; Messrs. Roy Overom, 
John Channer, Herbert Mathews. Mel- 
vln Overom and Orin Channer. 

Miss Pearl Mathews returned to Du- 
luth Sunday after being the guest of 
'■^latives for the past two weeks. 

W. R. Dass arrived home Saturday 
from International Falls to spend the 
Fourth with his family. 

Melvin and Roy Overom spent the 
Fourth at Hibbing. 

/^.9^^S' ^nderson was in the Zenith 
City Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dart of Silica arrived 
in Kelsey Monday and expect to re- 
side on the farm east of town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Jamieson attended 
the circus in Duluth Saturday. 

Miss Bessie Dass spent the Fourth 
in Duluth, the guest of Miss Marv 
Meniece. 

Miss Emma "Weiveg and Edith Hagen 
were the guests of Duluth relatives 
during the week. 

Master Willie Parker spent the 
Fourth with relatives at Brookston. 

Kelsey picnickers were not disap- 
pointed owing to the rainy Fourth. 
They were entertained by Mr. and Mrs. 
Channer at their home. The day was 
pleasantly spent by about forty guests. 
Plan.") had been made to have a picnic 
at the picnic grounds along the river. 

Clarence Cederstrom of Hibbing is 
the guest of Orin Channer. 

Chas. Stanly went to Cloquet Tues- 
day. 

A watertank is being built at Dum- 
blane by the Great Northern railroad. 
A depot is to be constructed soon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley had as their 
guest Sunday their daughter, Mrs. 
White of Cotton. 

Miss Violet Hagen was at Alborn 
Thursday. 

Mrs. E. J. Filiatrault returned from 
Duluth Thursday. 

Ernest Randall was in Duluth Tues- 
day. 




Carlton, Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Thomas McCausland re- 
turned the first of the week from 
Glasgow Mont., where he reports his 
brother, Andrew McCausland, a former 
resident of Carlton, died a week ago 
Friday. The deceased was an engineer 
for Porter Bros, during the building of 
the canal here of the Great Northern 
Power company. 

Deputy Sheriff John Flynn this week 
arrested one Niemine at Cloquet and 
brought him to the county jail. The . 
man lives on the reservation and is 
accused of having sold and disposed of 
mortgaged property. 

Nick Hill, Matt Paltinen and Bob 
Dubey, all of Cloquet, were arrested 
and lodged in the county Jail this week 
charged with furnishing intoxicating 
liquor to Indians. 

Ed Holm is serving a thirty-day 
sentence in the county jail for drink- 
ing whiskey on a train. He was 
sentenced by Judge Skemp, under the 
new law passed last winter, making it 
a misdemeanor to drink liquor on a 
railroad train. 

R. I Moore reports a big time at the 
Socialist picnic at his farm on the 
banks of Black Bear lake on July 4. 
The feature of the day was a baseball 
game between the Socialists and the 
Anarchists, according to the printed 
posters. 

Walter Eckland is paying a visit to 
friends in Carlton a few days this 
week, while on his vacation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Abrahamson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Lillequist of Duluth are 
guests this week at the home of Ole 
Swanson. 

J. E. Lund, former principal of the 
Carlton high schools, is visiting friends 
In the city this week. 

R. W^ Barstow was up from Barnum 
on Monday In the Interest of the Carl- 
ton County Fair association. 

The Priscilla club met last evening 
at the home of Miss Amelia Olson. The 
club is contemplating a basket ball 
team in the near future. 

The Carlton baseball team will play 
the Central Avenue team of Duluth on 
the local diamond next Sunday. It 
played a game with Barnum last Sun- 
day and defeated the latter by a score 
of 5 to 3. 

Born — To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Fell, 
Tuesday, July 4, 1911, a daughter. 

Attorney John Jenswold, Jr., of Du- 
luth was up to visit his Thompson 
farm and attend the Carlton Fourth of 
July celebration on Tuesday. 

County Attorney J. E. Diesen and 
ladles autoed over from Cloquet and 
took in the horse racing exhibitions 
here on the Fourth. 



Zim. Minn.. July 8. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — Mrs. Pearl Peterson returned 
home Thursday evening from an ex- 
tended visit at Upsala and Cambridge, 
Minn. 

Miss Sadie Kenworthy and Clair 
Kenworthy spent the Fourth at 
Eveleth. 

The F. N. society gave a picnic at 
their hall the Fourth. Lunch, ice 
cream and soft drinks were served and 
a large crowd attended. There was 
dancing in the evening. 

Louis Johnson was a caller in 
Eveleth Thursday. 

Albert Peterson returned Sunday 
evening from a trip to Duluth and 
Deer River. 

HJalmar Johnson was a caller In 
Eveleth Monday and Tuesday. 

Miss Lily Swanson spent the Fourth 
at Virginia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Narvanen and 
son. Arne, visited at Aurora the early 
part of the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lars Olson. Alfred Ol- 
son and Esther Olson, spent the 
Fourth at Canyon, Minn. 

Mrs. Emll Johnson vas shopping in 
Eveleth Monday. 

Helmer Gradine transacted business 
in Duluth Thursday. _ 

Hlldlng Gradine spent Tuesday in 
Eveleth. 

Olaf Swanson was a business caller 
in Duluth Thursday. 

Mrs. S. W. Levin and Miss Mollie 
Carlson spent the week-end with 
relatives arid friends in Hibbing. 

Mrs. Otto Swanson and Miss Eliza- 
beth Olson visited in Virginia Fri- 
day. 



BARNUM 



Barnum, Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — R. W'. Barstow "nd Miss 
Stella W'. Canno were quietly married 
last Frldav, June 30. at Superior, W'ls., 
the bride's home. Mrs. Barstow has 
been one of the staff of school teach- 
ers here the past vear and made many 
friends among the people of Barnum. 
The newly married couple will begin 
housekeeping in a short time in the 
residence Mr. Barstow recently pur- 
chased from J. M. Sauntry. 

The births reported by Dr. Shan- 
non for the week were: Mr. and Mrs. 
G. Hecker, June 29, a daughter; Mr. 
and Mrs. F. M. Zimmer, July 1, a 
daughter; Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Thomp- 
son and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hams, 
July 4. boys . , , ., , 

Miss Anna Scott of Duluth visited 
at the home of R. L. Goodell and wife 
on the Fourth. 

Mrs. W. E. Harrison and children of 
West Duluth. arrived Saturday to take 
up their residence here. 

Mrs. T. R. Bull is very ill with lum- 
bago at her home on West street. Dr. 
Shannon is attending her. 

Oscar Anderson of Cloquet visited 
friends in this neighborhood last 
week, returning to their home Sun- 
day. ^ 

Little Mabel Stone returned to Du- 
luth "Wednesday accompanied by Elsie 
Gerlach, who will spend a few days 
visiting there. 

A. P. Wilklns of Livermore, Iowa, 
arrived last Sunday and will stay at 
the home of his aunt, Mrs. D. Vaugha 
for the summer. 

R. T. McCubbins and wife of Cloquet 
are here on a visit at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. August Peterson, who are 
the parents of Mrs. McCubbins. 

Miss Minnie Hooker returned from 
Duluth Sunday, where she had been 
visiting friends for a few days. She 
also attended the circus while there. 

James Tobey of Proctor is now em- 
ployed at the farm of H. R. Patterson. 
He will move his family here soon 
and take up his residence in Mrs. 
Bouteller's house. 

C. T. Johnson. John Martin and E. 
C. Perlburg of West Duluth were here 
on a fishing trip last Sunday. 

"While burning some old paper and 
other rubbish In a ^bonfire she ha<i 
built for the purpose near her home 
at Mahtowa, last Friday, Mrs. J. M. U. 
Thompson was severely burned by fall- 
ing onto the fire. Mrs. Thompson, who 
Is becoming feeble in her declining 
years, was unable to arise without as- 
sistance. Her screams brought Mr. 
Thompson to her aid, but not before 
her clothes were nearly all consumed 
and the skin on her back and limbs 
badly seared. Dr. Shannon was hasti- 
ly summoned from Barnum and did all 
that was possible to alleviate her pain 
and dress her burns. She will be con- 
fined to her bed for some time, but 
according to reports wlli ultimately re- 
cover. 




Blwablk, Minn., July S. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Katharine Kinney 
returned home from Duluth Tuesday, 
where she has been visiting friends. 

Mrs. L. J. McKinna and Miss Julia 
Enrlght were in Duluth this week on 
business. 

N. B. Shank and son, Joseph, were in 
Duluth Saturday to attend the circus. 

Miss Hazel Goman was in Virginia 
on business Thursday. 

M. Patrick is in Duluth this week 
visiting friends. 

P. H. Hubbard of Two Harbors was 
here this week on business. 

Mrs. T. Trevena and baby returned 
to their home at Kinney Thursday. 

Mrs. Glassford and baby of Winnipeg 
are here visiting' her husband. 

Mr. and Mrs. Archdeacon of Two Har- 



bors are here this week visiting th» 
latters mother, Mrs. Devine. 

Miss Jennie Johnson was over from: 
Aurora visiting this week. 

Misses Irene Hogan and Irene Smith 
were in Virginia visiting friends Tues- 
day. 

Miss Bernett Hanson of St. Paul Mr 
here visiting her cousin, Alphle An- 
derson. 

Misses Margaret and Nellie Riley 
went to Hibbing Saturday to attend 
the wedding of their cousin. Miss Mar- 
garet Gerow. 

J. P. Sullivan returned home frona- 
Wisconsin Monday, where he has been 
visiting his sister. 

Mrs. J. Cummings returned home 
from Duluth Thursday, where she ha» 
been visiting her parents. 

Mrs. Betshar and children of Two 
Harbors are here visiting her mother, 
Mrs. S. Menadue. 

Mrs. G. R. smith and daughter, Irene, 
were in Aurora Sunday to attend the 
ball game. 

Mr. and Mrs. Z. Hincklev were itt 
Fairbanks Monday visiting the former's 
sister, Mrs. Peterson. 

Mrs. E. Glass and children are in 
Two Harbors this week visiting friends. 

Mrs. Larson and children were In 
Eveleth visiting friends Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. Everett were in Vir- 
ginia last w-eek on business. 

Miss Beatrice Thomas of Nashwauk 
s h=(re visiting her brother, E. Thomas. 

The Methodist Ladies' Aid society 
met with Mrs. J. E. Milliner Thursday; 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Dunstone and family 
went to Hibbing Wednesday, where 
they will make their future home. 

Mrs. George McGreavey of Two Har- 
bors was here Tuesday visiting friends. 

Mrs. Kate Carberry spent Tuesday in 
Virginia visiting Mrs. Smith. 




Cloquet, Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The J. C. Levings and 
Harry RaufF families camped at Chub 
lake from Sunday until Tuesday. 

Arthur Smith and wife of Superior 
spent Sunday with the former's father, 
McKean Smith. 

Mrs. Mary Coyne has been quite seri- 
ously ill this week. 

Walter O'Meara went to Minneapolis 
the fore part of the week to join rela- 
tives for a camping trip to Lake Sylvia, 
South Haven, Minn. 

The Cleve Sturdivant and Urquhart 
families camped at Chub lake the foro 
part of the week. 

Miss Lillian Ryan of Brookston spent 
the Fourth with Clocjuet friends. 

Hugh Amell and wife came up from 
Duluth to spend the week with rela- 
tives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Mooney spent the 
Fourth with relatives In Duluth. 

Felix Loi.«el and family and Joe Glea- 
Bon spent the Fourth at Wrenshall. 

Mrs. Bro is visiting friends in Su- 
perior. 

Misses Gladys Wright and Lydia 
Carlson, who are attending school in 
Duluth, spent the fore part of the week 
at home. 

Miss Florence Blair, who is attendingf 
school In Minneapolis, spent the Fourth 
in Cloquet with her parents. 

Henry Rogers of Chisholm has been 
a guest at the McGinnis home this 
week. 

Mrs. L. A. Fauley was shopping in 
Duluth Thursday. 

John Tonkin and wife, who are 
spending the summer at Chrysler, wer© 
in the city Tuesday. 

Joe Lontln and Joe Bodway. who are 
both working at Fort Frances, Ont., 
spent the Fourth here with their fam- 
ilies. 

Rev. L. H. Braafladt and Dr. O. A. 
Braafladt were guests of their brother. 
Dr. T. O. Braafladt this week. They 
were on their way to their home at 
Everett. Wash. 

Mrs. Phenie Cash spent the Fourth in 
Duluth with her brother and wife, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Barney and F. Hltu of 
Amery, Wis. 

Mrs. J. S. Sayers, who has been the 
guest of her sister, Mrs. Browning, 
leaves today for her home In Harris. 
She will be accompanied by her niece 
and son, Mrs. Bakken of Cloquet, who 
will visit In Harris. 

Mi.«ses Marie, Nannie and Vivian 
Turrlsh of Duluth entertained an auto 
party at Hotel Cloquet Tuesday. 

John Browning visited at Harris and 
Minneapolis from Sunday to Fridav. 

John Alstad of Spokane, Wash., 
brother of James Alstad of the firm of 
Alstad-Johnson of Cloquet, is visiting 
In the city with his brother and with 
the Holmberg family. 

Mis Mary Hullhorst of Lincoln. Neb., 
is the guest of her sister. Mrs. C. W. 
Lowrle. 

Misses Hazel Hall. Margaret Tavlor, 
Albia Richards, Lydia Cox and Winnl© 
Collins and Messrs. Cameron McLean, 
Harvey Koch, William Stevens, Ed Du- 
pont and Clarence Drake picnicked 
Thursday evening a short distance up 
the St. Louis river. 

Mrs. Thomas McGillvray of Mather, 
Man., is the guest of her sister, Mrs C. 
McMillan. 

Miss Henrietta Treadwell of Chicago 
is the guest of Miss Martha Belle Clark. 

Miss Stella St. Jactjues of Duluth 
was the guest of her sister. Miss St. 
Jacques, on the Fourth. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Campbell and 
family and Miss Carolyn Erwin are 
camping at Island lake. 

Miss Grace Rowell and William Ro- 
well are guests at the home of their 
aunt, Mrs. L. A. Fauley. 

Misses Martha and Alice Peyton of 
Duluth and Rev. R. T. Read and C. E. 
Bassett of Duluth, an auto party, were 
guests at Hotel Cloquet Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Coy have returned 
from a visit to relatives in Connecticut. 

Miss Elsie Batters has returned froin 
a several weeks' visit in Little Falls 
and Bralnerd. 

Grant Macartney spent the Fourth 
with his people in St. Paul. 

Fay Redfleld has returned from a 
visit to Minnesota Point. 

E. A. Peterson and wife spent the 
Fourth in Superior. 

Al Newman of Skibo spent the 
Fourth in Cloquet. 

John and Clarence Long are visiting 
at Ironton. 

Mrs. Oliver Proudlock fell out of a 
swing last Saturday and injured her 
foot quite seriously. 

Hugh Toland is visiting his sister in 
Minneapolis. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. L, 
A. Freeman, July 3. 

Miss Evelyn Brown of Winona was 
a guest at the William Sell home for 
several days. 

Mrs. Charles Clapperton was called 
to Stillwater Thursday by the illness 
of a brother. 

Oscar Enroth of Virginia spent the 
Fourth with his mother In Cloquet. 

Miss Waseen of Superior was th» 
guest of her brother, Dave Waseen, 
the fore part of the week. 

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
N. J. Thorpe, July 3. 

Miss Margaret McGugfn is visitinjf 
friends in Chippewa Falls. 

Dr. M. K. Whlttemore left Monday 
for Glenwood. 

H. R. Musser, J. H. Kendig and Z. H. 
Hutchinson of Muscatine, Iowa, were 
called here this week by the death of 
E. J. LUllbrldge. 

Edwin H. Lee, manager of the .Spal- 
ding hotel in Duluth and wife, enter- 
tained an auto party at Hotel Clo- 
quet. Sunday. 

Mrs. F. W. Sparling and daughter^ 
Evelyn of Detroit. Mich., are guests or 
Mr. and Mrs. John Murray. Mrs. Spar- 
ling Is Mrs. Murray's niece, and was 
formerly Miss Annie McCoubrey of 
Cloquet. 

Messrs. and Mesdames C. S. W^ilson 
and R N. Marble and Harry WeV)Ster 
of Duluth motored to Cloquet Sunday 
and were guests at the Hci%el Cloqaeu 



'< 








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4 




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1 

■J 





.=— ., 




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-1 



'/ 




^ w ill » 



■A«« 



Ton\ 
rt:ek I 



Bt. 
I- 



M. 






r 



Rvaa of Dmr River aperi tne | 

• ^"*!.. "■, ^ ^ - -'ifjrday to 

-.aay fr--;'- 
i^r at a'- 
v_- : • ;it. 
Mir Fruulx spent 

X ana son, 

are guests 

Fort RariBom. 
~ uncle, Louis 

tias c'fi- to Hayward, 
iiie vacation 
iirs tJrnrge De Poe ana 
i sited in Virginia for a few 

^rg of MiB- 
ajut, Mxs. 

> left her*" re- 
,r,il In Davton, 
.1 in that city 

- >■- 
- on win move his ffcm- 

^.i..i :.cxt week. 

♦- 




Mr 

SI"; 

da 



TONE J 

July S — Mr. and 
of St TavU were 
Mr« A. H Daniel:^ 



•w ■- 
t 



I 
c 






•-- .' E E^rywell and 
from North 
'. tht- Fourth at 
v.uie M.S6 Rfna B^r«- | 
•1 her parents bJnie. 
ii.j.* iiftif remained 
and Mrs Jackson of Hmckley 
— Hatton of Rushville l^'^^e 
Rev and Sirs". W Middle- 
-^ eek. 

. Qaillien of Duluth » 
>:-r home Tuesday 

Hr-rnian Teuber re- 

i- fton Wednesday to 

sebild effects pre- 

; =: to Miiaca,. where 

vval engage In the barUt-r 

;-s William Banderner ac- 

^em here. 

v.rs John Hagrgeboeck of 

va vlPited their son. 

k and wife this week. 

a«.i Friday aftcr- 

" son Warren, of 

guests at the 

-• Louis i? visit - 

...re this Week. He 

the Krttle River 

»-ti., have a branch 



r.tinel B-J'te. 

itiei and 



Bl- 



i:-.- 



..=■ Ali--- 
Kelly • 
.-isier hfit 



F 
t 



and daughter. 
rr. returned last 

■rai Wir— k - ^■t-it i 
rriends 



wr.ere he has a po 
oiisii s store. 

Mr and Mrs F 
I' ; t :. were call' 

M.iS Monno of 
hei e ~ 

C. i mo 

New Du.-Ui to hi 

avenue htre Sa*. u 

Arr'i - -■ • •'^ i 

ttiro'-- * 

(or tile i 'ii:-i. . wi.. t; 

Louses at Gary. 1 

ings in this locali 

ing Work lias st 

si>tate bank here. 

Mrs. Os.ar Ren 

Gladys and Ireu 

and George, were 

the week. 

Edward Ouacki 
at Brainrrd. 

Mrs. C Lindst 
Llndstrotn of We 
of Los Angeles. 
,jf West Du.Jth 
of Park Falls. W 
Mr and Mrs. A ' 
Miss Mable Bj 
and Miss Mable 

amping at Spin 
resiaence 

H Armstrong 
Marjory and Ht 
,>f Du:uth were 
Mrs. V A. Dash 
I Miss Hilda Ma 
1 Arthur Nl-kkilo 
M >'>se Lake 

Smith vlhe %nd 
g^me of bar. at 
atlernoon. T'ae g 
. .-I'ck. It lookf 
viile would be tt 
f5ve innings, but 
luns in the sixt 
tie. 8 to 8. 

D. Whiles tine 
here moving th» 
engine and hyd 
i ronton plant ai 
:o tiie Alieghen 
burg 

Five frame 
T^iesday morn in 
near here. Four 
empty. The fir 
after 1 ©clock, 
their contents 
ground. Tne ne 
the buildings cl 
Austrian settle: 
employed by th 
pany 

Mr. and Mrs. 
daughters. Eile. 
guests of Mrs. 
and Mrs J. G 
School electi' 
schovl house 
July 15. 

Miss Kathet 
talned the S. S 
ing at her h 
.ixt-nue The g 
Dorothy Dash, 
.-^wensou. Celia 
ri'er. Agnes ' 
tii Swensoi 
tie- Amundst 
tatson. Helen 
str >m 

Don Don veto 
Eveieth. the gi 



uUoB in A. Quacken- 

•ank Brandt of New 

•rs here Sunday, 
klidway was a caller 

fed his family from 
♦ residence on Grand 

ave been completed 
of A. r. V ilk 41: Co. 
on of thirteen frame 
he deinanJ for dwe I - 
ty is greaily in.rt-as- 
arted on the Centra. 

•tr>m and daughters 

> and sons. Elward 

in Duluth the last of 

nbush spent tiie week 

-om and Miss EUen 

it Duluth Mrs. Bloom 

"a! Miss Y. Johnson 

and Auifust Johnson 

.6.. we^-- 
i. R*^: 



- irur-*ts of 

iV 



es, 1.: - - - - 'h. 

^rS'Ti of Duiuin are 
t Lake at the Nelson 

ind daughters. Misses 

ien and S'-n. Ralph 
he guests of Mr. and 
Tuesday 
rman and Jelmer ana 
spent the week at 

New Duluth played a 
New Duluth Sunday 
iH'e was caKed at 8 ?•) 
d as though Smith - 
e winners for the first 
New Duluth made six 
b inning, making it a 

of Pittaburg. Pa is 

Nooming rolls, large 

■aulic sheitrs from the 

d they will be shipped 

Iron works in Pitts 



houses were burned 
{ at Pittsburg addiil.in 
were occupied and one 
; took place shortly , 
All the buildings anil 
were burned to the | 
.ghbors saved some of 1 
)se by Pittsburg is an 
nent The men are 
! Minnesota Steel com- 

A. D Mahoney and 

m and Ethel are the 
Mahoney's parents, Mr 

Brink 

n Will be held in the 

here next Saturday 



:ne Newbauer anter- 
H club Thursday «ven- 
•me on Ninety-fourth 
lests wer« the Misses 
F'li-" Overton. Mac i ton 
.■^ :.. Annie New- 

it. Mary Dunn. 

Mvrtle AmunJson. 
n. Clara Burg, G. Gus- 
rt,eQstrum Gladys Ren- 



have been all winter and spring They 
will reside In this city during the ore 

**Ffobert U Lee Wright and Mis* Alma 
Ciiri-topherson were married on Wed- 
nesdav at the heme of the briJe » par- 
ents in -New Duluth. The -room is an 
empluye of the Americao Bridge com- 
pany and is working for the company 
here on the erectiun of the new steel 
do.-k The bride is very popular in 
her home at New Duluth. 

WilUam O Rourke w»» here from Ely, 

Wedi.fesday. ^ -r^ ^a v«-r^i 

Isaac Johnson is at the Budd hospi- 
tal suffering from paresis 

Miss Ellen Johnson is visiting at 
Sunrise. Minn., for a couple of weeKS | 
" A'lce Pastoret of Duluth is visiting] 
for a few days at the borne of Mrs. 
W D. Lawrence ^ , ^ t. 

Andrew Larson is at the Budd hospi- 
tal 111 with typhoid fever .^^,. .- 

Mrs. A. NordaJl and son. Arnold, ot 
Cleveland. Ohio, arrived Tuesday for 
a visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs 

^'^^-^ill^'m Dwan. wmiam Footman and 
Robert McCurly have gone down the 
lakes on some of th« big ore car- 

'^'^F^'f McQuale of Duluth has been 
in the city this week looking after 
busineaa at the Marine meat /narket 
dunng the absence of Messrs Amund- 
sen and Puent . , , «- .T^^ Mrs 
The 6-ye*r-old girl of Mr_ and Mrs^ 
H^imar Soderstrom of \\ a^dp was 
l.r. u?ht' to the Budd hospital ^ednes- 

cJav light with a ,»>"•»'•" «^^>;!\e I^rl 
injury was causel by the litUe g^ri 
falling from^a bug^gy ^ ^^^^^^ 



here 



-.>.»r» hf iB £.riaaisina a nest of Owls. 1 returned from New York ciC where 
'^M? and Mr"; T^HiliUafd are spend- tney spent SIX weeks. They returned 

Ing two weeks with relaUvea at Crook — - '^- '°*'^" 



Thomas 



of Mrs. 



returned yesterdaj 




eap 

th^-Jr auto. , 

W A. Owens of Chicago 
of Thoma. Owen« was he'. j 

of the week. Mr Owens has recenu> 



a nephew 

was here the fltft 



Mr and Mrs T. J. Nicholas and 
children and Miss Gertrude Boase re- 
turned Monday from an enjoyable tnp 
on the lakes , , ^ .^ 

Mat Aito and daughter have gone to 
Brandon to visit with relatives. 

Miss Ida Poithan of Ely Is tu« »uest 
of Miss Jennie Lund 

Avin Keiiey and John Williams spent 
the Fourth at Cliisholm and Virginia. 
Mr and Mrs. J. L Schweitzer spent 
Tuesday at Virginia 

James Tonkin of Ely visited Aurora 
friends this week. 

G S Carlson was over from Gil- 
bert several days this week calling on 
triends ^ , ^ j 

Mr and Mrs. Andrew Johnson and 
Mrs George Kolir of Dulutli were the 
guests of Mr- and Mrs Frank Schuhe 
last Friday and Ssturday 

Misses Ales;andria. Sena and Anna 
St George of Allen Junction were 
guests ot Aurora friends Sunday 

O F. Kyte has returned from Rainy 
Lake, where he has been located for 
bume time. 

Charles Walters was in Duluth on 
business the first of the week 

Melvln Mattson was home from Vir- 
ginia tlic first of the Week 

Mrs J B. Beacty spent the Fourth 
at Virginia 

Miss. Alice Brown was home from 
Duluth over Sunday. 

Andrew Erickson was home from 
Duluth the liret of the week. 

Miss Ruth Norman is visiting friends 
at Waldo 

Archie Lampman left Thursday for 
Ely. to which place he hab been trans- 
ferred 

Rev J W. Schenck visited at 
Mead<~>wland8 several days this week. 
Charles Anderson was a Virginia 
visitor Thursday. 



via the lakes. 

A son has been born to Mrs. and Mrs. 
John Allen _^,.,, o 

The funeral of the late WilUam P. 
Raley took place Wednesday with ser- 
vices at the residence. Kev D. Staiker 
officiating , . 

Announcements have been received 
here of the marriage of Merwyn Kodl. 
son of Dr. C H. Rodi of Calumet, and 
Miss Eva H. Pattison, at Detroit, June 

John Burling has gone to Duluth for 
a week's visit. _. ,, 

Peter Wi.da has gone to Wallace. 
Idaho, on a two weeks business trip 



cottage returned home this week. Mr \ 
Booth is junior member of the firm or 
Walter S Booth & Son. book and blank 
printers of Minneapolis 

Mrs E E Cole of Fergtis Falls is 
orcupving the Cole cottage on Leech 
lake this week with her daughter. Mrs. 
John Andrus. of Pequot 

Walter Moye, engin«>er at the Walker 
hospital left this week for Evans- 

*J "jonnson is vlsiUng at the Quam 

home this week. Mr Johnson lives at • Alfied Harper left Thursday night tor 



church met with Mrs William Kewby 
on Ti»ui>day at the Geneva mine Tha 
ladies met at the ci.urcij at ISO in 
the afternoon and busses were thar* 
to take them t» Mrs. Newhya 

Mrs Thomas Oliver and daughter. 
Mips N> t-Ua of Norway. Mich., are vl»- 
ittng at the home of Mr and Mr«. 
Henry Rowe Mrs. OUver will remain 
lure mil'.! her d.iUiihter. Mrs Rowe. for 
some time. 

William Strick, Arthur Kempe. and 



'^raduat'rfrom the university of lU- 
fn.!'. a^d h« accepted • Position as , 
Instructor at psychology at the Dulutn 
normal under President Bohannon. 




Tower. Miiui... J:.- '^ — (.Special to 
The Herald. )— A large party of berry 
{ickers went up the lake Friday to 
secure Quantities of blueberries which 
are verv abundant this season 

The tourists an? finding their way to 



g« 
Mr and Mrs. Charles Haxen ot Ore- I4 
gon are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dee- 
gran T-. 

Peter Schneller has g'^ne to J^^" 
ver. •:ol . and Salt Lake City, Ltah, on 
a SIX weeks trip , , , t, ». 

The wedding of Miss Noyle and Rich- 
ard Hawley will take place July 1». 

Mr and Mrs J. E George have re- 
turned from the West where they spent 
several years , 

William T. Raley of Gra.nd Ha ^ en is 
in Calumet being called here ^iV ,,^ 
death of his lather, the late WilliAm 

1> R a 1 ^ y 

L F Urain, who has the contract to 
erect the new life-saving station at 
Eagle Harbor, has returned to his home 
in Duluth. ^ ^, , „,. 

Word was received here of the death 
of Frank Susterlich. aged 50 years at 
Chlsholm. Minn He formerly lived in 

C Albert Marsrh hajs received word 
of the death of his brother at Astorl*.. 
Ore He formerly resided In caiu- 

Miss Delia Leves<jue and John Ethier 
were married Wednesday at St Anne s 
church Mr and Mrs. tthier left on 
the steamer Octorara for a lake tnp 
to Buffalo and other cities 

Attllo Castigliauo and young son of 
Hlbbing Mlim.. have returned home 

' after spending the Fourth here. 

1 Imperial Good Samaritan John 
Christie. Field Manager Mis Nlssen and 
l>i8trlct Deputy Timothy Donahue, all 
of Duluth were In Calumet Thursday 
and Friday. 



Jacksonville. Fla.. and likes Northern 
Minnesota very much. He went East 
via Duluth. ^ , ^ ^ 

Andrew Gohers was here from La- 
porte Saturday, having disposed of his 
eneral merchandise business here. 

e intends going into business in a 
new town on the iron range located a 
short distance from Hlbbing. . . ,. ^ 

The Walker ball team defeated the 
Federal Dam nine the Fourth by a 
score of 15 to 8. . 

Miss Doris Bateman is assisting the 
county auditors ofl^ce this week, whue 
Miss Byhre. the official fctenographer. 
IS at Cars Lake 




Ironwood. Mich.. July 8.— < M>ec.al to 
The Herald. ) — The Ladies Home Mis- 
sion arv Society of the First M E. 



Detroit, where they expect to rewsalB 
permanently. 

The storm that visited Ironwood OB 
Tuesday night did some damage to th* 
Newport property Tiie frame work 
of the new sa"» mill which Is under con- 
struction was bi"wn ove! and the dy- 
namo at the electric light plant waa 
completely burned out by tne Untu- 
ning. 

The Ironwood baselia'.l nine went to 
Mellen. Wis., and played two game* 
ti.ere on the Fourth., and won both 
games As they were returning hom« 
in the evening their train knocked 
into a box car that had bec'une loo»a 
from another train and ran down near 
the switch. The passengers wer« 
shaken up but n" serious dumage waa 
done. On InspecUoc of the box cap 
li was found to contain five boxes ox 
dynamite It was a miracle that no 
damage was done 

The Chicago & Northwestern train 
oomine from Ashland aoid bound for 
Chicago was about four hours lata 



YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY 
SHOPPING IN DULUTH 



SOME DULUTH FIRMS WHO WUHT YOUR MAILORDERS! 



FRAZEE 

j,»._«.i to I Tower in large numbers. 
j_,»p«ct«l to, j.^^ homes of William Wilson and P 



Minn, Ju;y 




Frazefc 
The 
Grace 
sis 

D **spenTV fl;'w''days here this week ^^ray 

R G Chishoim attended to busin^rss hisses Helene and Jeanne Gallien are 

matters here Saturday, returning to g.^^.^^^ ,,f relatives in Minneapolis 

Minneapolis Monday. .,, Miss Carpenter, a teacher in the Min 

Mrs George Warmer and »on wm ^eapolis scliools. is here on a combined 

spend this month at her home in i^raj business and pleasure trip 

n N D. .. V. 1 „T,A The postoflice building is bein* re- 
Mr and Mrs F C Kronschnabel and roofed. ^. . , 

daughter Katherine, returned to Norm. jj^^ nmnagement of the City hotel 

ville S D. Wednesday. , . „^ has passed into the hands of Gabriel 

'^Mrs J 'H Melster returned bomel - ^ 

Sunday from a trip to the Twin Cities 
Cleir.nons Meyers arrived h*" Thu.s 




Write for What You Want, Every Order 
Will Be Given Prompt Attention ! 



spent the the week at 
test of his brother. 



after an absence 



this V 

ind da - 

riit in Supt-iioi 



TWO HARBORS 



i,i*i 



h 

v> ■ 
L 

I 

c. 

1 

le: 
t'_ 

F 

M 



Weeks visit with 

■ iluth i tig 

.jhiringnciii ihis' 

--■anled by Miss 



.iday. J 

ssell 
Aid so 
afterr. 



•will 
•with 



i.eran Sewing so- 

»ftern*'.'r. with 

- -were 

'.> Miss 

of the Presby- 
meet ' 'Vednes- 

the 1 i Mra 

- ret Lindley and 
.iitlng friends In 

ri-.v-ar^an and 
Sun- 



Aiken 



\ illow River Tisit- 
^ - William Sand wick. 

» .^-eek. 

s Horstroan went to Mlnne- 
^ .:sday to visit relatives and 

friends tor a week. -ar^A^^m 

Rfv A J V!''ll''r returned wednes- 
aar fr >m Pt where he took 

Jart m the - :;dence day exer- 

•ls#a. 






"^^^^■^M^^N^^I^ 



WARREN 



•Tt- 

eel- 



Minn. July 8 — (Special to 
i » — A large crowd was m 

here >n the Fourth of July 
fa.r.d the day was in every 
•B-a -s Music was fum'shed by 

rt. vband Judge Grindeland 

»a.- '"of t^e day The fore- 

nmtr. wa^ unvoted to a varied program 
of BP-eches and music, the .)rataon 
l>«ing piven by Rev N G W Knudson^ 
The afternoon was given up to all 
kind? of sports, such as races. baU 

*"-. - .^.v,-..- 1 I'tv^^ran congregation 

festival on Sun- 
H^^. . ;. :..- Monroe grove near 

Tias and Arthur Goldner. 

^i the North Star college, 

fiii . _ Winnipeg with the In- 

tt- • ,;. .♦ -.; •^irir.fi; situations there. 

M -- M.-.r..e Ti.lar has returned 

tome frum Detroit. Mich, where she 
as been a student at the conservatory 
. -" .-• past year 

'.eland and chtldrer. 

; .[ i. — .■..«.-. Iowa, where she 

at her foinier home 

.ara Wenzel of Fisher and 

- Bressau and children re- 

.1,1 IV r.. their home, after a 

home of Mr. and 

_,j, . • - > • "zel 

The cr'>i>s in this locality never 
io.vk.-.-. l.tier and everything points to 

& crop _ ^ w 

. Commissioner Brandstrom of 

NV..\;..idt.n says that never since he 
oaniv 1 . Newiolden. twenty-seven years 
a«o. has the outlook for a good crop 
|»©#n more promising „ , ... ..x. 

i~ . ■ ':v^ out last Sunday at the 
* ck Kepang on the East 

1. ,. r.,^ rire '^-'-'^''^ent was called 
^•..->r. and the 1 ch was located 

in all upstairs i, was i^uickly 

put out 



ll£ 



tUi'iit- 

'ireek 
lirs. 




I SMITHVILLE 



„. - Minn., July «. — (.'Special 

•0 T»'A }]■ :b.M I — Mr. and Mrs Georg* 
E and children of S'Uth Su- 

P' .^nt Saturday and Sunday with 

Mrs. !s parents. Mr. and Mrs. 

C- L' 

'Mi--- K ..h Goodell. wh-- —T.t the 
■Wr- k here the guest of E' erton. 

returned to her home in Ih.»^i. -... 

J : n BartB of New Duluth was here 

6. 



Sr...th 



>hn Hogan and cbildr«A v«nt 

in r-i^.ith. 



?s are ripe and 
The «teel plant 
"ad have 
, ....^ _.. >._ ^ - und, and 

berry pickers >re coaipeiiad to g^J 
further awav to find thena. 
f IrwiB Amundson left for Barrowa. 



.»■■- 

BJlii ' aTiUiiiiin 

ejM.ut-u an Oid 



Two Haroorr 
cial to Tne He 
«ted at Tower 

Mr and Mrs 
dren spent Tu* 
land. 

George Spu 
'.-'•ttages for t 
spent Sunday 

Fred Andersi 
bing Sunday tt 
las parents, K 
derson. 

A J Tippet 
Monday with J 
and Mrs Fran 
Lawrence '.T. 
daughter Ann 
for Syracuse a 
a via it. Mr ( 
attend the i 
Ro^iester 

Miss Mary 
Virgiiiia 

Engineer P 
Mond.^y for Isa 
to si".nd the I 
friends. 

Engineer C 
Friday from 
has Ills famil? 
his fruit farm 
R W. Bost 
Tower during 
Mr and Mrs. 
C Johnson 

John Magn: 
Fairbanks, vj 
da.vs this we> 
A party cis 
Anderson is 
Stewart on th 
In the party 8 
dnd cliildren. 
son Harold. M 
Nelson. Miss 
G. JohuBon ai 
blng 

Miss Rose 
from a visit 
Glass at Biw 
Dr. and Mr 
dren of Blwa 
itmg wtih M 
beck. 

Mrs. Q. Sw 
visited at M 
Emil Smith S 
Hubert Prt 
for Remer, H 
John B Ft 
Monday to s 
home there 
Mrs F J 
visiting relat 
Mr Grant 
his family to 
will make tl 

y 1 

si.ort r 
Messr.- 

Puent, accii 
left Sunday 
trip to M:t 
Martin I 
tract for g 
new state i 
work and b 
The road cai 
teen miles c 

Byron G. 
to spend tht 
Leo E. Sti 
urday and t- 
Glen Lock 
Mitchell can 
the Fourth. 
George B 
In the city 
guest of Gl* 
C. M. Nel: 
now runnins 
came down 
Mrs C. P 
visiting her 
left yesterd 
neapolis. 

Attorney 
Crassweller. 
luth. tranaa 
house Thuri 
John Swa 
and househ 
Mile 41 on 
expect f ' nn 

Last 
of the - 
perlal urde 
lar^re -r iwd 
an ' 

I .s 

iam Hail, t 
of Mr. Yot 
Tuesday m- 
Re.^ervBUon 
They secur* 

Mrs U. 
rsturiMd Ir 



. Minn., July U — iSpe- 
ral J. t — John Fuller vis- 
n Tuesday 
E. A Brand and chil- 
sday camping at H.igh- 

-beck. who is building 
:ie Tower Outing club. 
at his home here. 
n came down from Hib- 
spend the Fourth with 
r and Mrs. A. D. An- 

and son visited in Ely 
trs. Tippet's parents. Mr. 
■i Kent. 

»xry, his son WilUam and 
i. win leave tomorrow 
nd Rochester N Y . for 

laffy while ahsent will 
Ihruier 8 convention at 

Gary spe.nt Tuesday at 

O. Roaendahl left on 
itl, Minn., where he went 
ourth with relatives and 

F Bonham returned 

Ward. Mont, where he 

comfortably located on 

•n and children were in 
the week the guests of 
Fred Helm and Mrs J 

son, section foreman at 
*ited in the city a few 

iperoned by Mrs. P K. 
spending the week at 
e Anderson farm. Those 
re: Mrs. P K. Anderson 

Mrs Victor Olson and 
rs H O Olson. Mrs Emll 
Widtrom. Mrs Theodore 
d Fred Anderson of Hib- 

Houle returned Monday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Ed 

i Lee Spurbeck and chu- 
nk spent the Fourth vls- 
•. and Mrs. George Spur- 

»iger and son. De Koven. 
saba with Mr. and Mrs. 

inday 

novost left Wedneaday 
inn for two weeks 
'derlckson went to Tower 
pend the Fourth at his 



Miller and children are 
ves in Duluth for a week 
J Hanousek will remove 

Antigo. Wis., where they 
eir future home. 
veorge McGreev-y returned 
rom Virginia, where he 
■ ■'tor McDermott on the 
ag the rush days, 
r Andersen and Ben 
mpanied by their wives. 
In tJielr Kissel car for a 

..8. 

.. who ha^ the con- 

-tJliig two miles of the 
oad, has completed the 
•ought his crew to town. 
I now be traveled for six- 
ue north from the city 
3all was up from Endion 

Fourth, 
eeter was at Mesaba Sat- 
tunday, visiting friends. 
er, who Is deinonst rating 
I In Duluth. was here for 



land of Minneapolis 

:he first of the week, the 

n S Locker 

on. formerly of this city, 

a barber shop at Mesaba. 
for a visit Wednesday 

DeLaittre who has been 
friend. Mrs H. C Hanson, 
ly for her home in Mln- 

""rasBweller of the Ann of 

Crassweller & Blu of Du- 
•ted business at the court- 
day 

nstrotn moved his family 
lid goods to hla farm at 
iie Alper line, where they 
.ke their home 

was the postponed date 

annual picnic of the Im- 

- of RAdmen. A fairly 

attended the exercises and 

dav was spent. 
»ee<J. Emil Toung and Will- 
ae latter a brother-in-law 
ng from Duluth. returned 
irning from a trip to the 

river above Grand Marais. 
d a fine catch of trout 
A- Sanders and son have 
MO the South, where they 



day from the West 

of several years. v^^. *y^^• 

Earl Weymouth arrived here this 

week, after making a lour of the 

" RaVmond^'schleher left on ^edne^s- 
day for a visit with friends in ^V. «r t 

John Helmer of Wyndiien. N. D.. ar- » 
rived in Frazee Wednesday 

Jack Bordeaux arrived here Monday 
from his claim In Roseau cunty 

J™ n kohler of Little Falls attended 
to business matters here Saturday 

OS. Pengra arrived here Sunday 
from Minneap'^lis. _ 

Mr and Mrs. Du Pont and son. Ra>. 
returned Saturday from Red Lake 

Falls 

Mr and Mrs Ra^-mond Lord of Lake 
Park visited with the Ryder family 

here Mond»y . 

The funeral of Peter Schram, *«ed 
79 vears was held .Sunday at the hou.=«e 
The Interment was made in Advent- 
Ists cemetery Mr .'ichraiu was one 
of the old settlers around Frazee. ana 
was well liked and highly respected. 
G A Clemens and Jack Grant ot 
Fargo N D.. are spending this week 
•t D L r>urklns honi»- 

Rev George Warner left W ednea- 
day for a three weeks vacation at 
I.ra-itr.n N. D During this lime all 
. at the M. E. church will be 
i - " - -ed . .^ , ' 

The iadies of the M E church served 
'8 cbleken pie dinner the Fourth, the 
proceeds amounting to $60. 

Large cr'.wds from Perham and De- 
troit attended the celebration here. 
Music was furnished by the Detroit 
band A game of baseball was played 
between J'raxee and Detroit, which 
was won by the later In general the 
celebration was good and everyone en- 
joyed It. ,„,,», 
Miss Julia McMasters of St Paul 
is here visiting with Mr and Mrs. w 
F Just • „ 
Dr and Mrs Kimeae are rejoicing 
over the arrival of a boy, Wednesday, 

July 6- -_.-... 1 .• 

The death of Mrs C E Orafsland 
occurred at her home Friday morning, 
a^'ter a short illness The body was 
taken to Lake Park for burial 

During the awful heat of Saturday 
one death occurred, that of Mr Bren- 
berg He was piling lumber in the 
yards, when he was overcome by the 
heat and died in the Frazee hospital. 

Ted Strenkens left Thursday for a 
few days" visit with friends in Min- 
neapolis. 

Dave Robison was the first one to 
bring in new potatoes and received 
$2 50 per bushel He says the pros- 
pects for a large potato crop are 
good 

A general delivery system has been 
established by Smith-C'.ayton company. 
L D Hendry, P. O Field. B T. Mc- 
Nairy and T W Beulke Henry Teter 
has been appointed deliveryman for 
these stores _ , . ■ 

Rev. T J Martin returned to his 
home at Bemldji Monday 

J E King returned to hig home at 
Clifford. N D . Saturday 

Mr and Mrs Zern returned to their 
home in Duluth Saturday, after visit- 
ing Mrs Hanlln 

Rev. C L Klngbury returned to his 
home at Park Raruds Tuesday 

James Chilton, Jr . returned to F^rt 
Snelling Tuesday, after visiting friends 

' Miss Martinson of Lake Park spent 
the fore part of this week with Mrs. 
George Sharp 

Mrs R R Hamilton Is visiting her 
husband at Hope. N. D.. who travels 
through the state 

Mr Hkks spent Sunday at his cot- 
tage at Lake Weynar, returning to 
Minneapolis Tuesday. 

Ema Meyers returned to St. Paul 
Monday night 



; AURORA 



Anderson, the former proprietor. 

Mr and Mrs P. O. Helstiom returned 
home Thursday evening after spending 
the Fourth at Virginia. 

Tel«Mrrams were received here this 



week announcing tlie dea^ at Chicago 
of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. 
Sexton. *" 

The United States has established an 
enlisting station here at the Pioneer 
hotel 

A number of voun_ . . 
chaperor.age of Mr. and Mrs. G D 
Llzer spent Sunday last at St. Mary s 
is La rid. 

The annual school election occurs 
here Saturday. July 15. As yet little 
interest is manifested and only one 
candidate i." in the field. There ie a 
crving need for more room and better 
buildings, especially In the Tower pan 
of the dij'trict Owing to the crowded 
condition last year, some children at- 
tended only one session a Jay. the 
rooms >>eing occupied the other half by 
another set of pupils 

A large number attended the Scandi- 
navian picnic last Sunday at Wolmiin's. 

Negotiations for the resuming of the 
Alger-Smith mill are evidently not yet, 
concluded. Rumors are afloat as to its 
early resumption of work. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Pres- 
byterian church made a g-oodly sum 
from their luiu h tables on the Fourth. 



CALUMET 



Hii: *'ltv Mmn . July 8— 'Special to j 
The Herald..— Miss Cora Sevenson and i 
Miss Myrna Thomasson /f™* „,V^?P i 
Iron River Monday to spend the Four Uv , 

The infant s'>n of Mr. aiid Mrs Tom 
Hughes died Sunday. The funeral was 
held Monday. ., k^ i 

A base ball game was played be- 
tween Hill City and Brooketon at., 
Brookston last Sunday, resulting in a , 
score of 12 to 13 in favor of Brook- , 

^^The famliv of Prof Ingerham ar- ; 
rived here Saturday. Mr. Ingerham in- 1 
tends to n^.ake his future home here 
and will have charge of the public 

"""ja?^* Arnold suffered from a sun- . 
stroke Thursday afternoon whUe work- j 
Ing at carpenter work. . ,.^- Tuea- 

Dr Stewart returned home lues 
dav after a few weeks vacation. ; 

Mr and Mrs. J. B. Schoen spent the , 
- -- Fourth in Hill City with friends. . 

W J Gauzewitz returned home Mon- 
g peoi^le under the^^^ ,^,1^ ^jig bride and was met at 
- --" ""-" "^ ^* the depot by the band. 

K verv pleasant day was spent at 
Hi'l! City' the Fourth. Games, races and 
Tpeaklng being the feature of the da>^ 
A larae crowd was present both from 
Hill Citv and the surrounding co^n- 
trv A baseball game was played with 
Nishwauk which resulted in a score of 
1 "oTto fav-or of Hill City. A bowery 
dance in the evening was enjoyed b> 

^^Misses Mary Ro'«^an Esther Mac- 
Dona'.d. and Emma Jacobson all 0. Mis- 
sLssippi, spent the Fourth here 

Mr.s Rabey, mother of Mrs^ pt.?Jl*t 
Hankerson. W. N Rabey and Ernest 

^i7- ParVe7. 'who\as Un visiting 
in Cohasset. returned home Sunda v^ 
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. ciar 

'^^-^L'^Kr^alf m'ef^with Mrs. Ernest 

^^Il1?o:?'E^^^' -ade a busmes. trip 

' to Mississippi Thursday. daughter 

1 Mr« A R- Sevenson and aaugnier. 

I Li?fian. wefe in Swan River between 

trains Thursday. 



Bny YOUR CLOTHING 

BATS, SBOES AND RRNL^mNfiS 
IN DILITB 

And get tfcr k«-»*fl« «« •«*■ *«^ »rl«es 
end larse •eeortmeni*. 



♦•The De>UKbt Store.' 




Seeond Are.ne W. end So^erter St. 



,.Vl'IU>NblR«v'' 



Dry Goods, 
Millinery, 

and Women's Ready- 
t#-Wears. 

First Ave. W, and Superior St., 
Duluth, Minn. 



V(^«t We Advertise Vo« C«« 
Order Br 

MAIL 

The same special prices will be 
given our mall-order patrons. 

Watch Oar Ads. For 

Furniture Bargaint 




DtllOtlM BtlDB. 



Doik Televl>o»ea. 



BARTHE-MARTlNCo. 

GROCERIES 
AT WHOLESALE 

DIRECT 
TO CONSUMER 



1M-14M l^'eet Mlofclsea Street. 
DILITU. BU^K. 



Calumet Mich.. July 8. — ^Special to 
The Herald.^ — F S Eaton ha." returned' 
fr jm an automobile trip to Chicago 

Mrs Jane E Dewe has arone to De- 
troit to visit. 

Mrs. John Hoffman of Milwaukee la 
vlsltrtig here 




Walker Minn.. July 8.— (Special to 

, , The HerLld^- Walker* did n°t j^®'*" 

W. Wilstermann went to Detroit to i "^te the Fourth, the people SOj^fi^. 

spend the Fourth. . I Bemldji the Old A«ency or FecTeral 

The funeral of August MaJmquist, , g^^^^ /^gpend the day. 

aged 68 years, took place Wednesday. j^j.g xlioe Plppen is 



from the S^ifediah Lutheran church 

Word has been received here of the 
wedding at Milwaukee of Mrs Lena 
Engelhardt and Richarc Klau. The 
bride has resided in Calumet for 
many years. 

Nels Rounavaara has returned from 
Ann Arbor where he graduated from 
the law department at the university. 

Robert M. Wetzel, wife and child 
have returned from Chicago. 

A daughter has lieen born to Mr. and 
Mr? James Buokett 



visiting with 



States 
urs- 



Kenneth Ward has returned to Bay, home this week. 



friends in Minneapolis vinltlne 

Mrs Elizabeth Kich has been MBiting 

«f B^m^ii for the past few days, while 

her daiigiitl? Dorothy, has been vlslt- 

^"U\ .JiM^' assistant^^tted Bt 
district attorney, was In Walker in 
^^^h?c\s|^rotnty farmers are mavcing 
preparations for a fine exhibit at tne] 

has been 



Iftonthiy STYLE BOOK 

FREE fF TOU WRITE FOB IT. 

A monthly publication showing 
S.11 the newest 

LADIES' HOME 
JOUMNAX PATTEBJfS. 

We fill mail orders for Ladles" 
Home Journal Patterns and every- 
thing in Dry Gooda. 

(Successors to Gray Tallant Co.) 
117-1I* West Bii»*rlor Street. 



visiting here, left for her 



Aurora. Minn.. July '■. — (Special to 
The Herald > — Richard Blight and Miss 
Margaret Johns4.in were married at 
Chishoim last Saturday The young' 
couple are well known and have a 
host of friends They will make their 
home at Aurora 

Mrs. Max Cohen of Biwablk and Mrs 
M Pleldman of Eveieth were recent 
fuests of Mrs Dave Welner. 

Misses Eva Ooman and Beatrice; 
Thomas were over from Blwabik Tues- 
day afternoon calling on friends. 

Mrs B. Christianson and Miss Lil- 
lian r'hrletlan8'>n were quests of Mr 
and Mra. C. F. Nelson at Lucknow 

Tuesday. . , ... 

Mr and Mrs C A. Lundgren visited 
their daughter, Mrs. J H. Hoskiaa. at 
St. Paul this week 

Mr and Mrs. C A Bergman and Miss 
Tlllle Berywian visited with relatives 
in Duluth thl:« week. 

Otlo Winkler h*a gone to Buhl. 



City. He came here to attend the wed- 
ding of his brother. 

John Steefanez has gone to Milwau- 
kee where he will take a summer 
course at the Marquette university 

P. H O'Brien. circuit judge-elect, 
has returned from Cheyenne, Wyo . 
where he helped to win an interestln« 
lawsuit. 

Alexander J Kennedy has returned 
from Big Rapids, where he attended 
the Ferris institute. _ . 

William E. Parnall of New York 
city, formerly superintendent of the 
Tamarack mine, is visiting in Calum.et 
L W. Powell of Blsbee Ariz., form- 
erly vice president of the Calumet & 
Arizona and other properUes, is in 
Calumet on a visit. 

Mrs. Oscar Beck and two children 
of Tacoma, Wash., are guests at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. August Beck 

Mr and Mrs. Boyer of Pittsburg, 
who are visiting here, have come to 
be present at the S^eep-Whyte wedding 
which took place last week. 

Josepii HuJulesione of Butte. Mont.. 

Is visiting in Calumet, this being his 

first visit here for twenty-eight years. 

Samuel Mawrence has returned from 

Pittsburg. ^ ^ 

Johnson Vivian has returned from 
Chicago and Indianapolis. 

Richard Harvey of Chicago was 
called to Calumet by the Illness of 
his father. 

F. 8 Carlton aJid wife have gone 
to Cremore.. Onu. for a visit. 

Capt. Richard Martin has retnirned 
from the East, where he went to at- 
tend the funeraJ of a relative. 

I Gartner and L KroUk left this 
week for Paris. 

James Hardy has gone to victor. 
Colo 

Mrs. John Fisher and eon are vis- 
iting in Detroit. 

Mrs. Archie 91. Germain has gone 
to Detroit. 

Carl Betzler »«d sister have re- 
turned from a two week*' visit to De- 
Frank Kowak of the T. M. C. A., has 
returned from Detroit. 

Alexander McRae has returned Iroin 
Detroit and Lower Ontario 

Mrs. Engl bloom, mother of Mm 
John HUi, has left for her home at 
Moline. 111., after spending aome time 
In Calumet. , ^ 

Mr. and Mfs Harry Danlells of De- 
troit formerly of Calumet, are vlsJt- 



Miss Esther Malmquist Is visiting 

d^/^^ ?s-ttrp^hoirg!fi^du7: 

^f,?s"Trani"of Bertha has _been visit- 
ini 



j 



J. J. LeTOlRNEAlJ 
PRINTING CO., 

S21-22S 1»'EST FlSLar STREET. 

Dalutk. Mima. 

Printers, Lithographers 
En gravers and Bindert 

The largest and most complete 
printing establiahment at the Head 
of the Lakea 
Special Attentloe to All Mall Order*. 



"t UiTMortcarhome this week 



l^l rrow and Harold Davis took in 
tbr^ivic -^lebration at Minneapolis 

'^Pel^f Williams of Cass Lake has 

K, ^^^2lJ'o. rh^e^^YunfrKa^ni'ir 

hv oeople in this section, and it is ex- 
nested that'this place will be well rep- 
resented in the feenith City during the 

^^■suSmer school is progressing ijicely. 
thrau'^^ndaVe being the larg^t^nt^e 

Sli^i°t7 wiil^e^r iS^anTJiL^llace^^^r 
2"s"ummer^s*hoof owing to the cooling 

'^^"at'' WeYsh. roadmaster of tJie Great 
Northern railway, is "t^.PP^^^ .^°Jf.^." 
this week with his famiiy and enJo>- 

^^f-oberi'^'stalde^^left for Chicago 
WednlJday after Bpenoing the Jo-th 
here with his uncle. Ed. L P. Staeae. 

WlUiam Dowden and family '^f i^a"; 
sarare^opping in W^alker for the hot 
months, having rented rooms in the 

^ wTiraJn^Junlch of Long Prairie has 

^own for two daya this week 

went from here to 



ZIMMERMAN BROS., 

ass fVwn First Street. 

KODAKS 



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•<Wkcre Velaea Rel«B Sevrcae." 

STACK iS: CO. 

Dry Goods, 

Cloaks, Suits, 

Millinery and Shoes, 

21-23 Wsst Supmiar St. 



SPECIAL ATTEXTIOW GITEX TO 
MAIL ORDERS. 



•Tke 0»e Price Store." 




been in 



on buslneSB. ^ He 

^G^oSrRev'leJi' walked off with first 
T>H«! In the log rolling contest at Be- 
Sudjl the Fourth. George is the chana- 
^on log roller of this section and in- 
tends going in for a litUe easy mone> 
*■ " Duluth water carnival *^«« 



at the 
month 



this 



of 



ing iiere. 
Mra. A. Maxona ajkd son Leo, have 



Word was received here of the death 
Miss Dora Wilson at Plymouth. Ind.. 
on June 2i of consumpUon. She maue 
Walker her home durlnc the year of 
ll>.t9 and had many friends here 

Miss Pelam of Menagha visited her 
friend Rov Still, and Mr. and Mra. Mc- 
Namar here over the Fourth. . _ ^ 

Mrs Thomas Thompson returned 
f-om her Minneapolis visit this week. 

W M Bright, one of the most pros- 
perous merchants, was in Bemldji last 
week visiting his old friend. WUllam 
M^uai Thi» i« the first time in ten 
that Mr. Bright has boarded, a 



Orders for Hale 

Attire win be properly and promptly 
filled ty the 

Colombia Clothios Co., 

Formerly "The Great Eastern." 
Tklrd Ave. ^ . M S«»er»*r St., Dulmtk. 



Shoes for Everybody 

All klB^e that are »ew •«« S»*d. 

ap to »«.«« and ST.W). Spedml vmlncs 
at gX&O •»« g4.M». 

TheSUFFEL 
CO., 

103 West Superior St. 



•^-(f 







DCLITH. 




17 Fovrtk Avea«e West. 



years 

'^'^^"ill Booth and family. 

bern apending a m««th here at their 



who have 



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the Northwest. 

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WIELAND 
SHOE CO., 

(Sueoeaaora to W. A L Shoe Co) 

SIS 1*^ST StP«:RJOR 9TR8BT. 

Doletk. Mia*. 

The Leading 

Shoe Store of 

Duluth. 







f V, ■ p > III « 

■ 









1 , ■ ■ -4> 


» 


1 


' 


I 











1 



»*.-." 



w 




I 



i 



I 

I 



f 







r- 



-■" 




Saturday, 



THE D U L y TrH HERALD: 



July 8, 1911 




OlOUV 




last 'luvstla^- night. There were ten or | 
eleven coaones and with the roads iti 
poor condition the enjslne had hard 
work. An exlra engine was put on 
to !« A\-t» Ironwoud. 

Mi-s Margaret Kellet left the first 
of tin- week for tfcrunton. Pa., where 
She win sitend the summer vacation. 

Pes.>emer is poing to have aeroplane 
lltgi.s by illen Curtiss during the 
Qr^r-ns' tournament, which is to he 
held tn that city this month. i;r.at 
preparations are i-elng made by Fe.^^st - 
m*T people for this event. A carnival 
Will be held there at the same time 
Cash prla.s and not trophies, are to 
b« given this year, to the winners of 
the dififereiit races. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Truettner of 
Bessemer have opened their summer 
cottage at l-ake ».;ose>*l<*- , „ 

Mr. and Mis. Jolm Luxmore of Besse- 
mer are enJoylnR an outing at Lake 
Gogebic. 

Miss S-igna Larson of the postofflce 
■taff went to Cireen Fay Monday even- 
ing, where she will visit friends and 
also attend a postal convention. 

Miss Eva Lofberg left Wednesd.ny 
night for Chicago, where she will visit 
friends for the summer. 

MlsH Ada King left Sunday night 
for Grand liapids. where she will ..t- 
tend the summtr school for kindergar- 
ten w 'rk. 

Jostph Krcpidlowski is the only 
Ironwood student to graduate from 
Ann Ar^'or this yt-ar. He received 
bis degree from the law department 
last wtek. and it is understood that 
he will practice law in Duluth. 

Tinn'thv Shta went to Duluth to 
•pend the Fourth with friends. 

Severn! Ironwood peoj le are plan- 
ning to attend the home-coming at 
Hou«!it"n this year. 

\Vi:i <i'a*Uly will leave Sunday night 
for England. where he will visit 
friends, intending to be away from 
the United States a little over a year. 

Adrian Worii:n of this city has uc- 
oepted a position In the high school 
at Newberry next year, as science 
teacher. 

Mls-j» Dora Grimm Is attending the 
■ummer school ol the Ferris Institute 
at Fig Rapids. Mich. 

Mrs». Harrison left Thursday evening 
for Chicago and La Salle. TU.. where 
■he will visit her daughter for a cou- 
ple of weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. August Swanson and 
family returned today from Mercer, 
where they spent ten days camping. 

A partv of voiing people are spend- 
ing the "week at Lake Gogebic. Mr. 
and Mrs F. W. May acting as chap- 
erons. , , ^» 

Mrs. Juhn Luxmore and daughter, 
Mary, spent a few days at the Truett- 
ner cottage at Lake <;ogebic. 

Orvllle CoUick left Sunday evening 
for Colorado lo visit his mother for 
fl A V f" XI vtr (p ^ Vc 9 

Con and Maurice Geary are visiting 
friends in Buffalo. KresevlUe, N. Y.. 
and Boston. . , 

Gust Erickson of Bovey is visiting 
friends and relatives here. 

Mrs .John Mull.-n arrived home Mon- 
day morning from Chicago, where she 
undt^rwent a surgical operation. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C Thomas. Miss 
Charlotte Brook.s and Miss Ida Mc- 
Cauly left Thursday for Yellowstone 
Park, where they will remain lor some 
time sight-seeing. . .. ^ 

Fred Lllovd from Kelthsburg, 111.. 
is In the city visiting friends. 

George Sullivan. principal of the 
Montreal scho«d and Laura McE>'-'na!d 
were married at St. Michaels church. 
Hurlev. Wednesday morning. They left 
the same afternoon for New York city 
to visit Mr. Sullivan's parents. They 
will make their home In Montreal, Wis. 

Mrs Sophia Alhstein is visiting her 
daughter. Mrs. Rev. Kastman at Ash- 
land. 

Rev. Mr. Lilja left Monday evening 
for his home in New York city. Rev. 
LllJa was a former pastor of the Luth- 
eran church of this city. 

Axel Larson of Hibbing Is in tlie 
city visiting his parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
Chris Larson. Martjuette street. 

Gecrge Beddow is visiting his family 
here, from Virginia. Minn. 

Mtss Margaret Woods spent Sunday 
at the Montreal, with Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Meade. 

Mjs.'j Clara Jeffery spent the Fourth 
with friends at Iron Belt. 

Mrs. Rev. Johnson is visiting her 
parents at Ishpeming. 

Miss Nima Lundtren is home from 
Jackson. Mich.. where she taught 
■chool during the past year. 

Miss Stasia Malone left W ednesday 
rooming for a visit with Mrs. James 
Browner at Laurium, Mich. 

Mrs. Rev. Kaye and family are visi- 
Itlng her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. D 
Nelson, from Topeka. Kan. 

John Gannon of Thomaston Is In the 
city visiting friends this week. 

Miss Julia Tobin of Birmingham. 
Ala., is here visitng her parents. 

Gust Gabrlson of Bovey, Minn., Is 
here visiiir.g friends. 



after a visit of a f< 
brother, J. S. Wiklui 

Miss Margaret W 
Grand Rapids, MondB 
visit with Miss NagI 

Messrs. Murphy a 
are surveying in C 
here Monday lo spen 

Miss Heclila. who 
Miss Lauri the past 
Duluth Saturday. 

J. F. Metzger and • 
City, were Floodwoo. 

Mr. and Mrs. V. V 
spent the Fourth In 
her jarents. 

F. A. Henderson 
Sunday at the J. D. 

Aui;ui^t -Vnderson 
the Fourth with his 
lage. 

Jack Griffith of Tsl 
wood visitor Monday 

Joseph G. Fogartj 
caller in the Twin Ci 

Chris Kequam was 
to deliver the assess. 

Mrs. M. N. Triplet I 
RkhvUle, where she 
golden wedding of l 

Vernon Cravenus 
here for r. viblt at 
grand parents, Mr. at 
wood. 

A log dwelling r 
brothers on Eighth 
in an unknr wn mai 
bri'iight out the Are 
new chemical engin 
The engine was brou 
prevent the spreadl 
and acquitted its-elf 

C. J. Cosgriff, a ie\ 
Wisconsin I'ulpwood 
been making this 
here for the past fe\ 
from I>uluth Wtdne 
spent a few days wl 

vv deal was consur 
%vheret.y the Arm of ' 
company disposed of 
chandlse store to a 
be kni'wn as the F 
tile company of whi 
of Floodwood. J. E. 
G. Gearhart of Dulii 
porators. The i 

be under the person. 
Messrs. Johnson & I 
wh<>m have been In 
retiring company slni 

Mr. and Mrs. A. T 
ton. Wis. who receri 
Conrad Yager farm, 
lage Wednesday. T 
panled here by the 
Le Blanc of Superio 

Mr. and Mrs. Jean 
proud parents of a I 
who put In his ap 
morning. 

The celebration he' 
under the auspices o 
man camp, was all 
Iiected, ronsiderin.st t 
which the arrangem 
Rain at Intervals th 
tendered toward pu 
on things generally 
the day was a nlne-j 
uled as a ball game 
and "leans" of Floo> 
caused by the v 
perspiring "fats 
score stood 15 ti 
fellows. 



fog. 
the 
the 
big 



w days with her 

d here. 

right came from 

y for an extended 

e. 

id Emerson, who 

>ok county came 

d the Fourth. 

has been visiting 

Week, returned to 

on Clairs, of Hill 

I vis'itora Monday. 

I'llan of Duluth 

the village with 

md family spent 
Moore farm. 
»f Hill City spent 
family In the vU- 

and was a Flood- 
was a business 
ties Wednesday. 
In T)uluth Friday 
irs books, 
left Tuesday for 
will attend the 
er parents. 
>f Minneapolis is 
the home of hla 
d Mrs. A. J. Stan- 

wned by Lehrke 
street caught fire 
iner Monday and 
brigade with the 
c in »4Uick time, 
ght Into action to 
ig of the flames 
creditably, 
resentative of the 
company, who has 
his head(iuarters 
/ weeks, returned 
jdav. where he 
ih his family, 
imatcd this week 
?oolidge-Sch ussier 
heir general mer- 
new company, to 
oudwood Mercan- 
h M. W. Johnson 
Brandmier and H. 
th are the incor- 
lew firm will 
il management of 
randmier, both of 
'.he employ of the 
e Its organization. 

riummer of Sax- 
tly purchased the 
irrlved In the vll- 
ley were accom- 
r daughter. Miss 
r. 

W. New are the 
ouncing baby boy 
pearance Monday 

d here the Fourth 

f the local Wood- 

that could be ex- 

le limited time fn 

ents where made. 

roughout the day 

cting the damper 

The feature of 

ict comedy, srhed ■ 

)etween the ""fat.s" 

Iwood. When the 

apor arising from 

had cleared off, 

5 In favor of the 



Montevideo has 
Star Islani] and 
enjoying the In- 

pines. 



were scheduled here Thursday after- 
noon and evening. The local manage- 
ment got bu!>y and securea the famous 
Colored Gophers for Friday evening, 
the Gophers being compelled to make 
the "Jump" from Devils Lake, N. D. 

Fred Guilmette was overcome by the 
heat last Saturday afternoon, and for 
a time his condition was very Beric>us. 
He Is able to be around again this week 
and his condition is rapidly improving. 

E. S. Oakley formerly receiver In the 
local U. 8. land olflce but now assist- 
ant United States attorney was a vis- 
itor w^lth Cass Lake friends Thursday. 

Mrs. H. N Harding and daughter 
Bertha have been in Minneapolis most 
of the week taking In the big celebra- 
tion and visiting with rela.tives and 
friends. 

Ole Johnsrud of 
rented a cottage on 
will spend some time 
vigorating air of the 

Chas. Graham cashier of the Remer 
bank was a visitor here Thursday. 

Geo. Birtch left Tuesday for Minne- 
apolis to be present at the operation 
which was perft>rmed on his wife who 
Is In the hospital there. 

Geo. Beckett a former Cass Lake 
merchant but residing at Staples was 
the guest of frien<ls f<>r several days 
returning the first of the week. 

Assistant Attorney General Hillt ar- 
rived here Thursday to enjoy a few 
days' outing on Star Island. 

E'r. D. F. Dumas made a professional 
trip to Federal Dam Thursday. 

Siierlff I'edrle of Hubbard county 
was In the village Thursday on profes- 
sional business. 

Sam Coulter of Duluth was a week 
end visitor. 

Rev. H. F. rarshall spent the Fourth 
family here. 

Sutor has returned from an 

trip through Canada and has 

abode together with his fam- 

s houseboat which is anchored 




with his 
Samuel 
extensive 
taken up 
lly on his 



on Star Island. 

I'ere Smith the Cass Lake pitcher 
who has made such a remarkable rec- 
ord as a twlrler was injured while 
playing at Deer River the Fourth. He 
has Improved considerably since the 
accident and it is expected that he will 
be on the slab the rest of the season. 

l^ounty Auditor Byhre spent Monday 
evening In town visiting friends. 

County Attorney Funck has been a 
business visitor at Minneapolis most 
of the week. 

The firemen held their annual meet- 
ing Mondav evening and elected the 
following officers: Chief. Pat Cain: as- 
sistant. r>an Lilly: second assistant, 
Ira Chrlstner: secretary. Dana V. 
Wardner; treasurer. Homer W. Dugas. 
The Relief association also elected of- 
ficers as follows: President. A. F. 
Ittner: vice president, Henry Blatt- 
man; secretary, I^ana V. Wardner; 
treasurer. Homer W. Dugas. 

Chris Burns received a visit th^ first 
of the week from his son Mark and 
wife, who came here for the Fourth. 

Search Is still being made for the 
body of Peter Goraa.". a Greek laborer 
who was drowned in Pike bay Thurs- 
day noon, while in bathing with a num- 
ber of his countrymen. 



seat 

vis- 

the 




Floodwood, Minn. July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — W. H. Webb of Supe- 
rior transacted business here Saturday. 

M. W*. Johnson returned Monday from 
a business trip to the Twin Cities and 
Duluth. 

Miss Ethel Gourley is assisting Miss 
Neiile Auger, who tame down from 
Bemldjl Wednesday to resume her 
duties as assistant in the postofflce 
during the absence of the j>ostmasler. 

Mrs. E. N. Redfleld entertained the 
ladies of the Scandinavian Lutheran 
church at lunch Friday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haugsriid and children 
of Superior visited over the Fourth 
with Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Markkanen. 

The village council installed a new 
pump at the town well this week. 

Edward Pelto, who has been spend- 
the past few weeks with re;atives and 
friends In the village, returned to Su- 
perior Friday. 

Miss Pearl Stevens returned to Du- 
luth Sunday to resume her studies at 
the Duluth business university, after a 
week's vacatbn i^pent with her par- 
ents and friends here. 

Father Turb»aux of Grand Rapids 
was here Sunday on his way to Hill 
City. While in town he instructed the 
Sunday school cla«s In the evening. 

-\. camp of Royal Neighbors, to be 
known as the Evergreen camp of 
Floodwood, was organized here last 
week. Fifteen charter members were 
enrolled. The folUwIng officers were 
elected: Oracle, Mrs. E. V. Bartle; 
past oracle, Mrs. W. Zimmerman; vice 
oracle, Mrs. Wtsturn: chancellor. Mrs. 
Casey: marshal. Hazel Wolfe; assistant 
Marsi.all. Bessie Arnold; recorder Susie 
Clark; receiver. Mrs. R. W. Wilson; 
Inner sentinel. Mrs. J. McCormlck; man- 
agers. Hilma Laurl, Mrs. Paul and Mrs. 
McArton. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Robinson and chil- 
dren left Thursday for RlchvUle, where 
they will attend the golden wedding 
of his parents. Before returning home 
they Will take a trip to Isle Royale. 

Bert Stanwood has returned from 
Remer, where he has been located for 
the past year, and has again entered in 
to the employ of the Cooiidge-Schussler 
company, cruising. 

W. H. Nelson returned Tuesday from 
a visit with friends in Duluth. 

Mrs. M. A. Hender.^on returned to her 
home at Baudette Monday, after a visit 
of a week here with her son. F. A. Hen- 
derson and family. 

Oscar Johnson of Gowan, returned 
the latter part of this week from a 
visit with relatives and friends in Sault 
Ste. Marie. Mich. 

Carl Sandboe came down from Marble 
Monday to spend the Fourth with the 
folks in the village, returning to 
Marble Thursday. 

Miss Sarah Wtklund returned to 
Grand Rapids Friday of last week, 



HERMANTOWN 



NEW DULUTH 



Htrmantown, Mini 
to The Htrald)— TI 
both old and young, 
laff home July 4 for 
music, dancing and 
amusements and a j 
reported. 

Ed Hauson came fi 
tend the picnic at tli 

The Misses Ulsru« 
Wlltze spent the Fox 
ers. 

The dance given a 
last week was well j 
one present had an 

Miss Mary Lindahl 
at her father's horn 
the first of the wee 
where she will spend 

Emery Fagerslrom 
In Klondike one day 

M. W. Johnson of 
Sunday at the Fa|: 
Solway. 

Mrs. Anna Graff i 
visiting her sister. 
She will leave for he 
of this month. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edv 
last Sunday with d^ 
ville. Minn. 

J. D. Tusch vlslte- 
between trains one • 

Mrs. Frank Peter 
spent Sunday with A 

While out driving, 
Ing to Gottlieb Holl 
the help of neighb< 
disentangled from 
damage was report 
shaft, which was n 
so that Mr. Hollandt 
ceed on his journey. 

The Witte and Fit 
Joyed a picnic at Plk 

Mr. and Mrs. Char 
eral relatives and fr 
spent the Fourth at 

Wheelock Allison ' 
this week. 

Several of the far 
have started haylni 
heavy crop Is expect 

A. Wentzlaff and 
each purchased a ha\ 
ready placed the tn 
position, ready for 
taking care of the 1 

Mrs. Harry Gelint 
line Wentzlaff wer 
Friday. 

Miss Esther Stolh 
her vacation at her 

Dr. Albert Schulti 
a professional visit i 
Sunday. 

Mrs. John Monson 
ed business at Five 

E. B. Engren of C 
ness visitor at this i 



., July 8. — (.Special 
lirty-four people, 
met at the Wentz- 
a picnic. Games, 
races were the 
ileasant time was 

om Hibbing to at- 
e Wentzlaff home. 
!s and Miss Opal 
.rth at Five Corn- 

t the Martin home 
-ttended and every 
enjoyable evening. 

spent the Fourth 
e. She will leave 
H for Minneapolis. 

several days. 

of Solway visited 

this week. 

Floodwood spent 
erstrom home In 

f McLeod, Cal., Is 
VIrs. Eli Le Beau, 
r home the middle 

in Johnson spent 
■latlves at Smith- 

1 with his mother 
lay last week, 
ion and two sons 
rs. A. L. Tusch. 
the horse belong- 
mder fell. With 
rs the horse was 
he harness. No 
ed but a broken 
paired with wire, 
r was able to pro- 

chner families en- 

e Lake July 4. 

es Avery and sev- 

lends from Duluth 

Caribou lake. 

vas in this vicinity 

mers of this place 
c. An unusually 
ed. 

I. Anderson have 

fork and have al- 

-ck and pulleys in 

assisting them in 

ay crop. 

lu and Miss Adel- 
e Duluth visitors 

auske Is spending 
home here. 
5 of Duluth made 
n this vicinity last 

of Twig transact- 
Corners Thursday, 
mosia was a busl- 
ilace last week. 




LAKE 



Cass Lake, Minn., 
The Herald.) — John 
John Burnett, an In 
and brought before 
nesday evening and 
sentences at the coi 
drunk and disorde 
claimed furnished ih 
dlan. 

J. P. Foote of Croi 
ness visitor here W 

The annual school 
place Saturday eveni 
win be elected to st 
and George Birtch e 
derstood that Mr. Bi 
dldate for re-elect 
Bartlett will seek 
Toole's place. 

Mrs. August Oma 
spending several we< 
her son, J. G. Omai 

Peter Simonson 
night from a visit of 
his family at St. Hi 

Al. Nelson of H 
resident of Cass La 
friends here the fir 

Fred Lilly of / 
Fourth here at the b 
Dan Lilly. 

Iver .Vnderson retu 
a 5.000-mile trip thr 
erlng nearly every ; 
em part. Mr. Ande 
v.-ell impressed witl 
will remain in Cas 

The Crookston i 
ment cancelled their 



fuly 8. — (Special to 
Riley, while, and 
lan, were arrested 
fudge Koehn Wed- 
given thirty-day 
nty jail for being 
riy. Riley, it is 
e liquor to the In- 

>kston was a busi- 
idnesday. 

election will take 
ng, when members 
iceeed M. L. Toole 
X pi ring. It is un- 

tch will be a can- 
ion while Lester 

election in Mr. 

n of Hastings is 
ks at the home of 
1. 

returned Tuesday 
several days with 
la I re. 

ibbing, a former 
(e was calling on 
St of the week, 
keley spent the 
jme of his brother, 

rned Tuesday from 
3ugh Canada, cov- 
lolnt in the west- 
son was not very 
the country and 
J Lake. 

taseball manage- 
two games which 



New Duluth, Minn.. July 8. — (Stieclal 
to The Herald.) — Born to Mr. and Mrs. 
William Oconnel. a son, July 1. 

A goodly number attended the clr- 
cns from here last Saturday. 

W. L. Dash was In the Twin Cities 
for the encampment on the Fourth of 
July. 

-Mrs. H. D. Bloyer of West Duluth 
was a caller In i-Jew Duluth Saturday. 

Snilthvllle and New Duluth played 
ball here Sunday, the score being 7 lo 
S in favor of New Duluth. 

F. Liska is building a dwelling on 
Ninety-sixth avenue. 

Alderman Curren of West Duluth 
was a caller In New Duluth, Sunday. 

Miss Margaret McAlindon of the 
West end was a guest of her sister, 
Mrs. Jerry Lockhart, Jr., on tho 
Fourth of July and took In the dance 
here. 

Some of the young people gave a 
bundle shower for .-Vlma Christopher- 
s<'n, Saturday night. Refreshments 
were served and a musical program 
rendered. Miss Christopherson was the 
recipient of many nice and useful 
presents. 

Miss Ella Wiseman was a guest at 
the home of her brother, Sherman 
Wiseman, on Ninety-sixth avenue on 
the Fourth. 

T. T. Hudson has started to build a 
dwelling on Ninety-eighth avenue and 
Hurd street. 

Gust Viergutz went to Medford, 
Wis., to visit his mother and brothers 
over the Fourth. 

O. Miller of Fond du Lac was a 

fuest at the home of Mrs. Anna Smith 
unday. 

Mrs. W^elling of STmithville was a 
New Duluth caller Sunday. Mrs. Joel 
Lee of St. Croix Falls acc<>mpanied 
her home and returned to New Du- 
luth, Monday. 

A pretty wedding occurred at the 
home of C. Christopherson on One 
Hundred and Second avenue Wednesday 
afternoon at 4 o'clock. The contracting 
parties were Miss Alma Christopher- 
son and Robert Le Write, both of New 
Duluth. The bride wore a white satin 
dress with a tunic covered with white 
net and wore brides roses. The brides- 
maid, Hattie Bloyer, wore a dress of 
ashes of roses. The best man was the 
k ride's brother, Carl Christopherson. 
Rev. P. Knudson performed the cere- 
mony, a double ring service which was 
very impressing. The guests were: 
Rev. P. Knudson and wife, Hattie 
Bloyer Mrs. Robert Bloyer, Mr. and 
Mrs, Christopherson, and Carl Chris- 
topherson. After the wedding they 
sat down to a bountiful dinner. The 
couple left on the 6:15 train for Two 
Harbors, Minn. They will be at home 
in New Duluth after July 10. 

Mrs. Kelley of Jentley. Minn., and 
Mrs. J. St. Marton and son of Crook- 
ston were the guests of Patrolman 
Brouillette and family over Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Stautz and 
children, also Miss Lillian Stautz of 
Kelsey. Minn., were the guests of Rev. 
P. Knudson and wife, Wednesday. 

Miss Hllma Petersen of Fond du 
Lac was the guest of Miss Sarah 
Smith, Thursday. 

Ethel Bockllnger and Melvin Bock- 
linger spent Stinday at Solon Springs, 
W'is. 

Mrs. Stang. Mrs. Wlttset, Mrs. Melley 
and children from the West end were 
guests at the home of H. H. Murphy, 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bell of Cass 
Lake were guests at the Brouillette 
home Thursday. 

Harry Woods, wife and son, Ed- 
ward, of Duluth were the guests of 
Jerry Lockhart, Sr., Sundav. 

Rev. Allen Clark of West Duluth 
preaches here In the Congregational 
church every Sunday evening. 

The Royal Neighbors held their 
regular meeting "Thursday afternoon. 
Mrs. D. McGrath, Mrs. Nolen, Mrs. 
Joseph Runqulst and Miss Louise 
Dome of South Superior, Mrs. Winton, 
oracle of the Zenith camp of West Du- 
luth, Mrs. George Murray of West Du- 
luth, Mrs. Gust Johnson of Meawlow- 
lands. Mrs. Andrew Odegaard, Mrs. 
Gustersen of Smlthvllle were out-of- 
town visitors and members. After the 
meeting they served lunch and had a 
pleasant afternoon. 

The Northern Shoe company baseball 
team and the New Duluth team played 
here on the Fourth of July. The score 
was 3 and 3 when the game was called 
on account of rain. 

John McGrath was a visitor In New 
Duluth Thursday and Friday. 

The Royal Neighbors »f New Du- 
luth will give a picnic a week from 
next Tuesday at Fond du Lac. 



Moose Lake. Minn.. July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — C. F. Mahnk at- 
tended to business at the county 
Mon«iay. 

Miss Emma Lyden of Duluth Is 
iting at her home here this week 

-Mrs. Spiering of Carlton spent 
week end at the John Johnson home. 

Oscar Makl, a prominent Kalavala 
farmer, was here on bUointss Thurs- 
day. 

Miss Cecelia SWarmer of Denham 
was the guest of Miss Marie Wesko a 
few days the first of the week. 

Mrs. J. M. Curtis of Mahtowa was 
visiting friends here between trains 
Friday. 

Mrs. Robert Bergquist departed 
Suntiay for a few days' visit with 
relatives In Rush City. 

Miss Ellen Westholm visited rela- 
tives and attended the civic celebra- 
tion in Minneapolis this week. 

Gothard Ternberg left Friday for 
Clear Lake, Iowa, where he has em- 
ployment. 

C. F. Mahnke made a business trip 
to L'uluih. St. Paul and St. Cloud, the 
latter part of last week. 

Mrs. Holdsmith of Duluth Is spend- 
ing the week at her summer home 
here. 

Misses Minnie and Ellen Bergquist 
of Duluth spent a few davs the first 
of the week visiting at their home 
here. 

Mrs. Frank Kline of Mahtowa spent 
the Fourth at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Peter Anderson. 

J. P. Thompson and H. C. Hanson of 
Barnum were down,^n business Friday. 
They made the ^rlp In an auto which 
Mr. Hanson purchased recently. 

Mrs. McCall left Monday to take In 
the civic celebratlo.i in Minneapolis. 

Miss Jennie Johnson visited rela- 
tives and friends Au Carlton over the 
Fourth. 

Levi Johnson of Kalavala was at- 
tending to business here the first of 
the week. 

Joe Iveraon and' -Louis Calseth of 
Cloquet were guests at the Ole Hersted 
home the Fourth. 

Walter Mauiiela of Arthyde was here 
on business the latter part of last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ratcliff of Duluth spent 
the week with the latter's father. Dr. 
Patterson. 

Mrs. John Ehr of Park Falls, Wis., Is 
visiting at the Frank Vanouse home. 

Mesdames G. W. and A. T. Skelton 
departed Saturday for a few weeks' 
visit with relatives In Lamberton. 

Ed Losensky. who is employed 
warehouseman at the N. P. depot, 
taking his vacation and is relieved 
Arthur Nevers. 

Doc Patterson and Chris Madsen 
went to Minneapolis Saturday and re- 
turned Monday morning with nineteen 
head of horses which they" purchased 
down there and are selling up here. 

Friedolf Westholm and Geln Gold- 
smith accompanied the militia boys of 
Ituluth to the celebration at Minne- 
apolis Tuesday. 

Mr.*--. Ed. Blaha of Grantsburg, WIs^ 
Is visiting with her parents, Mr. ana 
Mrs. John Weske, this week. 

Rev. Mr. Savage of St. F'aul was here 
a few days the first of the week so- 
licltating aid. for, the support of the 
orhpans' home in St. Paul. 

Jesse Hall and Miss Dunlap of Iron 
River. Wis., are .guests at the. B. Pen- 
rose home thi» Wi?^k. 

Miss Agnes Rockey of Park Falls. 
Wis., is visiting with her sister, Mrs. 
Harry Nevers. 

Mrs. Nils Anderson of Hibbing was a 
guest at the H. T. Carlson home a few 
days the first of the week. 

J. W. Carlson and son, Herbert, who 
are employed with the N. P. steel gang 
at Flniayson, spent the Fourth at their 
home here. 



for a visit with his son, T. H. Todd. 

James Flood, a son of James Flood, 
met with a serious accident that might 
have proved fatal. On the evening of 
July 3, like other boys he began rush- 
ing the Fourth by firing crackers. In 
running Into the house for matches he 
ran into an open cellar door, and in 
falling he ran hi.^ hand through a win- 
dow pane and nearly severed the arm 
at the wrist. 

Miss Mable Sanderson left for the 
"Wtst Monday. She v.-ill spend some 
time at the "iellowstone park and then 
go on to Oregon. 

William Langguth left for St. Paul 
Thursday evening as ^ delegate to the 
M. B. A. convention. 




Iron Mountain, Mich., July 8. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Work has com- 
menced on the foundations for the sani- 
tarium to be erected by the Scandi- 
navian Hospital company and it l.s ex- 
pected to let the contract for the main 
building at once. The company has 
been incorporated with a capital stock 
of $15.1(00. 

Dr. James Record, Ph. D., has been 
appointed Synodical Sundav school mis- 
sionary of the Presbyterian church in 
Michigan and has entered upon his 
duties. Dr. Record will spend the next 
several weeks in the Upper Peninsula 
visiting churches and Sunday schools 
He will visit the Iron Mounta'in church 
and Sunday school on the 18th. 

The school election next Mondav 
promises to be unusually Interesting. 
There are four candidates for the office 
of trustee, viz.: John Garvey to suc- 



ceed himself and Richard C. Browning, 
A. T. Fant of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, and John Scavardla, a well- 
known blacksmith. John James de- 
clined to be candidate for re-election. 

Married, July 4, at the home of M. J. 
Fox. this city, George A. McCartney of 
the Press force, to Miss Ruby R. 
Yetteau of Central Lake, Mich. Rev. 
Mr. Tornquist of the Swedi.'^h Baptist 
church, performed the ceremony. Only 
the necessary witnesses were present. 

Capt. Harry McDermott left this 
evening for Chicago, where he will 
witness a practical demonstration of 
his recently Invented power loading 
and excavating machine. Capt. Mc- 
Dermott has about concluded a con- 
tract with the Stephens-Adamson Man- 
ufacturing company of Chicago, for 
manufacturing the machine. 

Miss Carrie Holmberg returned home 
last Sunday evening from a two weeks' 
visit with friends at Marquette and 
Ishpeming. 

Mrs. George Jump arrived last Sat- 
urday from Waterloo, Iowa, to spend 
several weeks with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Tonkin. 

Miss Jennie Dykes, accompanied by 
Miss Mabel Anderson, Leslie Chappelle. 
Jack O'Hara and Ralph Hanna, left 
Wednesday for the Fence river ranch. 

Supt. and Mrs. W. J. Richards, ac- 
companied by the members of their 
family, came down from Crystal Falls 
on the Fourth, making the trip in their 
touring car. Mr. and Mrs. James 
Nettell also made the run in their car. 

An old trapper named Foster, who 
resides about two miles west of Chan- 
nlng, was struck by an engine in the 
Channlng yards Friday night, June 
30, and fatally Injured, He was lying 
beside the track and the left leg of 
his trousers caught the steam cock of 
the cylinder. He was dragged about 
100 feet before the engine could be 



stopped. Foster was taken to Sagola- 
where Dr. Dcckery examined his in- 
juries and found that he had threo 
ribs broken, was scalded the wholo 
length of his left side and also injured 
internally. Foster was then brought 
by special train to St. George's hospital 
In this city, where he died of his In- 
juries Saturday night. 



Aeroplane to South Pole. 

Dr. Douglas Mawson, who is headeJ 
toward the South pole, has taken with 
him an areoplane capable of carryiny 
two passengers 180 miles without 
making a descent. Scientists say that 
the aeroplane will be useless to the 
voyager because of the tremendou» 
tempests which are prevalent in the 
polar regions. Far better for prac- 
tical uses would be a supply of eold- 
en grain belt beers, the wonderful 
food tonic and fatigue reliever. Taken 
propertly they Insure rest and a good 
digestion. If not yet. ri?ht away try 
them. Order of dealer or duluth 
branch of mlnneapolis brewing cona- 

pany. 

• 

Iowa Wife- .Murderer Dies. 

Cedar Rapld.«i, Iowa, July 8. — Guy 
Sells, who murdered his wife and 
fatally wounded himself after break- 
ing into her apartments, is dead. Sella 
had repeatedly threatened his wife's 
life. He went to a hardware store 
Thursday and purchased a revolver, 
saying that he wished to kill a dogr. 
From there he went directly to the 
house where the shooting occurred. 
Two young children survive the 
couple. 



t 



DULUTH BACKYARD GARDENS HAVE 
BEGUN TO SHOW PROFIT TO OWNERS 



-■i-%. 



BOVEY ii 

Bovey, Minn., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Laura Sullivan left 
Wednesuay morning for Minneapolis, 
where she will visit friends for a few 

Fred Gardner of Chisholra spent the 
Fourth here. 

Grandma Latham left Saturday noon 
for Superior to visit with relatives, and 
from there will go to Crosby to visit 
at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. 
Ingalls. Mrs. Webb Latham accom- 
panied her as far as Superior. 

Charles Weston and family of Grand 
Rapids spent the Fourth with friends 
In Bovey. ^ .^ 

Mrs. Meagher visited in Grand Rap- 
ids Thursday. 

Miss Jessie Dalton visited friends in 
Marble Sunday. 

A. Barron of Minneapolis spent the 
week in Bovey. 

A number of local citizens went to 
Marble Sunday to witness the ball 
game between Bo^-ey and Marble. 

Miss Bernice Provlnskl entertained 
friends from Dulutjj over the Fourth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillips visited at the 
Desonla home Tuesday. 




■'■ ■ ■!' < l 






A LAKESIDE GARDEN. 



-Photo bj McKenzla, 




Park Rapids Minn.. July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — A sane Fourth was 
observed here. There being nothing 
doing, the citizens went to the neigh- 
boring lakes and surrounding villages. 
Nevis, Osage and Wadena all cele- 
brated and scores of local citizens 
visited these towns. 

The dry weather has not affected the 
crops here visibly. There have been 
timely rains and prospects were never 
better for a bumper crop than this 
year. 

In the Carlton-Neste murder trial a 
jury was secured Thursday and at 4 
p. m. the trial began. The Carltons 
are being tried for the murder of Nesta. 
It is expected they will set up a plea 
of self defense. 

Application was made Thursday aft- 
ernoon to Judge Clannihan for the im- 
panneling of an especial grand jury to 
hear the complaint of Jennie Schmeister 
against Sam Robinson charged with 
the assaulting of little Jennie Schmeis- 
ser. 

Mrs. Lizzie Hawley, who has been 
visiting her brother, M. Levitt, return- 
ed to her home In Waupacca. Wis. 

U. S. G. Henry is visiting in the Twin 
Cities this week, having gone down 
July 4. He will remain away for sev- 
eral days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson of Twin Valley 
were the guests of J. D. Campbell and 
while here spent considerable time at 
the Gage cottage on Fishhook lake. 

Mr, and Mrs. F. Snow of Big F^lls, 
who have been visiting the home of 
Mrs. Snow's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
R. B. Smythe, returned to their home 
Wednesday evening. 

Robert Crossland of Delavan, Wis., 
is visiting with bis mother and ib 
spending his time at his mother's cot- 
tage on Long Lake. 

Sherman Weekley of Rock Rapids, 
Iowa. Is visiting friends here this week. 
Mr. Weekley was formerly in the 
jewelry business here. 

Mrs. Milliam Mallett is enjoying a 
visit from her brother, John Wilcox of 
Millbank, 8. D. He drove over in his 
auto and reports the roads in good 
condition. 

Anson Pimley and Harold Page are 
taking a week's outing on Fishhook 
lake. Thev will camp out and live an 
outdoor life while at the lake. 

Harry Todd returned to Pillager this 
morning, after a short visit with his 
father and mother. 

Grandpa Smith Todd, who has been 
living in Bemidjl IMo^y. came down 




1 




! 





THE ORPHANAGE GARDEN AT WOODLAND. 



—Photo by McKeniia. 



i*<i 



The back yard garden has begun 
to pay. 

For some weeks the Duluth back 
yard farmer has had green stuff on 
his table fresh from the garden In 
the back yard. Not only In dollars 
and cents, but in satisfaction, the 
premiums have been large. 

Radishes, lettuce, onions, rhubarb, 
strawberries and nearly every kind 
of fresh vegetables have graced the 
tables of Duluth back yard farmers 
foi^ some time and there certainly is 
a great satisfaction In saying: "Yes, 
all this was grown in the back yard." 

Never before this year has there 
been bo much interest in back yard 
gardens. Nearly every house owner 
in Duluth has a garden and everyone 
is making a success of it. 

The first place that visitors are 



shown is the back yard garden. Each 
row of plants is pointed out with 
pride and gardens are one of the 
chief topics of conversation in Du- 
luth. The back yard garden saves 
money, as many a Zenith City man 
can testify thus early in the game. 

Never did vegetables look healthier 
than do those In the back yard gar- 
dens of Zenith City men. Potatoes 
are up, some of them two feet from 
the ground and in blossom. Peas and 
beans are being served on Duluth 
tables from the back yard garden. 
Tomato plants, set out after the other 
seeds were planted, look fine. Even 
celery is being grown in Duluth gar- 
dens. 

The weather has been rather cold 
and corn has not grown as fast au 
it would under better conditions, but 



there are some good looking patches. 

"You don't know how much pleas- 
ure I get out of that garden," said 
one enthusiastic back yard farmer 
the other night as he was showing a 
visitor through. "I really had no 
Idea that things grew so fast. This 
year I have but a quarter of my lot 
in garden. Next year I'm going tQ 
dig up the whole lot. The things w^ 
have used from the garden even thu* 
far this summer have m^e a decided 
difference in the grocery bills. You 
see our family is small and so is ou^ 
garden. The cost of putting in thft 
seeds outside my own labor would 
amount to but a few cents. 

A part of the high cost of livingr- 
problem can be solved by utilizing th^ 
back yard as a garden. This ha« 
been proved by man" a Duluthian 
ajter thia veasoa's experience. 



- « 






"■ ^■m 



; 



-t-^ 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 
BEING HELD 



•whicli was to havr V een one oi tiu- «j»e- 

and had to l»f i ■ ' " 

rain, was held 
o i-locK TtM' N •! ! 1 ■■-•• '- 
ti.-sT part or the . \ eniug. 
-,.- formert In In «■ ^y ''»^ 
,.t twenty auto* «nt^i»d 
three prtxfs l> 
- . Tid r-cei*'fi1 
V. ..> ver% I»t- 



■" .unt of 

_ at f 

„ -d the 

ihtsn the 

city hall. 

the par- 

ln« given Robert 

t prize His auto 

deit. -rated with 



Tcackrs' School at Crooks- j |;-\^i, 
loD Africultural School 
Has Large Class. 

Noted Educators Including 

SopL Denleld of Dn- 

hith Speak. 



i.iin'mc and flfctES Uid U' He Maxwell 
Shr:nd^wa. di:L« like -Um-le Sam 
un'i aaiuteu ever" one^ wlwle Mr 
nd B urti,- daughter, Rcherta^ was 

ikf the < i»dde8s of uiherty. 

lia»t rere Vfd second prize 
auti' wa« df 
r; .sH avil .lapan»*>- 
t, Sui.h«-rland • 
auti' was dfi'Oi 
am all electric 
bunolies of r^' 
on every avaiUi: 
sat in the hack 



■w iy 



li 



l: ■ 

ll.- 

«■>. 
tr 



b 'XU. 

t- 

f- 

Ir 

t: 

I? 
T 

l! ■■ 

r ■ 
f:: ■ 

i- 
I 

ti.' 
» 

1,. 



• -la a: 

• vet'og- 
an: edu- 

r Mmnfe- 

• nunent 

,r:. ami »tlt 

. . :e laculty 

St-i\ lo ana Vtu- 

'■vartx Bulsliorow. 

• t ing 



and M 

In ii 



l;i\ 



»' eld 

,.ve u 

]..a 1- .' ■ address 

day iTesident L H. 

• '.nstiTiite at Me- 

was taken over 

I. bv ti>e Wiscon- 

grave one of tue 

ii.iustrial Educa- 

Today Prof 

ersity of Min- 

who are to speak 

■\d of the Duluth 

N PhilUps of Ai- 

each of ih*- thir- 

:';, ;.'■ ' i-'-esp 

-, ■■ -est; 

J.a > at 



wtil: cedar. 
■ nR Mttj r^ 
,..rd priae Hia 
.• h l.untinn. tta»C« 
and amiiai;. also 
carnutl.>nf tied 
Life "rncle Sam" 
seat and saluted a» 
ih.-\ passed tiiroufl. the streets 

Tualner s and M uellert" uiitos were 
..TV ni'-'-lv decoraled Several tliou- 
. .. .:.le Witt esaed the parade 

, ■ v V a no^eltv for Ironvc.od 

TUev paraded all she P'-l^^'ir'a' f,^'"^*^? 
of the Cit> and a^ iit.d the decision of 
the Judge* at tlie p osffnce 

georgTwm is 
at soldiers' home 

Once PromiBeot North Da- 
kotan, Veteran of War, En- 
ters Minn jsota Home. 

MlnneapnliB. Miun., July S— iSpectal 
»(> Tlie Herald >—(.>eorge H Walsh, who 
served tn the 1 hirieenth Minnesota 
regiment during the civil war and for 
n.iinv vears has been prominent in 
North l^lkota haMng resided at Gr«nd 
Fi»rk8 where lie suc-eeded 
ihf university 



r.ess at Wushmtrton. just t.s ?• '"H as 
the recipro( ity l)i:i it- passed repre- 
entatives fr..ni the agricultural .^tates 
m »»oth branches of congrea»i will in- 
sist on piving tree trade on manu- | 
tactured goods as well as on tarm 
proaucis. He predicts that the revised 
wool schedule m'ill be rushed through. ; 
then the cotton .schedule and the otiier , 
Lllis that propose taking the duty o.r ■ 
manufactured goo<!B ^^^a 

•And where m-;!! the president stand 
on these bills'^ he asked 'Will he 
dare opj.ost- them after liaving fought I 
for reducing the tariff on farm pr«»<l- | 

ucls" If lie should, what would be- 

ronie of his chances for re-election^ 

You know that no party can win on a 

I rot«-ciion platform unless the farmer* 

support tbe ticket And the farn.ers 1 

wlh not support a Repiil>luan tuKet 

oil a protection- for-manufacturera- j 

. nlv platform.' 

>4r. Sleenerson was -w v."";;. and hei son 

hosne by Mrs. Steenerson, He wih re- . «.nn net 

main in Minnesota until about Aug. 1. 




been completed 

•arted on the 

V . .; !, r>r. o. c. 

1,1 Third street. 

iiig made for 

Congregational 

($tes at Baudette. 

rt now being held 

eit Protestant de- 



ls the 
deputy 



tendent Ross of the 
1 for Chicago lor a 
home of his parents 
I The foundation h 
i and the framewi 
liBiidsome bungali 
Heleie is having 

Preparations a 
the jfbulldmg oj 
and E|)iscoi!al ol 
Kellgiou.s eervic 
there by tbe di 
nominations m a Iferap. tent. 

Joseph ftheeran of Faribault 
guest of his brotljef, Ctjarles. 
county auditor, ii •' „j_,. 

Miss l>oran ol^ : raturned yesterdw 
after a vl.lt wu»'*»l« lives ii> ^j^^ 
eouthern purt of ttie slate and in lowa. 
M J Lavermai) of Uoustoti. Texas, a 
stenograj.her. who left here six years 
ago after a two-i-»ar stay, 
which time he was manager 
strongest baseball team ^^^ ^'^f " /'*f 
ever had. and wliuih won first place 
m a league composed of Fort Frances. 
Rainy lUv.r. Baudette and \\ arroafl. is 
expected here for a brief visit 
Mr. and Mt s OR WatrouP 

of I'elland were here 8at- 

wert- accompanied by 

Westfield. I'a.. the lat- 



lo see her hrisband send a bullet into 
hi* brain. Gabriel, who lived in Two 
Rivers, had suflered intensely from 
cancer for over a >-ear and was visit- 
ing at Mishicott wlien he took hie 
life. 



during 
i.f the 



and C. 



IK auMinkee Fire 

Menominee. Mich.. July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The dining car con-; 
strucnon cat and sleepers of the Wis- j 
consln Northwestern railway were de- , 
stToyed by ftre at Wausaukee and half 
a million feet of logs and -'>o cords of 
l>ark were burned Tlie dining sleep- j 
ing and kitchen cars were used by the two 
cuustrucliun crew 



day aftfinooi, by the quick a'-^io", °* 
Jonn Andrews, who dragged him un 
c-onsc.ous. from the Heart rivet-, west 
the huspllai. Several young lelh^^J 
were enjoying a swim in a t'*'«l;'.*':^^'°* 

hole at that j.lace when V^^V"^*, f ,»?• '"Hiiickrey— (i^orge""Forhinaii. aged IB 
after diving irom the riglu bunk ul the HU.cKW ^^^«\^^^^^^ »,j. ^ • n.ud 

nver, was heard to call lo: help^ ^rn^exoTos ion that did not take the 

Valley City, N. ^ -^^'^'^^yj^fir^^J^Vs «> d?rectfon**'rxrc,ed He was struck in 

best fl^K»^^| «! ti,^ ta.e and two bad cuts were made 
)-#.i,K,= \v.'!rin^K- in his forehead and his Up was badly 
made five s^-nsatioual flights ^^ ''.^"^^^ . ^^^ ' ]_„. steplmn was 
day afteriioun and _eveiung ^_at_the tui.^^^^ ^^^^ ^t;^^^^ ^,^ 

** ! to draw them together. The 



man who seized her and held a hand- 
kerchief over her month She thinks 
the handkerchief was saturated with 
c-hloTotorm. as slie lost consijousness 
almost Immediately *<he c»n give no 
verv ilear desi-ription oi the brute. 

Hinckley — (Jeorge Forhman. aged 
vears, was liadly injured by 
can explosion that did not 



called 

stit.lies 



uf tlie railroad. 




B. Watrous 
urda> . and 
relatives from 



Isiipeming — Liouis H. Douglas was ar- 
rested and arraigned in Justn-e Gias- 



accompaniert ' ter being the 



wile of another brother 



: o 



a spfUlUilS. ea. 



ii» ii*iiii.i 



Teaeker* Be««g Well Tralaed. 

Supt C G SeMg lias gnen niucti 

X ■■ - e summvr school, as tiie 

•e all li-tting in thorough 

,.. the W'li. being done at the 

.n school of agriculture and 

V Id a great influence in sending 

•l!oo; students here later on 

u m ever-*- indication the enroll- 

;■ - .uming fall will tax the capac- 

■;,- .=rrii)ol again, despite the In- 

-r of buildings and im- 

1 : les. President Harvey, 

*■■ . :.; W.ld and tiie otiier out.^id^ 

^ , s have all stiown deep intt^rest 

Ic. Uf character of the work done by 

the scn.ioi of agriculture and expres.-- 

Bii-p-irir at trie advanced metliods and 

fine »M,^ipment of the institut ion 

YOUNGllAiuOSES 
MONEY TO HOLDUPS 

HeM Up Near International 

Falk and Relieved of 

$47 By Highwaymen. 

Int-rriationa. Falls, M;nn., July «■— 
Oimcial to The tl«rald. .—While George 
Monroe wap commg to town from Mid- 



elected 
where he 
and was 



in locating 
and bringing other m 
dustries to the No •iherr. Red R»^,^J '^^^y' 
"a^ been admitted to the 9t»te Sol- 
diers home at MlnnehuliB Falls, near 

"^A^fter serving three years In '^hf. «*j" 
war at its conclusions Mr wa.sn re- 
turned to the N.-rthwest, learned the 
printing trade aid during tenitor.al 
days of Dakota located at Grand Fork> 
where he later es ablished a newspaper 
and served as a Vnited States commis- 
sioner _ _^ 

AasMMM-d F»rti»». 

There fortune favored htm anti in 

time he amassed m comfortable fortune. 

Getting into polttics he was 

to the territorial legislature 

served with distinction 

honored with the position of pr*;s«dent 

f the senate T le divi.«ion of the tei - 

followed, and before the public 

of the subject of this .sketch 

eted he had secured the 

state university for Grand Forks^ at 

the exfienst- of great personal effort 

and n onsiderab e part of »'»« ^•■"/"nf- 

Evervwhere th-oughout the Dakotas 

Mr Walah was known as an astute 

politician libera. l!"^'»"'-«P*^'l*L?'';L; 
«en and one o the most generous 
friends a man e er had 

But in time hi fortune slipped from 
Mv grasp his health became hnpRl-ed. 
and both physical and menta. dt-Hme 
began with the result that the soldier 
boy of fiftv ye%rj. ago. who won honor- 
able discharge f om the service of l-.is 
countrv. is todi y an inmate of tiie 
Minnehaha Falls Soldiers home, where 
hf went Thursd lv of bis own accord 
and where he wi 1 perhaps pass the re- 
maining years i.? his lite 



WANT TURNPIKE 
IN MINNESOTA 

Effort Is Made to Sway Fed- 
eral Road North From 
Chicaga 

.-^L. Paul, Mint... July 8.— (Special to 
The Herald.* — Minnesota s good roads 
niav be links In the ioa*t-io-coa«t 
turnpike which the federal govem- 
nient contemplates building. Governor 
El>erhart and iieuben Warner, presi- 
dent of the State Automobile associa- 
tion have telegraphed memburs ol 
thepartr who are laymg out the ten- 
tative "course of tiie road, inviting 
them to come north from '-"^t'-^P". . ^. 
The party consists ol J H. Murpnj 
I of JSew York K H. Uippmcott. pub- 
' usher C. G A Loder. New \ ork. at- 



Icft for 

after a 

her sister. 



at Ban- 
of tlie same 
final proofs 
l)rummond, 
Andrew 
accom- 
irles G 
his home- 
receiving a 



the docks 
The city 



has 
now 



Mr*, Potter of Minneapolis 
her home Saturday exening 
visit of several weeks with 
Mrs J F. Swuri 

Alex I'.acbiier. postmaster 
nock, and George lnn>bar 
: ,,uMty. made Jiomesiead 
~ week before J H. 
• K of the district court. 
K. smuason and Carl Murray 
, pauied them as witnesses. •. harles G 
I Hull made final proof on 
! Htt'sd 

Capt L W. Wilson Is 
visit from las mother, from Eveietli. 

The high hose tower belonging to 
the city and located at 
been ordered removed^ . . - „« „ 
lias no use for it and as long as It 
stands there It will be a 
8(1 u was thought best 
moved. _ 

Miss Mildred Paulmnn has 
ilu j.osuion of assistant to Postmaster 
Josei.h Uoyd on account of the inten- 
tion of her parents to leave the cit> 

'^'lt'pu7;"criuy Auditor rharles 

fr^The'^r ^"^^ 'TtJi^'sHyf^r.u 

coiintv business, i.ertaining to the bond 
Hememet.t tecen.lv made between 
Itasca and Ko.iohiohtng <:ounties 

I O'ROl RKE DISCHARGEP. 



Wil 



It 

the 

the 

the 

At- 



menace to life, 
to have it re- 
resigned 



I 



tomey H O Bechlei. Justice of the 
-upreme court of Pennsylvania George 
r Allen, president of the Republic 
Trust company of New \ork. t. l 
Jenkins. F E. Moller and Ellsworth 
Sprague The men have a 1^'}f^^^ 
comniLssion to travel from the Atlan- 
ta to the Pacific, to pick a route for a 
reat automobile and wagoi; roau. 
have been traveling since June 



great 
They 



No Evidence Be Embewled From 
Great Northern at Hannah. 

Langdon. N. D., Jtily S.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Charges that Phil 
ORourke. relief agent for the Great 
Northern, had embeHCled cash l.elong- 
mg to the 



compan> while in its .-m ■ 
Hannali. fell Hat m court 



to 



tdvices 



ol 

ritory 

activities 

were com pi 



Th^ nar'v reached Cliicagii Tburs- i«pioy at »»—...-... _„i-.,,„,i f,,r 

The pat.> rea<. ^^j, ^^^^.^ Vhen the defendant was arraigned for 

u preliminary exanUnation 

The stale was unable to prove that 
there was any Intension upon the part 
OProurke to defraud the company 
casli. and he was disi iiarged. 



uf 



dav night and probably 

there today According 

from them, they have not determined 

their itinerary for the route west 

•Minnesota 8 roads are In such ex- 
cellent condition." Mr Warner said 
■that she should be u Idg bidder 
the coast-to-coast route.* 

Bl RIKII AT SANDSTONE. 

Georce Peps;. Old Resident \^ho 
Died in Mij*s«nri, Interred. 

.Sandstone Minn.. July K— (Special to 
The Herald. »— Funeral services were 
lield here today under Masonic auspices 
for Get.rtfe E I'egg a pi<»neer resident, 
who died last Thursday 



J of 

I of its 



^"' COOPER MIRDER CASE. 

Will (ome I p for Trial at Hillsboro 
Next ^ eek. 

Hillsboro. N D. July « — rSpeciH tc 
The Herald.)— When the district 
of Traill county begins next 
the Cooper murder trial will be 
Cooper Is charged with 



■wav 

th« 
tw 

ai-' 

«if 

wa 

•*■■ 

Wi. 
1 U r 



Tuan 

■till 
It 



T---W da'"r 



r. 

Cii. 

U 



ago. and when between 
he was accosted by 
who were loUering 
nd asked lot the time 
[le was looking at his 
suddenly grabl>ed him 
. the ground, when 
'■an up hi.s pockets. 
.ri casti and his 
lagliwaymen re- 
but they made 
v* ... lus money, and 
search, made under 
.reclion of Deputy Sberift.- Spet^.- 
and Holler, the hold-up men are 

1,1 h-LrCTt: 

^ SI r')bl>erie8 

ioii No cross 

(ttjvu an I'Utlet. so the 

It (inl\ avenues of es- 

aici trainmen along the 

: warned to be on the 

■ulpriis. so their arrest 

expected The victim 

.n.-. : .. and robbery is well 



GET MANY VOLTS; 
CAMM UVES 

North Dakotan and Man Who 

Saved Him liecovering From 

Electric Shock. 



in Greenville, 
moved with lim 
agu 



court 
week, 
called. 
killing a fore- 
man «in one of liis fathers farms near 
this city during a disi\uie as to who 
who was in authority 
er. at the time, being 
state. Since the 



as to 
the older Coop- 
Mi) where he had moveu wim ma ^j-. at the time, neing atisent from the 
ttmilv about s year ago. state. Since the shooting the n.-fend- 
Kver since leaving this place the , an* ha« '•**« *'•««- ""''«'• * »^"""" ^°'"^' 
'amU> has suffered willi considerable furnished l)y his f ather. 

ri' 1"'"»P?.".1. '-urr^irikl^Jir.U? i FonTl-NElXHERTlOTHES. 



for 
daugiiter Je.ssie. who is suffering from 
a sevtuie attack ot typloud lexer, and 
neither" was able to attend the tunera- 

iff- I'egg was wei: and favorablj 
known in tliis i>art of the country, and 
ft. led man> nigh offices in civic and 
fraternal affairs A wife and six chil- 
dten survive him. 

A J Hall. ai. auf'tioneer. was sow- 
ousl^ hurt Tiiuraday afternoon whiiv Inp a 

unloading a piano, which slipped anu found in — - - _^ - ,,.^_u, -.,,o 

partly feU on him, and it is feareu tie, a. Warwick of Everett. Wash., -who 
sustained Internal Injuries 



COMES TO SUPERIOR. 



Northern 



-I. 
.m 



'it; la.'- ' 

. Mr ^. 
fir escaj't 
a careful 



ti»wn. he 



having been for 
r-hart;e i>f the 

Imt has re- 
•:Way. 



IRONW(K>R AITO PARAGE 



Twenty Machines (ompete fo! 
Three Prize> OftVred. 



the 



Ironw'Ofl, Micti.. 
The Herald • — ^The 



.lulv S. — 'Sj>vciai to 
automobile parade, 



Wahpeton. N D.. July 8 —Although 
about 2.3iMt vol s passed through Max 
Cameron's body as he grasped a loose 
wire hanging from a poie. he is still 
alive So is Gilbert Estes. who was 
successful m freeing Caitieron by 
trrabbing hold of him and puUinc 
Both men wen badly shocked by the 
high current, but are recovering 

iSTEENERSON IS 
IN TWIN CITIES 

Minnesota Congressman 
Stay Away From Capital 
Awhile. 

St Paul. Miun.. Ju;> 8. — (Special to 
The Herald. >— According to Congress- 
man Halvor Steenerson who If back 
enjoying the cool breexee of Minne- 
sota after suffering from the torrid- 



Father rilnn Who Figured in Dietz 
Surrender Leave> \^ inter. 

Couderay. Wis.. July 8. — ^ Special to 
The Herald • — Rev. Father Pilon. who 
has been pastor of St. Peter's church 
at Winted. Wis., and this place for the 
last two years, has been transferred to 
Sujtwrior. and becomes an assistant to ; 
P.ishop Schlnner at the Sacre.j Heart . ^ •«•;- 

cathedral Rev Father Duenn of LVnaon, >^ IS- 
lUiiiielander will succeed Father PUon 
as pastor at Wint.T and tiiis place. 
l>uring the Dietz seige and capture last 
fall Father Pllon was at the front with 
the deputies in case he should have 
been needed. 



About fl2.0(M» Found on V oniai 
Taken From Train. 

ForguB Falls. Mum., July 8 — 
ISherUT Billings is thinking of open- 
bank to take care of the wealth 
the clothing of MUm L.ouise 

lA. " 

was taken from the Great 
coast train here Wednesday becaus«e 
she was acting Insanely He huf< been 
advis-d she e8cai»ed from her keep- 
ers at Everett and an ofticer is com- 
inr for her There was l':M>0 in 
cash, a 12.020 note, a $2,000 stock 
certificate ana diamonds, which 
brought her fortune up to a.bout Jl^ - 

[OOU, all of which she 
ut»on her person. 



ers court on a charge oj a.s.sault and 
battety, prefefted by Carl Ramquist. 
a menil>er of tlie Ishpeming band, which 
played here for the Home Coming and 
Fourtli or Julv celebrations Douglas 
was found guilty and committed to 
tlie county jail for teii days in default 
of paying a fine of $!•' and costs 

Negaune* A new Babcock and 

cox 5«Ht-hor8e power boiler is l>eing 
inslalied at the city power plant, 
may be a few days yet l»efore 
boiler is put into commission as 
work has l>een delayed because of 
nun-arrival of pipe. 

Calumet — The l>uluth. Shore & 
lantic Railway company started a 
sleeping car service l»etween Caiumei 
and St Ignace. commencing Satur- 
day. The sleeper will leave Calumet 
on Sunday, Wednesday and Friday 
nights and St. Ignaie on Tuesday, 
Thursday and .Saturday 

Ishpeming — John H. Hayden of Char- , 
lotte, Midi., father of Mrs. Agn«s H 
Barber of this city, has lieen critically 
ill the past several days. Mrs .Barl>er 
has been at Charlotte for nearly a week 
and her nephew. Gei'rge S Hayden, 
left tor there Wednesdny , ^ 

Hancock — Hancock lodge of Modern , 
Samaritans will be sulijected to a Intie , 
forcing process in its growth w iih- \ 
in the next few days. Imi»erial 
cers are In Hancock to oversee 
general a menii)ershU) campaign. 

Houghton — Capt B F Chynoweth 
has received a letter from his son, 
John, who is making the trip to Bos- 
toji with Rov Carnahan in the latter s 
fortv-foot sailing sloop, that the boys 
are all right and happy. The son telle 
of a few experiences while in Whtle- 
fish bav, such as being becalmed for 
twelve hours, on dut> for forty-eight 
hours straight and aground for two 
hours. . . 

Calumet— The Calumet township 
board inBi>ected the Jeffery farm road 
recently c<impleled by Highway Com- 
mi.ssioner Mugford. Thursday afternoon, 
and B report will be suitmitted to the 
board at its next meeting. July 11 
This highway is one-quarter of a mi 
m length and connects with 
L.inden road about one 
Florida. ... 

Hancock — The executive committee 
of the Hancock home-coming celebra- 
tion has ai>polnted Al Guascli 
buigoniaster at the German 
the celebration during 

July 1' 

Houghton— The funeral 
Harris of Baltic, who was killed Mon 
day by a fall of rock. waf; 
Wednesday afternoon from the 
M E church, with interment at For 
est Hill cemetery The acode.ni 
caused Hams death occurred 
tlie afternoon and the young man 
six hours afterward with a b 
back He is survived by his parents 
who live in England. 

Calumet — Edgar Olsor. left 
dav night for Hibbing. Minn., after vis 
iting his parents in Calumet, 
aoompanied by his mother 
two children, who w-ill spend a 
weeks at Hibbing „ . . ;, ,. ,.„_. 

Marquette— W. G Smith, day bag- 
gageman for th.' South Shore railroad 
Til Marou.nte. was a victim of the in- 
tense and unusual heat here Wednes- 
dav afternoon A physician J^'*" Z""^- 
moned and Mr Smith ^•^Z^*'''';/;' 't^'^ 
home His illness is reported not to i»e 

serious 



declares have been the 

lar in the state. L^ucky^ Bob St _ _ 

* "* " "" " "" ' and 

Barnes cunty fair grouiidt before '^""" ~ ~ ~ 

crowd of 5.UUU people. „ ^ „r I 

Wahpeton N D —Sheriff Moody of 
Richland county has just returned' 
trom a trip to Montana, bringing back 
prisoners. One ot them is John 
'Wilson, alias Jack Wilson alias Jack 
' Colwell. who is alleged to have violated 
the prohibition law a number of times. 
Aberdeen. S. 1». — Adeu C. Ressengule, 
w ho was apjiointed chief of police when 
the commission form of government 
was organized, has resigned. 

Devils Liike, N D. — Nei.t Sundav will 

b«. the feature day at l.>evils L-ake ^^^^ _ _ 

Chautauqua. It will be aviation day jj^j^.^.j. -^^t^nesdav, conflsoating a l>arrel 
and there wlU be other big special at- ,^j j,^^^ ^j,^ some whisky. Sendmg in 
tractions _ ,„ I some decoys before them, one of tlie 

Fargo. N. D. — Mr. and Mrs VT B i ^^^j^ employed bv the sheriff neigliefl 
Hancock returned Thursday from an ^^^ ^ uorse wlien he liad succeeded in 
extended trip through Europe, wliere j j.(hasin limior The sheriff anO 

tiiey went the first oi the year. Tbe^^j^^mv then appeared, arrested Bello- 
, voyage was a most pleasant one and|j,.j;|^, and seized tbe wares ^ ^. _ 

most of tlie principal centers of Euro- | si Cloud- A fatality occurred Thurs- 

visited 



necessary ..w - — - , . 

tn>v is reported to be doing well, but 
there i« mote than a possibility tnat 
his eves are injured from the shock. 

Bemidii — Earl Geil. city treasurer 
and chief oi the ftre department and 
oae of the oldest and most prominent 
uWim of Bemidji. has disposed of the 
Ramore hotel wuioh he has cupducteo 
here, and has leased the Holmes hotel, 
a modem eight -story stone 
in Minneapolis. _ 

Little Falls— Sheriff Frank 
strong and l>epwty F fX.. Heroux 
1 the Tom xielioieskl bliiio pig 



struct ura. 



Arm- 
raided 
at Swan 



j»ean countries were 

Fairmount. N. D — Two hundred far- 
mer friends of Dr T. 1- Bimberg i»f 
Campbell sub.scribed $600 to build him 
a new office Tiiirty-five of them re- 
ported in one day to begin the work 
and the building was turned over to 
liim comjilete today 

1 (evils Lake. N D — Several hundred 
head of cattle may soi»n be shij«i»ed In- 
to North Dakota for grazing purposes 
il the plans of the big packers are car- 
ried out 

Bismarck. N D. — As a result of a 

wedding Celebration held at oden.se 

Monday. William W. Schwartz is lying 

at the point of death in St Alexius 

I hospital ill this city. Two men got In- 

. to a fight at the celebi-ation and 

j Schwarti endeavored to separate tlie 

I rombatants and prevent eitlier from 

' dtung injury u> the other. He was 

' struck on the head with an iron bar 

m the hands of one ol the men and the 

i.ffi ' blow crushed his skull It is thought 

t^nd I »t the hospital that the man s recovery 

1 IS \ e,r\ doubtful. 



i MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



dav afternoon sliortly after 1 o clock 
at Rice, when the IVj- year-old son ol 
John Gazette, the Pace merchant, was 
killed Tlie little boy was run over l>y 
the w«»rk tram whi -h is stationed at 
tiui p.unt but the exact cans.' and 
nature of the a -cident w ill ever remain 

a mystery. ^ 

Invernatlonal Falls— A man named 
Clark w ho was unknown to our people 
and without friends, died at the 
pital Tuesday from alcoholism 
was buried Thursuay nuirnmK 
count vs cxpt^nse. ai tlie city cemetery. 
bv Indertaker Green l»ecea«ed wa« 
aiiout r>.'> years of age. v-..-.», 

Bratnerd— ^ L Staples of the North; 
em Pa ihr depot was .<-.udd«nly 
to Lincoln Thursday to assist the 
jigeni of the Northern Pacihr in de- 
I fending a law suit asainsi the 
w-hlch has l»ecn brought about 
!the loss of a su.re l»ullding ami 
I tents w-hlch were alleged to have 
' s«t aftte from the sparks of a 
tive The parties bring a 

til 
A Hun toon lias re- 
ceived trom tlie engraver a beautiful 
ivorv gavel, encircled by an engraved 
band of gold, which was present.'d to 
him by tbe State Bankers asso< 
at Its recent meeting at BenuUji 



The parties 
ges a.f 
Moorbead — Lew 



liOS- 

and 

at the 



called 
claim 
n de- 
railroad 
through 
■ ! con- 
been 
locomo- 
( laim of 



IK.iMiO damage.s against the company 



-latiOD 



the Lake 
mile easV of 



to 
village 
the week 



be 
at 
of 



of Helyar 

:i- 

held 

Baltic 

For- 

that 

during 

lived 

broken 



Wednes- 



He 
and 



V as 

her 
few 



Moorhead — Orris Oliver, administrator 
of the estate of the late Howard F 
Catlin, who was an engineer on the 
Great Northern system has settled 
the deaUi claim made by the heirs out 
of court. In a perfectly satisfactory 
manner to all concerned. l>e<eased was 
killed while in tlie performanc of his 
duty, at Niles. Minn.. July :i, 1S»HI. and 
the settlement was i»erlected on tlie 
anniversary of that date The parents 
of the deieased live at BamesviUe 

Princeton — G A. O'Reilly ol Manila. 

P 1. brother of Mrs J. J Skalien and 

Mrs T J. Kaliher arrived liere un,ifion- 

,iav evening from Chicago and departed 

f..f Washington. D C on Wednesuay. 

1 M"- O'Reilly is superintendent of the 

i Manila schools and is in this country 

j aF a leptesentative of the Phlllpp'ne 

go\-ernmenl 

Roseau— The largest sturgeon ever 

I caught in the l^ke of the Woods— as 

far as anv one here knows— wag 

brought in on the Isabel the hrst part 

I of the week It was caiignt near Long 

! Point by Louis Paim and his assistant. 

! Fred Peterson, who had quite a time 

1 getting the big fellow into the boat. 

■ He weighed Z'.if> pounds and dressaj 

120 pounds, the big difference being be- 

<-ause of about tifty pounds ol extra fat 

inside of H _, . __, 

Stillwater — Frank Neiman, aged 

about :ui years and living on a farm 

n»"ar big Carnelian lake, was severely 

Injured this week by being ki<ked by a 

horse His face was lacerated and his 

nose split, reiiulnng severa! stitches to 

r-lose the wound. He was also Injured 

on the breast, but no bones were 

broken 

Long Prairie — one of the 
mos 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



Ashland — L'onsiderabU hav w^ 
caught in the heavy rains of the past 
few days While some liay lias beei^ 
put up. <ons!deralde more has l»een 
mowed and >s now on the ground and 
s.mie fields have not been V*".'L e-nol 

Madist>n — At the close of th» fiscal 
vear just ended. the «tate treasury 
."•ontained $:;..MM),9?.4 KK in all of »« 
funds The general fund, out of ^.nij-n 

comes the current «'^I'*'"««f ^"J,,.,!!- 
state and roost of the appropriations 
made by the legislature, contained fl,- 

' "'Manitowoc—,! E Plumb, wi.olesaie 
grocer has been offered the ofht^e ox 
head of the new city water works com- 
mission, which will manage the new 
municit>al water plant 

Milwsuke. Otto Tauberl. ar 

by tiie Tinted Stales immlgtalion au- 
thorities on the charge of bringing 
alien woman to this country 
moral puriioses. was 
bound o\'<^r to tii 



rested 



an 
foi im- 
on Thursday 
federal district court 
under bond.'^ ..f $1. <•»(). which h- w-«s 
unable K- furnish. The woman Grctcli- 
en Broniea, was released and 
held as a witness against 
trial Immigration Inspector 
E Schubert. Chicago, told of 



will be 
iilni at the 



a flat at 8(>4 



.lohn 



■^■^ntf*'*'*^^^^ 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



uRjwi^^^rw-M-rT— "-^^^^ 



Bi.smarck. N Ii— Kenneth Gibson, the 
IR-year-old son of W. L Gibson ol this 
city, was saved from drowning Tues 



^1 ii. a r;-to-S tie. 

'C I I Fergus Falls- 

O I erirl of 14 wa 

J near tiie mterse 

****** and the Northe 

ison. the girl B home is 

_d- aI.Im n«-t/4 uV^<.^ U'flC v*^1 



the couple living in 

Str«et • 

Jefferson— The residence of 

Fronimader. a farmer living """"> "f 

this citv. burned ti> the ground Tl»e 

ftre started from a d^feitlve chimney 

1 Br >dhead — WiUiam VolihavUt a 

, .^ .... closest and t hricklayer fell from a two-storv buiio- 

spectacular games ever witnessed I ^ng breaking his ne( U and severing tns 

■ ' ' -' " spinal eord He cannot live 

Milwaukee- Waller V^ Hiller ha* 
be«in appointed supervisor of collec- 
tions of the Bell telephone system » 
the Middle West His terr.tory em- 
braces the stales of V isconsm. Ohio. 
Illinois. Indiana and Michigan BIT. 
Hillei has been with the ^ is<-onstn 
Telephone company for the pRSt twelva 
veiirs and has held tlie j.osition of as- 
sistant treasurer for four years 



on a local diamond was that of the H. 
P (..onrads of St Paul and the Long 
Prairies who batted seventeen innings 



— Wednesday evening a 
as criniinallv a.ssaulted 
ction of Sheridan street 
rn Pac.ifl( tracks The 
girls home is on Mill street south, 
and .she was returning from an errand 
just at dark, wiien siie was met by a 



was carrying 



KILLED FOR HIS MONEY. 

Murdered 



MAKES INVESTMENTS, 



Man 
Mitchell, S. D. 

Mitchell. S. D.. July 8.— The 
of a man found 



lioodhue. Minn.. Man Buys Interna- 
tional Falls Property. 

International Falls. Minn.. July &.— 
Special to The Herald »— C L Parkins 
of Goodhue. Minn., recently sold his 
telei)hone exchange to the Northwest- 
ern Telephone company. He has com- 
menced to invest here having pur- 
chased five residence lots on Lightn 
Btre-t. in block 75, on w^hich he «>^- 
pecis to build a number of houses, and ,[^'^^^1'^ 
several of them at onoe 

A P Therman of Pearl. Ill . l«rt 
his home Friday evening afi«r a visit 
at the home of James A Dawson 
w«w» accompanied by Miss 
Dawson, who wil; visit relatlvss at 
Pittsf leld 

W. N. Hurlburt, assistant to Superin- 



body 

a creek here 
been identified 
of Lyndoti. Wis 
have been mur- 
dered for his money, his throat be- 
ing cut and his pockets rifled Pa- 
pers on the body indicate Dore car- 
ried $2,000 on his person 



a man louna in 
Thursday night has 
as that of John I>ore 
Dore is supposed lo 



ASHLAND FLOIR MILL 

IS LN NEW HANDS. 



to 



TheBevera^e 

For All 

CI asses 



^XPrfTTi 



.-irtdr 



for 

nsit 
and 
Hannah 




tor 
'out 




MEN!^^ 



NERVOUS OR DISEASED 



TREN6TH AND VITALITY RESTORED 



Toung and middle-aged men. if you have vi Uated the laws of health or beer 

'V Indi^-cretions or excesses and <0'isciou8 of a constant drain upoi: 

do not permit your health and strength to be sapped away. Do not 

Ti . s and drains to break down yoir constitution Insanity, nervous 

: !-v8iva] suffering are in most cases due to neglect. Awake to 

: and preserve your manhoo. 

...-■ ouragec ■ .' e poor 

-iy*'mik1J''you - -K. ^vigoriius "^n rmanlv. I have cured thousands 
diseased men and can cure you 



: aiinii 
true I 



m; 



and vital powers If you are 
m-n)orv lack an;bition, heart palpitation. 
„*,. reconstru-'tive and vitalizing methods 
an I manly. 1 have 
I on't give tip in despair becau.-^e 
•i;. ... _. companies and free prescriptions' have failed to cure you 
Your case deserves the persona! attention am professional skill of an 
- -ienced and trustworthy specialist. My orlg nal and exclusive methods 
;.ecifi ally m all ca.ses of W»aknes»es. Dimins and Nervo-Mtai ail- 
^■ and will re-establish : 
ingly incurable cases 
jcuperlv treated have l>een pe: r-.... :i»-i u 

'em of ' treatment after tiiey liad l>een given 
the mos«t noted jihysiclar.s Uc'A\ in '' " •?■■' 
build up your physical strength 1 

oowers by promotini; iticreast . ... . 

her Pelvic disotders ar- jus a^ satisiactory "^ "r**"*'j;r'**, ,^ «-T„«;,i 
u„,„r.l rn.rf,nrs:^.»i^r^«^^ 2;:r*m.\'Sr l£rn»l^^^^^^ ^'"--"' Troubles I-r^.- 

'JX "i^;"!'"";. ^'nri?i;iri.r.t;r*;tr^^ArV'^»"r^^^ ••> .-."le-. n.etb..o.. I very man 

V ' hft^ • - to ^^ afflicted witl atiy of the above ailments «h^'^'" '^^.'7',^%^"^^\^'7 

. .-^ of his u.-.: .'■: t experiment with dis. a*.e. Come to me at once Tuu want the best 

yve "have 'fired ^thousand.^ of patients for the last twenty years In Duluth 
citv to citv, like other so-ca led specialists , _ . 

located 'or eight veurs at No 1 West Superior streeV u„n,iavK ift 

hours of K a. m and 8 p. m. daily. Sunoajs iw 



n the nuwt stubborn and 

were neglected or im- 

-.i by my own modern sys- 

uv as Incurable by some of 

I ,f ..id countries. I wi:: 

: '.al faculties: 

and good 



to weak rcati.s My methods 
I rrlhral OI>«truetit>n». 1 ■- 
d IllHtreMlug v.vm|>li>iiif> 



serious- 
medical 



e 
n^-i c' mii^''' from 

We Kie permanent 'v 
and can be c •••! free of charge ■ ' the 

Con n and corresponu e and conndentiai. 



'We stay right here and 
comer Lake avenue. Du- 



1 p m 



PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

LAKE AVENUE AND SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 



Ashland, Wis., July S— (Special 
The Herald » — The Ashland flour mill 
hands; this week, becoming 
the property of the Jackson Milling 
company of Stevens Fotnt Herman 
H Pagel. for the past nineteen y<»arB 
manager of the mill at Stevens Point, 
will be the new manager «-nd '' *^ 
prfwunied he will move to Ashland 
with his family The change In the 
ownership to the Ashland mill w-as 
brought about by the death of Sena- 
Stoui, his widow desiring to close 
certain lines of business which 
she could pot be burdened '^itli It 
is understood that Secretary W ngnt 
of the old company will retain an 
interest In the Ashland mill The 
purchase of this property by the 
Stevens Point people will, it is under- 
stood, result in the mill beinn re- 
opened very st.on. Mr. Pagel is well 
known in the flo ur trade 

NEW MILWAT KEEBLOCK 
I ON PLANKINGTON SITE. 

I Milwaukee. Wis.. July 8.— A tiinety- 
I nine vear lease on the PlanklngKin 
house block. '»^'hlch include^ the prop- 
erty between Second and ^ e^^ ,^ ^i"*^ 
streets, fronting north on t.'*an«J "*»'' 
nue was signed yesterday afternoon 
bv G A. Harvey. Cleveland, acting for 
CharieTw Somers. a millionaire coal 

|-^V}^;t!^'^^t^^^n^ieen-^^r? 
office building, a theater and a hotel— 
! w-m be erected In their plac e 

TRYING TO (lETHAZEN 

j CHARGES DEFERRED. 

St. Paul. Minn,. July ^—^^T^^'^'i,^^ 

I The Herald. >— Pressure is '^'"^ 
brought to bear to defer action on the 
charges against S-heriff Hazen of I»e.- 
tranU county until the cases againsi 
Dr Dumas and others charged with 
iiicendiarlsm are settled ,„„, , 

It is declared that his removal froi.i 
office at this time would prejudice the 

I I cases of the state in CasE and Bel- 
I trami counties. 

■♦ 

Cancer Victim Kills Rolf. 
Manitowoc. Wis.. July b— Startled 
bv the click of a revi>lvor 
hammer failed to eM-l 
cartridge, Mrs FTtuili 



THERE IS no prepared bev- 
erage of such general popu- 
larity as beer. . 

Rich and Poor alike are its patrons and 
are offered equal advantage when ordering 
Fitger's Beer, as there is but one qualit>- 
and that the very highest in the brewers' 



art. 



Ji^er/J^e^^r 



Licmai qus 



Ite miU 

ana me* 

k it 



D 



ri&J 



'/-r. 



:-- -U 



Best By Ovw 25 Years Te«t 

is aWlutcly pure, nourwhing and appctixing. 
and adicatc flavor, togctkcr witk ite rcfrcBKing 
1 quaKtics make it ideal for the home. 

\natL your mcaifi. It -w^ill quiet 
your nerves, aid aigcftion and 
keep your body and brain in 
d trim to -work. 



Gladstone Said: 



>.v< 



"How can 1. wkc drink S"^ 

win* and bitter be«r all my 
Uf«. in » oomforiabU room 
and among trlenfls, cooly 
stand up and *dvt»e bard- 
workinr ieho^ creature 
tc take ths pled»«7" 



gOO( 



Fitger Brewing 
Company 



DulutK, Minn. 



when the 

de the first 

vjabriel turned 



-r* 



It 



m 



fi^m 




} 



ipB »■ ■■ ■ 




-■■^ 



TfTrr""*"" 




22 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 





KB 



sm 



« 



INQUIRIES FOR FACTORY 
SITES ON THE WATERFRONT 



Real Estate Mea Report That 
Manufacturers Are Look- 
ing to Duluth. 

Activity of Week Largely Con- 
fined to the Outlying 
Divisions. 



With the mUl^•vImnu'r ' .■'• ess now in 
fu!! sn-i-K. ::trl.j of ;: happened 

jj- . I during the 

paM •A.tjx. aui .iH.v . . v.ected for the 
rest of this month and August. The 
general marktt and the condition of 
the cror*^ in the West, will have little 
bf--^'!' f it IS i:uid, upon the transuc- 
t. ihi» field of business. but 

Bi. - : - U's^t- two Ivatures of the busi- 
ness world turn out well, or even fairly 
well, the fall promises to be an active 

one. 

• • * 

Intjuirif^s somewhat out of the ordin- 
ary !f>r this time of the year were re- 
e- ■ ;it«er of the bigger real 

es during the wet-k, and 

witii '.Mvin (.'.•:ne the prospects of land- 
ing for I'uhuh some more industries. 

Tlirtf inquiries were received by one 
firm f"r sites along the water front, 
and tile general tone of the letters 
seemed to indicate that the writers 
meai ' • --nss. Water front sites in 
DuUi- .tiractive propositions, and 

the i ... .- ..;e said to be very reason- 
aM>. vvhlK- their advantages are great. 
L>the- firms also reT'ort that they have 
been . ' - • .uiries for water 

front- , ,^ . 

The turn which roivtd the three in- 
quiries relative t > v.attr fronts, also 
received . g:arding a suit- 

ablf» sit. iiciory. the par- 

ti- ::!^' i:i i;^.tii letter that they 

8' :>us of enti^ring this tleld. 

Sh :. I .: locate in L'uluth it will prob- 
ablv p'.:t ;ip a large factory. 

An " Triiry <>f tiie same firm was 
for ; r a" paint concern, which 

ha" ' .. n view for a location. This 

c manufactures all kinds of oils 

an :its and will carry on its work 

on a big scale should it come to this 
city. ^ , 

Little interest has been shown in 
down tc-wn property, and the deals 
w Tve been on for some time for 

:^ street parcels are still hang- 

ing :ire. Two deals were closed during 
the past Week for First avenue east 
propc rtv. one the old C. Volland prop- 
erty i.n the t-ast side of First avenue 
east. between Superior and First 
streets, for JS.t'OO. and the other on the 
sanie side of the avenue, between First 
and .Sei'ond j'.:-— '--^. fvr It'.Si'O. 

* « « 

Business in the divisions adjacent to 
the steel plant is still booming, and 
the agents for the different tracts re- 



port that the in(i 
fast, and many d' 
each week. 

A. C. Volk & C 
lots this week in 
including two bii 
bing people. Man 
made for lots In 
business streets. 
• 

Jela Kaznarlch 
this firm a site in 
ed pdans for a li 
construction on a\ 
in a few days. 

Another lot wa 
party, who plans t 
ness block. 

« 

Richardson. Da 

have the Norton's 
report that eight 
tills division last 
average weekly sa 
lier. Already foui 
been erected thre 
otliers will be st 
others have plan 
there. Those bull 
the steel plant. 

There are two 
cated in Gary, and 
one of Duluth's 
companies is golr 
next week, openin 
.\ local coal and f 
yards in the steel 
a short time. 

« 

W. M. Prindle 
there is consider; 
Orescent View I'a 
in the Crosley P 
Kits having been 
several prospects 

Whitney Wall s 
continued moveme 
the division near 
neigh iKirhood of v 
way c<:«mpany v 
Others having lot.' 
by. reptirt similar 
people are being a 
ity. During the 
provement has li 
streets, through 
Central Hillside 
and on account oi 
many people have 
ritory. 



uirles are coming in 
•als are being closed 

o. have sold several 
Gary First division, 
liness sites, to Hib- 
V inquiries are being 
this division off the 

* * 

has purchased from 
Gary, and has start- 
rge boarding house, 
hlch will be started 

< sold to a Kewatin 
he erection of a busi. 

• « 

r & Harrison who 

Steel I'lant division, 

lots were sold in 

week, and that tlie 

le there is that num- 

teen residences have 

and nxt week four 

arted, while several 

s to build homes 

ding are working at 

lumber concerns lo- 

it is understood that 

biggest lumberii;g 

g to enter the field 

i a big branch there. 

jel concern will open 
plant section wltiiin 



& Co. report that 
ible activity in the 
rk division and also 
irk division, several 
sold this week, and 
>eing in sight, 
tates that there is a 
nt in the market in 
the boulevard in t!ie 
■hich the street rail- 
/ill extend its line. 

in the .':ections near 
conditions, and many 
tracted to this lucal- 
past year much Im- 
een done along the 
the activity of tha 

Improvement club, 

these improvements 
moved into that ter- 



Easy Terms ! 

Good seven-room house, cen- 
tral; East Seventh street — 
sewer, bath, etc.; full lot — 
$2,500; $200 cash. 



C. L RAKOWSKY ft CO. 

201 Exchange Building. 



■^^^^»^>^>^>^s^>^»^>^»^^^^^.^^^^^^^^^^^^^»^^ ^ 



Business Property 

If you are looking for West End 
business property, see us at once. 
We have a 50-foot lot on Superior 
street with store and flat buildings 
f^nt pav better than 10 per cent 
net and the increase in the value 
of the lot will make you rich. 

Eby & Gridley, 

508 ralladio Bl<1g. 



Other divisions In the outskirts of 
the city have been attracting the peo- 
ple, and they are being built up fast. 
Many small house i are now under con- 
strtiction and mere are planned. 

Charles L. Rakowsky & Co. report 
that they have 1 ad a lively in«iuiry 
for property and that the outlook is 
bright. Earnest money was placed 
with them for a lot on East Ninth 
street, upon which the the prospective 
purchaser is goins to build. The lot 
will sell at fl.lOo and is on the pro- 
posed car line. T lis company also has 
earnest money oa a vacant lot on 
South street in the East end which will 
sell for $400, which will be improved 
by the purchaser. 

• • * 

C. L. Rakowsky & Co. negotiated the 
sale of the proper: y at 624 East Eighth 
street from Paul 8abrowsky to J. W. 
Carpenter, for |l.i>00, and also the 
property of B. F. Hathaway, described 
as lots 29 and 30 and the easterly one- 



half of lot 31. block 6. Princeton Place, 
to W. E. Kellogg, for |3,S00, 

« « • 

Richardson, Day & Harrison sold a 
lot in Chambers division to Andrew 
Naalsund for $500, and another in the 
same division to Alfred Long for $400. 
Both men propose to build homes on 
the lots. 

« * • 

John A. Stephenson has leased the 
basement of the Sherwood block to the 
I>uluth Casket & Undertaking Supply 
company for three years. The casket 
company is now moving into its new 
quarters. 

• « « 

The Marshall-Wells company has 
secured the lease on the old Clyde Iron 
works plant on Lake avenue, now oc- 
cupied by the Duluth Show Case com- 
pany and will use it for a harness and 
collar factory. 

• * « 

Noe Castengtiay has sold lot 4, block 
19, Walbanks addition, to Fred C. 
Smith for $2,654. 

• « • 

Roderick Murchison has sold to Sura 
Sosnovsky, the westerly one-half of lot 
6, West Fifth street, Duluth proper, 
First division, for $3,400, 

• « • 

N. M. Turnquist has purchased from 
Gust Hokanson the westerly one-half 
of lot 10, block 10, Chester Park divi- 
sion for $1,640, 

• « • 

Alvlne L Chance has sold to Louis La 
Montague fractional parts of lots 9 
and 10. block 3, Gay's division, and of 
lots 9 and 10, block 26, Marine division, 

for $1,500. 

• • • 

The Western Land association has 
sold to P. George Hansen lot 431, block 
85, Duluth proper, Second division, for 

$1760. 

• • • 

The Lakeside Land company sold to 



(Continued on page 23, first column.) 



ATTRACTIVE HOME WHICH WOULD 

COST $4,500 TO BUILD IN DULUTH 




vi/ 



I^RCMTCCT. ' p^^J^ 



I 




^Veranda 



«- 



^ 



trRRACt 



O 




TiROT Tu^-R PLA/ii OiLConp^ViM^ eC£/^ 



■hrfari. 



., L nt i "^ 



The above plan and perspective 

^ow3 a nicely arranged house, built 

on the story and a half plan. The 

front floor has a large living room 
with a beamed celling and a fireplace. 
The dining room is large, having a 
large buffet built across one side with 
ca.«e:nent windows above. The kitchen 
is well arranged, having built-in cup- 



boards en two 

stairways are la 

waste any space 

contains three 1 
bath and closets, 
on the long sides 
full height to all 
The house is fl 
' main rooms oa 



ymripfti^i.,. ^. _ . i-"n 

ides. The hall and 

d out so as not to 

The second floor 

irge bedrooms with 
The closets are placed 

of the rooms, giving 

bedrooms. 

ilshed in oak In the 

the first floor, with 



=«-J 



yellow pine in the kitchen. The sec- 
ond fioor is finished in pure white 
enameh with hardwood floors through- 
out. Th'^ exterior is stucco and shin- 
gles, making a very attractive exterior 
design. This house can be built, in- 
cluding plumbing and heating, in Du- 
luth or near vicinity, for $4,500. 

P. M. OLSEN. 

Architect. 





75 ME 




NOW AT WORK ON 

COLMAN'S ADDITION 



This number of men are now at work in Colman's Addition 
erecting houses, excavating basements, grading roads and laying 
water and gas mains. 

Excavations are being made for basements for 

FIVE MODERN BUNGALOWS 

Which, with the 23 .already built and occupied, insures this addi- 
tion as a favorite residence district. 

The addition is open for your inspection ever> day — evenings 
as well. 

NO SUNDAY SELLING 

But spend a part of the day walking over the addition looking at 
the improvements and growth taking place. REMEMBER, This Is 
a GRCtWING ADDITION — something doing all the time. The lots 
are large garden lots, from one to three blocks from street car. 
Only $5.00 to $10.00 cash, balance $1.50 to $2.50 per week, no inter- 
est, buys a lot in this addition. Call at the offlce or come out any 
time, we will be glad to show you around. Mr. Colman has a log 
cottage on Winonc street; call there and we will show you the 
property. Take Woodland car. get off at Winona street; go two 
blocks west and call at the log cottage. 



<> C. FRANCIS COLMAN 



1 00% Profit ! 

The investors who buy lots in Crosby and Ironton at the 
present prices are certain to make 100 per cent on their invest- 
ment in a very short time. 

Ironton and Crosby are located in the very heart of the Big 
Iron Mines on the Cuyuna Range and in a short time will contain 
a population of many thousand people. Property will increase in 
value accordingly. 

We are exclusive agents for West Park Addition to Crosby — 
this is a beautiful site, nice and level — and between Ironton and 
Crosby. Choice residence lots for $200 and up; business lots, $400 
and up. We can make very liberal terms — special inducement offer 
to all who will build at once. 

The growth of Ironton has been phenominal. Many business 
houses and residences have been built and many more are now 
under construction. You can buy very desirabe business lots for 
$400 and up. Residence lots, $300 and up — Terms to suits. See 
us for particulars and map. 

Locker-Donahue Co., 

416-417 Lonsdale Building, Duluth, Minn. 



The Most Desirable Located 

Woodland Ave. Corner 

141x170 feet, sewer, gas and water in avenue. Want to 
dispose of this lot at once. Can sell it for — 

R. P. DOWSE & CO. 



GENERAL INSURANCE. 



106 Providence Bldg. 




4000 



PEOPLE HAVE BUILT HOWES 

OX OIR EASY MONTHLY 
PAYMENT PLAN. 

TALK TO US 

CITY ANT> VILLAGE LOANS IN 
MINNESOTA. 



UNION SAVINGS 
ASSOCIATION 

C. A. Knippenberg, 

General Ke|)resentalive. 
300 Alworth Bids. — "Phones 597. 






One of the Finest Corners 
in tlie "EAST END/' DULUTH 

too feet by 140 feet on the eouth-eaet corner of Twenty-fifth Avenue Caot 
and Sixth Street. A locaiity of beautiful home*— an exclusiye, high-class residence district. 

Both street and avenue fully Improved— Granitoid Pavlnc Concrete Slde- 
walka. Sodded Slope*, Sewer In Alley, Aaaessment* ail Paid. 

PRICE $4,750. 

FOR TERMS APPLY TO 

GEO. R. LAYBOURN, 14 Phoenix BIk. 



xiM 



iCRDSLLY B\RK 

Take the first step towards owning a home 
of your own TOMORROW! Come out to this 
park between 2 and 5 p. m. Sunday and let 
us show you how to put your rent money 
y ^^to work for YOU. .Take the Lakeside car to 
,'*"'^* Fifty-fourth avenue east and walk north 
two blocks — We will meet you. 



W. M. PRIIDLE & CO., ^u7?£Va' 



tCK 



«» 



^.^r^^ 

^%:^^ 



I 



^^ 



i^ 



■^^ 



Handsomest 
Property in the City 

1 8th Avenue Easf. 

FIFTY-FOOT LOTS, 

$700 to $750 

Water, gas, sidewalks. Improved 

avenue and the finest view in the 

city. Easy terms; monthly pay- 
ments. 

Richardson 
Day & Harrison 

MONEY TO LOAN 

ON REAL ESTATE 




BEST CONTRACr-l£AST COST 



LOA NED 



%AND 




O N 

DULUTM 

RLAL- ESTATE 





U O M IM AJI^ti 



& CO 

WOLVIN BLDG DULUTM. 



MR. F. FULTON, 

Formerly Passenger 
Condactor on the D. & I. R. 



^Ti«heH \o annunnce \o bin friends In 
Duluth and vicinity tliat be itt at 
present eugased in the real estate 
buKineMti in Portland, Or., nod \h in 
a position to bandle anythintc In 
that line In the state of ^\'aHhlnK^ton 
or Oregron, Xn the advantaKe of his 
patrons, as he ban a very larare list 
of some of tlie best farm lands in 
Washin^on and Oreffon. 



HUNTER'S PARK 

Corner lot 160x90 feet; on street- 
car line 



$1200 



__£c6 _ 

REALESTATE LOANS INSURANCE 

300 Alworth BldgT. 



FOR SALE! 

First Mortgage Loans 

Bearing 6 per cent interest 
in amounts of $1,000, $1,- 
500 and $2,000. 

Loans are first class and 
on central city property. 

We have for sale houses, 
flats and building sites in 
all parts of the city. 

N. J. UPHAM CO. 

18 Third Ave. W. 



A GOOD BUY! 

Duplex House on East Second St. 
Built 1909. Separate heating plants, 
laundry tubs and strictly modern in 



every way. 



Price $9,000 

^f3,S00 cash will handle. 
See us for pariieulara. 

GLARKE-WERTIN CO., 



200 Ali^orth. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

5, BV^ and per cent. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Old Reliable Companies. 

REAL ESTATE 

Monthly Payment Plan. 



COOLEY & UNDERHILL, 

200-10-11 Exchange Building. 



Nelson Block. 



WANTED TO RENT 

Desirable hou.e in East End. eight 

rooms. First class tenant. ^^ 

LITTLE & NOLTE ccH FOR RENT! 



CROSBY, MINN., 

The Metropolis of the Cuyuna Iron 

RanK<^ 

NO MINERAL RESERVATIONS 

"When you buy a lot In Crosby 
you get a deed not only to the sur- 
face rights but to any minerals 
that may be found under it, thus 
Insuring a permanent location where 
you can afford to spend money to 
build up a business, and make it 
your horn© town. 

For particulars see 

GEORGE H. CROSBY, 

008 Lonsdale IlulldiuK, Uuluth, Minn 
or Crosby, Minn. 



Single Men Living 
In Duluth 

will find in the fireproof Bachelor 
Apartments just the kind of home 
they have long desired. 

Here, the single man, may live in 
ease and comfort. 

He always ha.« at his command, 
hot and cold water, whenever he 
wants it; plenty of light, and the 
best of furniture equipment. 

You are Invited to call and in- 
Fpect the Bachelor Apartments, 320 
^Vest First Street. Only apartment 
having a roof garden. 

W. C. SHERWOOD & CO. 

118 Manbnttnn Bulldius. 
BOTH PHONES. 




Woodland Cottages 

$500 CASH and $20 per month gets 
you a neat six-room cottage with 
water, gas, and electric lights. 
Price only fl,»00.00. 

«2,.t00 Bl'YS a fine corner. 100 by 
142 feet, with a dandy four-room 
cottage equipped with water and 
gas. Fine view and only two 
blocks from car. 

EXCLUSIVE. 

C. E. ROE, 

412 Providence Building. 



A CHANCE TO GET A HOME 
FOR YOUR RENT MONEY ! 

We have a new six-room house on 
a corner lot at Michigan avenue and 
Devonshire street. You can buy It 
for a small cash payment and then 
pay for It as vou pay rent. Come 
out and see it Sunday. There will 
be a man at the house from 10 a. 
m. to 12 m. and from 2 p. m. till 
4 p. m. to show It to you. It is a 
snap. 



Bloomquist, 



Subscribe for The Herald 



Mercantile purposes, second floor 
of building, central on Michigan 
street. Elevator and trackage. 

LITTLE & NOLTE CO. 



•V 



* ; 



r 



!; 



^■a^iha»—'w "I'li^ r- 



■■■M^ __ 



♦ ^ 



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i 














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J._ 


I 




1 


1 




1 




1 


f 


1 
. 1 

i 




' 1 

• 1 




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i 




1 


1^ i 



iturday 





-X 



|||||m.||W... 



INQIIRIES FOR FArTORY 
SITES ON THE WATERFRONT 

i<'mtin-ie.i from page 22 > 



Harry J. Dickey ' ^ * block 55. Lester 

park. Fourth di« t" »r t6o0. 

T' '.af WW; uvj rtii f»t«t» tntmSmn durliia 
till* 

^\ jtTtoi.in »1 

. . I., ■ir.n- lot 



UMt. i.w'm '-I'f liWW' 



igh- 



r>- - 



1 .> 

,X ! > A I'l 

blk. laT. Uulutli 



A HOME WITHIN YOUR REACH! I CTQp p|\Y|NG RENT! 



jfwottni^n* 




•*m 



1 



Ueti<.>:-- Fiflti divwu'-i 
bttc. T Ki>>9ev9ll 

South SM« Itea: 

1*. '^'^ '>k ■»; 

lilt 



bU 



K. 



t. t. oi.» 



$3 Pti Month Buys a $150 Lot - $10 Per Month Buys a $1500 Mouse and Lot 

Fifteen minutes, ride from Spalding Hotel. 

Are You Throwing Your Money Away for 

RENT? — DONT! 

Our sale5.cn at top of Seventh Avenue Incline Sunday will gladly tell you how to stop It! 

HEIGHTS 



DULUXH ,; ,,,i;.:.,„, 



Six Mn«»_ 



»tx MB«a 



HIGHLAND COMPANY 

^ .X SOS SELLWOOD BUILDING 

CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO., Agents 505 5tui.wuww 

"LET YOUR RENT MONEY BUY YOU A HOME" 



blk 






.. 8 U»b & 

1 ? . . 1 : ! 



bl,, 



-.rtt Liim«n. 

ma Mel ' 



■ eS of »wi». 9*.-tioa 
: iC Hl«h- 

: .J. iZ'.>- 

.ivvili.ll 

b'ji. 1, >»>".. si la aiOi- 

.- " , • 311 - '"fwwil"(n 
.vy Pi-'k »i- 



INVESTORS IMOXICE! 



$1,600 



Seven-room dwell- 
ing, city water, 
u IS pi'ped to basement. Corner 

I A. U a 22nd Ave. West. Very Easy 

Terms. 



$3,300 



Two five-room flats. 

two toilets, city 
water. Rent for $16.00 and $18.1)0. 
Street and avenue assessments paid. 
On Lake Ave Easy Terms. This 
price for a short time only. 



tlW^.^SLia^ CHAS. p. CRAIG & CO. ^ZTZ^ 



THER PARTICULARS 



Buy a HOME 

WE HAVE PROPERTY III ALL PARTS OF LAiCE$IDE, FULL SIZED L OTS, 50x140 FEET 

Small Cash Payment—Small Monthly Payments. 
Make Your Selection of a Lot and Then Purchase 
DIRECT From Us. 

WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY ! 

If vou are contemplating buying a home, we advise you to get in touch 
with tliis office as we will have an exceptional big surprise to offer homeseek- 
crs in the very near future. Terms and conditions on high-class homes at low 
prices that has never been offered in Dulnth and never will agam. Leave your 
name with us at once. We will be ready next month. 

LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY 

5th FLOOR, SELLWOOD BUILDING 



■■ — 

■rg •''■■ ' - < =» 



•m^t 



-•^^.v ..:i.*: 



■-.4*». 



•r^T*-:.' wV: 



■'v:gf^.-\ .-, -:^-: 



Ell.. 
*•- 
»•■ 

D 



L . 

1 ■ 

The 



. PruOiln- 

WaUs^ 

-l^ 

A Co.. 

JiTMion 

•.It n. 

lot 

..i P«rk 

-r»jleT. IiH 9. 
to Ptoc- 



70« 
64 

su 
i.:oo 

1S3 

1 
1 

475 
2.650 



WEEKLY SURVEY OF REAL 
ESUTE DEVELOPMENTS 



Btw ■ - 

ri' , 
Bl**".-- '■ — ' 

8^ 1. il 8. bU. 

f, B MVT» -. ^ *- ^1' = 

2, • ■ ■ ■■■•^ ■ ■ • ■ 

w 1 .:■: to A. L. Mi 

'>n ... . --■- — ■ 1- f''*^ '^ *^'-^-' 
»MAc'l.e«ia et ui ^> Mix U-wl*. -:Ji;.a=i 'n 

taurwsi In tot 17. I'lit- 3. f^^^ adJiUon. 

I.^w'^ :Uaer.' Jr. .' " « uj to ' O ' li. PeArui*. lot 



l.)t 9. 
•- lot 7. 

i)ik. ' v. 



Market in Throes of Mid- 
summer Dullness — Only 
Two Delegates at Building 
Managers' Convention-- 
Many WUl Cio to Denver 
—Eastern Firm ''Strong 
for Duluth.** 




Fulforl. H..« 
bUt - ■■ 

Im W. U . 

a 
a 
P 



_ J. ..^;.ii)er Co.. 

.Sjirih A Ryan, lot 19. 
iTk, .■^Lith d!Tl.4ii>n 

., Mlwa. 
ji Uowe'i 

. liicaier Par* 



22 

125 
1 
1 
1 



1 

6T5 

1 

32* 




<Iln.T. 



P-trT 



..ihaI<**T'i 



J >siT)h Haasoo. 
/, 7.) Ie«»l litM 
i*n>p«r. -Secoad 

aherly JS' feet Um 
L>;jiiiUi Prjix*. 3«c- 

IX to Helai C hioney. 

.- .wiittujrlx TO feet loU 
Diiiuth Prop-r. Second 

•n Fr.itik n Curumliiis. 



r.SINES.«- in the real es- 
tate li le lias been duller 
I during the P^st week 
than ever before this 
sea^nri It is merely the 
second week of the mid- 
summer dullness, a lull 
in the business which Is 
expected every year This Is the time 
for the real estate dealer to take his 
long planned vacation, and from the 
many vacant chairsr one sees in their 
offices these days, he would be con- 
vinced that it reaKy is the vacation 
time. 

From only one oftice came the report 
that business la be'ter than ever, and 
the prospects bright for the summer 
months. At this office it was stated 
that more contracts had been closed 
during the past w..ek than for many 
weeks past, and that several more con- 
tracts were ready to be closed during 

^'^l^-ro^^th'^^'-'finas stated that they 
had closed up as m iny deaL^ last week 
as they do usually, but that they have 
noticed a decided filling oft In the In- 

"T^^f-. ^"Ih^i'Tie're' ~- - -»^" 
indication that ti ere 




be little 



J- 



[■ ..- .- ■ ..I ~ ■.. i^*-> ■ - " 

• .T ■ Jj-teph Plemel. lot 

- ■ i JlT'.3;in 

., TlU Popktn. lot 

1, .,,=;» .......»n t.> Ciilihjlm 

2 Y ..' US U5 John WaM. m"* ot 

nW*. •: :. 15. ;l-:^ ■ V^-bi 

Aaute li.it* et ttl •- ■■ - ***- 

• f3. K!tz'.t!fc .... ■■■■ 

X - - .... Rcaltj I" I'' "-^- -■».. -.i..---. WB 

.■ : .i hi. Sh.Aptro"t »adtttoii. Sunny- 

T, {.Akovlew Home Co . 

. . . ^ . Ci»«l« Park »ddl- 

tiiJL™ ..... ' ■* tx-, 

m'-*tr.."n L«n.1 aimoria:: '" to I" <i«oTie Han- 
'^. . • :: • UuluU. Proysr. sec- 



P 

Ft: 
H. H 

«wn 
C- B. 

blli 
p. J 



: . L Buma lot 1. 

iBitijn 3, 'ii-13 

\ to AtiMhim It-nka. lot 



IrHfrrnin Hll?, f^ of 



iJt 



i>U 



-» n-Wertworth Co.. 

11. 'a-H 

to Jam^j E«in. *H 

. section 15. 4J-16 . 

vuille M Chaffee, lot 

jrk aJ.iiUou 

• liA t<j Th> mas Keamew. 

■ il Laie 

XX tj Aftliur M. Uitham. 

iAu,<i K 1 -hn.s^ia c-T u* to Oljf ChrURofferson, 

I,,, \-i T>wer 

/» i- ■' "ui to Al>r*him Bonki. nH 

*- ' ■ ■; -■ ' -"'•!->n VlrKiiila. 

^ "> vr** In 

,. . , ^ :.-S4. aecUcin 

^.i*.,... ...... ...^.-i . 

«i 31-14 

K. A MarUnson et ux to Ou.« Johneon. 5 
aerm mnimenctag at point 495 fa« north 
fiMUi *,uihweBt -omtr of »e>% of ne"*. 
taetiou ji. Sl-14 •• ,„■■■,■■ 

tHy r'tn-liipuxrn Co. to H. Antonn*.U. Ult* 
T S hlk •S. LaTlna Townslta 

TfcuaiiH J Chew u. Ami R. DuUnj. lots ta, 
at. bit IB, Marine iiflalcn 

P«liT Halterson ot ui to August HaUenon. 
InU 1 a 3. 4. Wk 8. Chan.l'.er Park ad- 
dlllun; liu IS. 14. 15. IB. blk. 6. Resar- 
ftf Murray ft Howe's avMiUon 

lla««r« OullUaid et mar to O V. QullUanl. 
j7 l^a 11 U> 15, blk. aa. Lon(l.>n aJdl- 
tliin ;*' 

lobn P. .-^xjU to John L. E»ans commeoclng 
W south line la? 82-100 feet «ast of 
aeuthwesl comer lot 9. Someiset Lake 

Katie i P3ol «t mar to Sarah MurpJiy. lot 3, 

WiL 9. Tower -•■ ■ •• 

a«a B Wilew et mar to Swan Blrsr I-og- 
gln* Co.. Ltd . »irl» acroas ne^» of seH. 
iwct[.r^T^ -7. 5iJ-2l 

J A. H'erpe et Ui U> Wilhalla Iron ft Steal 
C*>-. *W of iw^. »4 of ie^. aectlon M- 
*i-15. 9.000 sharaa at 

KeU M Nelson et ux to aam*. lot 5. •«»- 
tJloB 3 low S. ». »e>» of UW14. nwVi oT 
•iW. 3eotiun 10, 54-17. 7.9y8 *h»reB 

Alaah.itn Wldtstrjm el ua to aamt. 3W\4 « 
«4. ».'>4 of sw^fc. section 10. 54-17. 4.09O 

rr*<tofl«* lilcCluW«t ai to Chariea Ch»ni«: 
l.)t.i 1. 2. blk 8. Hun-er-s 0.-a?«y Point 
idditl ;n. Second dlTialon ■••••„.•• _^- 

Same to Mine. loH 8. 7. Uk. 93, West Du- 
Isith. Fourth divtaioii «• • "^ 

|lMal.a Iron Land* Co. to F. B. Buawm. 
•w^ of seW. section !•>• 57-80 . ;• 

A. W Prick et ux to Nela J Benson, lot* 1, 
I, tilk. J. Longvlew adJliion; i»art loU 1. 



1 

900 

1 

1 

1.200 

300 

157 

150 

1.750 

lOu 

1 

3.400 

1,200 

1 

1 

•00 

1 

93 

1 

700 

250 

130 
ISO 

13: 

1.S50 

1 

1 

ITS 

ISO 

ISO 

1 



_,^,_^^ __. . will 

doirTs In'juiy and Vugust. 

Thise months are the vacation 
months for the laige majority of, the 
people, and little can be expected in 
the line of real « state business. Of 
those who take their vacations, the ma- 
jority plan to go tome where for rest 
ind recreation, to <et as far from the 
business cares as "hey can. so It Is a 
hard proposition to Interest them at 
that time in real ef^tate^ bargains. 

fcNLY two I uluth men left yes- 
1/^1 t'=-rday f< r Cleveland, where 

1 V.J I they will attend the big con- 
^^LJ vention of the Building Man- 
IDaTTSl agers' asiociatlon, to be held 
l&Hml there on July 10. 11 and 12. 

- During t le week considerable 

interest was aiOL sed among D'^'u^'J 
real estate men tnd for a while It 
looked as If a big lelegatlon would go 
But gradually one by one, they dropped 
off until only tw . were left. , These 
two are W hltnev Wall, who will read 
a paper before th > as.'^oclatlon on the 
management of buildings, showing 



charts and reports, and ^^''^^ .^: 
Keilley. building inspector of this cii>. 

HK prospective delegates called 
on'^.Mr Wall yestei lay at 
aifterent times to tell him 
they could not go and ga^e 
the reasons. Three had b g 
Itals on. one expected big i 
officials from a c'J"<=f '"''"' 
represents, another l^^d .granted xaca- 

k^;r'^go^i'g"^o^'e^-^SXl/wh^r^e ; 

ing the fifth annual c-nvennon in Du- 
luth next year, and armed with all the 
documents^ liUormation and cordial in- 
vitations from the many organizations 
of Duluth. he left to take "I' ^Ms bife 
question and hoj.es^ lor good results. 

iNOTHER big convention in 

" which Duluth real estate men 

are interested is the annual 

patherine )f the National Real 

K.state association at Den\er. 

The efforts which are being 

made to hold the biggest convention in 

The history of the association, are 

meetinK with success, and it is saia 

That more leading real e-^^^« "^^J'.i^i^l 

be in attendance and present articles 

^'^Everrphas'e'":^ the real estate mar- 
keT wUl be di.^cussed at ^his big gath- 
ering Men who have devoted all the^lr 
fives to the real estate business and 
knSw it from almost every angle will 
discuss the important branches of the 
work Every method now in use in the 
^'al estate market for the promotion 
of business and for the bmUmg up of 
communities will he brought up by ex- 
perts, who will explain their merits 
and their shortcomings. , „ »^ „. 

Manv Duluth men are I'^^I'"'"'^;'^ j^'- 
They claim that ..ils is a far tnore im- 
portant meeting to them han the 
building managers- convention and 
that thev can get more out of it. *>. 
5 Upham. president of the Duluth Real 
Esfate Exchange, is working up con- 
siderable intere.st among the men and 
many have said they will go. 

Dr P W. Hewins, formerly of this 
city,' now a managing trustee of the 
Massachusetts Realty companjr. and; 
Ralph Anthony, general manaser of 
oTe same company, will be In I ul"<h In 
a few days to look over the interests 
of the company in this city. During 
their stay here James L. Cromwell, the 
local representative of the concern, will 
entertain them. The men have left 
Boston in an automobile and will ride 
as far as Buffalo, where thoy will take 
one of the Anchor line boats shipping 
tne car. bound for Duluth. ^^ hile here. 
It is probable they may lay plans for 
another big building for this city The 
company is "strong for Duluth." and 
believes property here is one of the 
best investments in the country. 



Here Are Bargains : j 

Comer Second .A\e»»ie WeM and 

Boulevard drr. <v sevt-n-room 

house, bath. electric light, gas. 
furnace, grate and mantel, hard- 
wood finish down and hardwood 
floors throughout: nice lot and 
garden. Very easy terms. 93AM>0. 

On IVlnth .Street, near Fifth avenue 
vast. 50-foot lot with thre.- houses 
of four rooms each Make your 
own terms. Price. 91,;tOO. 

Central — Ka.«<t Fifth trseet, seven 
roomi^ and bath, two toilets, elec- 
tric lli^ht; fine lot. 5') by 140 feet 
on ui>per side, nice garden; barn 
for four horses, $4,S4MI. 

Dtiuble houne on London road at 
Fifteenth avenue east, eight 
rooms and bath each side; stone 
foundation, furnace. gas and 
electric light. Rentals. $60 per 
month. Fine 50-foot lot on upper 
Bide of street; easy terms. 9.'V.4MM>. 

Rrlrk Flat Bnilding on East Fifth 
street, containing two nice five- 
room Hats with bath, gas and 
electric light; separate hot water 
heating plants. Nice finish, hard- 
wood Jloor.s throughout. Itentals, 
jr.S per month. Price 9a.<MM». 

MIcUbw> Street, n*ar Clyde Iron 
work.s, a 14-room house with city 
water, sewer and electric light; 
excellent for boarding house or 
suitable for four families. 93,700. 

Home on Second avenue west, be- 
low Fifth street, seven rooms, 
bath, gas, hardwood floors down- 
stairs, gas range and laundry tub. 
Very easy terms. 93,750. 



FOR HISWT. 

!Mtore room with Kood l>a*ement, 
rorner First avenue east and 
Fourth street. Will Bx up In 
HrHt-elaHN t-onditiun (or aatUfac- 
tory tenant; suitable for jtrocery, 
market or millinery biutiness. 



Stores, Houses and Flats for Rent. 
MO^EY TO L»».4.N. 

Stryker, Manley & Buck 



-an offer of 
real merit: 

Four fine houses and 
four fine lots splen- 
didly located in West 
Duluth — "the coming 
spot" — all in perfect 
condition, all togeth- 
er. The combined 
properties 

^ Rent for $900 

a year. This is the tag 
end of an estate we have 
GOT to close out QUICK ; 
hence this exceptionally 
low price. 

$6500 Will Purchase 

this entire property. The 
small capitalist will wait 
a long, long time before 
getting another oppor- 
tunity such as this, to 
secure nearly 

14% on His Invesfment 

with ABSOLUTE safety, 
and the certainty of a 
RAPID INCREASE on 
the original investment. 
Let us show you this 
property RIGHT AWAY. 

EBERT, WALKER & WcKNIQHT, 

•••^peHallsIs In Rapid Oeals." 
ai5 to 21 B Torrej IHdie. 

D. H.. 7-8-'ll. 



FOR SALE-EASY TERMS 

Beautiful New Residence 
1808 East 4tli Street- 
Just Completed. 

Six rooms, thoroughly modern, hardwood floors throughotit. 
hardwood finish, hot water heat, two firerlaccs, tiled floors, bath- 
room and vestibule, beautiful fixtures. For sale on easy terms, 

ALLIANCE REAL ESTATE CORP. 



205 Lonsdale Bldg. 



'Phones, 516. 




GARY, First Division 

is just across the street from the 48 big buildings ui the Minnesota 

lOK) men are now employed in constructing the plant; lO.OjX) 
to 120^) men will be employed when in full operation, and the 
first unit will be turning out steel in eighteen months. 

Call at our office and we will take y<ju up to Gary to see the 
biggest townsite, backed up by the biggest corporation in the 
world, the U. S. Steel Corporation. _^ 

*'A word to the wise is sufficient. 

A. C. VOLK Sl COMRAIMY, 

We sold the 1,700-acre site for the steel plant. 



..^ 



J Mk 1. En.ilon Park di»i«ion 

X. W. Frick rt UI to a<.ArlM A. Ptm^aj- 
part loU 1. 2, UU. 1 EnJlon P»rk dirt- 
sloa 

Jay W, Lyter. Jr.. rt uj to ThomM V. Mc- 
Nuliy lot 15. blk. iJ. Hwelwood Pa* 
(llvliljn. W«t Pututh 

ML-mawWa PJnt Land C >. to D»ntel NwOla. 
lot» 1. 15. blk 2. Oa;k» Reach addition.. 

Laka vUw Home Ci. I) WlIUs J. HMm^, 
InU 17. IS. blk. T. Hunter & MarkeU » 
Gr&»y Point adJltl-jn 

Pirtt Realty «>i. to Wai d An>««. Jr.. loU T, 
T^buTo-f; li« I. 2. '*• '*• E"^"^ '"'l- 

Si^T t.; ■ *une; ■ lot ■ ili» Lake ' »'en"«- '^7* 

of 9wVi »w>4 of neH ioutU two «<^i^ o' 
u\, .f»wV .««4 ' ««>• •*'"°° ""■ 

50-14 ■ W* tertlm li) 51-15 — 

J.)hn MMan to Albert liiiinazui. »w^4. tttxtoa 

Ji^^^Al'bwUm lo Annnu" S»nllnl. lot «. 

hlk. 3, Spirit Lake adUuou. ...... - _ • • 

WUllam Cnm to Ed»'f» i»«™^f;„?°" '• 

6 :. 8. bU. IT. nintn P!«.-e '"l.-l'^f;'" ,„. 
X W Hlngelej et ux o Asuelm Luoto. lot 

J. »*.-Uon I'J. 52-20 .,• „• w„<^„„' 

B«U. U C^iklnd * tl to S. O H<^^- 

aughtj. uniivt.t*l % mterert In loU J. *, 

faUc I'll . Portland di» »ion • •• • • 

Carrie MaiinlH^lmer to 3. O. Met oii*u«hy. 

BiSjlaue Co»ett« rtur'io Mom» VaodaU. 

lot T bUt. 38. Sarotid addition. Ereletn . . 
Fred LerA et ux U< M irlha B. <^ ;»««• ."H 

lot D lot !•). eV, lot >. ^>k- 2»- ^ '«!'"^: 
TuwTisldp of Btwablk U) Bl*ibUc tlnnUh So- 

ciallal club. undJvldu I V« intarwt Ui lot 

8. blk. 35. Blwablk ; • ' ■ V " .J.; "• 

Andrea Fetia « ux to SUtwitrl Bantl. lot T. 

blk S. ChUho'ja ,"■■-■ 

Au«iu; I'et^rviU to Heti-y Hendrlrksuti. lot T. 

blk 25. i«arran«emeni . FtPrt addition. Kt». 

V W kuatoow et UJt to May R. .Smith, lot 

II. Wk- ». Nort.in'» S*«l Plant dl»Ulon_ . . 

Banj V Hathawdy «t ix to Ws.ll«r E^*^**- 

lu«. iJU 29. 30. eH lot 31. Uk «. Pnuce- 

1 tuti Place a^ldStlon -^ 1, 'J V iVa 

Ar.nle Klu et al U) M*e Ogonortcb. lot 19. 

1 blk. 3, KiUTlUe ... • • ■ ■ ; 

West Duluth Land O . to Guitaf ^ arren. 
S20 lot* 1 J. 3. blk. 8». We« l>uluih. »»onJ 

diT»»l'>n , .•"■;^^' 

Edwi.-a Hardar K ux W Allwrl A- l^uia. 



L. Murk- 



1 
1 
1 

900 

330 

330 

1,900 

1 

1.35« 

600 

T0« 
1 

I 

250 

17S 



lot 6. blk. 3«. Floodwood 

B?nry K. Prltjn.iw et ux to Jama 

iej. lot 11. blk. 32. Virginia 

Leonard St Jacques tn K!*rt. Walker *Mc- 

Knlght Co.. I..U :. 8. section 30 >"-12_^^ 
O^iorg.. Nnrman to CharW^ L. John*on. wH 

of nek . se"* of nw»4. aecUon >-. ..l-U-. 

AlTlne Lachance et mar to Jf»»^„^». **'*V 
affue. part fratlonal lots 9. 10. blk^ 3. 

Gay^s dlvUion and of loU 9. 10. blk. 86. Mar- 
ine dlTlaion 

James T. Hale et ux to Jnmvh Plemel. lot 8. 
blk. 6. Irmton. Thirl ^*'^'«J>- yv. •,„,.• V 

Range Lumber Co. to Cbnclea \eoberi. loU 8. 
8 bit 17. <:hi*h.)lm ■ •••• 

Serurttlea Holding Co. to nululh H"™« C- 

lota 7. 8. 9. Mk. 101. P':"-*? V J?"l'L' a 

Koskl Irapri>Tein«nt Co. to MafU Makt lou 9. 

10. 11. 12 bit 15. Kofklvllle._...... ••^. 

Same to Suale Makl. lots 7. i blk. 15. Noi- 

B. Ashman ei'ux to "Wlnrrifre.! E. MM.an» 
undlTlded 3-32 Intereet In »«■*. •«^on "• 
and an undlrtded 3-32 Intereat In nw^4. 
ifctlon 19. 62-13 W"V™.;' 

Alexander McLaren at nz to B. AaMnan. 

Ch*^ W.' ElitonHtixtojiartesji. Brltu 

easterly 1) feet of aoutherlj «5 feel lot », 

w«;.rly 15 feet of southerly 65 feet lot W. 

Mt 7. Helm's addition •• • •• • 

S O MeConaughy et ux to Duluth H'wne »., 

lots 3, 4. bit 101. P>rtlan.l Jt»»«l"" , ■ - • 
Margaret Farr to Jennet McKetirie. undt»W- 

^ 1-3 of wS of leM. section 33; nw^.. 

secUon 84. 60-20 ■■■■ ■ 

DA I B. n R. Co.. to O. O. Sta«ebef». 

wVk '•( nw>4. lertlon 8, 50-M 

IVter TUlman for EaUte of John Llnsk»na, 

to G. A. Rydb«rg. nwVi of lertlon 3j. 

52-13 



1.800 



LET US LEND YOU 
THE MONEY 

With Which loBuild YourHome 

STANDARD HOME CO. 

Open Monny, ^Vcdnfmlay •»* Sat- 
urday Kvenlnic I'ntH » OTlock. 
418 PROVIDK^TE BUILDING, 
DILLTH. 
Zenith Phone, 24.V.. Old, Mel., ITftO. 



T.W.TILKE 

IULESUUANDIN5U9iMI 

COPY HOTfL CORNER 



THE 

COMINC 

SPOT 




Six-room bou3e In 
4.„),1 f-onditlon on Sercn- 
ty-flrsi avenue west, hard- 
wood floon downstairs, 
eUnurlc tight, well water, 
$1,150; »300 cash, bal- 
ance to suit. 

Three Iwel lot* with 
water and aewer Ijelween 
i>iy and Elln.-r streets, 
on Sixtieth avenue west. 
$280 each; terms easy. 

Fine bulLllng lota nn 
N.jrth KifU- first. Fifty - 
saond and Flfty-thrd 
■.»enuos west, $35© ea»;h; 
$.1') Juwn, $5 per month. 



LAKESIDE LOTS— I am ottering the 
Best and Cheapest Lots in Lakeside— E. W. 
MARKELL, 306 Lonsdale Building. 



Lots in llie townsite of New Dulutli for sale by 

THE NEW DULUTH CO. 



1.500 



520 



40« 
400 



100 



100 



FOR SALE 

Nice Home 

-at- 

Lakeside 

Modern except heat. Small pay- 
ment down, 125 a month. 

Phone: Gran«, 841t Park, 6112-Aj 
Melrone, ISttO. 



REAl ESTATE. 

MORTGAGE LOANS, ETC. 

SMITH REALTY CO., 

624 Manhattan nid«. 



IVIOISJEY 
LOANED 

At lowest market rates on im 
proved Duluth Real Estate. 

Money AlTrars •■ Hand. 

MENDENHALL 
& HOOPES 

200 First NatloMll Bank Bids. 



West Filth Street 

$600 

For any one of three 50xl50-foot 
l.ts on Wedt Fifth street, noar 
Eleventh avenue west; street and 
avenue graded, city water and gas 
in street. 

J. D. HOWARD & CO^ 

Pro«-tdenee Building. 



$3,500 

Takes seven acres adjoining Hotne- 
wood Addition, t-n minutes r de 
from Postofflce, ^\hich can be Pla.ed 
into fifty-.six bui'ding lots anJ has 
ing prices, adjoining lots are 
Ing for, you should do 
double your mnoey in 

ALFRED W. KUEHNOW 

403-4 Columbia Building, 
DULLTH, MIN-M. 



sell- 
better than 
short order. 



$450 each for your choice of two 
fine 33-foot lota at Forty-aecond 
avenue west and Fourth street. 
Very easy terms. 

$2.800 — Six-room house at Tt\'en- 
ty-fifth avenue west, overlooking 
Lincoln park, just complet.'d; 
ha.s all conveniences except heat, 
stone foundation. 40-foot lot. A 
beautiful home. 

Garden Tracts and Truck Farms 
near the Piedmont avenue car 
line for sale at low prices and 
easy terms. 

WESTERN REALTY CO. 

1H2'i West ."^uiK^rlor Streot- 



$2.200— 616 East Eighth stre«t. |5#0 cash, bal- 
ance $20 per month; »U rooms, electric U«hl. 
wkt. r ami gas at curb. 

$2,000—322: Weat Third street. $200 cash, bal- 
ati'-t' $20 i»er monlU; fWe rinm*. wat«r. ga«, 
ele.tric light, bath, cement walk. 

$2 75»— 805 Flftysecund avenue west. $500 caan. 
baUnc* on easy payoieDls; cement baaement. 
btith. electric lights. 

j2 800— 411.1 West Third atreet, rs* cash, bal- 
an.-w $27.00 per month, water, gaa, baih, tl«c- 

$3!3S)-i4ro» W«rt Third rtreet, $S0« cash, bal- 
ing $27.00 p>>r m'.nth. 

JSOO— Lot on Thlrteoia'i arenue eaat. near Ser- 
eirth str«t. 37V» r«rt b, 1^ ie«t. eMT pay- 
meiita. 

PULFORD, HOW I CO., 



60<t Alworth Building. 



2*-^-Acrc Tracts 
at $60. 

Per acre. Short distance from 
end Woodland car line, on first- 
class road: good soil; some tracts 
heavily timbered slightly higher. 
Terms easv. 

WHITNEYWALL CO 

301 TORREY BLDG. 



FA.RIVI LAISIDS 

320 .4rRES g'>od, level 'and v.-|t!iln 
one-half mile of Grand Lake .Sta- 
tion, on the Duluth. Mls.sabe &, 
Northern railway; easily cleared, 
fine soil. Will sell from forty 
aires up — $10 p*r a«re. 
4,000 ACRKS In 53-12. about six 
miles from Two Harbors, twenty- 
five miles from Duluth. ■ lose to 
good road and Brooks-.Scanlon 
railroad. Price $4 »er acre. 
OXE-4«RK traf-ts tn the village of 
Proctor, at »225 to «M0, on your 
own terms. Fine place for gar- 
dening and poultry raising. A 
good investment. 
D. W. SCOTT at SOIVJ, 

402 Turrr> Building. 



i BETTER R ESI LTS from Herald W.nt Ad.. Vo« 

1* money wh*u Tou udvertUe lu TUfc. HERALD. 



save aud make « 



*^ 



— =—— aaMp—^.^ju I ■ ^ ■ ■ 

I 



1^ « . ..». —' f -f -t r : 




1 



r 




1^*^ ■ p m r . 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 8, 1911. 




FEW URGE CONTRACTS 
ON ARCHITECTS' TABLES 



New School Buildings Planned 

for Several Range 

« 

Towns. 



Canadian Northern Contracts 

Let— Plans Out for 

New Bethel 



J 



It. t!u- arr n; r.ii field there was 
lit luring the past week. 

ai. I Hie. ruiiiB to the men engaged in 
this business thert is little hope for 
Improvement during the coming week. 
Some architects and contractors are 
Ijujiy vn minor jobs, but there are only 
two or three big Jobs in aiglit. 

On*' rirchit'ct stated yesterday that 

-; duller than it has 

t-r»ii i"v iiiiw.> .N^ctxs past, and others 

also report that iht-rt is little iictlvlty, 

»!•':■'■ belter things are looked for 

li. - .1. 

« * • 

ast week the board of 

euu<.,i:.i 1 1,1 lahl voted fiyo.Oyo bonds 

for the construction nf a new brick 

^ ' ^1. lo be used for grade and high 

; purposes and also for agri- 

' •<■ '. nvial training and domestic 

84 rtments. Anthony Puck A 

V ...<.\e been appointed the 

<■ with Instructions lo prepare 

; .-;. nit iHatt ly. 

I'a : cay was yesterday 

awui 'l for the consturc- 

. '.A lands school, by the 
•tion of Meadovvlands. 
V L. ii.uMfi. *r Co. are the archl- 
for the building. It is to be a 
1 1 . i .. .. uj.y;i a high concrete 

f, . to be used, not only 

f. ... . , , • . Mses. but for agricultur- 

•uanual training and domestic 
sv • •• -U "iirtments. When complet- 
ed no,::oo. 
« • • 

i:. S Kadeliffe, architect, will re- 

oelvt I'lKiiies this week on the revised 

piann for the t'rpheum theater to be 

«■■ ' at Eveleth at a cost of about 

>. The rifW theater Is to be of 

:,>rced concrete and brick, and will 

be the fir^^t building w»st of Chicago 
to have installed an automatic heat- 
ing and ventilating plant. It will have 
a seating capacity of yOO. In the front 
part of the second floor there will be a 
number of officey. 

« • • 

The bids for the Adriatic school near 
Aurora, which were rett-ived last week, 
were rejectt-d by the board of educa- 
tion, bt-cause the cost of building the 
BchO(.l which was called for exceeded 
the tmount appropriated. The board 
gave the architects Insructions as to 
the kind of building U desired, and 
when the bids were received it was 
found that it could not be constructed 
for less than $12,500. while only fi'.OOO 
was appropriated. Anthony Puck & 



LAKESIDE 
HOMES 

•2.S<M> Iir>GAl.O\V — Xear.y ready 
to move into, has fireplace, water, 
sewer and bath, hardwood flours — 
without doubt the prettiest little 
home in tonn. Price $2,500, oa 
very tmmy terms. 

94^,<M> — New six-room house, stone 
foundation, water, sewer, gas 
bath, hot water heat, hardwood 
floors and finish, laundry, etc. 
f'niy two blocks from car line. 
i:nsy term*. 

f4,(t04) — A new strictly modern large 
six-room home, close <o car Une, 
Year own terms, U anywhere ren- 
Monable. 

B14i BARGAIX — Brick and stucco 
house on McCulioch street, seven 
rooms, modern throughout; $400 
cash, balance like rent. 

WK HAVE a large list of homes in 
I-akf-side; prices from $1,200 to 
$10.00(>— will sell them on the 
easy payment plan. 

tOT!* — 5'»xl40 feet, in any part of 
the suburb. $200 to ^WW, $10 to 
$50 cnah, balance by the month. 
Talk to us before you buy. We 
can save you money. 

GREENFIELD 

310-11 Columbia Dulldiug. 



^HEELER & PARSON' 

80a ALWORTH 

PROMPT REPAIR 

Moans mui-li to a mtrchant 

wi.f«e Plate (Jlass is l>rokeii. We 

hine authtrity to act at once. 

I.ct 1^0 l£ili it <jvtr. 

•We Write Flrt iMurance RiBhl." 



Holstead may be c.illed upon to make 
a second set of plains. 

• •> • 

The building to be erected by the 

Fitger Brewing coi ipany on Cleveland 
avenue across froii the fire hall, in 
Virginia, was let ihis week to L. F. 
Ursin, of Virginia. It is to be of brick 
and stone and will cost about 113.000. 
It will be two stor es with two stores 
on the street and t'*ro flats on the sec- 
ond floor. It will contain a central heat- 
ing plant, which will furnish heat for 
several buildings in the same block. 
Anthony Puck & Holmstead are the 
architects. 

• •• • 

Arrangements have been completed 
for the erection of the two stories on 
the Wolvin buildlnj. . the contract hav- 
ing been signed by the owners and 
the contractor tJeorge H. Lounsberry. 
Work will be started within a few 
weeks, as it will require some time 
before the material can be secured. 
The improvement will cost about |100.- 
000 and when finished the building 
will be ten stories In height. 

• * • 

J. J. Wangensti In, architect, has 
completed plans foi a four-story brkk 
and stone building to be erected on 
Second avenue west, and Second street, 
at a cost of $100,0(0. It is to be used 
for commercial pi rpoees, principally 
by large manufacturing concerns. It 
will have a frontage of 200 feet on 
Second avenue, lOo on Second street, 
i and sixty -five feet on the Second al- 
ley. Bids will be i ailed for within a 
} few days and cor struction will be 
I started Immediate!;'. It Is expected 
' that the building will be finished by 
fall. 

• w « 

Kelly & Lignell. irchltects, will le» 
! the contract for the Grand Marals court 
I house, next Monday The bulld'ng will 
• be of brick and stone, costing about 
' 140,000. 

« * • 

The plans for the garage to built by 

I f'r. J. M. Poorhoi.se at Owatonna, 

' Minn., at a cost of 114.000 will be fln- 

; ished by the architects. D. V. Case & 

Broorahall. next we -k and bids will be 

called for Immedia ely. It will be 44 

by 125 feet, one sory. with a high 

tasement, and will be of concrete. 

• <* « 

The contract for :he ten-stall round- 
hou.se, the' machirn! shop and store 
house with office for the Canadian 
Northern Railway c tmpany at its West 
r>uluth yards north of Ramsey street, 
between Sixty-eighth and Seventy- 
I second avenues wes . was let yesterday 
by Chief Engineer H. T. Hazen to 
Bailey & Marsh of Minneapolis. Work 
will be started Imnediateiy and the 
buildings rushed "o completion, as 
they are to be occupied before Nov. 1. 
The tost was not jjiven out. 

• » • 

A permit for f 9.0 )0 was Issued dur- 
ing the week to Anderson & Gow. con- 
tractors for the construction of the 
new factory for the Duluth Show 
Case company. Th > factory will be 
built on the lowei side of Superior 
itreet. between Twenty-eighth and 
Twenty-ninth aven leg west. It will 
be of frame. 20o by 100 feet. 

« V « 

On Monday the contract for the heat- 
ing and wiring of the Hill City high 
school will be let by V. V. Case & 
Proomhall, architec s. These architects 
are now preparing plans for a business 
block In New Duluth for Adam Szubert. 
It will be two slorlts, of brick and cost 
$5,000. 

• * « 

J. J. Wangensteln has prepared plans 
for a bungalow fo • Arthur Erlokson, 
to be built in the Motor Line division 
near Woodland, at a cost of about 
$4,000. 

• • « 

F. G. German. ar< hitect, will receive 
bids during the coining week for the 
new Bethtl, which will be put up on 
First street and Mesaba avenue at a 
cost of about $50,00). 

• • • 

Richard Hansen secured the contract 
for the building of the new Bethesda 
Norwegrian Lutheran church. Sixth ave- 
nue east and Fifth Ureet. last Wednes- 
day. The new editice will cost about 
$10,000 when finished. 

• • • 

S. G. Collins win receive bids for the 
construction of his new house on the 
corner of Kemp strt et and Fay avenue. 
It Is to be of fram* and stucco upon a 
stone foundation, and will cost in the 
neighborhood of $4, 000. 
« t • 

De Caigny & Paei>e have taken out a 
permit for the « rection of a frame 
dwelline on East Second street be- 
tween Fifth and Sl> th avenues, costing 
about $5,000. 

• I* « 

Jacobson Eros, will erect a brick 
dwelling on Twenti?th avenue east be- 
tween Superior stieet and Greysolon 
road, costing $3,500 

• ■" • 

Li. B. Asbjornson Is building a frame 
house at Woodland for $2. SCO. 

• • * 

T. H. Hedeen has taken a permit for 
the construction o' a frame dwelling 
on First street, bet-veen Twentieth and 
Twenty-first avenu* s west, for $2,000. 

Following were the building permits 
l.«:sued during the veek: 

To M. Japllei, Frame cottage. 
Fifty-seventh a' enue west 
and Sherburne .'tree. $ 600 

To .Joseph Koelle'. frame 

dwelling. Woodland $800 

To T. H. Hedeen. f ame dwell- 
ing. West First street be- 
tween Twentieth and Twen- 
ty-first avenues 2.000 

To Jacobson Bios., brick 
dwf-lllng. Twentieth avenue 
east between S iperior and 
Grevsolon road 3,500 

Tu L. B. Asbjorn.'ion, frame 



k 



A HOME 



for $3-M)0, on East Sixth street, nea 

avenue east, seven rooms, hardwood t 

ish. furnace, bath, electric light and 

foundation: strictly modern, and just wTiat yt 

looking for. Offered exclusively by us. Let us si 

mill mill* I^ITF You cant beat this local 

liUILIIIIlll wl I fc ^"^ ^^'^^ more, you can t ec, 



r .Thirteenth 
oors and fin- 
gas, concrete 
u have been 
tOW It to you. 
Ion or price, 
ual It— i. e. — 
side of East 
; $1,150 cash 



INVESTMENT 



50x140 feet on the upper 

Superior street, near Twenty-eighth avenue eas 

will take it. A fine speculation. — 234-3. 

Pays 15 Per Cent Net — Fo 
building, stone foundation. J 
month; $1,500 cash will 

I'rlee $7,000. — 2.4. 
FAB DFUT Second floor of building on Mut 
rim I1E.M I oultahie for nianufaetaring, 50x110 
■ WIS ■■»■« ■ elevator, trackage, etc. 

216 East Third street, eight rooms, modern. $46. 

429 Third avenue west, five room?, modern. $20. 

1509 East Superior street, eleven rooms, modern 

1921 Jefferson street, eight rooms, modern. $25. 

1123»i East Third street, five rooms, modern. $2: 

1201 West Third street, five rooms, modern, $15. 

819 Fourteenth avenue east, nine rooms, modern 

2240 Minnesota avenue, five rooms, modern. $20. 

709 East Fourth street, five rooms, modern, $20. ' 

Store — 13 First avenue west, $40. 

Store — 1" Fifth avenue west, $35. 
WANTED TO RENT — Flrst-class East end home. LI it your prop 

erty with us. 



jr-flat frame 
tents, $88 per 
handle sale. 

higfln Htreet, 
feet I freight 



$75. 



$45. 



^y-^z^ 



ml 



MU 



Linii & HOLTE CO. 

REAL ESTATE-MORTGAGE LOANS. 

Surety Bonds, Fire Liability, Burglary 

INSURANCE 




dwelling. Woodland 2,800 

To I>e Caigny & Paepe. frame 
dwelling. East Second street 
between Fifth and Sixth 
avenues 5,000 

To Mrs. B. Ringsred. stone 

pier. East Sixth street BOO 

To D. Hauford, frame cottage, 
Wyoming street between 
Fifty-seventh and Fifty- 
eighth avenues 1,500 

To E. Ellison, frame dwelling, 
Seventh avenue east be- 
Eleventh and Twelfth streets 1,000 

To- S. Pepe). frame dwelling. 

New I'uluth $1,000 

To J. Cden. frame dwelling, 
East Eighth street between 
Sixth and Seventh avenues. 1,500 

To Ruben Johnson. frame 
dwelling, Robinson street 
between Forty-third and 
Forty-fourth avenues east.. 2,000 

To Anderson & (Jow, frame 
factory. West Superior street 
between Twenty-eighth and 
Twenty-ninth avenues 9,000 

To O. O. Torve, stone founda- 
tion. Twenty-third avenue 
west between Ninth and 
Tenth streets 300 

To W. J. Holmes, alterations, 
London road between Fifty- 
seventh and Fifty-eighth 
avenues east 900 

To Scott-Kriedler company, 
concrete block foundation. 
Fifty-ninth avenue west.... 200 

To Joseph Thomas. frame 
dwelling. Fifty-fourth ave- 
nue west, between Nicollet 
and Roosevelt streets $ 1,500 

To J. J. Clark, repairs. East 
Eighth street between First 
and Second avenues 200 

newsiesrIvel 
at the carnival 



Five Hundred Youngsters See 

Parker Shows at West 

Duluth. 

Five hundred newsboys reveled In 
the wonders of the Parker shows at 
West Duluth last night. Headed by 
the circulation men of the Duluth news- 
papers the crowd of happy shouling 
youngsters marched from show to 
show and missed nothing of the biglits 
offered. 

While en route from one tent to an- 
other they filled Central avenue, trav. 
ellng en masse and autolsts and street 
car men good naturedly slowed up until 
the howling mob of happy boys cleared 
the street. 

The human roulette wheel was the 
favorite spot for the newsies and sev- 
eral hundred of them made the futile 
attempt to stay on the whirling plat- 
form during the course of the evening. 
The big animal shows, and the edu- 
cated horse came in for their share 
of attention, while a lot of the mechan- 
ically Inclined among the youngsters 
spent the big share of the evening 
watching the operations of Kemp's 
model city. Altogether It was a hapny 
night for the kids, and it was well 
along toward midnight when the larger 
portion of them got back to their 
homes. 



GREAT PICTURE 
IS IN DULUTH 

Glass Block Store Exhibiting 
Mareau's ''Village Black- 
smith^' Worth $60,000. 

Duluth art lovers are having an op- 
portunity to see one of the world's 
greatest paintings. The Glass Block 
store has on exhibition H. De Mareau's 
famous painting "The Village Black- 
smith." for which the present owner, 
P. Fontaine of Toledo, paid $42,500. 
and for which Andrew Carnegie offer- 
ed him $60,000. 

The painter of the picture, De 
Mareau, died soon after Itg comple-- 
tion In France, and at the time of his 
death v.as Indebted for the black- 
smiths services as a n>odel and for 
the use of his shop, where the pic- 
ture was painted to the amount of 100 
francs. His widow soon after sold the 
picture for $2,500, and It sold for $12,500 
some time later. Since being brought 
to this country it has traveled about 
70,000 miles and has been viewed by 
12,000.000 people. 

The painting was brought to this city 
by the management of the Glass Block 
store at considerable expense, and will 
be on exhibition ail next week. No ad- 
mission Is charged. 



FIGHT WITH COOK 



Over Cooking Dynaniited Fish 
Proves Lawbreakers' llDdoing. 

Marquette, Mich., July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The next time C. 
O. Gochnaur and Albert Davis, em- 
ployed in Powell & Mitchell's camp 
on Dead river take fish by dynamite 
they will think twice before asking the 
camp cook to cook them. 

Both these men are overseers at the 
Dead river camp, and their arrest for 
dynamiting fish came as the result 
of a quarrel between them and the 
cook. The dynamited fish were brought 
to the camp cook and the cook re- 
fused to cook them, later reporting 
the dynamiting to the deputy game 
warden. 

Deputy Game Warden Maney went to 
the work camp and arrested the pair. 
At first the men protested their Inno- 
cence, but upon being brought before 
Justice Cary. Davis pleaded guilty to 
having used dynamite, while Goch- 
naur admitted having had trout in his 
possession that he knew had been dy- 
namited. Davis was fined $25 and 
costs and Gochnaur, $5 and costs. 



WANT NATIONAL SANE 

FOURTH ORGANIZATION. 



Cleveland, Ohio, July 8. — A move- 
ment has been started ^ere by Chair- 
man L. H. Britton and Secretary D. 
E. Mook of the Cleveland Independ- 
ence Dav association to secure the co- 
operation of the Independence day 
or "sane Fourth" associations of all 
cities of the United States in the 
formation of a National Independence 
Day association. 

The plan is to have annual con- 
ventions, the first to be held here 
pext year, at which new ideas for 
"sane" observation of the Fourth of 
July will be discussed. The pro- 
moters hope eventually to have every 
city in the country abolish the old 
way of celebrating the Fourth of 

July and take up the sane idea. 

• 

Foley's Honey and Tar Compoand. 

Is effective for coughs and colds in 
either chMdren or grjwn persons. No 
opiates, no harmful drugs. In the yel- 
low package. Refuse substitutes. For 
■ale by all druggists. 




TWO PASTORS LEAVE BECAUSE OF 
WIVES' ILLNESS— NEW PASTOR SINGLE 



Whether or not it is owing to the 
fact that the two former pastors of 
Grace M. E. church have been forced 
to leave because their wives were un- 
able to stand the Duluth climate, the 
congregation of Grace M. E. church has 
called a single man. Rev. George Sillo- 
way of Coleralne, to the West end 
charge. At least his transfer from the 
Coleralne pulpit to the West end church 
by Dr. E. K. Copper, district superin- 
tendent met with the hearty approval 
of the congregation. 

Duluth's cool, refreshing climate was 
too severe for the wives of the former 
pastors of this church and It was be- 
cause of the ill health of Mrs. M. O. 
Stockland. that Pastor Stockland gave 
up his work here and exchanged pul- 
pits with Rev. J. H Murray of Silver 
City, N. M. 

With the Murray family, who were 
accustomed to the high altitude and 
hot weather of the Southwest, the 
"northeasters" caused much discomfort 
and Mrs. Murray was ordered back to 
New Mexico by her physicians, after 
spending the winter and spring In this 
city. 

Rev. Mr. Silloway preached his first 
sermon as new pastor of Grace church 
last Sunday. Today he left for Coler- 
alne, where he will preach a farewell 
sermon to his former flock and after 
winding up affairs there will return to 
this city. He has temporary quarters 
at the Y. M. C. A. 




REV. GEORGE SILLOV/AY. 



WANT COURT 
IN WKT END 

Business Men Claim There 

Is Need of Justice of 

Peace. 



More Petty Police Court 

Cases Than in West 

Duluth. 



That a justice of the peace should 
be established in the West end to con- 
sider petty cases, which are now taken 
care of in municipal court, Is the opin- 
ion of many of the business men at 
the West end. 

The idea was suggested by the death 
recently of the late Judge J. B. Flack 
of the West Duluth justice court. Ac- 
cording to one business man "the tlm.e 
Is rapidly comin^j when this will have 
to be done and the city authorities will 
be impressed with the economy of lime 
and the convenience to large numbers 
of people." 

West Duluth has had a justice court 
for a number of years and although 
common drunks arrested at West Du- 
luth are taken to the municipal court, 
all of the other petty cases are dis- 
posed of by the local justice. During 
the month of June there were five 
more arrests in the West end than in 
West Duluth. 

The following arrests were made in 
June by the police at the West end: 
Drimkenness, 25; Indecent assault, 2; 
petty larceny, 2; transient merchant 
without license, 1; non-support, 1; 
keeping saloon open on Sunday, 2; driv- 
ing on sidewalk, 1; trespass, 1; va- 
grancy, 1; solecism, 1; selling bread 
without license. 1; assault, 2; total, 40. 

The police records from month to 
month show that the arrests in the 
West end outnumber those in West 
Duluth. Most of the arrests are com- 
mon drunks and petty cases, which 
could be disposed of expeditiously by 
a justice instead of being taken up 
town to the municipal court. This 
would leave the police court of the 
city open to more important actions. 
Uptown people have got to recog- 
nize," said a West end merchant yes- 
terday, "the Increasing importance of 
the district west of Garfield avenue 
and east of the ore docks. Not only 
does every season add to the business 
interests of the district, but the popu- 
lation is making such strides that the 
facilities of the city are not keeping 
up. For instance, hundreds of houses 
have gone up in this district from the 
bay front to the top of the hill when 
the last five years and yet we have 
approximately the same police and 
fire protection. The school board has 
built several new school buildings, but 
even at that, It Is having difficulty In 
keeping up with the Increasing num- 
ber of children clamoring for admis- 
sion." ^ 

IS BURNED BY 
ELECTRIC FLASH 



J O. McElroy, meter superintendent 
of the Great Northern Pow«-f company, 
was severely burned about the face and 
hands in the distributing station at 
Fifteenth avenue west and Superior 
street yesterday afternoon. 

A short circuit resulted while he was 
adjusting some wires, causing a flash 
of fire, which struck him in the face 
and hands. He was taken to St. Luke's 
hospital. Although t!ie burns are very 
painful It is not believed that '.hey will 
cause any permanent injury. 

SUMMER COURSE IN 

SWEDISH LANGUAGE. 



ton and of an audience which he had 
with President Taft. 



GLEE CLUBS WILL 

HOLD EXCURSION. 



Plans for the joint excursion of the 
Adums and Svta glee clubs have been 
made and it has been decided to take 
the trip July 23 on the steamer 
Easton, to Port Wing, Wis., where a 
picnic will be held. 

Although the boat will make two 
trips to Port Wing on that day, the 
two choruses and friends of the clubs 
will leave on the morning boat, which 
departs from the Booth dock at 9 
a. m. Another trip will be made at 6 
p. m., but there is no stopover at Port 
Wing before the boat returns. 

At the picnic there will be races and 
contests of all kinds in which the mem- 
bers of both clubs will participate 
One of the features of the day will be 
a ball game between the bachelors and 
the benedicts. Songs will be rendered 
by both glee clubs. 

New Sidewalks. 

Cement sidewalks will be laid on the 
east side of Garfield avenue some time 
this month. The Soo Railroad com- 
pany, through E. C. HoUidge, division 
engineer, has let a contract for the 
work to Houghtaling & Foley of Du- 
luth to construct 10.443 yards of ce- 
ment walk at a cost of about $2,000. 
The work has already begun and will 
be completed about July 25. 

West En'd Briefs. 

Rev. J. A. McGaughey. religious di- 
rector of the Y. M. C. A., will preach 
at both services tomorrow at the Sec- 
ond Presbyterian church, 1515 West 
Superior street. His subject in the 
morning is "A Three Fold Estimate of 
Character," and in the evening. "Seek- 
ing the Ghosts of Lost Opportunities." 

The body of H. T. Vollen, 55 years 
old. who died Wednesday at the home 
of his son, Herman, of 2406 West Sec- 
ond street, was sent to hi' home at 
Jacobson, Minn., for burial today. Mr. 
Vollen died while on a visit here. 

Miss Bertha Randall of 1717 Pied- 
mont avenue has gone to Minneapolis, 
where she will visit friends and rela- 
tives for a few days. 

Mrs. Joseph Olson of 2118 West 
First street returned today from a 
trip to Lake Nebagamon, Wis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shimonek of 1717 Pied- 
mont avenue have returned from an 
Eastern trip. While away they vis- 
ited many points of interest, includ- 
ing Buffalo. Niagara Falls, Detroit and 
Chicago. ^ „ , 

The annual picnic of the Sunday 
school of Zlon Norwegian Lutheran 
church will be held tomorrow at Lester 
park. The children will leave on Lake- 
side cars about 9 o'clock and at about 
noon a picnic lunch will be served on 
the grounds. 



A summer school for the study of 
the Swedish language will open Mon- 
day morning, July 17, at the First 
Swedish Baptist church. Twenty-sec- 
ond avenue west and Third street, for 
a four weeks' course. 

Rev. Swaney Nelson, pastor of the 
congregation, will be the teacher In 
charge. He will be assisted by Mrs. 
Nelson. Children between the ages of 
7 and 13 will be received. The school 
will continue until Aug. 13, when it 
will close with a patriotic program. 

Next Thursday evening at the Swed- 
ish temple. Rev. Sw^aney Nelson will 
lecture on his impressions of the 
world's Baptist congress which con- 
vened recently at Philadelphia. He 
will also tell of his visit to Washing- 



FOR SALE 

Carefully Belected FIr*t Mort- 
gage L/oanft. All loans on IM- 
PKOVEIJ PROPERTY bearing 5, 
SVi and a per cent, payable nenil- 
auniinlly. 

W. M. PRIXDLE & CO. 



MRS. CARLTON IS 
GIVEN FREEDOM 

Hubbard County Woman Freed 
of Charge of Murder- 
ing Father. 

Park Rapids, Minn., July 8. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Judge McClennahan in 
district court yesterday granted the 
motion of the defense to dismiss the 
charge of murder against Mrs. Lloyd 
Carlton who was being tried jointly 
with her husband for The murder of 
her father, Peter Neste. March 31, last. 
The motion was made at the conclu- 
sion of the presentation of the case 
against the pair. County Attorney 
Woolley opposed the motion, but th© 
court overruled him and ordered ShferifE 
Petrle to release the woman. 

A motion to dismiss the charge 
against Lloyd Carlton was denied and 
the defense began introducing evi- 
dence, its witnesses being largely 
character witnesses to prove Carlton's 
good character when living at Bemidji 
and other places. 

It is ex'^ected the case will be con- 
cluded late today. 

» 

Naturalisation Official Promoted. 

Marquette. Mich., July S. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Capt. Merton A. 
Sturges, who has been chief examiner 
of tne naturalization service of the 
department of commerce and labor for 
Michigan and Northern Ohio, with 
headquarters In Datrolt. has been pro- 
moted to the Chicago office. Capt. 
Sturges' new territory embraces all of 
Southern Michigan, all of Indiana. 
Eastern and Northern Illinois and 
boutheastern Wisconsin. 



!l 




ALLEGE PLOT 
TO RUIN THEN 

Detectives Accuse Postoffice 

Inspectors of Helping 

in the Scheme. 



Senate "Third Degree'* Com- 
mittee to Hear Attack 
on Burns. 



Washington, July 8. — Charges that a 
conspiracy exists between United States 
postoffice Inspectors and the W. J. 
Burns Detective agency, the conspiracy 
being aimed at the destruction of their 
business, have been made in a petition 
filed by the Perkins Detective agency 
of Philadelphia, Pittsburg and Indian- 
apolis with the select committee ap- 
pointed by the senate to Investigate 
the "third degree" methods of the po- 
lice. 

Counsel for the Perkins agency will 
appear before the committee and ask 
that It undertake an investigation of 
the circumstances surrounding the 
raiding of the Perkins agency offices 
In the three cities and the seizure of 
the papers of that concern by postoffice 
inspectors and operators from the 
Burns agency. 

Allege Threatening Letter. 

G. B. Perkins. Walter W. Perkins and 
A. Thomas were accused recently of 
having written to C. Strong of Erie, 
Pa., that unless $50,000 was forthcom- 
ing the Strong house and mausoleum 
would be blown up. The letters were 
alleged to have been anonymous and 
forwarded to Mr. Strong with the idea- 
it is contended, that the Perkins agency 
would gain employment in ferreting 
out the authors and preventing the 
carrying out of the threat. 

The petition filed with the committee 
sets forth that raids were made on the 
Perkins agency In all three cities by 
postoffice inspectors and Burns de- 
tectives and that the former, acting 
under federal laws, seized valuable 
papers and personal records. In addi- 
tion, the officers and employes of the 
Perkins agency, the petition further 
charges, were subjected to "third de- 
gree" methods for the purpose of ex- 
torting evidence or confessions from 
them. 

Say There Are Other CaaeH. 

In asking for an investigation at the 
hands of the senate committee, the pe- 
tition says that their case Is not an 
Isolated one, but that they are pre- 
pared to prove that like conduct on the 
part of postoffice inspectors Is not an 
Infrequent occurrence in other parts 
of the country. 

W. J. Burns, head of the Burns 
agency, was a former secret service of- 
ficial in the treasury department. He 
achieved considerable reputation for 
his work in connection with the anti- 
graft crusade in San Francisco, and at 
present is in the lime light as a result 
of his work in the dynamiting plot 
which caused the destruction of the 
Los Angeles Times plant. It was un- 
der his direction that the labor leaders 
now being held for that affair were 
apprehended. 



WILL HAVE HOME 
IF MOTHER HANGS 

Children of Mrs. NeapoGtana 
Are Offered Care By In- 
diana Woman. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., July 8. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — If Mrs. Angelina 
Neapolitana dies at the end of a hang- 
man's rope on Aug. 9, as sentenced, 
her four little children will bo ably 
cared for, and the baby expected next 
week will also be given a good home. 

This is assured in a letter received 
this morning by Uriah McFadden, the 
condemned woman's counsel, from a 
woman in Goshen, Ind., whose name 
is withheld. The letter has been 
turned over to Inspector J. P. Reed of 
the Childrens' Aid home, where the 
children are being cared for. 

ISHPEMING NOTES. 

Ishpeming, Mich., July 8. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Clarence Randall is here 
visiting W. P. Belden. 

Miss Foster of Philadelphia is visit- 
ing her sister, Mrs. W. W. Graff of 
North Lake. 

Misses Eva Fiegel and Gertrude 
Feigel will visit in Duluth the next 
two weeks. 

Miss Anna Wilson of Cleveland, Ohio, 
is visiting Mrs. Peter Finnegan. 

Hilga Johnson and Mildred Carlson 
are visiting friends In Duluth.*" 

Walter Lally, who is a student at 
the seminary in Quebec is home. 

Will Duncan of California is visit- 
ing his father, M. M. Duncan. 

Sirs. William Hebbard is In the Cop- 
per country for a few days. 

Elbridge Anderson and wife have 
departed for their home in Tennessee. 
They spent about three weeks here 
visiting C. L. Andrson. 

Robert J. Wise is at Mlchigamme 
installing an engine In the big Braas- 
lad boat. 

The members of the Y. M. C A. who 
started to hike to Calumet only got 
as far as Kewaunee bay and then took 
the train. They could not walk on 
account of the Intense heat. 

Len Williams and Howard Johns are 
in Calumet visiting and W. H. Norman 
has returned to the city. 

Eldred Gill spent the Fourth and 
fifth in Gwlnn. 

Nels Soderberg of Chicago Is visiting 
friends in this city. 

Iver Valeen, who is employed In 
Milwavikee, is in the city for a week 
on a visit to his mother. 

Miss Bertha Beaglehole, who has 
been in Detroit the past two weeks, 
has returned home. 

Mrs. J. L. Johnson has returned from 
Virginia and Coleralne, Minn, where 
she visited her sons, Harry and Ed. 

J. E. Brandlund has gone to Mari- 
nette, Wis. in response to a telegram 
advising him of the death of his 
father-in-law, Mr. Anderson. 

Mrs. G. P. Jones and two children 
of Hadley, B. C, are In the city visit- 
ing at the home of her sister, Mrs. 
David Gordon. 

P. H. Devlne. superintendent of prib- 
lic works, who was seriously Injured 
a short time ago In a runaway, is able 
to be around again although he still 
carries his arm In a sling. 

William Reed has been in the Copper 
country the past few days on business. 
• 

Harley, Wla., Getting Good. 

Bessemer. Mich., July 8. — Hurley, the 
famous town on the west bank of the 



Total les.OOO.OOO 

A reduction In stocks of lO.uOO.OOO lbs. 
In the Copper Producers' statement to 
Issue July 10, is considered very likely 
in fact a decline of 15.000 000 lbs. would 
not bo surpri-slng, in which case it 
would undoubtedly have a very stimu- 
lating effete upon the market, but the 
most optimistic cannot see any possi- 
bility of a "runaway market' as given 
as a possibility by Daniel Guggenheim 
when he sailed for Europe — there Is too 
much new copper in prospect to permit 
of this. A 13 or 13Vic. market Is In 
prospect, however, and copper stocka 
liave certainly not discounted this. 
« • • 

Closing quotations on the Duluth 
.Stock exchange today follow: 



Llated Stoclu — 



Bid. I Asked, 



pd. 



American Saginaw 
Butte Coalition . . 
Butte Alex-Scott, fl 
Butte-Ballaklava . 
Calumet & Arizona.. 
Cactus Development. 

(Copper Queen 

Denn-Arlziona 

Giroux Consolidated. 
Greene-Cananea .... 

Keweenaw .*. . 

Live Oak Development. 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Red Warrior 

Savanna, pt. pd 

fl. pd 

.Arizona .... 

Development. 

Develoiiment. 
L'nllHted Stocks — 
Amazon Montana .... 

Ely 

Superior .... 

Superior, old. 

& Montana. . . 

& Corbin. . . . 

& Sonora . . . 
Consolidated • 



Savanna. 
Shattuck- 
Warren 
Warrior 



Butte & 

Butte & 

Butte & 

Calumet 

Calumet 

Calumet 

Carman 

CThief Consolidated 

Cliff 

r»uluth Toroda 

Elenita Development.. 

Keating Gold 

Mowitza 

North American 

Rice Bay Iron Co 

Summit 

San Antonio 

St. Mary 

Sierra 

Tuolumne 

Vermilion .'^teel & Iron 



3 

18% 

4% 

4% 

58?4 

10c 



6% 
6% 
7% 
2% 

20 

33 
7 
l'« 



3 
17 

2% 



70c 
814 
83 
50c 

"6% 



1 
93c 



3 

'eoc' 

45c' 



4^ 



19 

5 

5 
59^ 
16c 
18c 

20% 

^^ 

1 B-16 

1 1-16 

3% 

17% 



Total No. shares, 3,535. 



SAYS JOHN W. GATES 

HAS NOT IMPROVED. 



east branch of the Montreal river, has 
had a spasm of reform, and twenty of 
Its most notorious resorts, called Ba» 
loons, have been refused licenses and 
must now go out of business. In Wis- 
consin the state license year begin 
July 1, to have moneys with the gen-, 
eral government, and acting under the 
peremptory advice of Governor McGov- 
ern, all "free and easy" places will 
not be licensed another year. 

COPPERS ADVANCE; 
BUYERS ARE ACTIVE 

Producers' Report Expected 

to Put Metal to 13 

Cents. 

The copper market advanced today, 
overcoming certain bearish movements 
In the industrial and railroad list. 
While there was some realizing 1q 
Amalgamated on the bulge, yet mos^ 
of the other issues closed higher thali 
yesterday. The report of the Copper 
Producere' association on Monday 1S_ 
expected to show a fairly large de- 
crease in metal stocks. Some people 
in the metal trade think the report will 
be sufficient to advance the price of 

electroyltic from lil^ic to 13c a pound. 

The weather is a factor of prime im- 
portance. Scattered showers in the 
\Nesi caused a favorable undertone at^ 
the beginning but when grain.-* began 
to advance the market retlected the 
action of the cereals and eased off. 

Locally the market was active. Red 
Warrior sold at $1.31 V* and ?1-37»A, 
Butte -Mex bcott, fall paid, at $4.93% 
to $5, Calumet & Montana at 4 5c, 47c, 
49c, 60c and tic, Calumet & Corbin at 
19c, Cliff at 95c and 97c and Keating 
at $3.06^. Summit sold at 47c. 

Calumet & Arizona sold at $59, 
Giroux was $6.25 bid and $6.37 V4 blq 
without trading. North Butte sold at 
$33 and $33.1 U>4, Amalgamated at 
$69.75 to $70.12»A to $ti9.5u. 

* • * 

A wire to Paine, Webber & Co. from 
New York said the stret was disposed 
to wait until the publication uf the 
government's crop reports on Monday 
as the reports are expected to have 
considerable influence on market val- 
ues. The East, it was said, iias been 
skeptical of poor reports from the agri- 
cultural communities. 

• • • 

The Little Annie shaft of the Butte 
Alex Scott mine Is down 195 feet. The 
vein two feet wide recently cut is show- 
ing high grade values, running 117 
ounces in silver and $3.20 a tun in gold. 
The vein is below a cross fault. The 
foot wall is hard and there is not much 
water. The Scott is showing up well. 
The 600 raise is in good ore. The Amal- 
gamated and the Butte Alex Scott ar^ 
working In harmony, side lines being 
established and a working agreement 
having been arranged. A drift from 
the Amalgamated's West Colusa shaft 
will be run on the 1800-level, according 
to a wire to The Herald from Butte, to 
Butte Alex Sdott ground. This explo- 
ration work will show up the values on 
the 1800 level of the Scott much more 
cheaply than it would cost the Scott 
management to sink the shaft on the 
Scott claim to the 1800 level. It is con- 
fidently believed by the company that 
the rich ore on the 1600 level will be 
disclosed on the 1800. When values 
have been disclo.sed on the 1800 the 
Scott shaft will be driven to the 1800. 
• • • 

A leading copper authority estimates 
that the accumulated stocks of 165,- 
000.000 lbs. of copper in this country of 
date June 1 were distributed as fol- 
lows: 

Pounds. 

Lake Copper 50,000,000 

Elec. held by U. M. Selling Co 60,000,000 
Elec. held by other large re- 
fineries 45.000,000 

Miscellaneous stocks 10.000,000 



'^*r 



I 



■ f 



•»1T-»M'»l'«-|«i 



^ 



■ ■'■ 



ifti 



la r * !■■ 



Paris, July 8. — The condition of John 
W. Gates has not Improved .since year 
terday. His physician. Dr. Edmund li. 
Gros. describes the state of the Amerl-. 
can financier as stationary but not 
giving positive cause for alarm. 
• 

Bier Crops Around Roseau. 

Roseau, Minn., July 8. — (Special t<> 
The Herald.) — Matt Johnson of Wan- 
naska brought in some wonderful t 
samples of winter wheat, winter rye 
and timothy. The wheat measurea 
4 feet and 9 Inches; the rye. 5 feet 
and 7 inches, and the timothy 4 feet 
and 2 inches. The wheat heads were 
5'/^ inches and averaged 40 grains; 
the rye, 6 inches, and the timothx 
heads 6 to 7 inches. 

Governor Eberhart has promised 
to speak here one of the fair days, 
but it is not yet ascertained what 
day he "vsill be hers, ,- 






DULUTH HERALD 



July 8, 1911. 



I 



DAMAGE IN 
NORTHWEST 

ft Is Used By Bulls to Put 

Up Wheat— Corn Values 

Decline. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, JULY 8, 



Statistics Bullish— Linseed 

Spreads Make Nervous 

Market 



July— 

Duluth 

Minneapolis . . 

Clii'-ago 

Wluntpeg 

^^o^)lember- 

Di'Iutii 

Minneapolis . . 

Cliicai?'} 

WiunlpeJ!. Oct. 

>:,;ir York 

SI. Loui3 . . . . . 

Kansas City . • 

December- 

MtiineapolU .. 

Chicago 

Winnipeg •••< 
New York . . . . 

St LouU 

Kansas ''ity 
SoulUWBiieri 



Ol en. 

1.0 
.91^-02 4 
.17 



High. 



9u% 



•93 



1.(^1 
1.00V4 

.92^ 

.94 

.97 

.89 

1.01 
.94*4 
.9:tb 
.99H 

f-lV* 



anil Wli nil** auoUtlona furnished b B 

DULUTH 



Low. 

'.'9S% 
.89^ 
.97Mj 

.99%a 

.99 

.91 

.»3^ 

.9S% 

.87 

.92V4b 
# .99»4 

.9014-^ 

E. Bdker 



Close, 
t . 9 .« "'« n i 

.894 
.97%b 

.99T*a 
.99H-Vib 
.9mb 
.93V4-^b 
.96% 

.87 

.93%-^b 
.9*V4b 
.92Vib 
.99«4 ' 
.92Vt 
.90%-% 
Co. 



1911. 

Jul 



7. 



!i:l».m I 



r»iiiuth 



■9)0 



S«l.i. iKber 
aoliv.-. Casii 

was 
July 

Ju.y 
tember gained 
for the 

two 

1 2.0 J asked. 
basiH. The 



n>ai.l '^f Tra-le. July 8 — 
•ked u;.war.i today. July ad- 
c and was not traded In. 
gained V*o and was fairly 
wheat was on a Sep- 
galned Vs*. R>«? 
dropped V*C 

V4C. 
lie to $2.08. 



July 

Sept 



July 
Sept 
Oct. 



DURUM MARKET. 

Hi^h. Low 

.90»,b % .90'*b 

91 .90'Sa 



Close. 
I .'JO'.^n 
.90%a 



.$2 



Open. 

.;>o».4b 

. >o% 

nULUTH LINSEED MARKET. 

Low. Close. 

»2.')8 Ji-OS 

2.05b 2.10a 

1.95b 2.02a 



.99-^a 
.»S\4a 
.89-?* 
.97Vijb 

.99S»a 

.»l%b 
.»3>i»b 
.96^ 

,88 ^a 
.87% 

.99Sia 

.»4^-V4b 

.92V(»b 

.99% 

.92% 

.90%-91 



July 7. 

.9<ib 

.90%b 



pen. 
20a 



2. ).ib 



1.95b 



Hii^h. 
|2.2i)a 
2.11b 
2.00b 



July 

|2.1»a 
Z.05n 
1.95 



TRADING IS 
VERYUGHT 

Strength of Copper Shares 

Is Feature of Stock 

Market 

Business Drops to Very Small 

Proportions — Close 

Is Strong. 



and 



c»ats 
uiK-hangfd, corn 
• iurum went up 
Unseed lost 

c to |2.1i.>. passing 
history 
gained 
Cash seed was on 
weakness in the cash ait- 
absence of a 



90V»C 



Duluth close: 
arrive: No. 1 nor 
li'.^il; September, . ,„ . — , , 
No 1. 90 "..o: No. 2. 88 "-^c: JU'V- .., ..^ 

Li,,3eed-dn tracl- ^^^ ':;\J^'"j'e\2c to 
October. 12.02 asl^ed O-its. 46'4C. to 
Aug. 20. 72-710. I'orn «>-%c- 

*Keoeip's-Wheat. 59.61 bu. 

;9,40.-5 bu: U"«.^_^'^.' ,-,-^'f;J;",-a.sF y.-ar 12,21S bu 



tl.O'>%. 
-A-97%< 



On track and to 
July. 99T8C nom- 



Wheat— On track: No. 1 hard.^ 

hern. ?9^c; No. 2 "'>^^''?' a^l' In" stoV^ and to' arrive: 
,l,T,c_asked, ,l>urum-On tra^k. in s^to^^^^ ^ 

luiT »-.i.'>«: September. $2.10 asked; 
arrVve.' 45%c. Rye. «l-33c; to arrive 

last 



year 



last year 93.030 bu; 
last year 9.6'*1 bu. 



oats. 1,19:J bu, 



: tirst time In the 
optima. October 



Sep- 
Ju:y 
of the 
7c to 
a July 



Shipments — Oits 





•A*Aa 



■Wi'-- 

b 

J U . .V 
tCbtl 

Th'. ■ 
firm. 

Xortri 



demand 

of 1.0<J-* 

which put 



uai. n and th 

:. itcuted by the offering 
►^levator company 

ash sttuati.>.a at Mlnn'^^P^"^^ ^f 
prlces advancing 4< to •-^i^j^ ^.^^ 

to close ^^"\^:\^„t!e« July was 
ievensh vv ^nu.pes ^^^j ^^^ 

sold at 
July-Au- 

12.12 ^. %t^'«f .^:i:.^xrii-aT%. 'i>^ ^v. 

i2.')3. 1%^' "P- 
Nortl-.west were 

, but there were .^-;;«J\,^f 'V^! 

close there 
ill the face of 



here 
Wlnutpes 
was $1 S.. 
Flaia seed 



market - 
$1.9 J bid. Oclob.T 
werp July-August 
T'U^ %ir^8C up Calcutta 
gust at London sold at 
Bueni'S Ayres sold at 
R.jport3 from the - 

there were enough 
messages to intensify the 
Ing. Shortly before tne 



day; somewhat hi..her temperature. 
SiLXr Thowers"" migh^t' or Sunday: 

local showers tonight or 

in east tonight. North 

South L>akota- -Generally fair to- 

'^ I .Sunday; cooler tonight and 

Sunday. r^^braska-Lnsettled 

loc.il showers in east 

cooler Sunday and 



$15.85 for pork, 
$S.55 for ribs. 

Articles 

flour, bbl 

Wheat, bu .... 

corn, bu 

Oats, bu 

barley, bu 

Car lot 



$8.37 Vi for ^^rd and 



New York. July 8.— Trading was 
quiet and changes were small on the 
stock e.xchange at the opening today. 
Canadian Pacific, the only stock which 
fluctuated widely, advanced IVi Amal- 
gamated Copper and Western Maryland 
gained %• International Harvester 
and Peoples* Gas lost %. 

Prices drifted aimlessly 
pecial movement in 



The statement follows: Daily aver- 
age— Loans. $2,014,801,000, increase. 
$41,608,000; specie. $353,408,000. de- 
crease $36,498,000; legal tenders. $8-.- 
933.000 decrease $699,000: net deposits. 
$1,876,135,000, Increase. $5,920,000. cir- 
culation. $46.«75.'J00, Increase $36 000. 
banks cash reserve in vault jibJ.Jsa,- 
u<»0 trust companies cash reserve in 
vault, $66,905,000; aggregate ,cas.i 
reserve. $436,3 41,000. decrease $112.- 
507,000; reserve required, $4«>9,0JJ.7&\». 
Increase. $1,480,000; excess cash re - 
.serve $10,924,250. decrease, $3..j8S.ooo, 
trust' companies reserve, with clear- 
ing house members carrying 25 per 
cent cash reserve. »5«.903.000 

Actual condition: Loans, $2,009.30.?,- 
000. increase, $628,000; specie. $34y,375.- 
000 decrease, $21,731,000; legal tend- 
ers." $83,628,000. increase. $498,000; net 
deposits, $1,862,008,000. decrease $19.- 
556,000; circulation. $46,721,000. in- 
crease, $83,000; banks cash reserve in 
vault 1359,668,000; trust companies 
cash 'reserve in vault. $69,336,000; ag- 
gregate cash reserve. $429,004,000. de- 
crease $101,150,000: reserve required. 
1465,502.000, decrease. $4,889,000; ex- 
cess cash reserve. $7,377,000. decrease. 
$16 072,600; trust companies reserve 
with clearing house members carry- 
ing 25 per cent cash reserves. $65,30o,- 

Summary of state bank.s and trust 
companies in Greater New York not re- 
porting to the New York's clearing 
house: Loans. $361,679,300. Increase. 
89 037.500; specie, $65,506,600. increase. 
$S74.400; legal tenders. $13.25«,000. in- 
crease. $746,300; total deposits. $734,- 
006,000, Increase. $6,165,700. 



■•••••••■•■ 



3.75 
3.75 
S.75 



por lb. 



...174 



...13V§c«i 



.isca 



lb.. 



••••••••• 



21'«. 



.$1.10® 



i.00<34. 
4. 



...... 



nivxe' 



•wa** 
the 
paid 
age 

to -i 

v.. 
t' 

'i 
1, 



-^J^^^'^tinnh^tl^re^-mtle 

territory, 
was from 
Dotlineau 



that 
leat to kill. In 
■ame from scattered 
nctpal damage news 
I Die key. Sargeant. 



warmer 

and probably 

Sunday; warmer 

and 

night and Sunday, 

in east 

with probably 

?r'w;'t'""t.?nUht''' KanVas-Generally 
Si-^onighi and .Sunday; cooler Sunday 
and in west lonigl t. ^ 

The Soutl,wf.:...n wh.at^ market. 

The cash situati>»n 
The Northwe.>^tern mar- 
Receipts were 



97 



cuuuiu-5 and al^,' « .^^.^^i^ 
weather in ^ ^'•^'Vi^.^^jfe lOO 
temperatures n^f^.'^ '^.'^v^tly 
terduy. Today it i» *;\?,^" -edloted for 
lower temperatures ^^^^P'^^'^'geat-ered 

the Miuot district 



.Soo. The 
warm and 
mark yes- 
cooler and 



Southwestern 
were weak under t"ie 
arrival.-; of wheat 
was heavy 
ketd were strong. 



small. 



Rcpta. Shpts. 

17.300 12.600 

171.900 7.000 

: 1S9.000 633,600 

120 600 413.400 

::: 16:500 2.900 

receipts— Wheat. 139 cars 
with 125 of contract grade; corn. 20a 
car-s. with 71 of contract grade, oats. 
74 cars. Total receipts of wheat 
Chicago. Minneapolis and Duiutn 
dav vvere 332 cars, compared wttn 
cars last week and 171 cars the corre 

sponiing day a year afo-^j, ^aA,.. No 
Cash jirain — No. 2 red, 88%(3>9«c. «o 
3 re^] 8f^89%c; No. 2 hard. 88%ra.90c 
No. 3 hard. 86 @ 89c; No. 1 northern, 
(3$1.02U: No. 2 northern. 94'sj'9.c- 
3 northern. 91® 95c; No- 2 spring. 
97»-.c: No. 3 spring. 89^ 94c 
chaff, S9'a)92c: durum. 84 4? 90c. 
No. 

S\c N;x'TVh"lte.*63Ci''a63%>-: No. 3 
vellow. 63«^'S' Mj3\c; No. 4, 



with no es- 
either direction. 
Virginia Iron declined 6%. and Lacka- 
wanna 11 points. 

The market closed 
strength of the copper 
oral l':iectric and a 
In Brooklyn Hapid 
only fetaures of the 
trading fell t o very 

N«w York »t«ck quotaUons, fumUheJ The Uei*ia 
by Pipar. Johnsuii A ('a*); 




ib.. 
5o-lb 



lb. 



bozu. lb. new. 



or 
exira 



MKiU. pet 



laucy. 



lb 

■11) CM- 



Strong. The 
shares and Gen- 
one point advance 
Transit were the 
last hour. In which 
small proportions. 



Now Yot*. July 8.— Bradstreefs bank clearlrgs re- 
ix.rt for Ui« week ending July 7. *Uows au aggreg.it* 
of $:; 111 rSO.OOO as aKalnst $2,776. u89,'Mi) U»t 
and $:!12.441.000 In tlie iv.rrespoiidlu* week lut 
Tl>« fuUowliig U « ll»t uf the clUaa; 



week 
year. 



Pet. 

Inc. 



at 
to- 
293 



98c 
No. 
94(&) 
velvet 
Corn — 



STOCKS 



temperatures 
tomorrow. Tliere 
Bhowers, the rain lu 
being l:eavy. 



some extent 



. 63=Vira64c; No. 2 white. «4(rjt ^4 »-*e. 
"> vllow. 63*4 41' 64c; No. 3. bSVifeP 

62'a)62ViiC; 

No. 4 white. 62'a62%c: No 4 veHow 62 

-u»62V.,-. (Jats— No. 2 white. 4'>^'.^P>=," 

3 white. 46'fi47c: No. 4 white. 46iQ) 



No. 



in America 
favorable report? 
there wa.s some s 'lung 




>r 

They think the corn 

be about 3 per cent 

indicated yield of . atwut 

indicated yield of 

believe, 



spring wheat, 
ftcreitge will 
larger and an 

Si;::;-"tl^^y 'b^ev;,'^uri>e aboUt 850.- 

000. Joo bu. 



Broomhall cable. ^/'•??l.<.,H''Vteadv 
The wheat market, displayed » -^^^^J^ 

undertone at tl^e "^t"' T*he *strl'n4S 
values were unch: ng.i- ^1^ ^tre-;;^ 

from Russia and 
in the way of 

o»Yi.-ial reports vas again.st 

Later there was free 

-ihorts on nervousness. 

ports from Amer c.^. 

-ipring wheat and the 

'^i'.i Dolicical siti ation. 

strengt; u Buen ».s Ayres was unex 

oected here and largely affected 

Srmuess*' of^ hold, rs as Plata offers 

ar^ more firmly heul. Spot maiKeis 

were tlrm and unchanged to iv^a 

higher w"ith the »tre«gth In Manitoba 

*'world-s shipments are expected to be 
iighi with smalUr shipments from 
America! There va.s a free disposition 
^"^lJ^t.the weeV end, and at the close 



cent 

gun 



showed the 

to l>e S6 per 

The Mii:hi- 

condition of 

as last year 

an acre. The 

the condilior oi 

and spring wheat 

through- 



holders. 
covering by 
on private re- 
on damage to 
continued unset- 
The closing 
.a ur 

the 



46V4C 
2. 84.\ 
$9.0041' 13 
Wheal— 

July 

s<pt 

IltW 

Corn- 
July 

.Htpt 

!>«<: 

.VUy 

ftnia— 

July 

.Sept 

IKw 

May . . 

MeiM 
.>»<pt . . . 
Ian 

Lartl. 
July . . 
.Sept . . 
Itec 

Short 
rtept .. 
Jau. 



Standard, 46^(5 4. Vic Rje— No. 
Barley. 75c(&$1.15. Timothy, 
50. Clover, $9.00® 15.50^ 



itptn. 

.yiiii-sm 

.»4«»-\» 

.fiiV-H 

.nr.\ \ 
.87%-<S8 



Ulgh. 

.94% 

.<5.VH 
.C8 



Crop Report*. 

The I!linol-=t . :op ropori 
condition of winter wheat 
agiiinst 94 ou May 1. 
import indicated tl;e 
Winter wheat* tiie «*"'«? 
When the yield wu:? is uu 
Wisconsin report gave 
Winter wheat at 9 
&t 89 

There were heavy showers 
»„t th« r^nadiau Northwest, where the 
whei^ crop l^ ^^^ tirst-class conditiom 
Theri wore showers also in Southern 

Minnesota, but. were »n^^i^;^'7,V,,rable 
Foreign statistics were ^nfav oraoie 
World's shipments this week will be 
2nali Cable" were higher on account 
oTdamage to the spring wheat crop 
ttie Liiited States. 

Forc^ign crop reports are 
favorable. Portugal will 
enou«h wheat for home 

southwest of Russia the weather 
and crop prospects are favor- 
Southeast there have been 
The weather is hot. 
in a critical 
has occurred 



the market 
higher than 



was 

yesti 



and 



,.. .46\ 47 .47 
.. .4«S-% .4'*% 

. . .5m-=s .JiH 

Pork, per 1)N — 
..l.'i.S'S l'>i'S 

IMir 100 11) — 

... 8.^4-30 i.:S2Vt 

8.13 8.4i-»7H 

. .. 8.37S 8.:i7V» 

Rlba. per 100 ll>— 

. g.iS 8.5.'>-57^ 

... 8.15 8.17^i 



L»w. 
.8t*Vi 
.91 
.9J% 

.•3W 

.S.'.% 
.'ilH 
.66 4 

.4:.^ 

.4«i 

.47% 
.50'?fc 

13.624 
15.574 

8.274-30 

8.:.: 4 
8.3:24 



Clone. 
.HU4 
.914 
.»4 

.63% 

.m»ii,-' 
.674 

.454 

.1134 
.4*4 

.314 

15.624 
13.80 

8.30 

8.124 

8.35 



Anialginialed 

.Viiierlcan Car foundry. 
Aiuerli'an Smolten . . . ■ 

.\iiai-oiida 

A. T. & T 

Atehlwn 

Baltimore & Ohio 

Br<K.kl>u Kayi.l Transit. 

CheMipeakc 4 Olilo 

C.. M. * St Paul 

Canadian Pacific 

Erie 

,Jo Isl pfd 

(Jri-at Nortlieni .■••■•■• 

Ixulsnille & .Ni»hvUJe.. 

Mlaa'Airl Pacific 

New Yurk Central 

Northern Pact Ic 

IVruJsylvanlii ^.... 

UepuljUo St«el ft Iron. 

UcK-k hlaud 

Heading 

Six) Llui' 

HouUiem Hallway 

.■ioulhem Pacific 

Twin <lty 

ViUin PiuUlc ■•-••■•• 

LiiltiKl routes 8t«« 

du pf 1 

Wrttern L'lilou 



SKCIKITH-S— 



4 

■4 



50 
124-15 



in 

generally 
produce 
consumption. 



In th 
Is rainy 
able. In the 
beneficial rains, 
howev.r, and crops are 

cortdiiion Much damage 

in the V.JIga district Harve.^ting of 
wheat in Roumaula Is general. . In 
Spriln and Italy I'^ospect.s are fairly 
Kood In Indii rain is needed. ThJ 

official estimate of the Hungarian crop 

Is 1*2.100.000 bu. compared with -wo. 

Oo0.t>oO bu last year. 

Corn dropped on account 

♦ak'n.1 and scattered rain in 

tak.n, a.i ^^..^^^^^.^ There was no 

in 'he Southwest. Pros- 
rain in the Southwest were an 
of weakness in the corn mar- 
ket Th^ Illinois crop report 
the" condition of corn in th.it 

8.S .md the Michigan report gav 
p^.r'ceMtage of i:2 against 
Jur." 1. 



firm 

r..rn onened i.«l' higher and further 
adVan"ed'vf on* he -[rerigth in Amer- 
ica and the stro ig closing in Buenos 

■^n Mr" Portugal agent estimates a crop 
which ^irrbriuijfcient to supply h._^rne 
re.iuirements. The crop last >ear 
amounted to 6.000.000 ^bu. 

Cars inspected: Wheat-No 1 north- 
ern. 4. No. 1 durum 2: No. ^...'*"r""'' Y 
total wheat. 7: ast year. 32, Unsce.t. 
1 last vear. 7; t. tal. 8. on track. 

♦ • • 
Grand Forks wired: There 

heavy rain at Loeds and Mlnot, N. D.. 
last night. ^ ^ 

Minneapolis wired: Weak spots In 
N.mh Dakota rrop are showing up 
more clearly. Tie Western nali of the 
Soo wheat line branch north 
main line is c. mplaining 
.ounty also sending > 

♦ • • 

today 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 

hour* ending at 8 *. m.. 8»tur- 



K-ir the t»>iity-lour 
lay. July A. 



II. 



w^as a 



STATIONS. 



state at 
wwallMt 



Temperatur*. 



E 

i 



Raln- 

ffta 



II 



of the 
Bottineau 
reports. 



of profit 
North Da- 



kota and 
rain, l.ow'^ver. 
pects of 
element 



be 



Primarie.s: Wheat — Receipts 
<<^ao.) last ye.ir 381.000; shipments, 
?':"000' last yea 253.000. Corn--Today. 
^8:000, la^t year. 351.00<J. shipments. 
S54.000, last year. 35j,000 bu. 
• • • 
quotations on foreign wheat: 
*',.d up: corn. *.ad up; Ant- 
%c up; Pans. 'Ac 
to y^c up. 
• 

Receipts of wheat: 



Closing 
Liverpool. 
werp and 
up; 'tour. 



"^'i 



lip; 
Budajest. 
unchanged 



showed 
state to 



91 as 



of 



Today. 

7 

139 

186 

212 



.223.000 
150 



Last 

Year. 

32 

16 

113 

119 

40,000 

83 



MARKET GOSSIP 



Ko. 

Ko. 

No 



Cank SalcM Saturday. 

h»r»l. 1 Mr 

1-uril. 1 ear 

u rthei-n. I ••*r ■■ 

u r'hem. 2.J')»> tm, li arrlfe 

tioififrn. 4 i^jrs 

n,>rUi'Tn. 2% ^"i 



Boiide<l. 



N». 
Ko. 
Net. 
No. 
No 
No. 



•ir3 
lia.<ee<l. 
Unseeif. 
diiniu). 

durum. 
i.liir.::n. 



5«0 bu. to »rrtt« 

18.42 htJ 

1.000 bu. 10 arrlTo.. 

I oar 

I ..-ar 

1 oar 



.11.114 
1.014 
. 1.01 
. 1.W4 
. 1.004 
. .WS 
. .M4 
. 1.14 
. lit 
. .90^ 
. .i>l 

. .904 
. .90% 



D'lluth 

Chi<"ago 

Minneapolis 

Winnipeg 

St. Louis, bu. 

Kansas City 

■ • 

Minneapolis \w^heat 
50.000 bu tor 01. e day 

• * • 

Winnipeg Juy oats closed at Z7\c 
bid and October at 39V3C. 

Stores of grt in here June 
■ hanges since June 1 follow In 



.\l«X:U1'1rll 

Caiupliell 

Crooluliin 

IvtrAt CU» 

ILiUud 

New I'lm 

Pirk HaplJ* ... 

U.)choiti»r 

Wln:ieli«gi> CItl 
Wjrthlngton 

Ameiila 

ll.ittuieau 

l>l.:lanii)a 

<iraiti>n 

l.aiigdoQ 

I.artiuors 

LUbun 

M'lwt 

.Napoleon 

renihlna 

Walipo'on 

.Vbepleeu 

M.llhank 

Mitoh.)U 

l'.j:l jok ■ 

aious KaUi . . . 
WaUTt'.wn .... 

Viiikton 

tl{Um.in:k 

;Ik<tIU Laka .. 

UuluUi 

tHup'U 

l\^ Cw«aa . ... 
Miiineap<jIU . . 
iM'iorUeatl .... 

iPlcrre 

lit. Paul 

Winnipeg 



Pt 



.Pi, Cioulyl 

Clear! 

Cleari 

Cloudy! 
Cloiulyi 
..Clear! 
....Cl.udy 

, Clearj 

Cleari 

Clear; 

Cl«ar| 

.Pt. Clou.ly| 
.Pt. I'loudyi 
.Pt. Cloudy I 

t "teari 

.Pt. Clon.ty 

Cloudy 

CK ir 

Clo'idy 

.Pt. Cloudy 

CKari 

.Pt. CloudTi 

<'lear| 

Cl«*r| 

Cloudy i 
..Clenri 
. .Cleari 
..near) 
Cloudyi 
Cloudy 

Clear 

...Clau.bi 

Clear 

Clear 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Cleari 

Pi. Cloudyl 



..Pt. 



.Pt. 



84 

ItO 

8!i 

8*> 
M 
90 
82 
92 
90 
»8 
88 
91 
102 
30 
88 
80 
90 
96 
9« 
84 
88 
94 
92 
91 
100 
94 
90 
92 
98 
96 
87 
94 

8« 
88 
98 
84 
84 



82 

64 

88 

62 

82 

70 

C2 

72 

GO 

70 

70 

60 

62 

02 
62 

60 

68 

62 

88 

58 

08 

70 

00 

68 

78 

68 

04 

70 

72 

68 

54 

78 

74 

74 

74 

82 

72 

60 





,08 

.08 




.04 


.20 

.42 
.04 
.14 

.34 

1. 10 
.12 







.02 
.18 



.04 


.04 
1.38 




Duluth 



riiM National Hank •• 

America.; Kxchaugti .NaUoual 

City N jUonal Bank 

Nortltern National Bank 

81 LouU* County Hank 

western »Ul» Bank ..... ... • 

Duluth Superior Traction t-o. 

do pf Ji •.• 1 

DulutU Stwet lUUway. Ut g. 

N. A 

l>uluth «xli»on Electric, lal 8- 

Match. 19J1. op. M. & 0. 
Great NorUicm Puwer Co. 
Auicrlcdn Caibulte. paf H-- 
Z«iUh Furnace Co . 



New York 

i'Uloago ...< 

R'Mton 

Philadelphia 

.St. L.ula 

Kansas City < 

Pittsburg 

.San KrancUco 

UttltliiioPi 

Clnrluuiiti 

MlnueaiHilta 

New Orleans 

Cleveland 

l»«mlt 

Omaha 

[>i3 AngelM 

LouLs^Ule 

Milwaukee 

Seattle 

31 Paul 

Buffalo 

Denver 

Iri'UuiiapoUs 

.\Uanta 

Pn)vldenc« 

Portland, Or 

McmpliU 

Salt Lake City 

Washington 

Tacouia 

Savannah 

Spokane 

Dea Moines 

Sli.ux <'lty 

Oraiid llapl* 

DavMii'ort 

Kal.iiu;kzoo. ktlrb . . . . 
<'e(Ur Ilaplila. Iowa... 

Hc-lei;a 

K.irso. N. U 

.■<loux FalU. S. U.... 

•Kuluth 

lUouston 

tdalveston 

WaliTloo 

J— Not Include'! In 
Items than oliarir^r* 
cause cunipiUlau;ii aie 



10.7 
0.6 
8.0 



5.5 
2.4 



3.8 



....$1,904,954,000 
2o2.Jl»6,000 

.... 1151,390.000 

.... 191,440.0')0 

St;. 82 1000 

40.8T1.0'X) 

4K.51T.niJ0 

4r;.;'oo,«oo 

3-2. 1)10, OiW 

aj.657.0O0 

17.963.000 

20.40j.000 

1.-.. 903.000 

IS. 004.000 

12,04H.OOO 

li5.8Tl.000 

11.84d.00« 

12,585.000 

10.74^.. 000 

8.675.000 

10.746.000 

10.720.iJ00 

11.485.01)0 

8.10.5.000 
8,651.000 

.... 7.4'.':i.ooo 

8,279.000 

5.740.000 

6.926.000 

3.405.000 

'. 3.696,1)00 

.... 3,6H6.000 

..... 3.5.58.000 

.... 2.:«o.ooo 

.■ 2.270.000 

1,500.000 

&58.000 

..... 1.347.000 

7'<2,000 

,.'.'.'.".'. 390,000 

" flij.DOO 

".'.... 2.346.'JO0 

".' 21.301.000 

12,432.1*00 

. ! 1.018.000 

totals lie<-ause routJtlnlng 



Pot 
Dec. 

9.1 
2.4 
0.8 



3.8 

7.2 

21.6 



S-lb cartons. 



5-lb cartons, lb. 



box.. 



3.1 


.... 


4.8 


■ . . ■ 




18.6 


12.6 


.... 


15.3 






3.4 




7.3 


.... 


11.0 


.... 


22..-, 




3.8 


.1 




.... 


io.o 


.... 


46.4 


.... 


11.8 




16.1 


.1 


.... 


.... 


7.7 




13.9 




6.6 


.1 


• • • • 


7.7 


.... 


13.8 


.... 


.2 







i.'j 


.... 


18.9 



18.0 



•Not Included 
In complete. 



lu toula be- 



Liverpool Grain. 

Liverpool. July 3.— Closing:^ ^, .'??*?•. 
s4)ot firm: No. 1 Manitoba, .s 10^*a. 
No. 2 Manitoba. 7s 4'>id; No. 3 Mani- 
toba, not quoted; futures firm; July. 
6s ll%d; October, 6s lOV^d; 

6s 10%d. , .:. 

Corn, mixed old, 5s 6d: new 
can kiln dried, 5s 2d; futures firm, 
September. 5s 4%d; December, as 6%d 



December, 
Ameri- 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 



taKfis'o1^'ih^"fop^Je\^^cks at Boston 
today, reported by I'aine. 
CO, 316 ^^'""f Suoerlor street. 



closing quo 
""lostu 
Webber Sl 



West Superior 



stocks 



decreased 



7 and 
bushels: 



spring wheat 
Durum wheat 
Bonded wheat 



Cars received; 



Buluth .... 
Winnipeg . 
Minneapolis 



Last 

Year 
7 
1 
9 



Total 
Com . . 
tja^s . . 
Linseed 



wheat . 



.594.000, 
. 130.000, 
. 117,000, 

,1.841.000. 
. 300.')00, 
. 59.>,00t», 
. 134.000. 



dec, 
inc. 
Inc. 

dec. 
Inc. 
Inc. 
Inc. 



103,000 
42,000 
24.000 

37.000 
1,000 

11.000 
4,000 



again general. 
Ullnols. Iowa, 



Ui:.MAllKS — Hot weather to 

Sl.owtri feU over Ohio. KentuciJ, 
Nobra^ta and North UakoU^ ^. „„.„ ^,i„j,oN. 

Looal t'Jteiaster. 



T-Indlcate« in.ipproclabi* rainfall •-Maximum for 
yeierday. r-Minimum for t*vuU-four liours. en^ng 
lam 75th meridian tirae. J-Mlnlraum t«nper 
itur« for 12 uour period ei>dlng at 8 ^-^ 
v-oTB— The aneraga mailmum ai-.d minim 
'^ up ,1 each ceotar from Uie actual 

receive*!, and Uie anerage raiufaU 
of itailona reporting .1 Inch or 
of wttatUar" U that pr**ailui« a( 



i 

tern- 



peraiurc* are made 
number of repoiia 
from the auoiber 
more. The ' 'state 



time of uuaenailou. 



Today 
•......*.*.■* ^ 

3 

V • • 

Yesterday's Chicago Record-Herald: 
First attempts at an export trade in 
Chicago wheat for the 1911-1912 crop 
year were made ysterday. 
export hou.se bo-ight 180,000 

red and No. 2 hard. . 

Ibly "iacd all or part of t abroad. 

The sales here were of 100.000 

red and 80.000 bu No. 

former was old or now. 

and the latter wis 

sold at Chicago 

price c 

fteclared 



A Duluth 
bu No. 2 
has presum 



Total grain ...2.870.000 
• • • 

Grain shipped but not reported: 
Spring wheat. :;; 24.000 bu; bonded wheat, 
92 000 bu; durum. 74.000 bu: total. 340,- 
000 bu. Load ng — Spring. 350,000 bu; 
durum, 15,000 Hu- 

CHIOGO MARKET. 



bu No. 2 
hard. The 
buy*:>r'3 option, 
said to have been 
September delivery 
I f Buffalo. The local seller 
that the price realized was 
very low In each case, netting no 
profit, but giving some room to worfc 
In here. New York reported export 
■ales of 80.000 bu of No. 2 red. and this 
was presumably a part of the wheat 
•old by Chicago owners. 
• • • 
Forecast: UnaettUid with probably 
local sliowers in west tonight or Sun- 



Bullish Cables Support Hlsrher 
Prici'S for Wheat. 

Chicago. July 8. — Bullish cables aid- 
ed an upturn today In wheat. World 
shipments weie expected to be lignt. 
and the un.settled outlook regarding 
^Iorocco cau.-; 



Unl >oked for -■ 
counted also 
withstanding 
spring wheat 
in mind too 



A GOOD HRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 



d continued uneasiness 
trf'ngth at Buenos Ayres 
igainst the bears. Not- 
rains in the American 
belt traders kept firmly 
the idea that the crop 
had been mat.rially damaged through- 
out a distrlc in considerable size. 
The opening was a shade off to htc 
higher September started at 91 ^c to 
92»^c. a gain of %c to \ic and ad- 
vanced to 92 ^c. There was a good 
deal of buyljg here credited to for- 
eign account. 

The fact that rains Northwest were 
heavier and more general than report- 
ed brought about a sharp decline 
which was acentuated by denials of 
black rust la North Dakota. The 
close wa.s w 'ak with September He 

-.at nil.; 

moisture showing on the 
,'eloped declde«i firmness, 

a reaction because of 
S«>ptember opened \ftif 

higher at 66 1.4c to «6\c, 



lower at 91 "^ 
With little 
map corn de 
but suffered 
profit taking 



10 65*4 <R)63''>|C. 



gtren to esah 
shlpmeata our 



6pec1al attention 
grains. We give all 
personal attention. 

DVLUTH. MINNKAPOUB. 




and receded 

The marke 
further with 
ever, was fin 
net loss of a 

Oats appea 
A'holly by the cour«». 
• arlv "advanc- was foil 



later eased off a little 
wheat. The close, how- 
\ with September 65^ c. a 
shade. 

ed to be governed almost 

of com. An 

wed by a com- 



plete reaction, with baslne-ss active in 
both rtlr-^ctioiis .September started >^c 
to Sc hlghe • at 4H=^c to 47c and fell 
imck to 4K«.jC. 

The provU on pit was almo-st desert - 
id Little ch inge was made In -luota- 
tions. First sales were 2Hc lower to 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

Wheat Opens Strong But Drops 
luder Chicago Pressure. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. July 8.— Further 
damage reports from North Dakota 
and Canada caueed a strong opening 
fn wheat I'ressure In Chicago, how- 
ever t'oned a decline later. .Scattered 
rains fell In North Dakota over night 
but they were Insuflllclent. July closed 
^c higher than yesterday. .September 
Z(fi\c higher and December %'(i\c 
hiKher. Lo.al elevator stocks decreased 
5 1)5)0 bu for one day. Mlnneaplols to- 
day received 180 ^ars of wheat against 
113 a year ago; Duluth. 7 against o2, 
and Winnipeg. 212 against^ 119. July 
opened at 99 Vic; high. 99 ^c; low 
98v«c close. 98Ti,c. September opened 
99\c; high. |1.00\4: low. 99^; close. 
•iftU 'fi''>9'MC. December opened ♦i.'iyv* 
JlOOS; high. fl.Ol: low, 99%®99%c: 
close. 99^i,«?99'ic. ^ . . -,», 

Cash wheat was quoted steady. The 
demand continued good, coming from 
both mills and elevators. No. 1 north- 
em sold for lVi<&2V»c above the Sep- 
tember contract. Close: No 1 hard. 
S101*«; No. 1 northern. $1.00 «4 <© 1.01 Vi ; 
to arrive $1.00({i' l.oi ; No. 2 northern. 
97&99**c; to arrive, 96*4®99»4c; No. 
3 white 95>4f^98>*c; No. 3 yellow 
com, 65Vj@6«c; No. 3 white oats. 44 Vi 
'a*45c\ri. 

Mlllsluff — Shipments. '1.540 tons. 
Market steedv and active. Bran In 
100-pound sacks |19. 00® 19.50. 

The demand for Hour was not ac- 
tive today. Prices were unchanged. 
Shipments. 47.439 bbl. First patents In 
wood f. o b. Minneapolis, J5.10(^'5.30; 
second patents. |4.50^t4.85; first clears. 
$3 45'rt3.65; second clears. $2.45(^^2.60. 

Flax — Receipts. 4 cars; year ago. 9; 
shipments, none. Demand continued 
good for flax at even Duluth July con- 
tract. Closing price, $2.08. 

Barloy — Receipt.^. 3 cars; year ago. 
•>*• shipments, 11 Demand was limit- 
ed but on account of the unusually 
!lKht offerings prices were firmer. 
Feeding grades were unchanged to .^c 
higher and malting unchanged t.i »4c 
Closing range. 75c''g$1.024. 




South St. Paul LIveHtoofc. 

South St. Paul. .Minn., July 8.— Cattle 
receipts. 200: market steady; Quota- 
tion.? unchanged. Hog receipts, 1.200. 
market steady to 5c higher: range. 
$6.30 (a 6.60; bulk of sales. $C.40'it6.4.). 
Sheep receipts. 2<»0; market steady; 
sheep, $1,00 0*3.75; lamb.s. ?3.001iib.aO. 



Amalgamated Cupper 

Anaconda 

Adventure 

Ahmeek 

Allouez ...... . ■ • • ■ 

American Telephone 

American Zinc 

Arcadian • • • 

Arizona Commercial 
Butte & Ballaklava. 

Boston Corbin 

Butte Coalition 

Calumet & Arizona... 
Calumet &. Hecla..... 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly - We.st 

Davis - Daly 

East Butte 

Frankli'U 

First National 

Glroux 

Granby 

tJreene Cananea . . . . • 
Hancock Consolidated 

Helvetia 

Indiana ' 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

Lake Copper 

La Salle • 

Mass Consolidated 

Mass. Oas 

Miami Copper ... 

Michigan 

Moliawk 

Nevada Cons . . • 
Nevada Utah .... 

North Lake 

Nipissing 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Old Dominion .... 

Osceola 

Parrot • • • 

Pneumatic Service 
Qulncy 

Ray Cons 

Santa Fe 

Shannon 

Shattuck 

Shoe Machinery 
Superior-Boston 
Superior Copper 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

United Fruit . • 
U. S. Mining . . 
U. S. Mining Pfd 
Utah Apex 
Utah Cons . 
Utah Copper 
Victoria . . . 
Winona .... 
Wolverine . 
Wyandot . • . 
Yukon Gold 
Bohemia . . . 

Begole 

Boston Ely 

Cactus 

Chemung 

Cliff ,\^rA 

Chief Consolidated 

(7hino 

La Rose 

Live Oak 
New Baltic 
Oneco 

South Lake 
Tonopah Nevada 



ChleaKo Llvcatock. 

rhirago July 8 — < attle— Ueceipta «»umated at 400, 
markPt steady; b*-v«i. $4.90(?.0.90; 1•«^'V».^^*!n^ 
$4 80(^5.80; w«teni iU*.n. J1.7j«'..90; stocker* and 
fee-lers. $;!.;i.5(35.50; cow* and heifers. Ji:.Joiu>...8o; 
calT0«. $6.00(*8 00. tt)g» - Kecelptfl estimated at 
9,000; market sU^.ng U) 5c higher; light *6.')m^i.»l%. 

mlie.1. »«5.40i3«.S7W; heavy, ^ "«•>:!■•: "'-"u' nli;,'' 
ia6 43- good to choice heavy. $6.45i*0.8. "n . Die*. 
$6 i5<^6.T0; bulk of sale*. $t5.0il(sfi;.80. 
reiyts estimated at 5,000; nurket at.'a.ly ; 
(,H TO; •.veatem, JS.ooi-rl.HO; yeartlnga. 
lamljB. native. $4.25wr 25: western. 



Cherry, keg ...< 
Orapc. keg .... 
CUiet. keg ..... 

BA.NANAS— 
Banauaii. per lb. 

UUTTKR— 
Fancy creamery 
Uairr, ptr U> 

CHEESt— 

Twins •,•■" 

Wisconsin. ftiU cream, per lb.. 

Amtrican, full cream, per lo 

lllock Swiss, pel lb. No. i.... 

PtimtM •• 

Wheel Swiia. per lb 

EOU&— 

liggs, balk, doi 

Eggs. fr<3h, cartons, per doi. .. 

Fancy, raw, per lb by the sack. 
Fancy, toasted, sacks. p« lb-- 
Fancy, roasted. 1ms Uian sacjta. 
Salted peanuts. 30-lb palls. 
Salted peanut*. 10-lb sacks. 
Fancy Jumhos. roasted, per 
Fancy Jumbos, raw. pei lb. 

MAPLE BYKLTP— 
Vermont, per gal 

MAPLE SCUAll— 

Iowa aawrted pigs.. SO-lb box. per to. 

POP COU.-' — 

SnowbaU pop com. 40-pkg. box 

SanU Claus pop corn, case 

Pop com. on me cob 

Pop com. shelled 

HONty— 
Wisconsin whlU closer, per c»s«. 

CABBAGE— 

Teune>see cabbag*. crfcU 

POTATOES— 

Miiinesoui, per bu ~ 

New Uu ,......•*•••"..•' 

ONIONS— 

EcvDtian. ssck ,,,...... 

l^Xiis, crate 

Wahiuw.'~new. Callfoml*. llO-lb sack, per lb. 

Fliberu. SUUy, Pcr lb--.- 

Hra^U, extra laige. per lb. 

Pecans, exua faucy poUihed, pet 
.VImondi, TdragauU. p«r 
Miied nuts, luo-lb and 

1 Cocoanuta. per doz 

New iilckory uuu. large 
I'eciius. liaises, shelled, 

tons, per lb V ' " V 

Walnuts, ah^UeU. extra taucy. 

lb 

Clieatnuts. per lb 

Almoudi, alieUed. extra fancy. 

D\TEd ANU FltiS— 
lUiiowl dates. 7U-lb boxes, new 
U..U0W1 dates. 30 packages, per 

Fard dates. 12-lU boxes tiew 

sug;tr walnut dales. «->& b-^^- •••••• — ••• 

Ne« Culifotuia tigs. i2 Pkg. oox. per dox. ... 

\ -w smynia figM. S-crowu. 20-lb box. j)ei box. 
New bmTma ?is. I-^rowu. lOo-lb box. per 

bux A" ' ' ' ' 

New Smyrna fi*^ 3-«own. 

FBESH VEtiETABLBa- 

Gra«. crate 

Uinl. do» 

Carrots, box 

Egg plant, crate 

Oyster plaut, dox ••• 

Peppers, basket 

Head lettuce, hamper 

Lettuce, leaf, doz ■ 

Beans, wax, per box 

Parsky. horns grown, per 

(ireeii onions, dox... 

Cauliflower. Callforula. per 
Splnacli, box .-• 
Hound radishes. 

dm ••■■ 

Hothouse cucvuiibers. per doa. 
Texas cucumbers, crate. ..... 

New Orleans cucumbers, doi. 
Celery, California, pet 

Celery, florldo. crate 

Kndive. New Orleans, per 

New bceu. p«sr doi 

New carrots, per dos 

Asparagus. doS 

Asparagus, case 

liarlic. pound 

HOOTS— 

Table t/vijt., per cwt...... 

Uorse radish, toot, per bbl-... 

Uurse raddlali. uer llJv 

MLSCE1.LAN Ia; ua— 

licdus. navy, per bu 

IJeaua, bruwn. per bu 

fcrull baskets, per huudiwl 

ME.\TS— 

Beef, per lb 

liuituu, ptt lb 

p.jrk loins, per l«> 

Ve.il, per lij 

Lamb, per Iti 

Lard, per lb • 

DllES&EU POULTKY— 

Hens, fancy, fat. per lb 

Springs, per lb 

Ducks, per lb 

Geese, per lb ........... 

liens, per lo 

LIVE POL'LTBY— 

Hdiuk, pet lb • 

Small hens, per lb • 

Springs, per lb • 

Trout. Lake .Superior, fresh... 

Wliltefhh. fresh 

Pike, fresh • 

Pickerel frozen 

SaUuou •• 

Halibut 

.Smoked whlteflsh 

Smoked Clduook salmon 

Frtsh frozen mackereL each.. 

Jtiie shad, each 

Shad, toe, per pair 

Sleali. cod. per lb 

Scallops, per gai ■ 

HAY ANU STRAW— 



.04 

.21^ 
.18 

.12H 

.13H 

.18 

.14 

.07 

.li 

.ISVi 
.17 

.•T 

.08 
8.75 
1.40 

.10 

.0«^ 

1.7} 

.10 

2.S0 
1.75 

.o3W 
.04>« 

4.XS 

4.00 

1.25 
2.50 



ii 

...... ....."•". ••••_!.•* 

...•••..■.....•"•"•*' ■ " 

20.00 

browB 10. 64 



Fox. led . ■ . 
Fox. gray... 

Lynx 

5Iarten. dark 

Manen, datt _ 

Marten, light brown ana paM 

Weasel, white 

Weasel, stained, damaaed. . 

Wolf, timber 

Wolf, brush, cased 

Wolf, open 

Wolf, coyote, cased 

Btar, as to size 

Badger, civet and house 
mountain Hon. opossom and 
ket prices. The above pnces 
skin* No* 2. 3 and 4 In 



e.«o 

LOO 
20.00 
15.00 
T.OO 
6.00 
.50 
.15 
3.75 
3.00 
2.50 
2 25 
$3(^21 
cat. crcee and kit 
wolverine command mai- 
ar« for Prim* Ito. » 
proporUoa. 



£.59 
.8! 

5.00 
4.00 
3. SO 
S.OC 



e.o« 

.7J 
13. 00 
10 04 

s.o* 

S.2S 

.u 

.19 
2.50 
2.00 
1.7i 
l.M 



foi. 



10-lb. pet box. 



50 

50 

.IT 
.15 
,14 
.15 
.20 
.14 
.U 

.M 

.48 

.10 
.45 

4.50 
2.25 
1.40 
1.35 
1.00 
2.fS 

14.50 
l.U« 



TOO LARGE 
A SURPLUS 

County Pays $100,000 to 

School Board as Advance 

ApportionmenL 

Cash Has Been Pouring Into 
Office of the Treas- 
urer. 



10.2 
23.0 

'r7 
'".a 



.i.ooa 1 



............ 



dox. 



crate.. 



Hothouse, latga 



.,.45ci^ 
bunches. 



bunch., 
bill. . 



3.4 



other 



30 

40 
1.60 
0.50 

,90 

.90 
2.75 

.30 
2.25 

.45 

.12H 
2.25 

.50 

.IS 
1.25 
1.75 
1.00 
I.IU 
3.75 
6.50 

.75 

.7S 
LIS 
2.25 

.15 

. 2.00 
.10.60 
. .13 

. 2.60 
. 2.75 
. l.OS 



County Treasurer Holgate has turned 
o%^r to E. R. Cobb, treasurer ot the 
school board JIOO.OOO as an advance of 
the apportionment for ne-^^ yeaj: 

At this lime of the season ui just 
after the big rush to pay taxes at the 
tielsurer-8 office, a very large sum oi 
inoiiev Is accumulated. 

The money was simply turned over 
as an advance on what the school 
board is to get. The '>oard needs the 
money, the county w*s getting too big 
surplus., and as it h^s ^o^.^b^ J^^n 



more. It wa^ 



col- 



anyway with 

advance. ., . w„„„ 

Thousands of <i"»ar3 have been 
lected by the treasurer during the past 
lew weeks. The receipts have been 
the largest In tlie history of the of flee 
ind the clerks have »>een swamped wRh 
the counter and in the man. 
the rush at the counter was 
the mail had to be packed 
some time until it could 
opened and the money turned 
Is the reason there has been 

the sending out receipts for 
sent in by mall. 



work at 
This year 
so great that 
away for 



lay in 
money 



be 

In. This 

some de- 

the 



...0S(3 
...OSviJ 

.11 bi* 

'Jla 



....2oa 

....20(a 

lOld 

....15«l 




.10 

.10. 

.12 

.10 

,13 

.08 

.23 
.23 
.22 
.10 
.18 

.15^ 

.17 

At 

.12 

.12 

.12)4 

.06 

.11 

.12 

.10 



SUPERIOR 



Slrat 

Order 

a Pythian or- 

the Sons of Nor- 

A class of ifilrty 

Initialed Into the 

order and there will 

features connected with the 

It is expected that several 



Pythian Ceremonial. 

The annual meeting of Al 
Temple, No. 135, Dramatic 
Knights of Khorassat 
der, will be held at 
wav hall, .July 20. 
candidates will be 
mysteries of the 
be other 
ceremonies. 



will attend from Duluth. 



Complete Boulevard. 



will 

the 



Slieep — He 
nall»e. $2.60 
$4.40(^5.50; 
»1.75@7.ri. 



Midway Horae Market. 

Minnesota Traasfer. St. Paul, Minn.. July 
rati & Zlmmennan rrport : Fair retail 
slilpmenU l>elng made to Marquetta and 
Ml.|i Anliland, Wl.i., and Dululh. Minn. 
marke.1 dnwnwani lendemy lu Uio price 
and sldppirs sliould buy them worth the 
^Uind a loas. 

lirafteni, extra 

l>rafter». rholc* 

1 (rafters, common to good •>•• 

Fann mares and liorses. extra 

K.inu nif.ri« and liorses. diolce 

Farm mares, common to good ■ 

l>ellvery 

lirlvera aud saddler* 

Mules, aoi'ordlng to size ' 



8.— Bar- 
demand. 
KepublU-, 
Tliere l.i 
of horses, 
money or 

.$190(^240 
. 120t«'l90 
. a.jvsUS 
. 150®180 
. lloc'li-. 

. 706*110 
. 130(*200 
. 125(i2M 
. 130(£245 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Kye 
Oat 



timothy nay, per ton. . 
timothy hay, per ton... 
mixed tlaiJihy hay. pet 
mixed tlmoUiy hay, per 
upland hay. per ton 

upland hay. per ton... 
midland liay. per tun.., 
midland hay. per ton.,. 



t.7n.. 
ton.. 



straw, 
strmw. 



per 
per 



ton. . 
ton. . 





.18 






.ii5 




1 


.25 






.89 






.12m 


1 


.90 




118.009818. 


00 


16.00(91 


17. 


00 


15.00(3 


18. 


00 


lO.ooia 


12, 


00 


14.00(91 


15 


00 


10. 110 (d 


12 


00 


12.00(3 


14 


00 


8.00(9 


10 


00 


a. 50(3 


7 


00 


<.oo(i 


8 


50 



Chicago. 

Chicago. July 8— Butter.iio market F.gg». 
receipt. 7314 ca*«. Che«.*^-^teady : ',1^^ ??•, l^J;*^ 
fVidliJc- young AmorK;a lJ(n'l.lV«fi. wig 
^^^pnta^esistrong. ..Id. $1.1) 'il.20; 

,.w »5..o^^25. v..^J-^^- ^^lit^r^ao' tJ 

Co'Titt.! te! O^to sflb WU.. 9H^^10Hc: 85 
to 110 lb wta., lie. 



bums. 



twins 

l3(al3M|C. 



no market; 



An extension of about a mile 
h^ added to the boulevard and 
BtlllnKs Park drive will be le.igthened 
?,it if connect with Central avenue. 
The proposed extension wih 8uppi> 
the link needed to complete the boule- 
vard circuit, making it «>'>?'*"•>«„'? 
drive through Billings Park along 
ml river front and to return via Tower 
avenue and .South Superior, or to re- 
verse the trip. The boulevard drive 
In places Is one of the finest In the 
Northwest. 

Votes for Women. 

A Women's Rights club "lav . ^« 
formed in Superior next week, when 
Mrs Emma Smith DeVoe, a prominent 
suffragist and lecturer on women s 
riehts will give an address at the su- 
perlof- Commercial club rooms. She 
win talk on 'The Universal Question. 
The lecture will be held either 
dav or Thursday evening. Mrs DeVoe 
ll%-!^s m the state of Washington 
comes to Superior highly 



Wednes- 
*Voe 

, and 

recommended. 



New York 

Titm York July 8.— Butter— Steaily; receljiU. 5.536 : 

factory current 



22c; 



Loudou Stooka. 

London, July 8.— American securities 
opened a fraction higher here today 
and Improved under the lead of Cana- 
dian Pacific, which closed 1% over the 
New York finals of yesterday. Others 
finished below the best, and the closing 
tone was steady. 

. — ^ 

Cotton Market 

New York. July 8— J^e ^^tton inar- 
ket opened easy at a decline of 18*^.21 
points for the old crop, and of 6rg » 
points on the new crop positions under 
general liquidation which amounted al- 
most to demoralization so far as the 
old crop positions were concerned. 
.July broke from 14.30 to 14-13 on the 
call, while August sold off to 13.S2. the 
lowest prices reached since last Febru- 
ary. New crop deliveries sold 10 to 
12 points net lower right a'ter the 
call. Private reports of further good 
rains In the southwest seemed to be 
respon.slble for the selling movement 
but at the decline to the 13-cent 
there was heavy covering, and 
trade buying of the new crop months 
This checked the decline and s light 
rallies occurred during the middle ot 

the morning. r.i^„iT,<r 

Futures closed steady. ^Closing 

bids- July 14.17: August. 13.93; Sep- 
tember 13.20: October. 12.96; Novem- 
beV. 1193 ; December 12.95 January 
\-"i2- March, 13.00; May. 13.00. Spot 
closed quiet; middling uplands, 
middling gulf, 14.75: 



finest. .../. .> - , , 

fair, l*(3'20c: procc^a fl««^fl- ,„ 

\l^ke firsts lie: seoomU. 18(?lSVic; thirls 1* ^c^ 

^^^^-^ "-^•^i.j'^t^k.-'^ri.ri^; ^ 

fiujcj-, ll*»c; do. lajge. 
lH»c; do, small, wliile. 



Baptist Convention Ends. 

The closing session of the annual 
convention of the Lake ^''JPf '"' 
list association was .held last 
Ing at the First Baptist church. 
Wilbur Clapp spoke on The 
People in the Church, and Dr. Hul 
bert on 'Wisconsin. Today, 
day and Tomorrow." 

...-inr-inAl address »> »L 

of Kev 



Bap- 

even- 

Rev. 

Young 



tjoxes; I >^ state 

sTnall. colored, average. 

col,.re.l. ,^''«;™e^-./"'^':''j„ lame, white, average. 

white. 9l^ll'*c; dalles, bert. ^^Y' 

spe-ial, 9V3c: fair to good, aV»® 
3^j(-v4'.,c; hard, 2%(.g!2i»c 



faJicy. 

tr grides, 

skims. SVii^'S^c; 

7V»c; common. 



low 
new 



Yester- 
In the afternoon 

the principal address was .'ie^^v'"'!!^ ?^ 
Mrs Harrv Giffen. wife of Hev^ J. H. 
Slffen .She spoke on 'f-astern Women 
In Eastern Lands." dealing mostly with 
the women of China. 



old 

suic whole nUlk. fan<y. <^^1'J"»'>- l''5>?,V;,^f°: 
«^w r"al3c; &:>. lower grades, colored. 11® 12 ^c 
^o ^ower gra:i«.s, white. IKallVjc. Kggs-Quiet 
do. >«*«',,«■;*"(/„,, gathered, extras. 20W22 
17(;'l*V4c; timU. I5@l6c; 
thir*, to poorer, 11(3' 13c; 
No. 1, 12W(3'13c; No. 2 
fair 8»»9-, fresh guUiered, 



re- 
extra 
seconds. I'i'/tdi 
fresh gaUifrel. 
Uisric; dirUes. 
cliecks, gojd lo 
.J.,- ..friilc- state Pennsylvania and n. arljy hen- 
1;^ Wiatc 2l't3"c; do, gathered white. l>.«22c; do, 
uery wlUte. -"-"j^-^^^^. j„, gaUi«red l.r;)wu 

wertem gatliered whites, l.aliW. 



.-lipts. 
firsts, 
14 Vic; 
dirUes, 
pour to 



level 
active 



bennery bP/wn. 
mixed, l6«J0c; 



and 



HIDES, TALLOW AND FURS. 



sales, 100 



14:50 
bales. 



New Vork Aioaey. 

New York, July 8.— Money on call 
nominal. Time loans easy; 60 days 
2V4^S P"r cent; 90 days, 2\rip^; six 

'"^Tei'Vor^.^jlb- 8.-Prime mercantile 
paper 4 to 4Vi per cent. Sterling ex- 
chanKe steady with tlie actual business 
in bfnkers- tills at |4.»5 5 for 60-day 
bills and at 14.86.3 for demand. Com 
mercial bills. $4.87%. 
52 ■%c. Mexican dollars^ 
ment bonds, steady, 
steady. 



WlsconsUi 

14 

, 40(934 



ORKKN .SALIED HIDE»- 

Q. H. steers, orer 60 lb 

O. S. steers, 25 lb. and up and steeri 

under 60 lb • :;;•••• 

G. a. long haired klps. 8 to 25 lb... 

t} S veal klps. 5 to 25 lb 

O. a- l>««con skins, under 8 1J» 

ti. S. borsehldes 

DBV S.^LTKU— 
Dry fllti"; hides, over 15 Ib 
Dry Mnnesota. DakoU. 

and lo 7a hlles 

Uuskrat. winter 

Muiralus 

Urj kid •• 

Uty salted calf •••• 

TALLOW AND GUtASt- 

Tallow, IB caka* 

Tiiilow. Ui bbl 

Urease 

PELT3— 

Pells. Urge, each ■ 

Pelts, medium lo small. 
Urj pelts, butcher. 

Washington 

Dry shearings, eacb. . 



No. 1, 
$ .09% 

.08% 
.09 
.13 
.80 
3.66 

.18 



No. 2. 
$ .08)t 

.07% 
.07 W 
.IIW 
.70 
2.90 



,12 
22^19 



PAINE, WEBBER 
g COMPANY 

We handle orders for all 
stocks listed on the Boston, 
New York or any other ex- 
changes. 

We can give you the best ana 
most accurate service possible 
on local curb or other unlisted 
securities. 

We are members 01 the t-ni- 
-ai > Board of Trade and give 
particular attention to trade in 
^raiii. provisions and cotton. 

Our daily market letter and 
Walkers' weekly copper letter 
will be sent to you without cost 
upon application. 

Telephone, vrrite or wire us 
for quotations or information 
pertaining to anything market- 
wise and we will give you the 
best obtainable. 



I 



Muotaaa. 



Torrey Building. 31« ^'*^ 
perlor Street; Teiephoneat Grand 
13»1, Melrowe a:i43. 

M. J. O'Brien, 
ager. 



•mr^» 



I 



Bar silver, 

45c. Govem- 

itailroad bonds, 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



with 

adverse 

to- 



higher. 

New 

94 'uc: 



- '■sc 



higher with September delivery 



|99^< 



ji*tf Tork Orala. 

York July 8.— Close. Wheat. 
September. 9.'>^«c; December. 
Corn, September. 70V>c. 



New York. July 8— Tl»e --^ ^^ y^ 

clearing house banks '•!'^j,^''t-'^v,o,d 
(five days) shows that the hanks hoia 
$Vo.924.250 more than the r^^^uirements 
n.f \ho -'.T ner cent reserve rule. Tbls is 
a de.re'aBe'^of $37,588,900 in the propor- 
donate cash reserve as compared 

last week. .„ki,» 

Because of considerable 
frltlfism the statement, beginning 

^^ve will he ba.<^ed on the actual cash 
Toldtnjs Of banks and tru.n com- 
oanles This will have the effect of 
creating a smaller 9urplu.s reserve than 
ba^ appeared for the last few weeks. 



.13.50 
. 3.85 
. 3.5« 
. 8.23 
. S.e« 

. 6.00 

. 5.50 
. i.OO 



«■••••••••■•• 



CALIFORNIA OBANO 

Extra fan.-y narel*. 96s 

Kaiicy naveU, 126s- 250s 

Kancy navels. 2S8« 

Choice navels, 288j 

Cbolce natels. 128s-250s. .... 
rLOUlUA ORAPEKBUIT— 

(4s, 48s. box 

Grapefruit, box 

i'alUomls • • • 

CALIKOnMA LEMONS— 
Extra fancy, box, any size... 

Imported limes, box 

PINPIAPPLES— 

24-36S. crate 

18-42S. crate 

TOMATOK8— -. 

Florida, basket "^ 

FlorUla. crate 

Al'PLES— 

Gano. fancy, box 

Ben Dafles. b-'X ' 

'sTKAWBaiUIES— 
WUc insln. case, li Ots 

»liJ»l.ANT— J 5, 

Bo« 

FRUIT JUICES— 

Orauge. keg 

Uaspbetiy. k<f 



5.00 
1.29 

3.rs 

3.30 



4. SO 

3.30 
3.15 



.11.259 l.SO 



3. 78 

3.T5 




WOOI^- 
XJuwastaed medium wool 
Unwashed coarse wooi.. 
Unwashed fine mediun. 

LEATHKB— 
Texas oak sole A.... ...... 

Texas oak sole 

Hemlock slaughter sole XX. 
Hemlock slaughter sole No. 

Hemlock dry hidt. sole 

Hemlock harness leather. . . 
Uak h.xrness leather. 
rUKS— 

Skunk, black 

Skunk, short stnpe 
.Skuuk. long narruw stripe 
Skunk, broad stripe and 

Uuakrat. fall 

Mi'skrat. kiu 

Raccoon 

MUili. dark and brown. 

Mink. P»le 

Beaver • • 

Cat. wild ••• 

Flslier. d^rk 

Fisher, pale 



I 

i 



JAMES S. MATTESON 



PtBLIC 



Buslnean Counnelor 

702-70S AL WORTH 



AC rorXT.\NT AND 
AlIJITOB. 

and SyntemUer 
BLDG, 



Dalnth, 



Telephone — Melroae, 4700. 



Zenith, 

Martin Rosendahl ft Co 

(INCORPORATED.) 

COPPER STOCK BROKERS 





H " ■ " ■ *■ 




I- ».»,* »..»ft-;~ X ' t^-«. ' 




iiii|ilh, 



L 



26 




_ ~^ .. (. 



> 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTrH HERALD. 



July 8, 1911. 






■pw4i 



PROGRAM OF 
CARNIVAL 

Details of Big Midsummer 

Celebration Are Nearly 

Complete. 

Rowing Races Will Not Be 

Scheduled Before 

Next Week. 



Coralia, whalebac!:, 6.30; Price, 7; 
Adriatic, 7:30; Buisen, L. C. Slnlth, 
8:30; Philip Mint h, 9: Cuddy, 9:30; 
liocefellcr, Mandel, Elba, 11. 



Detroit Passages. 



At a meetints of the regatta officials 
and nit'inbt'rs uf the water carnival 
cuiitiaiitt;f, which is beiiiK held this 
afterrioun, some final plans will be 
made for the carnival. The members 
of the (.arnival committee plan to detl. 
nitvly decide on several details of the 
program, while tlie Duluth officials 
of the Northwestern International re- 
satia wlU also £o over the plans for 
the holding of liie revving races. 

It was stated today tliat the entries 
for tlie beat races will be In by ne.\t 
Wednesday. The program will not be 
printed befure the entries of all of the 
clubs of the association are in. 

It is planned to have a press boat 
follow tlie races so that tiie reports 
^iil be accurate and complete. 

Following IS the tentative program 
of the carnival, minus tiie rowing 
races, wjiicti have not- been decided 
on in detail: 

Special water sports events to be 
scattered through the three days: Canoe 
tilting, log burling, high dive dor 
medals), pusii ball game, tug of war, 
caiioe wrestling, single canoe race (for 
mtdals», double canoe race «for med- 
alsri, tiiree man canoe race i for medals), 
double lady and gents' canoe race (tor 
medals), 5o-yard swimming i tor med- 
als), luu-y;ird swimming <.ior medals), 
tub race for boys, swaying pole, chas- 
ing live duck, relay race. 

No. 1 novelty curioe races — length of 
stand without paddles. 

No. 2 novelty canoe races — length of 
Stand and return, btlh men to get out 
of canoe and back In again once going 
each way. 

No. i novelty canoe races — length of 
•taitd: canoes to be upset, righted, and 
men to get in again and finish race. 

No. 4 novelty canoe races — backward 
race, length of grand stand. 

No. 5 nC'Velty canoe races — length of 
course and return; men to 



Detroit, Mich.. Julv 8. — Special to 
The Herald.)— Up Friday: Uganda, 
Ashley. 9:55 a. m. ; Bope 12:15 p. in.; 
Cranage. 1:15; Ellwood," 1:25; Mc- 
Dougall, Marsala, McGregor, C. B. 
Jones. 2:10; Sampel Mather (large), 
2:40; Omega, 2:50; V'alker, 4; Meecham, 
r.;40; Chicago 6; Di nham, 6:20; Fryer, 
6:25; Ranney,' 6:30; .Mauch Chunk, 6:40; 
Charles Neff, 6:45 Bessemer, Bryn 
^ran-r, 6.50; McGean, 8; La Salle, 9:15: 
Bangor, 11;40; Vuhan, 11:50. Down 
Friday: ChoctaW. 12:20 p. nv: H. B. 
'Nye. 1:20: Midland Prince 4:30; M. S. 
Kee, 6:10; EricssDn. Alolta, 6:40, 
Millinokfctt, Arizona, consort, 10; Mc- 
Kinstrey, 11:15. Upt^aturday: Edenborn, 
12:20 a. ra.; Burnhivm, 12:30; Marina. 
Magna 1; Turret Chief, McCuUough. 
1:20; Jex, consort, Major. 1:30; Michi- 
gan, 3:15; W. G. Glenella, Flower, 
3:30; Gettysburg, c< nsort Ionia, 3:40; 
John Mitchell, 4:15; Matthew, 4:30; 
Cornell, 4:40: Mauraloa, 5; Norton, 
5:40; Roman. 6; Chiller, 6:20: Wyan- 
dotte. 6:50; Ward Ames. 7:20; Northern 
Light. 7:3(i: Germaii, Iroquois, 7:60; 
Tagona. 8:10; Baber on, 10:10; Mahon- 
ing. 10:30; CastaMa noon; Widener, 
12:10 p. m. Down S.iturday: Old Wolf, 
2:10 a. m. ; Yuma, 3:30; Thomas Wil- 
son, 5:15; Tagona, 6:20; Ontario. 6:50; 
Mohawk, 10:40; Turret Crown, 11; J. 
P. Reiss, 11:15; Newona, 12:10 p. m. 



be heard before this Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House 
in Duluth, In said County, on Monday, 
the 17th day of July, 1911, at ten 
o'clock A. M., and all persons Inter- 
ested in said hearing and in said mat- 
ter are hereby cited and required at 
said time ana place to show cause, 
if any there be, why said petition 
should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this 
Order be served by publication In The 
Duluth Herald according to law, and 
that a copy of this Order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior 
to said day of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., June 23d, 
1911. 

By the Court. 

S. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
D. H., June 24; July 1 and 8, 1911. 



be heard, and ji^ia final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms In 
the Court Hou.se. In the City of Du- 
luth In said County, on Monday, the 
7th day of August, 1911, at ten o'clock 
A. M., and all persons Interested In 
said hearing ana in Fald matter are 
hereby cited an4 igkiuired at said time 
and place to sho1<Kause, if any there 
be, why said petition should not be 
granted. ^ 

ORDERED FUHETER, That this or- 
der be served by publication In 
The Duluth Herald according to law. 
Dated at Duluth, Minn, July 8th, 1911. 

By the Court. J 1l 

^ '4fl. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Ob\<»t, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) ^\ 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

From Pages 27 and 28. 



Port of Hiilnth. 



Arrivals: S Thomj son, H. M. Hanna, 
Jr.. light for ore; Jai lea Gayley, Joseph 
Morrow. Saxona, UtU y. Cornelius, coal; 
Aztec, Mizteo, light for lumber; C. O. 
Jenkins, light for jrrain; Alva, mer- 
chandise; Hamonic, passengers and 
merchandise; Empire City, to shipyard. 

Departures: Kennedy, A. M. Byers, 
Gates, Crawford, ore. Kalkaska, R. L. 
Fryer, lumber; Northern King, grain; 
Tlonesta, passengers and merchandise; 
Duluth, North Sea. Merchandise; Fitz- 
gerald, V'erona, W. U Brown, light. 



Marine Xotes. 

The United States vessel inspectors, 
John Monaghan and M. F. Chalk, to- 
day lnsi«ected the ferry boat Swansea. 
• * • 

The tug, Ella G. Stone, belonging to 
the Northern Dredge & I>ock company, 
wa." taken to the Grlgnon dry docks 
this morning for repairs. 



SUES HUSBAND FOR FEAR 
HE mil LEAVE FAMILY. 



places in canoe about midway going 
each way. 

No. ti novelty canoe races — length of 
course: canoe to be turned around com- 
pletely twice during race. 

Water baseball — Captain, Beth Rob- 
inson: caitain. Gus Frey. 

War canoe races — Captain, Miss Fran- 
cis Biirris; captain. Miss Helen Swan. 
Tkaniday, July 20. 

2 p. m. — 26-foot class n^otor boat 
race, two cups, first and second; 32-foot 
class motor boat race, two cups, first 
and second: 40-foot class motor boat 
race, two cups, first and second. Vene- 
tian fete in evening? 

Friday, July 21. 

2 p. m. — Sailing races, 18-foot, 22-foot 
and 28-foot classes. 

3:30 p. m. — Rowing regatta starts. 

Historic Sfectacle, Monitor and Merri- 
mac in evening. 

Saturday, July 22. 

2 p. m. — Free for all mo;or boat race 
for Fairbanks-Morse 12 h. p. engine. 

Rowing regatta cuncUules. 



Washington, July i. — Alleging that 
her husband, Elmer B. Carpenter, 
had frequently declJired that a man 
with too many chilJren to support 
was justified in dest rting them, Mrs. 
Agnes Carpenter, his wife, and moth- 
er of his three children, caused pa- 
pers to be served on her husband in 
change la suit for malntenante, as he was sit- 



MARINE 



M) PENALTY LMPOSED 

UPON (APT. BENHAM. 



Cleveland, Ohio. July S. — (Special to 
The Hera'.d ) — Advice has been re- 
ceived fct the local office of the United 
States steamboat inspectors that no 
penalty will be Liiposed on Capt. 
Charles A. Benham of Cleveland, who 
took out the steamer John Stanton 
from Chicago at the opening of the 
Beason without having his vessei 
passed by government inspectors. When 
the matter was reported to the in- 
spectors it was referred to Washing- 
ton for decision. 

Hutchinson & Co. of Cleveland, the 
owners of the Stanton, put up the plea 
that the boat was loaded with a cargo 
all winter and that they didn t believe 
the action of Capt. Benham was a 
direct violation of the law. Other boats 
e>alled under similar circumstances, but 
the department at Washington did not 
punish any of them. 



ting at his desk in tl e department of 
commerce and labor yesterday. 

Mrs. Carpenter cla ms she thought 
her husband was gong to put his 
theory into action and she feared he 
would betake himself out of the 
jurisdiction of the district court if 
he had any intimation that she con- 
templated the procet ding. 

Carpenter is in jail in default of 
bond. 



ORr>ER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL — 
State of Minnesota. County of St. 
Louis. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Andrew 
Dahl, Decedent: 

A certain Instrument purporting to 
be the last will and testament of An- 
drew Dahl having been presented to 
this court and the petition of RagnhiUl 
Dahl being duly filed herein, represent- 
ing, among other things, that said de- 
cedent, then being a resident of the 
County of St. Louis, State of Minne- 
sota, died testate In the County of St. 
Louis, state of Minnesota, on the 30th 
day of May, 1911, and that said peti- 
tioner Is the surviving spouse of said 
deceased and that she is named in the 
said instrument to be the executrix 
thereof and praying that said instru- 
ment be allowed and admitted to pro- 
bate as the last will and testament of 
said decedent, and that letters testa- 
mentary be issued to Ragnhild Dahl 
of Vlririnia, Minnesota, thereon. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard before tliis court, at tne Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House, 
in Duluth. In said County, on Monday, 
the 24th day of July, 1911, at ten 
o'clock a. m., and all persons Interested 
In said hearing and in said matter are 
hereby cited and required at said time 
and place to show cause, if any there 
be, why said petition should not be 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this 
order be ser/ed by publication in The 
Duluth Herald according to law, and 
that a copy of this order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior to 
said day of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., June 30th, 
1911. 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN. 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
D. H., July 1, 8 and 15, 1911. 



Afflicted Man l^Velcomes Death. 

La Crospe. Wis., Ju y 8. — After hav- 
ing been blind eleven years, bed- rid- 
den for three and having suffered 
paralysis and other afflictions, Fred 
Kosby. an old resldt nt of Onalaska, 
met death as a relief He was S7. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 



DECREASE IN LMPORTS 

FOR THE LAST QUARTER. 

The Quarterly report of the imports 
of the local harbor, which was com- 
pleted th's morning by the custom 
house officials, shows that for the last 
three months there has been a gr«rat 
decrease In the amount of imports to 
Duluth as compared with the same 
months last year. 

The total valuation of the Imports is 
|62.«32.16. of which $49,358 entered 
fluty free, and 112,467,16 was dutiable. 
The balance came from the warehouses, 
where the goods are being kept, having 
been received during the past three 
years. Of this $300 was without duty, 
■while $567 was dutiable. 

The duty paid on the goods received 
this year amounted to 14,592.98, and 
the duty on the goods stored In the 
Warehouses was $448.46. Internal rev- 
enue received from stored goods which 
were dutv free, was $330.86. and ad- 
ditional duties on reliquidation, $6.9o 
making the total receipts for the cus- 
tom house department for the past 
three months $5,379.20. 



HAMONIC BRLMiS 110: 

TIONESTA CARRIES 275. 

The Hamonic of the Northern Navi- 
gation company arrived in this port 
this afternoon with 110 passengers 
from Sarnia. Ont. She will leave at 
8 o clock this evening with about 125 
passengers. 

The Tlonesta of the Anchor line left 
last evening with a record load, the 
list beliig nearly 275. 

The Minnesota of the Chicago & Du- 
luth line, leaves Chicago today, and 
will be here next Tuesday morning. 
♦ 

Goes to Shipyards. 

The Empire City of the Pittsburg 
Steamship company was taken to the 
Superior ship yards this morning 
where she will have some repairs 
made, particularly to the tank, which 
was ilamaged during her trip up the 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL — 
State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of John 

Smith, Decedent. 

A certain Instrume it purporting to 
be the last will and t ;stament of Johti 
Smith having been i resented to this 
court, and the petition of Donald Smith 
being duly filed her* in, representing, 
among other things, tt at said decedent, 
then being a resident of tl»e County of 
St. Louis, State of Minnesota, died 
testate in the County of St. Louis, 
State of Minnesota, oi. the 19th day of 
June. 1911, and that tald petitioner Is 
one of the executors- named in eald 
instrument to be one of the executors 
thereof, and praying that said Instru- 
ment be allowed and admitted to pro- 
bate as the last will and testament of 
said decedent, and that letters testa- 
mentary be Issued to Donald Smith and 
Angus Smith thereon. 

IT is ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard before this court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms In he Court House, 
in Duluth, in said County, on Monday, 
the 17th day of Ju y, 1911. at ten 
o'clock a. m.. and all persons interested 
In said hearing and it said matter are 
hereby cited and required, at said time 
and place, to show cause, if any there 
be, why said petltloi should not be 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHI;R. That this or- 
der be served by pu'>licatlon in The 
Duluth Herald, accon ing to law, and 
that a copy of this orler be served on 
the County Treasurtr of St. Louis 
County not less than len days prior to 
said day of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., June 22nd, 
1911 

By the Court, 

S, W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal. Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
D. H.. June 24, July 1, 8, 1911. 



Sault 
(Special 
Hebard, 
Palmtr, 



Sault Passages. 



Ste. Marie. Mich., July 8. 

to The Herald.)— Up Friday 
Poe, 11 a. m.; Butler, noon 
'Linn, Manitoba, 12:30 p. m • 
Codorus, Joseph Wood. 3:30; Harvard' 
4:30; Leonard, 5; Van Hlse, Neilson! 
Krupp, 7; St. Clair, Weston, Jay Gould. 
8; Mary Elphicke, 9:30; Saxon 
Nasmyth, 11:30. Down Friday: Crowe 
Meaford 12:30 p. m. ; Lynch, Athabasca! 
1:30; Wickwire. Jr., Black, 2: Zimmer- 
man, Ionic, 3; Flagg. Thompson, Leuty 
4; Gilbert, Mat hew, Wilson, 5 3{»' 
Jacques. (;:30; Midland Queen, 7- Moll' 
8 30; Snyder, 9; Midland King,' 9:30' 
Ottawa, 10:30. ' 

Up Saturday: Peters, 1 a. m. • E. O 
Mills, 5:30: Emperor. 6: Yate.s, 7; Calu- 
met, if; John I>onaldson. 9: Morrell, 10- 
Wade, Western Star, noon. Down Sat- 
urday: Fairbairn, Bell, 12:30 a. m 
Sell Wood, 1:30: Morgan, Jr.. 2:30- Sie- 
mens, Manila, 3; Stadacona. 3:30; 'Mari- 
copa. Rob: In, 4, Corunna. Dalton. Dave 
Mills. Anderson, Selwyn Eddy, 6 



ORDER FOR HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR ADMINISTRATION— 
State of Minnesota, Co mty of St. Louis 

— ss. 

In Probate ?ourt. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Madison 

Monroe Ormsby Dei edent. 

THE PETITION ( F .Mary Alice 
Ormsby of Davenpor . Iowa, having 
been filed in this Court, representing, 
among other things, that Madison 
Monroe Ormsby, then being a resident 
of the County of St. Louis. State of 
Minnesota, died intests te, in the Coun- 
ty of St. Louis. State of Minnesota 
on the 2Sth day of Januarv 1909; leav- 
ing estate in the County of St. Louis, 
State of Minnesota, an J that said peti- 
tioner is the surviving spoupe of said 
decedent, and praying that Letters of 
Administration of tht estate of said 
decedent be granted to Fred E. Weath- 
erwax of Duluth, Mini.. 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard before this Court, at the 
Probate Court Rooms In the Court 
House in Duluth, in lald County, on 
Monday, the 24th day of July 19il at 
ten o'clock A. M., and all persons In- 
terested in said hearing and in said 
matter are hereby cltid and required 
at said time and plact to show cause 
if any there be. whj said petition 
should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by pul lication In The 
Duluth Herald, accord ng to law. and 
that a copy of this irder be served 
on the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior 
to said day of hearing, 
jgj^ated at Duluth, Minn., June 30th, 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, 
xc. , T» ,- . ^ Judje of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court St. Louis Countv 

Minn.) *' 

D. H., July 1, 8. 15. 19 1. 



SUMMONS IN APPLICATION FOR 

REGI.^TRATION OF LAND — 
District Court. Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— ss. 
In the matter of the application 
of Sarah D. Robinson to regis- 
ter the title to the following 
described real estate situated 
in St. Louis County, Minne- 
sota, namely: The Southeast 
quarter of the Southwest 
quarter (SE^ of SWV4) of 
Section Sixteen (16) in Town 
ship Fifty (50) north. of 
Range Fourteen (14) west of 
the Fourth Principal Meri- 
dian, according to the United 
States government survey 
thereof. Applicant, 

vs. 
All persons or parties un- 
known, claiming any right, 
title, estate, lien or interest 
In the real estate described In 
the application herein. 

Defendants. 
The State of Minnesota to the abovj 
named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the application of the 
applicant in the above entitled pro- 
ceeding and to file your answer to the 
said application in the office of the 
clerk of said court. In said county, 
within twenty i20> days after the 
service of this simimons upon you, ex- 
clusive of the day of such service, and, 
if you fail to answer the said application 
within the time aforesaid, the appli- 
cant in this proceeding will apply to 
the court for the relief demanded 
therein. 

Witness, J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, at Duluth. 
in said county, this 7ih day of July, 
A. 1). 1911. 

(Seal "©f District Court, St. Louis 
County, Minn.) 

J. P. JOHNSON. 

Clerk. 
By R. E. JOHNSON, 

Deputy. 
W. P. HARRISON, 

Attorney for Applicant. 609-611 Tor- 
rey Buildlngj L»uluih." Minn. 
D. H.. July 8. Id. 22, 1911. 



ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
— ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Ole N. 
Flxen, Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF M. F. Rusfeldt, 
as representative of the above named 
decedent, together with his final ac- 
count of the administration of said es- 
tate, having been filed In this court, 
representing, among other things, that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said final account of 
said administration be examlnecl, ad- 
Justed and allowed by the Court, and 
that the Court make and enter its final 
decree of distribution of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
persons entitled thereto, and for the 
discharge of the representative and the 
sureties on his bond. 

IT is ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account exam- 
ined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the I'robate Court Rooms In 
the Court House, In the City of Duluth, 
In said County, on Monday, the 24th 
day of July. 1911, at ten o'clock A. M., 
and all persons Interested in said hear- 
ing and in said matter are hereby cited 
and required at said time and place to 
show cause, if any there be, why said 
petition should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn.. June 30th, 
1911. 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Coun- 
ty. Minn.) 
D. H.. July 1, 8 and 15, 191L 



AGENTS WANTED. 

A(5ENTS— THE CANCHESTEtTis'tHE 
biggest money maker ever known 
^"^ ^fS'^.l "'^'^^ $107.50 in four days; 
one $73.25 In five days; others are 
making from $8 to $10 a day selling 
the Improved 1911 patented Can- 
chester Kerosene Incandescent Lamp 
Burns air instead of money. Six 
times brighter than electricity gas 
or acetylene at one-tenth cost; burns 
with or without mantle; burner fits 
any lamp; saves 75 per cent oil; no 
trimming wicks; lighting methods 
revolutionized; showing means sell- 
ing; territory going fast. Write to- 
day. Particulars free; handsome out- 
fit furnished. Beware of imitations. 
Cancheeter Light company, 26 State 
street, Chicago, Dept. 26-X 



AGENTS— WE'VE THE HOTTEST 25- 
cents seller yet. rarely less than 
three sales to a home. Woolverln 
company, Pittsburg, Pa. 



PERSONAL. 

PERSONAL. 
MADAME STERLING. 
WELL KNOWN PALMIST AND CARD 
reader is in the city. Maaame Ster- 
ling has been belore the public pro- 
fessionally nearly thirty years and 
from her long experience Is prepared 
to give advice an all the affairs of 
life. Madame Sterling has been for 
years teacher and demonstrator at 
the College of Palmistry. New York 
city, the only Institution of its kind 
In the world. Thousands can testify 
to her ability as a reader. Ladies 
are requested to call In forenoon or 
afternoon as much as possible to 
avoid the night crowds. Arrange- 
ments can be made for entertainment 
at jirlvate home If desired. Open 
Sunuay. ^ 

MADAME STERLING. 
129 East First street, across from 
Armory. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

WOOD PURDY CO., 
601 Manhattan Building. 71 

HOTEL FOR SALE AT A BIG BARn 
gain, 23 rooms, furniture worth 
$1,200; selling price only $750; easy 
terras. 



BOARDING HOUSE — AUSTRIAN 

trade. This place is getting the busi- 
ness; big snap. Buiiuing and all only 
$250; worth $900. 



CONFECTIONERY— CORNER LOCA^ , 
tion; three living rooms; daily sale^ 
from $25 to $40; good fountain; big 
lunch trade; rent only $30. 



ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Louis. — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the matter of the estate of Wil- 
helm Lehtto, Decedent. 
The petition of Adolph H. Lehtto as 
representative of the above named de- 
cedent, together with his final account 
of the administration of said estate, 
liaving been filed In this court, repre- 
senting, among other things that he 
has fully administered said estate, and 
praying that said final account of said 
administration be examined, adjusted 
and allowed by the Court, and that 
the Court make and enter its final 
decree of distribution of the residue of 
the estate of said decedent to the per- 
sons entitled thereto, and for the dis- 
charge of tlie representative and the 
sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms in 
the Court House, In the City of Duluth 
in said County, on Monday, the 24th 
day of July, 1911, at ten o'clock a. m., 
and all persons Interested in said 
hearing and in said matter are here- 
by cited and required at said time and 
place to show cause, if any there be, 
why said petition should not be 
granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., June 30th, 
1911. 

By the Court. 

S. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
D. H., July 1-8-15, 1911. 



AGENTS— A NEW LEADER WHICH 
sells Itself; government recommenda- 
tion; write for free sample and catal- 
ogue. W. R. Mixer. St. Paul. Minn. 



AGENTS— FREE SAMPLE. NOSPLASH 
water strainers are winners. Daily 
profit $5 upward. Let us prove it. 
Send 2 cents (mailing cost.) C D. 
Seed Filter company. N ew York. 

AGENTS— MAKING $75 WEEKLY 
giving dollar atomizer free with 60c 
bottle perfume; you can, too; samples 
30c. Parker Chemical company Chi- 
cago. 



PERSONAL— FREE FORTUNE— SEND 
birthdate, three questions five red 
stamps for book "The Sphinx." Read- 
ing sent free. Secrets of life re- 
vealed. Madam Mlzpah, 1440 Acoma 
street, Denver, Col. 



PERSONAL — FUTURE REVEALED 
free. Mall three questions, birth- 
date, four 2-cent stamps for post- 
age. Will send reading that will 
amaze you. Prof. Herman, Box 111, 
Engelwood, Colo. 



AGENTS— HERE'S A WINNER; MAKE 
$10 to $15 daily selling our Malt 
Beer Extract; everybody buvs; 100 
per cent profit; $1 can make twelve 
gallons real lager beer; guaranteed 
under United States pure food law; 
write today for terms, etc. Carl Con- 
rad company, 601 Conrad building, 
Chicago. 



AGENTS— SALESMEN TO SELL OUR 
new food product. Lady Washington 
company, Seattle, Wash. 



LOST AND FOUND. 



LOST— JULY 2. AT SMITHVILLE, 
three cows, one red and muley cow; 
one Jersey heifer with horns; one 
red cow with horns; finder please 
notify S. Widdes 429 Forty-sixth 
avenue west. Zenith Cole, 3133-Y 
for reward. ' 



FWND— THURSDAY MORNING ON 
Fifty-ninth avenue west, red cow 
with straight horns; owner can have 
same by proving property and pay- 
ing for ad. Call 611 North Fifty- 
eighth avenue. West Duluth; Cole 
1014-A. 

LOST — GOLD LOCKET ON SECOND 
avenue east and Fifth street. Finder 
return to 126 East Fifth for reward. 



PERSONAL — BIG MONEY WRITING 
songs. Thousands of dollars for 
anyone who can write successful 
words or music; past experience un- 
necessary; we want original song 
poems, with or without music. Send 
us your work today or write for free 
particulars. H. Kirkus Dugdale com- 

pany, Dept. 424, Wash ington, D. C. 

I'ersonal — Wanted pupils to tutor. Miss 
House. 1502 Last 3rd St. School held 
in Y.W.C.A. Bldg. Phone £60-A Grand 



CONFECTIONERY — FIVE LIVINQ 
rooms; selling price $300; rent $35 
month. This is one of the biggest 
snaps in the city. 



ROOMING HOUSE— TWELVE ROOMS; 
selling price only $550; best of loca-r 
tion; good furniture. Look thi0 
place up. 



MEAT MARKET — MANAGER FOR 
same, with the privilege of buying; 
price only $250; good location and no 
competition. 



^? bALE — SMALL HARDWARE 
store; hne location, cheap rent and a ' 
money-maker; and the price is right, i 

71 Q 

WOOD-PURDY CO., 
501 Manhattan Building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE-I i 
Restaurant in city of B.t'OO, doing : 
good business, owner wants to sell 
on account of other business 
dress Herald, O 94. 



Ad- 



PERSONAL — COMFORT, BEAUTY 
Shop, 20 W. Sup. St., upstairs. Mani- 
curing, 25c; Shampooing and hair- 
dressing, 60c; switches made from 
combings. Both phones. 



PERSO.NAL— F. C. ROSS. PIANO TUN- 
er, 317 East Fifth street; Melrose, 
1777; Zenith, Grand 1968-Y. 



PERSONAL — WHY NOT QET AWAY 
from washday troubles by sending 
your family wash to us; 5 cents per 
pound. Lute's laundry. 808 East 
Second street. Both 'pnones 447. 



MRS. VOGT. HAIR DRESSER. IS NOW 
located at 17 East Superior street, 
upstairs. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — WANTED— 
Trustworthy, competent man with , 
$5,000 cash to establish and manage 
subsidiary business; $250 a month' 
and expenses, and share of profltA ' 
besides; large manufacturing com-" 
pany, well known staple line, has ex- 
cellent opening for steady, capable 
man. Favorable investment; high. " 
class business; position worth $6,000 
a year or better for the right man, 
with large future prospects. For 
particulars, addr ess O 118, Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Tailor shop, cleaning and dye worki, < 
on the range; three years in business; 
doing good business. Owner must 
leave city on account of sickness. 
Address E 103, Herald. , 



LOST— SMALL WHITE FOX TER- 
rler. tan spots on face and ears. Re- 
turn to 116 West Second street for 
reward 



LOST— STRING OF GOLD BEADS 
between Bostwick flats and Frei- 
muth's store. July 1, finder please 
return to Herald for liberal reward. 



PERSONAL — I.LADIES — ASK YOUR 
druggist for Chlchesters Pills, the 
Diamond Brand. For 26 years known 
as best, safest, always reliable. Take 
no other. Chichesters Diamond Brand 
Pills are sold by druggists every- 
where. 

PERSONAL — COMBINGS AND CUT 
hair made into beautiful switcbe& 
Knauf Sister*. 



PERSONAI^— SOUTHERN LADY, 45; 
independently wealthy, would marry! 
M, Box 35, Toledo League, Toledo, 
Ohio. 



LOST — LADIES' GOLD WATCH BE- 
tween aerial bridge and Fourth ave- 
nue east. Finder return to "Cafe- 
teria" for reward. 

LOST — LAST SUNDAY, SMALL 
Jersey cow. Finder please return to 
2717 West Third street for reward. 



CERTIFICATE OFINCORPORATION 

—OF THE— 

GARY LIMBER COMPANl. 



ORDER TO EXMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Lou«s 

— ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Joseph 

Walkoviac, Decedent. 

THE PETITION of Chasmer Grac- 
kowski. as representative of the above 
named decedent, together with his final 
account of the administration of said 
estate, having been filed in this court, 
representing, among other things, that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said final account of 
said administration be examined, ad- 
Justed and allowed by the Court, and 
that the Court make and enter Its final 
decree of distribution of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
persons entitled thereto, and for the 
discharge of the representative and the 
sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDfiRED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account exam- 
ined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms in 
the Court House, in the City of Duluth, 
in said County, on Monday, the 31st day 
of July, 1911, at ten o'clock A. M., and 
all persons interested In said hearing 
and in said matter are hereby cited and 
required, at said time and place, to 
show cause, if any there be, why said 
petition should not be granted. 

ORDEREt* FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn., July 7th, 

By the Court. 

S. W. GILPIN. 
,^ , „ . Judge of Probate. 

(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co 

Minn.) ■' 

ALFORD & HUNT, 

Attorneys. 
D. H., July 8, 15, 22, 1911. 



ORDER FOR HEARINi} ON PETITION 

FOR ADMINISTRATION— 
State of Minnesota, County of St 

Louis — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the 1 state of Martin 

Woinovich, Decedent 

THE PETITION OF John Bablch of 
vv est Duluth. Mlnneso a, having been 
filed in this Court, repjesentlng among 
other things, that Martin Woinovich, 
then being a resident <f the County of 
St. Louis, State of Minnesota, died in- 
testate, in the Count' of St. Louis. 
State of Minnesota, on the 25th dav 
of April, 1911, leavlnj. estate in the 
County of St. Louis, Jitate of Minne- 
sota, and that said petitioner Is a 
creditor of said decedent, and praying 
that Lettern of Administration of the 
estate of said deceden; be granted to 
John Bablch. 



IT IS ORDERED, Tl at said petition 




NOTICE TO FOURTH STREET 
PROPERTY OWNERS. 

A meeting will be held at 10:30 A 
M. July 10, 1911, at the office of the 
Board of Public Works in the City 
Hall for the purpose of determining 
upon a permanent grade for Fourth 
street, between Sixth and Fourteenth 
avenues east. All property owners in- 
terested have the right to be present 
and to be heard In relation to said 
matter. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 
OLOF O. OLSON. 
^ „ President. 

D. H.. July 6, 7, 8. 1911. D. 756. 



EXAMINE FINAL 
County 



of 



AC- 

St. 



ORDER TO 

COUNT— 
State of Minnesota. 

Louis — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Stephan 

Puhek, Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF Northwestern 
Trust Company as representative of 
the above named decedent, together 
with Its final account of the adminis- 
tration of said estate, having been 
filed In this court, representing, among 
other things that it has fully adminis- 
tered said estate, and praying that 
said final account of said administra- 
tion be examined, adjusted and allowed 
by the Court, and that the Court make 
and enter its final decree of distribu- 
tion of the residue of the estate ot 
said decedent to the persons entitled 
thereto, and for the discharge of the 
representative and the sureties on its 
bond. 

IT IS ORDERBa>. That said petition 



KNOW ALL MEN BY THE.SE PRES- 
ENTS. That we. the undersigned, here- 
by associate ourselves together and 
agree upon the following Certificate of 
Incroporation, under the provisions of 
Chapter 58 of the Revised Laws of the 
State of Minnesota for the year 1905, 
and all acts amendatory thereof and 
supplementary thereto, and do hereby 
adopt the following certificate of in- 
corporation: 

SECTION L 

The name of this corporation shall be 
GARY LUMBER COMPANY. 
SECTION II. 

The general nature of the business 
of this corporation shall be the carry- 
ing on and conducting of a general 
timber, logging and lumbering busi- 
ness; to engage In the manufacture of 
timber, logs and lumber into products 
and articles of merchandise; to buy, 
acquire, own, hold, lease. Improve, 
mortgage, pledge, sell, exchange, trade 
or otherwise dispose of and deal in 
property and estates real, personal and 
mixed, and any and all interests there- 
in; to erect, construct, equip, operate, 
manage and maintain mills and manu- 
factories, for the manufacture of logo 
and timber into lumber and other kin- 
dred products; to manufacture timber 
and logs into wood, pulp, paper and 
any article or articles of merchandise; 
to erect, construct, equip, operate and 
manage yards, docks and warehouses, 
and the Improvement thereof, and the 
improvement of any river or stream for 
log-driving, lumbering or timber pur- 
posts: for the running, driving, boom- 
ing, sorting, storing, braillng, rafting, 
towing, handling and hauling of logs, 
timber, lumber and kindred products 
and other materials upon or down any 
river or stream, and for the accom- 
plishment of such purposes to im- 
prove such rivers and streams and 
their tributaries by clearing and 
straightening the channels thereof, 
closing sloughs, erecting sluice ways, 
booms of all kinds, side rolling and 
fiooding dams, and in general doing all 
things that are expedient, convenient 
and necessary In the carrying on of a 
general lumbering business. 

The principal place tor the transac- 
tion of the business of this company 
shall be Duluth, Minnesota. 

SECTION IIL 
The period of the duration of this 
corporation shall be thirty (30) years 
from and after July 5, 1911. 

SECTION IV. 

The names and place of residence of 
the incorporators of this corporation 
are as follows: 

W. P. Helmbach. Duluth, Minnesota 

H. C. Damkroeger, Duluth, Minne- 
sota. 

Grace Weiss, Duluth, Minnesota. 
SECTION V. 

The management of this corporation 
shall be vested in a Board of three 
Directors. The names and address of 
those composing the Board of Directors 
until the first election are as follows: 

W. P. Helmbach, Duluth. Minnesota, 
President. 

H. C. L'amkroeger, Duluth. Minne- 
sota, Vice President. 

Giace Weiss. Duluth. Minnesota, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. 

The date of the first annual meeting 
of this corporation shall be on Mon- 
day, tHte tenth day of July, A. D 1911. 
at two o'clock P. M., without notice, at 
Room 609 Torrey Building, Duluth. 
Minnesota, at which a full Board of Di- 
rectors shall be elected to serve one (1) 
year. Thereafter the annual meetings 
of this corporation shall be held at 
the general office of this company at 
Duluth. Minnesota, on the second Mon- 
day In July, at two o'clock P. M. 
SECTION VI. 

The amount of the capital stock of 
this company is Fifty Thousand Dollars 
($50,000.00), and the same shall be paid 
In In such Installments as the Board 
of Directors may designate. The num- 
ber of shares in which said stock Is 
divided Is Five Thousand (5,000), and 
the par value of each share is Ten 
Dollars ($10.00), and said capital may 
be Issued for money or for nroperty at 
Its reasonable value. This corpora- 
tion may begin business when Ten 
Thousand Dollars ($10,000) of its cap- 



LOST— LADY'S GOLD WATCH; $15 
reward for return of same. Address 
letter to X 444. care of Herald. Lost 
Sunday, West end. 

LOST— LOCKET AND CHAIN. CRES- 
cent head at West Duluth car- 
nival. Reward If returned to 817 
Fiftj'-slxth avenue west. 

LOST— LADIES' BLACK SILK UM- 
brella about two weeks ago, silver 
top handle with 'nitials. L. G. W. 
Return to 320 Seventh avenue east 
for reward, or phone Melrose 3672. 

ifc ^k" ^k ^t A* ^^ ^' "^ ^^ ^k ^k ^f ^' ^' 'ifr '^ "^f "^ ^^ W" " ^ ^^ *^ ^^ *^ ^^ 

^ UKTTFR KESII,TS from Heruld )^ 
^ Wiint AdM. Von nave and make i 
» money vtben you advertlMe in TH£ * 
4 UfclHALD. i 



FOR SALE AUTOS. 



FOR SALE— WHITE STEAMER AUTO 
mobile in A-1 condition; will con- 
sider a deal part cash and trade or 
trade all for good real estate free of 
incumbrance. Address Box 98. Eau 
Claire, W'is. 

FOR SALE — AN ELECTRIC AUTO- 
mobile. Call or write P C. Miller, 
care of the Water, Light & Power, 
Superior. 



FOR SALE — CONFECTIONERY AND 
cigar store doing good business: 
owner leaving city; 2102 West Third 
street. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FORSALE-i 
Bakery doing a good business at 
Crosby, Minn., no competition; ill- 
health cause for selling. Address 
or call at Vienna bakery, Crosby, 
Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE 
cheap — Modern barber shop, three 
chairs, with two bath tubs; beauti- 
fully located and doing good busi- 
ness. N 110, Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Old established and good paying ho- 
tel business in Virgmia, Minn., for- 
ty-eighi. rooms, dining room and 
kitchen furnished complete, five-year 
lease, $225 per month; $2,500 cash 
for business and all furnishings; 
failure of proprietor's health only 
reason for sale. Address Central ho- 
tel, Virginia, Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE 
or rent, store building, barn and 
warehouses; suitable for general 
merchandise, grocery store or meat 
market; good location. Finnish 
Mercantile company, Cloquet, Minn. 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 



J 



MADAM STERLING, PALMIST, CARD 
reader. 129 East First street, cppo- 
slto Armory. 



MRS. ANNA, CARD READING. LOST 
articles and property traced. 329 W. 
Superior St., room 12. Melrose 2275. 



CLAIRVOYANTS — FREE — MAN OF 
mystery tells past, present, future; 
shows you the road to success; three 
2-cent stamps, birth date gets won- 
derful reading. Prof. Raymond, 
Peoria, 111. 



Ital stock Is subscribed for and taken. 
SECTION VII. 
The highest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to which this corporation 
shall at any time be subject is Twenty- 
five Thousand Dollars ($26,000.00). 
SECTION VIII. 
The office of President and Treas- 
urer or Secretary and Treasurer may 
be held by the same person, and the 
Board of Directors shall have authority 
to make such by-laws for the manage- 
ment of the affairs of this corporation 
as in Its Judgment may be deemed 
proper. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, We have 
hereunto set our hands and seals this 
thirtieth day of June. A. D. 1911. 

W. P. HEIMBACH. (Seal) 

H. C. DAMKROEGER. (Seal) 
GRACE WEISS. (Seal) 

In Presence of: 

WM. P. HARRISON. 
F. H. DE GROAT, 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

On this 3rd day of July, A. D. 1911, 
before me, a Notary Public with'n and 
for said County, personally appeared 
W. P. Helmbach, H. C. Damkroeger and 
Grace Weiss, to me known to be the 
persons described in and who executed 
the foregoing Instrument, and acknowl- 
edged that they executed the same as 
their free act and deed. 

WM. P. HARRISON. 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis County, Minn. 
(Notarial Seal. St. Louis Co., Minn.) 
My commission expires Feb. 25, 1917. 



.State of Minnesota, Department of 

State. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed for record In this 
office on the 6th day of July. A. D. 1911, 
at 9 o'clock A. M.. and was duly re- 
corded in Book U-3 of Incorporations, 
on page 340. 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of State. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

BS. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed In this office for 
record July 7, 1911, at 9:45 A. M., and 
was duly recorded In Book 14 of Misc., 
page 258. 

M. C. PALMER, 
( Ttegister of Deeds. 

By THOS. CLARK. 

Deputy. 
D. H.. July 7. 8, 1911. 

NOTICE 

—OF— 

School Election 



OFFICE OF THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION OF THE CITY OF DULUTH. 
Duluth, Minn., July 3, 1911. 
Notice is hereby given of the annual 
school election to be held on .Saturday 
July 15th, 1911. between the hours of 6 
6 o'clock in the forenoon and 7 o'clock 
in the afternoon, for the purpose of 
electing members of the Board of Edu- 
cation of the City of Duluth. 

Three directors for the term of three 
years each are to be elected to succeed 
L. D. Campbell, E. R. Cobb and W. E. 
Magner, whose terms ox office are 
about to expire. 

PollinK Places. 
The following polling places have 
been designated in each of the several 



voting precincts of the City of Duluth, 
to-wit: 

Ftritt Ward. 

First precinct — Lester Park school 
building. 

Second precinct — Lakeside school 
building. 

Third precinct — Salter school build- 
ing. 

Fourth precinct — Washburn school 
building. 

Fifth precinct — Endion school build- 
ing. 

Sixth precinct — 118 Fourteenth ave- 
nue east. 

Second Ward. 

First precinct — Basement First Pres- 
byterian church. 

Second precinct — Jefferson school 
building. 

Third 
east. 

Fourth 
street. 

Fifth 
building. 



precinct — 421 Ninth avenue 

precinct — 703 East Fourth 

precinct — Franklin school 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
Sniall dairy, snap if taken at once. 
Owner leaving city. Address Q 76, 
Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FIFTY-ROOM 
brick lodging iiouse on Lake avenue 
south; $150 per month. Rental de- 
partment, Joiin A. Stephenson &, Co., 
W'olvln buil ding. 720 

FOR RENT — STORE ROOM 26 BY 75; 
in growing town; good place for 
undertaker, furniture or hardware 
store. Z 72. Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — TELEI'HONB 
system; 400 miles in Southern Min- 
nesota and Eastern South Dakota; 
will sell or trade for Minnesota landg' 
Ebert Walker & McKnight company, 
315 Torrey building. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— WANTED— A3 
partner, a cook, with about $3y0, to 
open boarding house in Twin Porta 
or on range. I have twenty-room 
outfit. Address 111 Thirty-ninth 
avenue west, Duluth. 



Business Chances — We huy stocks ot 
merchandise, paying spot cash. No 
matter wbere located or size of stock, 
write Eastern Salvage Co.. mercban- 
dise brokers. D uluth. Minn. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE OR 
rent, store building, barn and ware- 
houses. Suitable for general mer- 
chandise, grocery store or meat mar- 
ket. Good location. Finnish Mer- 
cantile company, Cloquet, Minn. 



Third Ward. 

First precinct — 26 West First street. 
Second precinct — Basement St. Paul's 
Episcopal church. 

Third precinct — 103 West Fourth 
street. 

Fourth precinct — Nettleton school 
building. 

Fourth Ward. 
precinct — Whittier school 
Park Point, 
precinct — Webster 



school 



precinct — 220 Lake Avenue 



First 
building 

Second 
building. 

Third 
south. 

Fourth precinct — The Armory, East 
First street. 

Fifth precinct — The Washington 
school building. First avenue east and 
Third street. 

Fifth ward. 

First precinct — Jackson school 
building. 

Second precinct — 25 North Fifth 
avenue west. 

Third precinct — 628 West Second 
street. 

Fourth precinct — Emerson school 
building. 

Fifth precinct — Lowell school build- 
ing, Duluth Heights. 

SUtb Ward. 

First precinct — 1228 West Superior 
street. 

Second precinct — Basement Second 
Presbyterian church. 

Third precinct — Ensign school build- 
ing. 

precinct — Adams school 



REAL ESTATE LOANS. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
FOR SALE — SEVERAL GOOD 6 PER 
cent first mortgages on city property: 
$1,000 to $1,500 each. 

N. J. UPHAM CO., 
18 Third Avenue West. 



MONEY TO LOAN O-N' CITY PROP- 
erty; lowest rates; small and large 
amount.s. Scott-Kreidler company, 
405 Central avenue. Both 'phones. 



CITY AND VILLAGE LOANS IN MIN- 
nesota. Buy or build a home on 
monthly payments?. C. A. Knippen- 
berg, 300 Alworth Bldg. 'Phones 597. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A, 
Crosby, ao.'i Paliadio building. 



SIX PER CENT INTEREST ON SMALL 
real estate loans; money on hand; 
prompt service. F. I. Salter com- 
pany, Lonsdale building. 



ANY AMOUNT OF MONEY TO LOAN 
on improved property. A. H. Burg 
& Co., Alworth Bldg. 



Money to loan — An v amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underbill. 209 Exchange. 



Money 
Title 



to loan, no delay. Northern 
e Co.. 613 First Nat. bank bldg. 



Fourth 
building. 

Fifth 
building. 



precinct 



Madison school 



Seventh Ward. 

First precinct — Basement Grace M. E. 
church. 

Second precinct — Monroe school 
building. 

Thlro precinct — Bryant school build- 



precinct — Oneota 



school 
Con- 



ing 

Fourth 
building. 

Fifth precinct — Vestry room, 
gregational church. West Duluth. 
Eighth Ward. 

First precinct — Ely school building. 

Second precinct — Longfellow school 
building. 

Third precinct — Fairmount school 
building. 

Fourth precinct — Irving school build- 
ing. 

Fifth precinct — Bay "View Heights 
school building. 

Sixth precinct — Smlthvllle school 
building. 

Seventh precinct — Stowe school 
building, New Duluth. 

Eighth precinct — Fond du Lac school 
building. 
The Board of Education of the City ot 

Duluth. 

CHARLES A. BRONSON, 
(Seal.) Clerk. 

D. H.. July », 5. «, 7. 8, 10, 11. 12, 13 
and 14, 19lL 



WANTED TO BUY. 



Wanted to Buy — Highest price for 
men's cast off clothing. Melrose 1834, 
Grand 1134-D. N. Ston e, 213 W. Ist. 

WANTED TO BUY, SElT OR e5c^ 
change property, any kind, any- 
where. Address Northwestern Busi- 
ness Agency. Minneapolis, Minn. 

WANTED TO BUY — A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for investment. 
I 69, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— DISC RECORD 
phonograph; must be cheap. A 129, 
Herald. 



We buy second-hand furniture and 
stoves. Lincoln 295-X. 1629 W. Sup. st. 



WANTED— RESIDENCE LOT IN EX- 
change for mineral rights; give par- 
ticulars. J 128, Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY — OLD CLOTHES, 
auto and carriage tires. 328 East Su- 
perior street. Zenith 1243. 



WANTED TO BUY— A LARGE SEC- 
ond-hand safe. Telephone Calu- 
met 108-M. 



WANTED TO BUY— OFFICE DESK 
with or without chair, must be very 
reasonable; state lowest price. Ad- 
dress Q 75. Herald. 



Advertise in The Heraiil 



i 



■ i « ■ ' 



m<ii'i*t 



k 



-f^ 



"^ 



ii»>-- 










Saturdayt 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 8, 1911. 



ST 




pfpald excursion 



a 



• !• 



ff 



WN THE LAKE 

NEXT THURSDAY AT 4 P. M. 



AUTOMOBILES. 



V m iiiiii u li 



WE KKPKESENT MAXWELL.. PRE- 
ini«r, OaKland. Moline pleasure cars 
an.l WlUox trucks. All kinds of re- 
paaring. even tire valcanUing. OlJ 
CATS bougbt and sold. It will pay 
j^u to try u*. Also have automobTles 
for blre Call, phone or w rite M ^ 
F'klk. Rapid Transit Auto & ^«Pf'^, 
ln« Co.. 2110-12 W. Mich St. Pa«ne» 
li*l 347; Zen 47 Lincoln. 



WATCHES UKPAIRED. 

cleaned. $1 Garor Bros.. ^13 W. ist. 




FOR RENT— FLATS. 

(Continued.) 

Foir iikvr^^^HrATsT 



FURNITURE. AUTOMOBILES. CAR- 
rlasea reasonable prices. E. ^Jti. n* 
Flrsr avenue weit Both 'phonefc 




WEST. 

7;iO 



NO. 16 FIFTEENTH AVENUE 
four rooms, first floor; ^H- 

1303 WEST MICHIGAN STREET 
$14.50; water and sewer. w^^J 
paid. 

412 EAST FII'TH STREET, FIVE 
rooms, hardwood floors 
for $Z3. 

lift FAST FIFTH STltEET. QROUND 
410 EAST^^tir^^^^^ ^^^^, modern; 



bath; 



cheap 

720 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
On ^H}^}^^J^^' 

FOiTrENT— HOCSES. 



HELP WANTED— FEMALE. 

(Continued.) 



MONEY TO LOAN. 



WANTED — COMPETENT 
general housework. 120 
street. 



OIRL 
West 



FOR] 
Third 



Z AUK VOU GOING UN A * 



BATH. 



floor; 
|3U. 



EAST. 



21 SECOND AVENUE 

water and sewer; |25. 



rooms; 
W 



720 

SIX 

720 



FOR RENT— TWELVE ROOMS. 

steam heat, hardwood floors, electrl. 
light. 315 West Third street, foo. 
D. Field company, 8o3 



E. 
Exchange 



building. 



710 



FOR RENT — DESIRABLE SIX-ROOM 
and alcove brick, modern conven- 
iences. 213 East Fifth streeL 
man-O'DonncU Agency, 
building. 



WANTED— GIRL 18 YEARS OLD TO 
assist with housework and care of 
childr en. ISlOVa E. Superior street. 

ROOM HOUSE; 

all modern ex- 

ip at only >2,700. 

Manhattan building 

720 



FOR SALE— NEW SIY 
ju.st being completed; 
cept heat, a 
Smith Realty. 



sna 
524 



Hart 

205 Lonsdale 
710 



M. PRINDLE & CO.. 

Lonsdale buildin g. 

STRICTLY 



WHERE TO GET WHAT YOU WANT 

Each firm a leader ib its line. Consult this list b ?lore placing 
yonr order U yn not th^ jegjtjijriceyeu like_topay^ 

A\\ NLNGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 



Ft)K KENT-SKV EN-ROOM 
m.-dern steam-luxated "at. 
service, icntial location, within 
walking distance of S,""' ^^''"^ruv^^^S", 
office and lallroad depots, only »•"' 
to right parly, no children. 
Mt'lrose 2615. 



Janitor 
easy 



Call 
720 



FOR RENT — BEAUTIFUL SEVEN- 
room brick house, 412 i^»«hth avenue 
east- hot water heat, hardwood flnl*h. 
everything strictly modern; 137.50 per 
month. >!assachuselts H^''*' t:«'^^« 
company. 18 Phoenix building. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 



VACATION 
Cin't you use a little more money": 

SPECIAL VACATION RATE. 
Money tor all needs. Your credit 
is good here. Dout let the oppor- 
tunity slip by. Office hours, 
m. to 6;a0 p. m. Open 

Saturdays until 8. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO.. 
301 Palladio Uldg. 



8 a. 
noon&. 



J*^iw^-^s^*^***:*^*^f^^^f2'f:^^ 



^^^^^^««^^^ ^W' 



**^**^W^^Mt*****^Mf****'*'^^ 



10 



Point r Tent A Awnmg Co.. lo6, K. Sup. 
*^*' manutact urer and repairing- 

1608 W. Sup. 
347 -i. 



fct. 



DuUitl, Tent & Awr.lng Co . 

Packsacks Tac up. /enith 



St 



KEY, LOCK AND S.\FE WORKS. 



Sandei Bros." Hardware 
store, 203 W. 1st St-Phones: 
Old. MeL3063; New.2^SS-A. 



LANDSCAPE liARDENLNti. 



KOK RENT — SIX-UOOM FLAT; HOT 
^ater hLl; all newly painted ami 
decorated; ill m.>dern eonvenlences 
hardwood flt.ors, 8-^f^^ r^^^^v &na 
L'rate Janitor service, >38 per month. 
1-sVV est Fourth street. Call Melrose 

47s7. In quire next door. 

pTTp KENT — SlX-KOOM STEAM- 

hlate.l flat, centrally located; water 
! Slid Mnito^ service ^ "^nlshed , .^entaj 
" L>. Howard & Co.. lioviaeuc-* 



FOR KENT— NINE-ROOM HOUSE ^OS 
West Second street, $40 per month 
hoi water heat, water paid. 
How A Co.. ttot» Alworlh 



Pulford. 
buil ding. 712 

FOR RENT — SlX-HuuM HuUSE. 220 
Fourteenth avenue east. |2t> pet 
month, furnace, bath, water paid. 
Pulford. How & Co.. 
building. 



6oS> 



Alworth 
712 



AWNINGS AND TENTS. 



WALL TENTS 
American Tent 



FROM 14 50 
i AWiiing Co. 



UP 



ACCOINTANT. 



L.. 



\TANT— F. D. 
buildiiiK. 



HARLOW. 412 
phone. Melrose 



GARDENS OR LAWNS TAKEN CARE 
° of grading and s..ddlng. by day or 
contract, b. Johi son. Phone Mel 424.. 



»4i>. J. 
building. 



ri'j 



MUSICAL LHSTRLMENTS. 



7^r^^-,Wf*-***** **>£p;^^***-*'*';^ 



fr 



M. LESTER. 

building. Both 



412 PROVIDENCE 
'piiones &62. 



ART GLASS AND MIRRORS. 



FOl. SALE 
We went out ot retail business. 
Have ahout dozen piano.s left. » ui 
SfU them all Ihuisday. July 13. 
one dav only, for whatever you 
give. Cash or lime. Watch paper 
tor location ot showroom for tnai 
day. or call at our office. Kortj, 
Piuno Lompanj, 210 American 
l.ange Bank I uiMing 



Ex- 



FLAT; ALL 



FOR RENT— ELEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
centrally located; all modern, hard- 
wood floors d.iwnalalr.s. full base- 
ment with laundry, furnace heat, 
also furniture of six bedrooms full 
of steady roomers lor sale. B oo. 
Herald. 



* 
* 
* 

* 

* 
it 



HOMES WITHOUT CASH. 




LAKE AND _RIVER^jTEAMERS. 

S. S. COLrWBIA. 
TlM* Card. 

Trift ta ran4 «h LM. 

Le«*a» Duluth tor roo4 <l«i L»c (tolly ( 
unliij »nd SundMl »l » *^ ■»■. nunXns 
lulb «t 6 p. m « . ... 

rtUurdaj* and Sund»ys leuM PuIulA 
»Dd 2 pm.. nUuotug tc l>uluib M 

Httti4 Tn» Tiekatt. St*. 



•t 9 
1:49 



aie 

of 



We build you a home to suit, 
without any down .Pa>'™*"\,°I 
bonus, on any good lot you own 
In Duluth — just monthly pay- 
ments. Act today, as we 
limited as to the number 
houses we can build. No expense 
to you until your house is On- 
Ished. Get our plans and priceS. 
Our houses built by union lahor 
for Duluth climate. Ottice open 
evenings by appointment. 



THE 



EDMUND O. 
AGENCY. 



WALTON 



208 EXCHANGE BLDO. 



t 

* 
* 

* 

* 

'it 



MoMiHflit EmwWmi M tk« kak». 

L»,«»es l>iiluUi. fjot t>r iUlh aveuue 
m retunuaa W 10 30 p. m. 

Tlektt*. 2S MAto. 

Dpcu« ^ ^ CLOW. I«»n»»«». 

Offlo* »nd niMk, root or Kim> Afwue 
Melr.we. ^6^ Orand. 56. 



w«M. U tM 



WML 



■it. C.A.SH TALKte. * 



ft people can afford to pay. 

ss ODen Saturday Evenings, 

s| DULUTH LOAN COMPANY. I» 

If Cor. Third Ave. W. and &up. St., II 

is a07 Columbia Bldg fl 

IS Old phone, Melrose 235a. »} 

MONEY TO LOAN ON .V^-^^^.^'j'^^m 
watches, furs, rifles. e«.": .^"^.. "V 
goods of value. $1 to $1,500. Key- 
stone Loan & Mercantile company. 2i 
West S uperior street. 

SECURITY MORTGAGE LOAN CO.. 
401 First National Bank building. 
Money to loan on houseliold 8''^^*. 
pianos or olher security. A liberal 
discount it paid before aue. All trans- 
acUons trtaied conadentially . cour- 
teous treatment. 

Security Mortgage Loan Co.. 
401 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 



MlNNE/LPQLIS.ST.PAUL 



UNION STATION— KUPTiT Vt. »»* 



«latb Ai^ Wi 



L«»Te. TWIN PORTS EXPWtSa. Afrtr*. 



•«.4ipm.... 
t7.30aM 7 
2.4)««i 10 
15 Mpm II 
for k;au 3 
Clali^ aud 

Kaui 7.l3ain 

•6.4aain 



IS** 

2i)pw.. 

30pm. 



DULUTH 

suixnut 
tLa^iy.aiuli 

UMlUU 

. U^ilkk>.ti . 



Ullvaukea 
Clili-i 



aad 





•«.OUa« 


• 30aM 


tS OtWB 


S.ISair 


lUSUa* 


4 OMIH 


t7.55»il 


U.Olam 


i roiu Iw 


Claiw aad 




Cliijpe** 


i.SOpw 


kail* 


•roopm 




Ubrarj 


Otiaarva- 



vnu KFNT — FIVE-ROOM 

^"^^ nvc^'ilemes, 606 East Sixth street^ 
kpply N. J. Upham company, l^ 
Third avenue west. 



7Ui 



FOR RENT — liy'n E.VST 
street, seven large rooms 
gas, $2i) per month. H. 
402 Lonsdale building. 



SECOND 
and baili, 
J, Mullln. 

72i 



LONDON ROAD, 



ON 



KENT- THKEE-ROt>M FLAT 

$>> per moniii. wm 

shape. Rental de- 

A. Stephenson & ^^o • 



FOR 

Oarfleld avenu.-, 
put in flrsl-class 
partment. John 
Wolvln building. 



FOR RENT— 413 FOURTH A\ LNl E 
east ten-room modem house, wiin 
all conveniences; $00 per month. 
Sirvker, Manley & Buck, 'loire> 



We have a brand new six-room 
house, also ncA six-room cottage, 
both very attrac live and well 
on large lots. If you liave 
and are looking for a flne 
amidst pleasant surroundings 
very low price. It will pay you to 
see us at ome. W. M. 
Co. Lonsdale building 



built 
ash 

home 
Lt a 



I'rlndle & 



ZENITH LOAN COMPANY — MONEY 
loaned on personal property oJ aa 
kinds low rate, business strictly 
confldentlal. 412 Columbia building. 
'I'hune Grand 1<36-A. 



DlniiU Lara. I'alaca »ie«1»>t» vi-...,.. 

Uou CM.. Va*UuuieU - Vacuum UeanoU - klartn. 

^itiTimccUon at Udnmlth "'V.^"^ « "" 
Udue. UUdilona aiid UilefintdU ta polBta. 



Laac*. 



BHOOTCN EXPREM. 



Aftva. 



building. 



iLll kinds glass 
main Bros., i; 



lowest prices 
;1 First avenue 



St. Ger- 
west. 



ALTO TIRE REPAIRING. 



A. Haakonsen. dealer 

and expert repairer. 

W. Nelson's. 5 

Superior street. 




FOR RENT — 

flat; call Dr. 



FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
Oredson. Lincoln 52. 



FOR RENT — 1«I6 
street. 8- room house, 
VenlenceS, laundry 
Strvker, Manley & 
building. 



E.\ST FIRST 

with all cun- 

In ba-sfnunl. 

Buck, Torrey 

721 



FOR liENT— THOKOUGHLY 
nve-room furnished flat toi 
Augu.st. lli> L»»"^t 
Relerences required. 



MODERN 

July and 

Second street. 



Duluth Auto 
treading and 
repair and apply 
faction guarauteed. 
Grand 9>»S- 



Tire Repair <--«^-— ^«; 

sectional work. W e aUo 

solid tirea. toaus- 

32» E. Sup. St. 



C\RPENTER REP.VIR WORk- 



RKPVIU OR NEW WORK L>CNE REA- 
><ew phone Lincoln 



Qisacd 
Bee on d 
4»:-Y 



Ole 
street 



EVERYTHING I^ MUSIC, 
catalogues; popular she 
Cents, Boston Music Co. 



SEND FOR 
;t music 10 



MOV LNli AND STORAGE. 



moved. 



POR~RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT. 320 4 

^"Wcst Fourth street, water, sewer and 

electric li^ht: $12 per month^btry ker 

Manley «i Buck. Torre y Bldg. 



18 



SIX- ROOM 

gas range. 



FOR RENT — MODERN 
flat; electric light, gas. 
laundry, heat and water 

Massachusetus Real Estate 
lb phoenix building. du 



lurnished. 



$40. 
company. 



FOR RENT — NINE- ROOM HOLSi;, 
1426 East First street. »•»-,, P*"."" 
month, laundry, furnace. Pulford. 
How & Co.. 6 0a Alworth building. <1- 

FoK RENT— WE HAVE ONLY ONE 
of our new brick East end houses 
left, modern In all particulars, 
not fall to see us at once and 
your own decorations. F. 1 
company. 



FOR .^ALK— $1,400; NEW 
house, city water, gas. 



Do 

c noose 

.Salter 

721 



FIVE-ROOM 

electric light. 

$1.J0 ca.sh. $ir) per 

Olafson, 5417 Ram- 

D uluth. 71"^. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM HOLSE AT 
321 East Fifth street; water, sewer 
and ele«tric light, in-iulre Bloom 
Co., 102 West First street. 



WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us. 430 Manhattan Bldg., and gel 
ratts Duluth Mortgage Loan CO. 
Horkan. New 1598-D; Melrose 



3733. 



hardwood floors; 
month. Thomas 
»:ey street. W'e.st 



MONEY SUPPLIED TO SALARIED 
people, women keeping house and 
others, upon their own names with- 
out security; easy payments. Tolman. 
510 Palladio building. ^ 



tS.45«ni 
b. ijam. 
• a^am. 
lO.JUaoi 
lU.SUam 
fl 2Upai 
Cocnertluiu at 
Canada aud U.* 



t7.00ani 

lO.UOam 

S.IOiiai 

tt.uupm 



l>uluui 

^jpcnot 

. . . Muuaa 

\^aUkuu 

Uuamia 

. . . . U[out«a 

Biv.jtaa (or 

PmcUIc coaat 



.t«.oo»« 

.. «.3«*pm 
.. b.aapn 
.. «.4^pai 

4.Upa 

....tl.4J»« 

Twin ClUa^ 



ts •0»« 

li.35p* 
/ . 26«a 

t«.4iua 
Waaua 




T 



Leava. 



OULUTH-WINNIPEG LINE. 



& 



NEW 
3632 
3728 



SITIATION WANTED— FEMALE. 



"^^'^^"^id^Sp^l^^d\l^'rfd^u?ed rate. 

'•■^^ 'l:,^u^luth^^an 1^'Stora'ge i SITUATION WANTED 
company. Beth "phones 4a2. 210 
West Superior street^ ^^^__ 



stored 
General 
safes moved. 



"WORK. DONE 

20 : w is I St 



NEATLY. O. P!=?ARSON. 

Zea 1274. or Zen. boJT. 



OXY-ACETVLENE WELDING. 



CABINET MAKER AND UNISREU. 



\vi.'«;TKlti^L'ND. 207 VV. Isl 
ant showc^a^e fixtures a special 



ty. o2& 




&inoiie 

ail cleaners 

West Michigan 



Company — 



Caruei Cleaning 

& Van Norman. C'^»\l\r*fy'',, 

and rug weayeis ia- = 

streeu Both phones 



DONT SCRAP A 
or machine pi *t 
steel, alumintm 
have conferred 
Spring. 313 i:ast 
•I'honea; BeL. Mel 
S»74. 



BROKEN CASTING 

of any size oi iron. 

of bra-ss until you 

with us. Buck Ht 

Michigan street. 

»74. Zen.. Grand 



stenographer 
ability; best 
aid. 



BY COMPETENT 

with good business 

references. A 93, H«r- 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM 

house, furnished; Just painted. 3632 
Minnesota avenue. Imiuire at 
Minnesota avenue. , 

K>in<ENT-K0UR LARGE , HOOMS. 
all conveniences, except bath. $ll-'*' 
per month. .liKiuire 382<» Magellan 
street. , 



FOR SALE— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, NEAR 
Twenty-sixth avenue west and Tiur.l 
street, bulli. electrh- light and gas; 
hardwood floors all through, good 
basement, price $2.7o0; good terms. 
The S'vedlsli Real Estate Bureau, 
2602 West Third street 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 

Eclipse Photo Supply Co.. 17 4lh Av«. 
Develop and finish for amaieur». 



W. 



t 9 30am. 

IS.U&aa. 
ll.ZSaoi. 

4.B0pm. 

4.3;pa 

7.iupn 

toub«i:U<9tu 






. DulutA 

sutMsnot 
M.x'a* 

.Caa* L.alui 

Baoudil 

~TIU«< Uitei ralla. . 
Tluet Kn«r *"»11» '»» 



Arrlta. 
IO»l 



••••••T *• 

s.o»« 

••.»*•■ 

••»»•■ 

;.««•• 

Wlanu>«(. 



CUYUNA RANGE LINE. Arrlira. 



FOR RENT— COTTAGES. 



SITUATION WANTEL>— A FEW MORE 
wa.shlngs to do at hoine. cheap. Mrs. 
Johnson. 211^ East Sixth street. 



OSTEOPATHY. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



^ ■'■-• m I. 



Duluth Engineeiing <-,o^. 
Mgr.. 613 Palladio Mdg 
prepared and c»n»^.. ^ 
tenuei for waierwoiks 



VV. B. Patton, 

Specirtcaiions 

uction superln- 

sewerage. etc. 



Dr C B. Hutchinson, specialist. 306-7 
Alworth Bldg Office Grand 821-D. 
residence Melrose 4481^^ 



SITUATION WANTED-BY COMPE- 
teiit lady stenographer and booK- 
keepcr; experienced 'n 
flee and billing 
Herald. 



work. 



wholesale of- 
Address A114, 



i'oR RKNT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, loa 
Thirty-ninth avenue wesl, city vvator 
paid, rental. $10 per month. J 1>. 
Howard 4fc Co., Providence bui.dlng. 

i 1 J 



FOR SALE— HOUSE AND LoT 50 BY 
140. cheap, by owner. Call 11 East 
Sixth street. 

FOR SALE— $150 CASH AND RENT 
money for 3-room cottage and oO- 
foot lot, L.ake.slde, $l,luO. C. E. Roe, 
412 Providence. 



721 



For sale * 

Dandy, brand new, six-room cot 
lage, hardwood tloors, 
surroundings, large- lot. 
If you are looking for 
tlve home at a very 
price, ste us at once. 

W M. PRINDLE & CO., 

3 Lon.sdale Bldg. 

N.w phon.- 2.;:*. old, Mc-lrose. 2100 



beautliul 

50 by 140. 

an attrac- 

reasonable 



7.20am.. 
j.SSam.. 

• .SOain... 
10 U2am.. 
IU.24am.. 
10 33Bai.. 
IU.4tiaia.. 
It.4»am 



. UuluUt . 

Supcnoc 
. Uawlat . 
.Kaat Laka 
. Liaitoa 

BtMKtwrg 



. ..ItiiU Hut). 



• 40p« 

• .03»a 
4. iO»a 
S.Mpa 
!.»»■ 
t.iaoa 
>.lJ»a 
2.6a«a 



Ainia H.lS«i» OEEKWOOO l.*»fm l^'*'* 



,11, 57*H . 
12 OSpa. 



Curu&a 
Ctatbt 



a.oapa 
*. 



•U^Ujf 



tballj txcvA Sunday. 



FOR SALE— YOUNG TEAM OF B.\Y 
horses, harness and wagoji; wight 
3 200. For terms address W. H. Sears. 
R. F. D No. 3 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ltOOM 
house. 2010 East Fifth street 
ly modern. Rent $22..'.0 i>er 
L. A. Luirsen 
Ing 



514 



BRICK 

entire- 
month, 
i'rovldeiice bulld- 

720 



Dr Lillian M.-ffal. osteopathic P'lysl- 
404 Provid -nee bldg. Both phones. 



Clan. 



PVTENTS. 



PATENTS — 
See Stevens, 



iLL ABOUT 
liO Sellvood 



PATENTS, 
building. 



SITUATION WANTED — SITUATION 
wanted as .seumstre-ss, understand.-, 
cutt ing and fitting E 141. Herald . _ 

SITU.VriON WANTED — RELIA B LE 
woman wants washing to do at no'"^ 
Call or address 228 North Sixty-flrst 
avenu e west, Wesl Duluth. 

SITUATION WANTED — IKJ^NING 
and washing by the Uay. Call Mel- 
rose 2124. 



SITUATION W .\NTED — AS 
girl or light work In store. 
West Slxtn street. 



NURSE 

Call 2206 



FOR RENT— TO COUPLE W-ITHOUT 
children, five-room furnished cottage 
m flne condition; electric UghC gas 
for cooking, fine yard. lo22 
sola avenue, Park Point, 
rose U 25 or Grand Oou. 

For rent — FINE N1NE-ROO.M 
brUk hou.se at 7tJ9 l^a.-it First street 
large light rooms. $60 per 
liental departmtHit. John A. 
son & Co.. Wolvin building. 



FOR SALE— AT THE RIGHT PRICE, 
1 would buy two-llat hou.se, East cml, 
not further than Tenth avenue. Ad 
dress W 96. Herald. 



FOR RENT-FOUR-ROOM C«JTTAGi:. 
Thirty-first avenue west and ihiro 
street. $15 water, electric light hard- 
wood floors. A. H. Burg, 300 Alworth 



DILITH, MISSABE & NORIU- 
ERN RAILWAY. 



712 



FOR SALE— SIX-ROO.M HOUSE 
alcove, hardwood finished 
stairs, modern except heat. At 
gain. 1717 East .Sixth street. 



WITH 
down- 
a bar. 



Mlnne- 
Call Mel- 



motich. 
Stejhen- 
720 



FOR SALE— HOUSES ON THE EASY 
payment plan. Talk with I? Ider, 18 
Third avenue west. 



building. 



FOR RENT — LAKE NEBAGAMON. 

furnished cottage; rowboat, anom- 
modailon for eight; $30 l>er niont i. 
H Burg 6i Co., 308 Alworth bulld- 



4U« West 



Superior 
0<W. 



•i. 



l.«ata 



Anita. 



I Blt>bli«. CliiatwUa. VtrHnU. •••- I 

•7.40«« \ laiu. CoUralnc. SUaniO ibu^l;. 1 
1 tUount li IruQ. tsparta, tMlwauU^ 



•S.S4»« 



A. 

Ing. 



721 



FOR RENT— FIVE 
also five-room flat. 
Sixth street. 



ROOM 
Inquire 



HOUSE, 
514 East 



KOK S.\LK — A SPLENDID »-ROOM 
h.)uso. arranged two fjiniilie.-s; large 
corner lot, all improvenn^nts; snap 
$3,300; cash, $l.o<Jo; terms 
Realty. 524 Manlialtan building 



at 
Sill it h 




CHIROPODISTS. 



SHOW -ME A 
not yield to ni> 
all foot troubles 
Smythe. 1< 



FOOT— THAT WILL 

treatment. 1 relie%e 

instantly. Dr. O. t. 

Ea^i Superior street. 



The 

10 



PLINO REPAIRING SHOP. 

Twill Por s Pi.mo Repairing 
r E. Mich. St. Mel. 788; Grand 



Co.. 

544. 



CORNS REMOVED, 
nails and bunion.s 
20 West Superior 



23C. 

cured 
street. 



INGROWN 

Dr. Scott, 

upstairs. 



Carriage and wagons. 



PIANO & FIKNITLRE REPAIRING 

I Piano r«furnisuing. carpenter and i-ab- 
in-i maker. . ohnson Ai Carlson, --OV, 
W 



SITUATION WANTEI>— LADY WOULD 

like to go out by day to do memling 
and darning; prices reasonable. A-74. 

Herald. ^ 

WISHES 

Address 
delivery. 



SITUATION WANTED— GIRL 

po.sltion working evenings. 
Mi.ss M Hall, general 



FOR RENT— SEVEN- ROOM HoUsE. 
modern except heat. S. s. W 111 um- 
8on. 515 Torrey building. Both 

phones. 3_, 

ON 

$20. 

build - 

712 



FOR S.\LE — UNFINISHED HOUSE 
with water, sewer, and gu.s. lot 4t) by 
100 beaiuifui lawn anu young trees, 
one' block north of car line, $1*00 cash 
or $950 terms; corner i-orly-nrst 
avenue east and Regent^ 



FOR RENT— EAST END COTTAGE 
seven rooms; nice corner lot; Just 
been remodeled, new modern plumb- 
ing new haidwood floors, newly pa- 
pered and painted $35 per month 
I Salter company. 



•S.Mpa 



•7.I9PIB 









tUUbuitf. CUlabulJn. bu.roo 

TuuUi>7 Vlrglau. KTciKfi, f •«« >'•■ 
Cukralnu. J 

VltBlnla. Cook, llalner. Jolt | 
traiicea. I'ort AiUiur. Bau- > 

attu. Wairoad. WUuilfag. J 



•4.3 IAS 



F 
721 



?;Mr~RENT - FURNISHED - THE 
••Brown"" cottage irontlng on Pike 
lake; very attractive. $25 P^^ m""' 4 
F. I. Salter Co.. Lonsdale Bldg. 714 



BEE J G. 
pair *ind 
AJiey East. 



ELDER. CARRIAOE 
horseshoeing; -t-i» 



RE- 
First 



Third St Grand 2322. Mel. 140j. 

PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING^ 



danciniTand lessons. 



FOR 
See 



T>ancing Tues 
ing.^ at 224 

tauyiU. 



Tliurs. and Sal. even- 
\V Isl St.. also dancing 



DENTIST. 



^ TT w Olson 222 rsew Jersey Bldg. 
Dr. W H-./^^«'^'J."^^re.,u. Both phones.^ 



222 New 



All w 



ork 



PMNTLN'G AND DECORATING 
Youngda hi & Ditrrs. 223 W. 2d. Si. 

F Leonard, l louse, sign, carriage and 
marine palner. p. Gi ignon s ship yds. 



SlTl" \TloN WANTED— COMPETENT 
young la.ly woulJ like a position in 
ce-neral house-work; small family 
preferred. Address 1901 East Nlnlh 
Zenith phone Grand 20j9-i. 



street. 



SITUATION WANTED 
la'Jy; bookkeeping or 
work, evenings. Y"125. 



BY YOUNG 
stenographic 
Herald. 



RIG WEAVING. 



FIRST-CLASS RAG AND FILLER RUG 
v^eavlng. Melrose 334L ^^__ 



SITIATION W ANTED— MALE. 

j^.TCATION W-\N TED— PUBL.IC JAN- 
Itor and window-washer. Prudence 
Robert, the best nev/ v/lndow-clean«r 
In the city. Melrose 305. La Salle hotel. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE 
Jeir.-r.son street, water paid, rent 
J. D. Howard & Co.. Providence 
I ng. ^_^ 

fTTr rent — TWELVE-Ri>< >.\1 

boarding house; two mlnulc-s walk 
from oiass block; two bathrooms, 
electric light. etc. Wahl-Messer 
Realty Co.. 208 Lon sadel building. 

FOR RENT— FINE SIX- ROOM HOUSE 
at 2126 East Fifth street; all con- 
veniences. $35. L. .V. Larsen coui- 
pany. 213 Providence bui lding. <13 

FOR ItENT — SEVKN-ROOM HOUSE. 
203 Eleventh avenue west, $12. jO per 
month, water In basement. I'ulford, 
How &, Co.. t»09 Alworth building 



FOR SALI'f— SMART. NEW. M«)I)EltN 

six-rooiii home, hardv^'ood floors, oak 

• finish, stone foundation, ho! water 

Ileal; $4,250. 5:o Seventeenth avenue 

cast. 



;2o 



FOR SALE— NEW SlX-KuO.U HoC.SE. 
modern; good location. 1 18 lenm 
east Call Grand 2253-Y. 



FOR RENT — FhSHLXG LODGE ON 
the Biule. for the season, completely 
furnLshed; ideal location for sum- 
good ftsljlng. F. E. Kennedy, oor, 

4* 'J 



m» r 



Alworth building 



avenue 



l\m SALE V .SMALL IKjlSE AND A 

fine lot on East Fifth street, tor a 
k sale only $1,250. Smith Realty 



quic 



4 Manhattan building 



20 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

MRS LUZINA OJAL.,V, located at 34S 
Lake avci.ue south, will cure rt-eu- 
niiitism, 8toma<h troubles, constipa- 
tion catarrh of the bowels and ner- 
vous del.illty. Can also cuie dis- 
abled limbs. 1 am a graduate of 
Helslngfors Clinical inslltute. 



'^^o i^b^v-^rfon'^ C^; Mesaba Rang. 
Points Solid Vestlbuled Train. Modern 
Slee^pers throug h to Winnipeg. 

"tUEDLLLTH & IRON RANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

••VE11M1LI4>N K4»LTIiJ'' 



UuUe Ul««r. Two HarUon. T.wer, 
Bl>, Aurora. JJIwabiK. ItcKUilaf. 
SrftVia, fcvfleth, Gillian 
Vtnt.ula 



aiid 



1 1 



•Uaiir tUaiii ixctpt Suadar 



RESTAt RANTS. 



^J5;vli:EAMNG AND PRESSING. 



WORK GUARANTEED. 
Works Old. Meirose, 
2474 



CITY DYE 

1942, Zenilh 



For good cooitc-d 
Cooking restaurant 



meals try the Honie 
4 First Ave E. 



FLORIST. 



J 

Flora. 



921 



Le Borious. florist. -_ H.>wers 

funeral designs, cat floweis 



St.— 



KOUHNG, CORNICE, SKYLIGHTS. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION As 
engineer by first-class man. Addre,.sb 
Y !>4, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTEl>— W^\NTED Po- 
sition as .salesman. Considerable ex- 
perience In wholesale groceries. Best 
of references. Address X 105, Her- 
ald^ . 

SITUAT1«»N WANTED— BY KXPERl- 
enced chauffeur, can keep machine in 
good condition. C Erlckson. j1< 
West F'lrst street. • 



FOR RENT— MODERN ELEVKN- 

room house, good repair; two grate.s, 
electric light. ga». full lot. neutral 
location. Getty-Suilth company. 30b 
i'alladio building. 



714 



FOR RENT— ELEVEN-ROOM HOUSE 
on Superior street and Fifth avenue 
east, all conveniences except heat, 
rent $43. Apply N. J Upham Co., 
IS Third avenue west. ^^^ 



BURP. ELL & 

Both phon 



HARMON. 30g E. Sup. 

jj First-class work. 



St 



FIRNITIRE RE-COVERED. 



- 






m 












— c.»— ^:^= 






• 




1 '" ■"""• 
























Let Forsell do your 
334 E. Superior St. 



UPHOLSTERING. 

Zen ith phone 949. 

B.OP VN EXPERT^-PHOi-STEivER 

'^ r-\n Lai<en Llncjln 369, Mel. .38. 

call Lai.tn latest designs. 



RIFLES AND GINS. 




Samio-is 



RRNITIRE AND PIANOS. 



Finished and 
8on. w-i6 E. 



repaired. Theo. Thomp- 
Sui-. St. Old phone 2428 



URNITIRE FINISHING. 



Fini^hinsi. painting, paper hanging. 
W. JoiTiison. Lincoln 369; Mewo.e 



A. 

r3s. 



Grinding and Repairing a 
specialty. City Gun Store. 

R. C KRLSCHKL, 
402 West Superior Street. 



SEEDS PLANTS, TREES. 

. „_,.,v.T.ifiN -NO^sTTs THE TIME TO 
•^^pTtVn'l'' fl.?v eong*^ shrubs and hedges. 

Call Mercer, Mel. 3;>4o; Orand -34o. 

He knoW!- low. 

SEU)NinrAND~DEALERS. 



SITUATION WANTED — AS EXTRA 
man in hotel during summer months; 
able to take any kind of position, 
will star t right away Q 85, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY ALL 
around florist and gardener In pri- 
vate place, life experience; stea.ly 
worker; German; please state wages 
and parllfulara In first letter. 
Studer. 360 Sixty-first avenue 



FOR RENT — NINE-ROOM 
with heat, water and Janitor 
centrally located; nicely 
J. D. Howard (k. Co 
building. 



HOUSE. 

service; 

finished 

Providence 

78 



HORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 

HORSEsPllORSES ! HORSES! 
MIDWAY HORSE M^UtKET. 

•THE HORSE AND MULE HEAD- 
tjuarlers oi the Northwest;" 50u to 80U 
head of horses and mules coKsiantly 
on hand; part time given if desired 
Private sales daily. II you need "'■^'■'■ 
horses, general purpose hordes, de- 
livery horses, mules or ral. reading 
or other purpo.-es, drivers or sadd-eis. 
we can fill your order. Every horsd 
sold guaianteud to be as rcpresenleO. 

BARRETT it ZIMMERMAN. 
Midway H orse Market, St. Paul. Minn. 

FOR SALE— TEAM OF HORSES, 
weighs about 2.500 poumls. Call 208 
East First street. 



M.VNICUR1NG. MASSAGE, FACE AND 
Bcalp treatment. 813 Torrey ouilding. 
Grand 946-X. 

m7^^ H. W iking, SWEDISH MAS- 
■ :i05 East First St Melrose 4494. 



•7.30aM tl2.00a 
t2.4»p«| •li.U«»pa 



RAILWAY. 



OULOTH a NORTHERN MINNESOTA 

Ki.iu lu»a J.iU) ui»i»<Uf'f smulAiJ 

tiaiua leavlu* UuiuUi al * •iO *• ••• 
aue- arn»»M» •. . „ ,^ .i... «beu ruuiitcs. 



OtliGa.1. 

Trait)* couufkl :ii 

«tu> u a L 

arntUil 



U 
ai 



Cramer 



rliu 



Ciraud U»rau .la*. 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



sage. 



Mrs 
4th 



Calmodeen. Room 7, 
Av W^ and 3 si St. 



Wmthrop blk. 
Grand 207S-T. 



BUSINESS ANNOINCEMENT. 

* THE NORTH WE.STERN 

AGENCY. 



L>aav«. 
•4 bUpn . 
•8.U0affl. 
•7.30P«. 
••OSaM 



AatiUnd and Eait. . 

! ..Aahlaud and Kaal. . 

Mlu». »>"! I'akoia Kipei 

.North Coa.1 Umllad. 



AlTlta. 

.•II ISaa 
,. 'e 40pa 
,. •« I5«a 

. •« 25PB 



TEACHERS . , ^ 

310-311 PROVIDENCE BLDG., 
DULUTH, MINN. 

We have many gra<le vacamlf-s 
on our lists. Write us for appli- 
cation blanks. 



Laa<a. 

to OOaia 

• t.Sftpa. 

•tl.lOpa 



"buiuUi stton 

ST. PAUL... 

:.. MINNEAPOLIS 



•Dull/- tDallj fK-apl Svuidaj 
DeiX/t .1 334 Weat Sup<rn.-r aUeet. 



Arrlta. 
•• 30aa 

. t2.05pa 
. •7. oops 

•TiiuiM 214. Unloa 




W ESTERN IIMEI 




ja^j»i*>»^J<^Ai^»^»^l^»^'^^'»»^^»^^^ 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
1526 Va East Third street, every con- 
venience; $35 per month. R. P. Dow.se 
& Co.. 106 Providence building. >14 



O. 



east. 



Isew and 
sold A. 



s. cond-hand goods bought, 
B Davis, 1729 W. Sup. St. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY JtJUNG 
Norwegian man, age 23, in wholesale 
hou.se Bto?e or any kind of work. 
Address C. N., 512 Seventh avenue 
east , new 'phon e. 1670-Y. 

JEFFERSON. PUBLIC JANITOR. ALL 
kinds ot store and office cleaning. 
Mel 2623 219 East Superior street. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROO.M HOLSE. 
1312 East Fourth street; $2d per 
monlh, furnace, good basement, bath. 
Pulford. How & Co., 609 Alworth 
building. 



FOR SALE — GENTLE ^AM1L\ 
horse, 6 years old; not afraid of 
automobiles or electric cars. A. C. 
Volk Palladio building. 



FOR RE.N'T — TWO .STABLES. ONE 
double stall and one single and 
double stall. 507 West Superior 
street. 



FOR SALE-REAL ESTATE. 

^I^'^P^Ta^^^^^^TmciT^uble level 

lot on upper side Second street and 
Twelfth avenue east; fine building 
site; price $2,600. For sale exclu- 
sively by U A. Larsen company, 213 
ITovldence building. '12 



i,>»4 45p'» 
|,»»5.05pn) 
ArlO.Miam 
Ar>ll.S»ai« 



tt.l6pRi 
fi.aSpm 
7.4!>aNi. 
tt.l&aa 



lIUlllUl . 

Sul'urlKr 



L,vt8.30ain 
L,\ 9.108111 
Ar 4.30pm 
Ar S.O»pni 
•Unlly 



•4.l5p«. . l>ulutli .. 
4.35pm.. Sui»erlor . 
O.japm. ..»•-. Paul.. 
I0.2ipi>i. Ulmi«iDoUi 
tUalU except SuudaJ. 
ai-. 



Ar*B.iiam •12.40fm 
Ax 7.53a" t2.20a« 
..L, 7.4jpm 
.Lv •.25pm lO.IOpm 

*S.i5pa 
•.35pa 

4.jo»a 

4.00* ■ 



.ArtJ.35pSl 

.Ax S.OSpm 

..Lt a. lOam 

.Lf 7.WMI 



Office, SOU W««l Superior 

Duluth, South Shore 



Duiuta. 

& Atlantic. 



712 



TIMBER LANDS. 



DYE W ORRS. 



Second HAND macuiner\. 



HORSESHOEING. 



Bbofcing crippled and interfering horses 
my soecialiy. Carl Schau, 14 Jo Av. E 



HOTEL SUPPLIES. 



scrap 



We buy ane 

ona-hand machine: >. 
Metal Co., 



Lincoln 366, 



iron and sec- 
N. W. Iron «t 
Mel. 667 630. 



ZENITH CITY DYE >VORXS— LAR- 
seat and most reliable. All work 
done In Duluth. Work called for and 
delivered 'Phones. Old. lli>4-R. new, 
1888. 232 E ast Superior stre et. 

Duluth Dye Works— French dry clean- 
fancy dyeing. Old phone, Mel- 
4191; new. 1191-A. 330 E. Sup, fat. 



le 



FOR SALE— FOUR ^'-'^<''^^^,•J,''^^\^^.,,^, 
years old. weight from 1,100 to l..i<'0 
pounds. S. Wlddcs, 429 Forly-sixtii 
avenue west. Cole 



3133-Y. 



A SNAP. 

160 ACRES IN LAKE COUNTY, 
timbered white pine, pulpwood. 
tamarack and birch. For partlcu 

'^' Am1:IUCAN SECURITY CO., 
I'alladio Building. 






*-.¥^-;e*A-#^^-^%^t**'***'«^f***^*^^ 



ing; 
rose 



swedisTmassage. 



WE WILL FURNISH YOUR KITCHEN 

dining room complete; write or 

E F. Burg. 224 West First St. 



and 
•phone 



A- E 
Jersey 
rose. 



i^.v»EN. M-^SsEUR. '».^.<>,.NKW 
Old phone 42^3 Mei- 



bui ding. 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co.— 
Oldest reliable dyers and trench dry 
cleaners In Not th west. ^}^^^^Ya ^W 
north. Phones: New. 1516. old. 1^37. 

NATIONAL DYEING AND CLEANING 
company. 319 E. Superior St. B^r^nch 
cleaners and fancy dyer*. Both 
2376. Branch. 15 Lake Ave N 



TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LAi<DS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby. 305 Pa lladio buildi ng. 

FOR SAL*;— FORTY ACRES LAND. 
all white pine and spruce timber. In- 
quire 709 Hamuiond avenue. Superior. 

Wia. 

also cut-over 
Lyceum bldg 



FOR SALE— 5-YEAR-OLi> DELI\ER\ 
maie, weighs 1,200 pounds; guaran- 
teed sounu. S. M. Kaner, 1219 East 
Seventii street. 



FOR SALE— LOTS AT STEEL I'L.VNT. 
$o down. $5 per monlh. Melrose 2634. 



FOR SALE— THINK OF IT. TWt» 
lots 50 by 140 feet, between Tweni- 
ty-third and Twenty-fourth -avenue 
west; water in street, Pr'^ie , .'V, V 
tynn,s to suit; d^in't miss it. Call 2401 
West Fourth stre«>t. 



Leare. 



STATIO.NS. 



Arrtta 



FOR SALE— DRAFT AND DRIVING 
horses; F. E. Bellows. Cumberland, 
Wis. 

IHE WESTERN SALES STABLE 
company has removed '""'^ra 11 
Eleventh avenue we.st to 2» ana a 
Ea'-t Flr&l street, and will have two 
carloads of draft, driving and gen- 
eral purpose horses .Saturday direct 
from the Blue Grass farnia. 



WANTED TO RENT. 



1 buy standing timber; 
lands. Geo. Kupley. 615 



TUNING AND REPAIRING. 



H-\TS RENOVATED. 



Donl throw your hats away. O d hats 
made- new at the Zenith Shoe shining 
parlors, in Sullivan's barber shop, 21=. 
W. Sup. St. 



IMPROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 



C VI RUD TUNING AND Kl;>PAIK 
'of pianos and player pianolas. 
Superior St.. Melrose 2S2S. 



ing 

33u 



East 



WATCHMAKER. 



dry 

'phones 

Plumes cleaned 



and 
clioi 
502-4 



Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. Miss 

Fii/.l'atrick, 

'phones. 



dyed any 

1 guarantee! 

E. 4th St. 



color. 
Miss 
Both 



,■ »^»»^^>^* 



MONEY 
saving 
works 



<iiVING TIME SAVING. SHOE 
While you walL Gopher Shoe 



Advertise in TDs Herald 



Repairing i eatly 
304 Manh itlan 
rose 4719 



done, 
bldg. 



Wm. E. Rose. 
Old phone Mel- 



WINDOW SH-\DES. 

F J Lowe the window shade man. 
CarDet -Jitd linoleum work Wall pa- 
per cleaned. Leav orders at Scotl s 
drug stoi's. 



CLOTHES GLE-AJiED & PRESSED. 

Brlng^ur skirt to 10 4th Av W. to 
be cleaned and Presi-ed for 50c; do- 
clean 1 n g ^lso^_^fnm^_Gr8md_2»52-3^ 

to 
re- 
al F. A. 
Grand 1134-X. 



FOR SALE — 40 ACRES LAND. ALL 
white pine and spruce timber. In- 
quire "To* Uaminonnd avenue. Supe- 
rior. Wla 



Homesteads and timber claims located. 
From 40 to 80.000 acres of timber 
lands for sale. 816 Palladio Bldg. 



HORSES ACCLIMATED HORSES. 

"Young heavy horses; several teams 
for sale. Red Cliff Lumber company, 
barn. Thirty-ninth avenue 



ON 
of 



WANTED TO ItENT— COTT.^i.E 
Minnesota Point duritg loonth 
August. Send lull description _ price- 
and location . George 
.spencer, low^a^ 



t7.4SMa 

1«. I2aa 

T>.20Aa 

Arrlta. 
t7.S»»m 
t8.5»piii 
t7.05p 
W.46P 



.. .•!• 30a« 
Bunou. I 
.. .• 10 warn 

SUtluu. ) 
... ««,}UMI 



•«.l5pai... Uulutu 

(S 'o Uue LuloD 
•C 43pai. .. Suoenor 

iS'jo l-luf Ciuun 
H.ftip*. .. Suiiertor .. 
(Umuo beooLi 

S 40am . Hoinhton ..1ll.00#m 
J loam .. CaluuiM ••ttO-'W- 

•4.2Ua«.. UlipeinlUA ■■!'**?*? 

•5 OOam MarQuetia ..•ll.JOpm 
• 10.2oamSault We. Maria •* »4#* 

H Ooam Uoutraal •*•*•*"; 



i».4a»a 

ts.iopa 
ts.Mp* 
Lcata. 



t«.20«« 

tS 20aa 

•• 20»a 

•e.ioam 



Lea ea- 
ts. 05am "8 15pm 
tlO Obpm '10 20am 



. Montreal . 

Ni-w York 



»I0 



Mam 
ISpm 



tic 

tl 



DO-JW 
30aa 



UJail: ti<--pi Sunilij 'btUJ 



A. Heald. 



west. 



For sale— Forty head of draft and gen- 
eral purpose norses just out ot woous 
be sold cheap 209 W. Ist St. 



to 



FOR SALE— TWENTY-FIVE HEAD OF 
h o rs es at 811 Lake avenue north. 

FOR SALE— 30 HORSES 
Sale & Boarding Stable. 



AT ZENIIH 
524 W. IStSt 



WANTED TO RENT—SMALL FUR- 
nished llat, strictly modern; central 
lucation; two adults permanent Z 
lOS, Herald. 



WANTED TO RENT— BY GEN TLL- 
man room and board in private 
family; aboi Twelfth avenue east, 
on Flr^t or Second street, preferred. 
Call (;rand 2354. 



Uave. 



THE GKEAl NOUTHEUN. 

HTATIO.NS 



Arrtea 



i«.00aai / 

•S.25p»i{ 

• ll.lOpm 1 

es.4S«in ( 

•6.S5pm l 
1 1 55pm 
t«.oeam 



ST. PAUL 
and 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Cro<jk>w«i. UriUii^ Kurtu. 

Houtaua ai»«l Coa»t 

Sttan lilver. HlBulug. Virginia 

St Cloud. WUmai. Sioux Cttif 



tlO I5pm 
•I S5pa 

•« 3baa 

•« o5p« 

•7 l^a■ 
tl2 5upm 
tl».«5pa 



PICTURE FRAMING. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 






WANTED TO BORROW. 



REMOVED PROMPTLY. ZENITH 2 
X. 807 Sixth avenue west. 



!78. 



WANTED TO BORROW — LOAN OF 
$700 on real estate valued at $6,000 
Addre-ss J. A. S.. care 



of Herald. 



W \NTED — Ladles and gentlemen 
know that the best pressing and 
pairing In the city Is done 
SicKarlln's, 201V* VV. 



1st; 



JOHN MUELLER. 208 
street. 

C 



WEST FIRST 



BOARDERS W ANTED. 



THOERSEN, 11 Lake avenue north 
Grand 2197-y. Everything in tailoring 



BOARD OFFERED— FOR BEST HOME 
cooking in city at moderate prices 
try a meal at the Melrose, 318 West 
Second st reet. 

boai:ders wanted — meaus at 

all hours. 521 W. 2nd St. Hotel Irving. 



REMOVED ON SHORT N0TM;E~DICK 
" 11;;: E 4th St Zer. 1945-Y. 




DRESSMAKING. 



•I>aily 
r«Adjr at 9 



tUaib 
p. m. 



cccepl 

OSl<e. 



Sunda* 

SpaldU>g 



Ttrin 
tioUl. 



CU> t 



HOTELS. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Hotel McRay 



MPS ROY — EXPERIENCED DRESS- 
inaker. 1414 Jefferson street. 



Barrett. 



BOARDERS WANTED— GOOD BOARD 
and room, modern conveniences, lie 
West Third street. 



STOVE REP-AIRS. 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10 000 different stoves and ranges. C. 
f' Wlggerts & Son. 4lo East supe- 
rior street. Both 'pnopea 



DRl 

day ; 
ship 



.SSMAKING — TAILORING BY 
flrsl-<las8 style and workman- 
will call. J 123. Herald^ 



Caroar Flrtt ftl. Mi FWtP 



A*a. WaaL OULUTM. 



Imperial Hotel 



Thoroughly modern and up-lo 
In every respect 
R<>OM<». 7Sc AND IP. 
S0<I-2U!S Weat Su|»rrl«»r Street. 



dats 



"HAIR DRESSING PARLORS. 

Moisan la the only French hair dr«»- 

'scr In Duluth. Expert In mak ng 

wigs, toupees and hair dye Switchea 

and puffs made front <^o|Vi''^',.r5, 

orders prompUy filled- 212 W. 1st St 



fIrst^class dressmaking 

ladles' tailoring done at 310 
Second street. Miss Maycrofi. 



AND 
West 



Hotel Superior 



—SUPCRIOR. 



Frederic 



Conner Fif»t A..nu. We.t and FIr.t »«'!«'„"••••'•_;, 
Thi not; hom.-liaa place In the t,t>. Room, aiaja 
«iile hot and cold ryoniop *at« ii> aaeS 
HALEY HE8TAUWAWT CO ■ Prapa_ 



•r en 
room 



Fine 
Room. 



Leadlni Hotel of the city, 
popular pricta. Larje Sample 

"""tUROPEAN PLAN— 7V> to 47.50 
—SpaaiAl WmM* RatM. 



Cafe Service 
Bui macta 



.ancHett 



522 LAKE AVEHUE SOUTH. 
Tourlaie aiiJ .>cU*r» t^iii M»l » coarfortable 
uucf i.*ur liirl 't r.'i>iil. .UiUJ 



iUv 
eanleii'-ca 




5! 



i 



<i- 







k 






t 






\ 

















— **- — *hr 






-«r- 



» .d 



Satiir^y, 



THE DIIL/UTH.HERA1JD 



July 8, 1911. 




HERALD EXCURSION 



u 



V 



UP THE RIVER 

lEIT MMMY AT 9 A. M. 




One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

— OF— 

BUSINESS 
HOUSES 

Below you wiU find a 
condensed list of reliable 
business firms. This ia de- 
slKned for the convenience 
of l>u»y people. A telephone 
[order to any one of iheni 
I will receive the same care- 
ful attention as would be 
yiveu an order placed in 
kptrson. \ou can safely ile- 
'Pcnd upon the rellai>llity 
I of any one of these firms. 
Old New 
'Fhone. 'fhone. 
CHIROPODIST— 

Dr. Hoyt, Temple bldff. 

DRitaasTs— 

Ed lit.* Jeronimus \.\3 

BoNce . . ^'•3 

Sni'ith & s^mith ....... ibU 

DYK WORKS*— 

Zenith City L'ye works.lSSS 

Northwestern Dyeing 
& Cleaning Co 1»7 

National Dyeing *„,-. 
Cleaning Co 23 «» 

Intt-rstatf Cleaning & _^ 
Dyeing Co. 'Kellys Zo^fi 
GRlKk:RS — 
Thatcher & Thatcher.. 
LAl.XDHIKS — 

Peerless Laundry .... 428 

Yale Daundry ^'*^ 

Lutes Laundry 447 

Home Laundry Co.... 478 

Model Laundry 2»4» 

Puritan Power Laun- 
dry 13 1 8 

Incline Hand Laundry, 
•phone Mel 1609 

Snow Flake Laundry. 3&3S 
MII.LIM^H— 

M. A. CO.X 45.6 

ME.%T MARKETS^ 

Mirk Bros 1590 



G8&3-Y 

10L7 

163 

7 

1SS8 

1516 

2376 

30 

1907 

428 
479 
447 
478 
13)2 

G1378 
«2 



189 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

IXSURANXE AND 
RENTAL AGEXXIES. 

J'. L. Kitkowsky & Co., 201 E.xch. oldg 
ohn A. Steplienson & Co., Wolvin bldg. 
E. D. Field Co.. iu3 E.xchunge buildinS. 
t. A. Larsen Co.. Froviilence building. 
\V. r Sherwood, 11 ^ .Manhattan bhlg. 

FUR SALE MlSC£LLA.^£Oi:S. 



FOR SALE. 

ONE WALNUT FlJ^CHER FI.\NO. 
in g>.rod condition. |17 5: terms, 
1 10 cash and |5 per month. 



ONE HALLETT & DAVIS PL\NO. 

mahogany case, slightly used, 
good as new, for $l7i>; terms, 
|2S cash and |10 per month. 



* 

a- 

* 

* 
* 



ONE USED STEINWAY PIANO. 
€b(>ny vase, gnod condition, for 
|li!5; terms, flu cash and | 
month. 



per 



One large M.\HOGANY STUART 
I-iani,', alniust iiew. for |lo5, 
terms. |10 cash and fi> per 
month. 

FRENCH & BASSETT. 



FOR SALE— GAS RANGE SUIT.VBLE 
for large family or small boarding 
house. 32& West Second street. 

FOR «ALE— CHEAP — BICYCLE AND 
gun; buth in good ct>nditlon. See 
Stewart. North ern Hardware. 

FOR SALE— ENAMEL LINED RE- 
frlgerator; flrsst-class condition; 
holds fifty pounds of ice. Call Mel- 
rost 4163. 

FOR SALE CHELAP— A SLIGHTLY 
used T-foot horse hav rake. Josei'h 
Proff. 1032 West Ninth street. 

FOR SALE— SECOND-HAND OFFICE 
furniture in excellent condition; 
practically new. Apply to R. M. At- 
wattr. Jr., 1503 Alworth building. 



TOR SALl^— HAKP. AMERICAN MAKE, 
first class condition, will sell cheap. 
Inquire evenings. 119 Mesaba ave- 
nue. 

FOR SALE— TWENTY-FOOT FAMILY 
launch in perfect condition; bargain 
for cash. Address L 133. Herald. 



FOR SALE — ALL KINDS OF M.\- 

terlal used in packing furniture, bur- 
lay, excelsior, etc. We also furnish 
packers by the hour. Estimates free. 
Duluth Van & Storage Co., 210 West 
Superior street. Both 'phones 4i>2. 



FOR SALE— SIX SHELF REVOLVING 
book case; will be sold cheap. SOI 
Torrty building. 710 



FOR S.\LE— LARGE TENT, 14 by 16, 
J12. or with floor on Park F'olnt, J15; 
Jewel gas range, five burner, with 
oven $7.50, bed lounge with mattress, 
13.50, two rugs, 10 by 12. |3.50 each. 
16HM/I East Superior. Melrose 1801. 



FOR S-\LE— CHEAP, GOLDEN OAK 
dinmg table: eiglit feet in diameter. 
Call mornings, 80»^ East Fourth 
street. 



FOR SALE— ELECTRIC DISC LAMP, 
two Iron bedsteads, one spring, one 
child's bed, two center tables, one 
buffet and china closet, two rockers, 
two rugs. Call 219 Si-xth avenue east. 

FOR S .ALE — TEN-FOOT SHOW CASE, 
full glass sides and top; to dispose 
of nuitkly will sell for $30. Call and 
see it Mt 16 East Superior street. 



FOR SALE — RA.VGE. USED ONE 
year: good as new; hot, water front; 
cost $40: will sell for $20. :i719 West 
Helm street. 



FOR SALE— 14-HORSE POWT^R RUN- 
about in good condition; splendid 
barg ain for $250. Call Melrose I'y'il. 

FOR S.ALE--ROOMLNG HOUSE: BEST 
corner location in city; steam heat; 
cheap rent; will take $650 if taken 
at once; deal with owner. Melrose 
1537. 



FOR SALE cmEAP— USED MOTOR- 
cycle; will demonstrate after 6 p m., 
or .'■Sunday at 2431 Ogden avenue, Su- 
perior. 

FOR SALE— CHE.\P. ;i2-FOOT Cf>UN- 
ter. together with back bar suitable 
for restaurant or saloon. 30'6 Central 
avenue. West I>uluth. 

FOR S-\LE — REMINGTON TYPE- 
writer; bargain; time, or will rent to 
right party. J 121. Herald. 

FOR SALE— MUST BE .SOLD AT ONCE 
18, 19 and 21-foot gasoline launches. 
Call Melrose 3655. 1116 Lave avenue 
south. 

FOR .SALE— THIRTY -FOOT CABl.N 
launch, 15-horse power; very reason- 
able if taken at once. N 112, Herald. 

FOrl SALE — PIPE! PII'E! PIPE' 
All siaes from 3.4 -inch to 12-inch, suit- 
able for steam, water, gas and fences, 
at very low prices. E.xcellent bar- 
gains In wood-working machinery 
and engines. One 12-hor.«e power 
Racine gas engine, suitable for boat 
or other purposes, $150. L>uluth Ma- 
chinery company. 



One Cent a 'Worii Elacn Insertion. 
No Adyertlsenient I ess Than 15 CeaU. 

HELP WANTEI>- FEMALE. 

a- WANTED, * 

a- * 

* THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED * 

* SALESLADIES * 
^ * 
if For suit, coat, waist, fur and mil- # 
}(f. llnery departments; also expert * 
•* tailor, talloress aid fitters for al- * 
•jf teration departmtnt, for our new ■# , 
■^ store, * 
^ # 

* 105-107 WEST ^;UPERIOR ST.. •* 
^ ^ 
if- wJjlch will be In readiness about •* 

* Sept. 1. Answer by letter. All i< 

* correspondence treated strictly V^ 
-A^ confidential. *■ 

* MILLER- ALBKNBERG CO. -^ 

a- * 



One Cent a Word Kach Insertion. 

HELP WAITED— MALE. 

a- * 

# WANTED. -^ 

# Every man In town whose wife or -it 
"^ daughter wants a piano to watch ff- 
it- for notice of our sale July 13. Last H- 
•jt few pianos sell for whatever you •^ 
it- give. Cash or payments. Korby it 
Tfr Piano company, 210 American Ex- * 

# change Bank building. -^ 
if' 7^ 



* * 

if- wante:d j\t once. a. 

* * 

^If. Competent and experienced sales- if- 
■^ lady who unde 'stands gloves, i^ 
■^ neckwear and jev elry. Apply at i& 
Vr- once. ^ 

7^ J. M. GIDDING & CO. i» 



■» WANTED AT ONCE. *- 

7^ Competent and experienced sales- 1^ 

if lady who understands gloves, ig. 

^ neckwear and Jev elry. Apply at ic- 

i(- once. jA 

* J. M. GIDDJNG A CO. * 



WANTED— FIRST-C^\SS COOK FOR 
two months beginning July 14. at 
my summer home at Wabana lake, 
no:th of Grand Rapids, Minn., 
kitchen Is well « quipped. Address 
Thomas H. Simmo is, 1;:29 First ave- 
nue. Cedar llapidM, Iowa, stale ex- 
perie nce and sal.ir / expected. 

if- 
ED. * 

J would like to i^ 
hand Thursday. ;i^ 
4 sell last few y^ 
Gone out of re- -.» 
. sell them for 
itever you will 
o comjjany. 210 
e Bank Bid 



For Sale — Two-chair poolroom barber 
shop: fine location. X SO . Herald. 

FOR SALE— AWNING FOR 25-FOOT 
Store. Apply 100 Oak Hall buUdlnff. 



WANT 
Every woman wh 
own a piano be on 
July 13, when w 
pianos we have, 
tail business, wll 
cash or time, wh 
give. Korby Piai 
a- Amerkan E.xchan^ 

WANTED — EXPEj 
sniall family; good 
First str eet. 

WANTED — OIRUM AT MRS. .SO.M- 
P^ers' employment office, li Second 



if- 
it- 



tIENCED GIRL, 
wages. 1118 East 



avenue east. 



WANTED — THE NEW METHOD 

Dressmaking scaotl teaches you to 
become a dressmaker In ilx we^ks: 
make dreases for /ourself or others 
wnile learning. ..10 West Secand 
street, next to Y. M. C. A. building 



\\ANTEr>— GOOD COMPETENT GIRL; 
good wages. 22)1 East Superior 
street. 



\V ANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. V. W. Lignell, 1916 
East Third street . 

WANTED — CAPABL Z STENOGUAPH- 
er. Address statli g age and experi- 
ence. D 137, Heruld. 



W'ANTED— WE HAVE AN UNUSUAL 
oi>portunity to offer a person, able 
to act as district or local representa- 
tive, controlling exclusive territory, 
directing sub-agents, accepting or- 
ders, etc.; $25 to $50 and expenses 
weekly easily made; experience un- 
necessary. American Supply com- 
pany. Portland block, Chicago. 

WANTED— MEN TO KNOW WE GROW 
a head of hair or no pay. Bryant Jk 
Co., room 12. Phoenix building. Mel- 
rose 3257. 



WANTED — BRIGHT MEN TO TRAl.V 
as chauffeurs; practical instruction 
given. Auto Owners' association, 131'<i 
Hennepin avenue. Minneapolis. 

WANTED— TWO YOUNG MEN TO DO 
Janitor work for tuition. Apply at 
once at the Duluth Business Uni- 
versity. Office Sixth floor of Chris- 
tie building. 

NATIO.NAL EMPLOYMENT CO. Estab- 
liBhed 18S2. 'Phone 376 for men. 

WANTED — MAN AND WIFE TO 
wc>rk on dairy; woman must be good 
cook. 2107 East Fourth street. 

W.'VNTED — DON'T PREPARE FOR 
any civil service examination with- 
out Seeing our illustrated catalogue, 
free. Columbian Correspondence 

college, Washington. D. C. 

WWNTED— BIG PROFITS: OPEN A 
dyeing and cleaning establishment* 
little capital needed. We tell you 
how. Booklet free. Ben-Vonde 
System. L>ept. 86. Charlotte. N. C. 

WANTED — CAPABLE SALESM.VN TO 
cover Minnesota with staple line; 
high commissions; $loo monthly ad- 
vance and permanent position to 
rlgnt man. Jess H. Smith Co., De- 
troit, Mich. 



WANTED— SEVERAL YOUNG ME.V, 
l>uluth or vicinity to fit for railway 
mail clerks, post office clerks and 
letter carriers; salary $50 to $75; pro- 
motion. Address P. O. Box 763, Chi- 
cago. 

WANTED — CIVIL SERVICE EXA.M- 
inatiuns c>pen the way to good gov- 
ernment positions. 1 can coach you 
by mall at small cost. Full particu- 
lais free to any American citizen of 
eighteen or over. Write today for 
booklet, E 302. Earl Hopkins, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

WA.XTED- DRY LUMBER GRAI»ERS. 
Work year round. Apply to Virginia 
& liainy Lake company, Virginia, 
Minn. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIP.L FOR 
general housework. 201 West Third 
street. 

WANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework; refereaces required. In- 
quire C. B t»unn. Interstate Trac- 
tion company, ^iineteenth street. 
Park Point. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 2432 Ea^t First street. 
Zenith. Grand 912. 

WANTED— COMI-ETSNT GIRL FOR 
general housework , 2431 East Fifth 
street. Melrose 42 20. 



WANTED AT ONCE— GOOD GIUL 
for general house *'ork, 1810 Jeffer- 
8c>n street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, or 01. e to assist. 80I 
East First street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENEFtAL 

housework. 1428 .refferson street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR BOARDING 
house. 2727 West Helm street. 



WANTEI> — LADIES MAKE SUPPORT- 
ers. $12 per 100; no canvassing; ma- 
terial furnished; stamped envelope 
for particulars. Wabash Supply 
company, departmtnt H 137 Chicago. 



WANTED — DINLNG 
Adelphl Hotel, 2813 
street. 



ROOM GIRL. 
West Superior 



WANTEI>— MIDDLE AGED WO.MAN 
for light housework; can go home 
nights if necessar/^. 23 East Fourth 
street, second floor. 



\\ ANTED — GKADirATE NURSE AT 
\\alker hospital. Walker. Minn. $50 
a month. Write Dr. F. L Wilcox 
Walker. Minn. ' 



WANTED — AN EXPERIENCED 
housemaid. Mrs. 0. G. Dickerman 
Twenty-fourth avenue east and Sixth 
street. Melrose 3 ;47. 

WANTED— WOALAN, WHO HAS HAD 
experience in nu sing confinement 
cases. Address X 66. Herald. 

WANTED — GENEI AL HOUSEWORK 
girl in small fainily. Apply l5o8 
East Superior stre-it. 



WA.NTED — CHAM1:ERMA1D AT THE 
Lenox. 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY NOW. 
Earn $60 in railroad position in spring. 
Excellent opportunity: don't miss it. 
Write Thompsons Telegrapu insti- 
tute, Minneapolis. 

W-\NTED— YOUNG ME.N AND WOME.V 
— The Whitney School of Telegraphy 
for practical knowledge of the art. 
L>ay and evening sessions. I'rogres- 
sive. West Duluth. Minn. 

WANTED AT ONCE— INSURANCE SO- 
itcltor; good position for wide awake 
party. Locker-Donahue Co., Lons- 
dale Bldg. 

W.\NTED— MEN. AGE OVER 18, TO 
prepare for firemen; about $100 
monthly, brakemen $80; nearby rail- 
roads; experience unnecessary; no 
strike; positions guaranteed; compe- 
tent men; 4,S66 sent to positions In 
1910; state age, send stamp for par- 
ticulars. George H. Baker, president, 
care Herald. 

WANTEL>— BOY Tu WORK ON FARM. 
Apply Hotel McKay. 

WANTED— SALESMEN; WE HAVE A 
brand new, clean cut, prompt com- 
mission pocket side line; consigned 
goods for traveling salesmen mak- 
ing small country towns; for inter- 
esting particulars address Yale Jew- 
elry company, 12 S. Jefferson street, 
Chicago. 111. 

WANTED — BOO MEN TO SEE OUR UN- 
redeemed pledges; 25 suits; 5 camer- 
as. 100 ladies' gold rings. 50 men's 
gold rings, 50 diamond rings, 50 
men's watches, 25 ladles' watches, 
10 railroad watches. 10 vijilns; all at 
big reduction. Keyston« Loan Co., 
22 West Superior street. 

WANTED— SKAT SOAP. A GREAT 
side line or specialty for any salesman; 
Minnesota is one of the few states 
not covered; the right man must be 
a hustler, can get control- Write 
Sk at, Hartford, Conn. 

^V■ A NTED— .MALE TAILOR. APPLY AT 
once at 2 409 West Superior street. 

WANTED— MAN TO DRIVE BAGGAGE 
wagon; must be acquainted with the 
city; steady work. Apply Duluth 
Van Ac Storage company. 

WANTED — TROMBONE PLAYER 
who is barber by trade; must make 
good at both; state particulars in 
first letter. Address all letters to 
Manager, Coleraine City band, Cole- 
raine, Minn. 

WA.XTED- WINDOW WASHER. AP^ 
ply housekeeper. St. Louis hotel. 

W.A.NTED— $25 WEEKLY AND Kxl 
penses to trustworthy people to 
travel and distribute samples for 
big wholesale house. C. H. Emery. 
261 M, Chicago. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework. 1014 i^ast Seco nd street. 

WANTED— COMPET E.VT WOMAN TO 
do washing on Sat arday. Call at 114 
West Fourth street before 7 p. m. 
Inquire In basem«nt. 



WANTED — THOR JUGHLY COMPE- 
tent girl for ge leral housework; 
good wages. 161». East Superior 
street. 



WANTED AT ONCE— AN EXPERI- 
enced waitress. 24 First avenue east. 



WANTED— LADY 'i'O TRAVEL IN 
Minnesota; good PJ y and tailor-made 
suit in ninety da>s; experience un- 
necessary; reliablt firm. Write for 
particulars. McBrudy & Co., Chi- 
cago. 



WANTED— CO.MPETSNT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family. 
Mrs. F. McCarthy 534 East Superior 
street. 



WANTED— NORWEC IAN 
general housewt rk. 
Fourth street. 



GIRL FOR 
2231 West 



WANTED— COMPET SNT GIRL FOR 
general housework; 319 North Twen- 
ty-eighth avenue vest. 



WANTED— GOOD RIILIABLE WOMAN 
to do home fami y washing every 
week. Address EH2 Herald. 



WANTED— AN EXPSRIENCED GIRL 
for laundr>'. Appl;- Linen exchange, 
4 Third avenue east. 



WA.NTED — COOK; APPLY AT 540 
West Second. Central Park, Superior. 

WANTED— $100 MONTHLY AND EX- 
penses to travel and distribute sam- 
ples for big manufacturer; steady 
work. S. Scheffer. treasurer, 161 L, 
Chicago. 



WANTED — COACHMAN; REFER- 
ences required. Call 204 Sellwood 
building. 



WANTED — DON'T WORK FOR OTH- 
ers; start mall order business at 
home on capital of $6; profits large; 
spare time; 1 made $8,o00 last year 
in one mail order business; free 
booklet tells how. Voorhles, desk 
381. Omaha, Neb. 



\VANTED — FIRST-CLA.^S PASTRY 
and bread baker. Address E 73, Her- 
ald. 



WANTED — SALESMAN — EXPERI- 
ienced in any line to sell general 
trade in Minnesota. Unexcelled spe- 
cialty proposition with brand new 
feature; commission with $35 weekly 
for expenses. The Continental 
Jewelry company, Cleveland. Ohio. 



WANTED— FULL REGISTERED. Ex- 
perienced pharmacist. Bvers" phar- 
macy. 1831 East Superior street. 

W-\NTED— YOU ARE W.\NTED FOR 
government position. $80 month. 
W rite for list of positions open. 
FranKlln Institute, Dept. 188 O. 
Rochester. N. Y. 



Hotel and domestit help furnished. 
Out-of-town order I solicited. Park 
Employment agenc /, 15 Lake Avenue 
north. Both 'phonits. 



Central Employment oflfictf. all kinds 
of places illed and positions furnish- 
ed for girls. Room 3. over Big Du- 
luth store. M el. 269 Grand. 620. 

(Continued on page 27.) 



___^FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOR SALE — A CARLOAD OF FRESH 
milch cows will arrive Sunday. July 
9. 429 Forty-sixth avenue west. Cole 
3133-Y. S. Widdes, 



FOR SALE-^S. M. KANER WILL AR- 
rlve with a carload of fresh milch 
cows Sunday, July 9. 1219 East 
Seventh street. Both 'phones. 



One Cent a Wo«d Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement L<es8 Than 15 Cents. 

On Pages 26 and 27. 

FOR RE^UT— ROOMS. 

FOR SALE AND FOR RENT CARDS 
15 cents at Judd's, 20 East Superior 
street. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS; 
all cor.venlences, centrally located. 
216 West Third street. 

FOR RENT— LARGE, WELL FUR- 
nished front room and single room: 
all conveniences. 201 East Second 
street. 



FOR RENT — NICEL FURNISHED 
room; all conveniences; gentltmen 
preferred. 413 »4 East First street. 
'I'hone 430 Grand. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM; 
Bt«;am heated apartment near Sev- 
enth avenue east and First street; 
good home for right party. Address 
P. O. box 109. 



FOR RE-NT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all modern. 16 West First 
street. Fla t 1. 

FOR RENT — THREE ROOMS; NO 
children. Call 420 Flist avenue east. 



FOR RENT— FUR.NISHED ROOMS; 
also for light housekeeping; all con- 
veniences. 316 West Second street. 



FOR RE.NT— .NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all modern conveniences; light 
housekeeping allowed; $7 per month. 
319 Mesaba avenue. Melrose 1874. 

FOR KENT— FURNISHED ROOM IN 
modern fiat; reasonable. 130 Sixth 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT— IHREE-ROOM BASE- 
ment; water, sewer and electric llghr, 
hardwood floors; will rent with or 
without barn. Call 720 East Third 
street. 



For RENT— one or TWO FUR- 
nished rooms; very central and suit- 
able for light housekeeping; rent 
reasonable; at 111 First avenue west, 
upstairs. 



FOR RE.NT — TWO OR FOUR FUR- 
nished rooms for housekeeping. 2609 
West Huron. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISH lED 
rooms; reasonable. 314 East Second 
street. Grand 1364-\'. 

For RE-NT— four ROO.MS. C.^LL AT 
418 lyi vVest Sixth street. 



FOR RENT — THREE NICE ROO.MS 
very cheap. 10:: East Fourth street. 



FOR RE.NT — THREE MODER.N UN- 
furnlshed rooms for light house- 
keeping; light and fuel furnisiied; 
$19 per month. 522 Fourth avenue 
east. 



FOR RENT — ITTRNISHED ROOM; 
suitable for two gentlemen. No. 440 
Mesaba avenue. 



P'OR RENT— A NE.A.TLY FURNlSxiED 
front room; private family: rent 
reasonable, central location; two 
blocks from postoffice; good home to 
right party. Apply 40'} West Third 
street. 



FOR RENT— ALL MODERN. COOL 
rooms, with beautiful grounds at 
Wiidwood, Park Point. Phone 1467 
Melrose. 



FOR RE.NT — THREE LARGE. MOD- 
ern rooms in new house; $12 per 
month. Call 1126 East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM. 516 
East First street, flat A. 



FOR RE.NT — HANI'SO.MELY FUR- 
nlshed room at 316 Third avenue 
west. 



FOR RENT— TWO MODERN FUR- 
nished rooms for light housekeeping; 
reasonable rent. 11 West Second 
street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS; 
all modern Improvements; prices 
range from $2 to $3.50 per week. ::1J 
Fifth avenue west. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. Mrs. 
Scott. 20 West Superior street. 



FOR RENT— TWO OR THREE FUR- 
nlshed rooms for light housekeeping. 
702 West Second street. 



FOR RENT— ONE FURNISHED ROOM. 
711 East Third street. 



FOR RENT— THREE NICELY FUR- 
nished rooms, all modern, $8 to $20 
per month. 307 East Third street. 



FOR RENT — TWO NICELY FUR- 
nished rooms; good lake view, $3 
per week. 809 West .-r^uperior street. 



FOR RENT — FUR.NISHED ROOM; 
modern; good location; lake view; 
for one or two gentlemen. 222 West 
Third street, San Marco, Flat I. 



FOR RE.NT— PLEASANT FUR.NISHED 
room. Call mornings. 206 West Third 
street. 



FOR RENT — NICELY^ FURNISHED 
room; $8. Melrose 2789. 



FOR RENT — WELL FURNISHED 
room, bath In connection. Reason- 
able. 614 East Second street. 



REiNT— STOKES, OFFICES. ETC. 

FOR RENT— LARGE, LIGHT HALL 
suitable for lodges, private clubs, or 
meeting rooms. R. B. Knox & Co. 

710 

FOR RENT — NICE LARGE ROOMY 
and airy store with A-1 basement; 
suitable for grocery, butcher, candy, 
confectionery or other purposes. Call' 
at 29 West First street. A. Borgen. 

FOR RENT— VERY DESIRABLE OF- 
flces, fifteenth floor Alworth build- 
ing; two or more adjoining rooms in 
suits. Apply R. M. Atwater, Jr.. Al- 
worth building. 

FOR RENT — OFFICE SPACE IN Su- 
perior street ground fioor; store 
space fcr show if desired. Address 
O 97. Herald. 



FOR RENT— 2010 WEST SUPERIOR 
Street, $40 per month. Stryker, Man- 
ley & Buck, To rrey building. 721 

FOR RENT— LARGE FRAME BUILD- 
Ing, corner Eighth avenue east and 
First street, easily remodeled for 
laundry plant, garage, light manu- 
facturlng, etc. F. I. Salter company. 

FOR RENT— FINE LIGHT OFFICE I.N 
front of Edison building 214-216 
West First street; newly decorated. 
Rental department, John A. Stephen- 
son & Co., Wolvin building. 720 



FOR RE.NT— THE BEST LOCATION 
for small store, Superior street- low- 
er side between Second and Third 
avenue west; rent reasonable; three- 
year lease. Chas. P. Craig & Co., 601 
to 505 Sellwood building. 713 



FOR RENT — TWO FRONT ROOMS 
over Kelley Hardware company, three 
large windows, $87.50 per month. A 
good location for business. Pulford 
How & Co., 609 Alworth building. ' 

714 



SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 

TANIS SCHOOL OF ENGLISH OFFERS 
the foreigner a thorough training in 
English, and prepares young men and 
women for entrance into other 
schools. Wlnthrop block, corner of 
Fourth avenue west and First street 
John Tanis, principal. 



^OR RENT— FIVE VERY ATTRAC- 
tive rooms, second floor, 501 East 
Fourth street; splendid condition; 
new hardwood floors; modern except 
heat; $20 per month. F. I. Salter 
company. 721 



One Ceat a Word Each Insertion, 
y o^ Ad vertisemc iit^ L^s Tlum 16 Cenu. 

FOR RENT— FLAm 

FOR RENT — THREE, FOUR. FIVE 
and seven-room flats; central W'est 
end; furnished and unfurnished; all 
conveniences. Inquire 2531 West 
Superior street. 



FOR RENT— A VERY NICE FIVE- 
room heated flat in basement of 
Barrington apartments. 115 Eighth 
avenue east water and gas range 
supplied, our Janitor will rent one 
room. Rent $20 per month. Rental 
department, John A. Stephenson & 
Co.. Wolvin building. 710 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROO.M APART- 
ment In th© Barrington apartments, 
115 Eighth avenue east, $40 per 
month, heated, water supplied and 
janitor service. Rental department, 
John A. Stephenson & Co., Wolvin 
building. 710 



FOR RE.NT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT AT 
2102 West Third street; $10 per 
month, water lurnished. D. W. Scott 
& Son, 402 Torrey building. 721 



FOR RENT — BEAUTIFUL SEVEN- 
room apartment in the Adams apart- 
ments. 715 East First street; splendid 
view; water and janitor service sup- 
plied; largo storeroom in basement; 
$53 per month. Rental department, 
John A. Stephenson & Co., Wolvin 
build ing. 714 

FOR RENT— NICE FIVE-ROOM FLAT 
at 5 North Nineteenth avenue east; 
heat and water supplied; $32.50 per 
month. Rental department, John A. 
Stephenson & Co., Wolvin build- 
I'ifif- 714 



FOR RENT— VERY DESIRABLE SIX- 
room corner Jlat, Munger terrace; all 
conveniences; attractive surround- 
ings; no telephone calls. F. I Salter 
c;»mpany. " 7^1 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 109 
East Fifth street; water and gas, 
$14 per month. R. P. Dowse & Co., 
106 Providence building. 721 



FOR RE.NT — FINE SEVEN-ROOM 
apartment; water and janitor service; 
storeroom in basement; beautiful 
view; St. Elmo apartments, 721 East 
First street. Rental department; 
John A. Stephenson & Co., Wolvin 
building. 714 



FOR RENT — FOUR- ROOM HEATED 
flat. No. 1826 West Second street; 
rent reasonable. N. J. Uphana com- 
pany, IS Third avenue west. 714 



For rent— FIVE-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
conveniences but heat; very central. 
Apply N. J. Upham company, 18 Third 
av'enue west. 714 



FOl; RENT— FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
Hat for small lamlly, 307 East Eiglitli 
street. Inquire 814 Third avenue 
eaot. 



FOR RENT— SIX ROOMS WITH CEL- 
lar, 317 Third avenue east; all mod- 
ern except heat rent moderate. Call 
up stairs or call 2030-X Grand. 



FOR RENT— EXTRA FINE FIVE- 
room brick flat, 14 Eighteenth ave- 
nue west; inquire Zenith 1747-Y. S. 
8, Altschul. 129 Second avenue east. 



FOR RENT— TWO. FOUR AND SIX- 
room flats, $5, $8 and $12 per month; 
five rooms lurnished, $18. 702 East 
Seeond street. G rand 1299-D. 

FOR RENT — TWO FIVE ROOM 
modern flats, hot water heat, gas 
range. 2031 West Third street. Fred 
W. EJ-lckson. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM MODERN 
flat. $12 per month; water paid 3137 
Restormel street. 



FOR RENT— A SIX-ROOM FLAT; 
modern except heat; good condition; 
820 East Fifth street, upper flat. 
Cooiey & Underbill. 208 Exchange 
building. 



FOR RENT— MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
flat. Inquire 34 East Fifth west. 
New 'phone Grand 1461. 



FOR RENT- MODERN FOUR-ROOM 
furnished flat. 731 East Fift h street. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROO-M FLAT, UP- 
stairs; all conveniences except heat, 
$25; water paid. 721 East Fourth 
street. Inquire 719 East Fourth 
street, upstairs. 



tOR RENT— .MODERN FIVE- ROOM 
flat; good sized bathroom; $21 per 
month. Call Charles P. Craig fifth 
floor Sellwood bu ilding. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HEATED 
flat; central location, hardwood 
floors and finish, hot and cold water 
janitor service, thoroughly modern! 
Corporate Investment company, Tor- 
rey building. 712 



FOR RENT — NICE SEVEN-ROOM 
flat; water, bath, electric light, hard- 
wood floors. Call P. Mainella, 1101 
West Superior street. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROO.\l FLAT; 
modern; hot and cold water; all 
newly painted; $;iO per month; also 
four rooms furnished for light house- 
keeping, $14 per month; water paid. 
517 First avenue east. 



FOR RENT— 2210 WEST FOURTH 
street, four rooms, $12. W. M 
Prindle & Co.. Lonsdale building. 712 



FOR liENT — SIX-ROOM HEATED 
flat; central location, hardwood 
floors and finish, hot and cold water 
Janitor service; thoroughly modern! 
Corporate Investment company, Tor- 
rey building. 710 



FOR RENT— 513 FIRST AVENUE 
west, desirable fiat on ground floor, 
furnace heat, $30. W. M. Prindle & 
Co.. Lonsdale. 712 



FOR RENT — FLAT NO. 3, 2108 WEST 
Superior street, five rooms, all con- 
veniences, $16 per month. Stryker 
Manley & Buck, Torrey building. 712* 



FOR RENT — FRO.VI JULY 1 COM- 
pletely furnished seven-room flat lo- 
cated on Superior street in vicinity 
of Eighth avenue east. R. P. Dowse 
& Co., 106 Provi dence building. 719 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HEATED 
flat, janitor service and modern. 
Dacey apartments. 1002 East Third 
street. Inquire either 'phone 423. 



FOR RENT — FOUR- ROOM MODERN 
flat; very central. S. S. Williamson, 
515 Torrey building. 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS AND 
bath, hardwood finish, gas and fire- 
place. 420 Sixth avenue east, $28.50 
Five rooms and bath, 706 East Fifth 
$17. E. D. Field company. Exchange 
building. 710 

FOR RENT— AUG. T. DESIRABLE 
six-room hot water heated flat; thor- 
oughly modern, hardwood finish; 
gas range, water and janitor service 
furnished; $37.50 per month; 1829^ 
East Superior street; a bargain In- 
quire above address. 'Phone 3085 
Melrose. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 320 
Sixth avenue east; water, bath gas 
electric ligths. $16 per month. P^ 
P. Dowse & Co., 106 Providence build- 
ing. 



FOR RENT— THREE-ROOM FLAT, 15 
East Superior street; water, gas, 
electricity and steam heat $25, in- 
cluding heat. R P. Dowse. 106 Prov- 
idence building. 714 



FOR RENT — FIVE ROOMS AND 
bath; very central; modern «^xcept 
heat; only $22 per month. Chas. P. 
Craig & Co., 505 Sellwood Bldg. 713 



(Continued on pace 27.) 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Ttian 15 Cents. 

~^r^FFBijIFG^ 

Acres— 80 acres In section 17-52-13, 
tnree acres cleared, hay meadow, 
county road, school house. $12 per 
^"e- hi 

^'^If^T*'^ '^*^' * "^11® south of Munger 
station on Duluth. Mlssabe & Nor- 
inern. A snap at $8 per acre. 714 

Acres— 40 acres in section 14-51-17. 
north of Grand Lake station. Some 
timber. Cheap at $6.50 per acre. 714 

Acres — 40 acres west of five corners 

two miles north of Adolph station! 

$12.50 per acre and very easy terms 

714 

Acres — 40 ^cres west of Proctor, $20 
an acre. 40 acres northwest of 
Proctor, house and clearing, $850. 

714 
J. D. BERGSTROM & CO., 
417 Columbia building, Duluth. 



* FOR SALE. * 

* 20.000 acres in St. Louis county; i^ 

* 30.000 acres in Carlton county; all f^ 
i(- near railroads. Will sell in tracts -^ 
*• of forty acres and up. Price $8 to.'^ 
iS- $10 an acre; very easy terms. Let * 
if- us show you these lands * 

* BOSTON & DULUTH FARM if- 

* LAND CO., ■^- 

* 1603 Alworth Building. * 



* * 

1* FOR SALE. if 

I* * 

lii- 20,000 acres choice lands along the ^ 
\ii- lines of the Alger-Smith and Du- •jt- 
■^ luth & Iron Range railroads, at •Jt 
if- lovf prices and easy terms. * 

! ■* HAZEN & PATTISON. ^ 

I* 1009 Alworth Bldg.. Duluth. a. 

* *■ 
■.c^i^i^ii'9(^)^i6i^i6i6-i6-?i^9iii'i6'9^^ 



FOR SALE — 500 FARMS— IMPROVE I J 
and unimproved, 40 to 4,000-acre 
tracts, midway between Duluth and 
St. Paul. Clover, corn, potato belt. 
From 5 to 40 years at 4 per cent. 
Good soil, markets, roads and schools. 
Also land near Duluth. Come and 
get your choice. No better chance 
anywhere on earth. Minnesota Land 
& Immigration Co., 801 Torrey build- 
ing. 



FOR SALE— $5 A MONTH— YOU CAN 
get a one, two or five-acre piei^e 
fronting on a good road and only 
thirty minutes' walk from car line. 
The tracts are well drained and 
half of them are cleared, ready for 
cultivation. The soil Is a sandy 
loam with clay sub-soil, not stony. 
These tracts being on a good road, 
only three blocks from Snively's 
boulevard leading into Lester Park 
so near the car line and on the low 
terms of $5 down and $5 a month no 
interest, makes them the best acres 
offered near Duluth for gardening 
or poultry farming. Some of the 
tracts are wooded and overlook the 
lake, making them an ideal summer 
outing spot. Call and get further 
particulars. C. Francis Colman 421 
Manhattan building, Duluth Minn 



80 acres, section 11-51-15, 235 cords 
birchwood cut; 800 cords birch 
standing, one-fourth mile from rail- 
road. Price $1,350. 714 

120 acres, section 15-51-15. three-room 
house, barn, good water; five acres 
seeded; 500,000 feet hardwood tim- 
ber. $2,500. easy terms. 714 

240 acres of good farming land along 
county road, only six miles from Al- 
born station. $11 per acre; easy 
terms. 714 

240 acres, nine miles from Lakeside on 
good roads close to school. $10 per 
acre;- 35 years time to pay. 714 

Two 160-acre tracts in 57-18, near 
Iron Junction at very low price. 
For a bargain look these up. 714 

E. A. LINDGREN, 

112 Manhattan building. 



FOR SALE— FOUR TEN- ACRE FARMS, 
$12.50 per acre, $5 cash and $5 per 
month, near Rice Lake; 1,500 acres 
well located, one-quarter mineral, 
$2.50 per acre, very cheap. H. W. 
Coffin, Sellwood Bldg. 



FOR SALE— BEAUTIFUL ISLAND, 
Burntside lake, twenty-two acres, 
with log cottage, furnished. Address 
George D. Bartlett, 912 East Sec- 
ond street, L^uluth. 



FOR SALE— 200-ACRE FARM. MID- 
way Duluth and St. Paul; all im- 
provements. $25 per acre; long time: 
cheap. 801 Torrey building. 719 



FOR SALE — HOMESTEAD RELIN- 
qulshment, 160 acres; 40 acres 
cleared and fenced; balance jackpine; 
on fine lake and good road. Address 
Herald, D 138. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE — FIFTY-ONE 
acres of land in the fruit belt of 
Lower Michigan for house or lot in 
Duluth with good view. Inquire or 
address 119 Mesaba avenue. M. 
Hajden. 

FOR SALE — 40 ACRES FINE FARM- 
ing land, near railroad, good soil; a 
snap; price, $350. Smith Realty, 624 
Manhattan building. 720 

FOR SALE — 40 ACRES IN CARLTON 
county, adjoining Northern Pacific 
railroad; fine soil; for quick sale, 
$500. Smith Realty, 524 Manhattan 
building. 720 

FOR SALE— EXTRA FINE TRACT 
for colonization; 1,020 acres; all fine 
land and heavily timbered; one and 
a half miles of water front; railroad 
right beside it; now retailing at $15 
to $25 per acre; owner going away; 
if taken within next ten days will 
sell for half price and give easy 
terms. Address George T. Cress, 
owner, 615 Lyceum building. 720 



FOR SALE — 320 ACRES OF JJPLEN- 
did black soil farming land at great 
bargain, located in Dakota, wthln 
five miles of a city. Address M 78 
Herald. 

/ATER FRONT TRACTS. 
Extra fine small tracts on St. Louis 
river and Grand lake; only a few 
rods from railroad; terms: $10 down, 
balance in small monthly payments. 
615 Lyceum building. 



FOR SALE — 132-ACRE FAli.Vl NEAR 
Barnum, with crop; fine buildings; 
trade for Duluth property. .Minne- 
sota Land and Immigration company, 
801 Torrey building. 7lO 



TEXAS INVESTMENTS. 

Buy Orchards and Garden Lands at 
Aldlne, near Houston, the greatest 
city in the Southwest, where values are 
growing upward all the time. Address 
E. C. Robertson, 601 Klam bunding, 
Houston. Tex. 



FOR SALE— 500 FARMS, 5 TO 40 
years time at 4 per cent, midway 
Duluth and St. Paul. Minnesota 
Land & Immigration Co., 801 Torrey 
building. 



Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building. 

FOR SALE — U.\NDS In SMALL 
tracts to actual settlers only; good 
location for dairying and truck gar- 
dening. For further intormallon call 
on or address Land Commissioner, 
Duluth & Iron Range Railroad com- 

aany, 101 Wolvin building. Duluth, 
Linn. 

SELECTED FARMING LANDS. 

On line of the Alger-Smith railroad. 

On easy terms to settlera 

ALEXANDER McBEAN. 

Sales manager. 406 Columbia Bldg. 

EBERT. WALKER & McKNIGHT CO.. 
315 Torrey building, buy and sell 
farm and timber lands. See ■■ for 
10-acra tracts. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



i^^a^ii'^wi^ i^ii 




W. M. 



PALESTINE LODGE "nO."* it, 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month, at 
8 o'clock. No meeting until 
further notice. Rene T. Hugo. 
H. Nesbltt. secretary. 



IONIC LODGE NO. 186, A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meetlnga 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each rtionth, at » 
o'clock. No meeting until fur- 
ther notice. W. N. Totman, 
W. M.; Burr Porter, secretary. 





KEYSTONE CHAPTER NO. 
20, R. A. M. — Stated convo- 
cations second and fourtlk 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 8 o'clock. No meet- 
ing until further notice, 

Charles W. Kieswetter. H. P.; Alfred 

Le Ric heux, secretary. 

DULUTH COUNCIL NO sT 
R. & S. M. — Next meeting^ 
Friday, June 16, 1911, at i 
p. m. No meeting until fur- 
ther notice. Jarnes A. Caw- 
ford, T. I. M.; Alfred Le Richeux, re- 
corder. 



DULUTH COMMANDERY NO. 
18. K. T.— Stated conclave first 
Tuesday of each month at ft 
o'clock. Next conclave, Tues- 
day. Aug, 1, 1911. Work- 
General business. Frederick E. Hough» 
E. C. ; Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 







SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR 
meetings every Thursday- 
evening at 8 o'clock. Next 
evening at 8 o'clock. No meet- 
ing until further notice. 
Henry Nesbitt. secretary. 

ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 25.. 

Order of Eastern Star — Reg- 
Lim/*S. ular meetings second and. 

fourth Friday evenings of 

each month at 8 o'clock. 
No meeting until further notice. Eliza- 
beth-Overman, W. M.; Ella F. Gearliart^ 
secretary. 

EUCLID LODGE NO. 198. A. 
P. & A. M. — Meets at West 
L>uluth second and fcui-th 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
June 28, 1911. Work — Second. 

degree. M. M. Meldahl, W. M., A. 

Dunleavy, secretary. 

DULUTH CHAPTER NO. 50i 
R. A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth first and third Wed- 
nesdays of each month at 7:30- 
p. m. No meetings until Sept. 
6, 1911. Roger M. Weaver, H. 
P.; A. Dunleavy, secretary. 

K. uf~I\ ~ 

NORTH STAR LOlKJE. NO. 35, i. of P. 
—.Meets every Tuesday eftnlng dt Cdbtl* 
hall. 118 West Sui>erior street. Stx%. 
.'ueelirig Tuesfiay eveijing. July 11. 8 P. 
^_^ m. sharp. All knifiits cxrillitll} !DTlt«<tC 
A. L. Sturgis. C. t". ; S. A. llpam, K. cf H. & S. 

DIA.MO.ND LCUGE. No 45. K. of f.-^ 
Mci'U evei7 MonUay eytuing in Slcon't 
hail, comer TwciiUeth avenue v»e»t and- 
Superlor street. A.U lualghts conllally In- 
ated. L. B. AUen. C. C; S. U Pierot^ 
K. of K. & S. 

UL'LVTH LODGE. .NO. 28. L O. O. P.— MEETS 
jj::;^ cviry Friday evening at 8 o'cUck at Odd 

Kellowa' hall. 18 Lake avenue no'ta. 

.N'ext meeung night Jul; TUi. Iiist&U- 
ation of ofll'trs. J. A. Nelson. N. G.; L. G. MarloW, 
Kec. Sec; A. H. Paul. Fii.. Seo. 

WEST DULITH IX>UGE. -NO. 168. I. O. O. F. 
Meets every Tuesday night at L O. O. F. 
hall West Duluth. Next meeting Julj.- 
11. Work: First degree. W. £. Cowdeo. 
N G., W. is. Hartley. Rec. Sec. 






UULl'TH ENCAMP.MENT, NO. 33. I. O. 
O. F. — Metto on ;he second ana foinil 
Tliursday* at Odd Fellows hall. 18 U.kt. 
avenue north. Next meeting night July. 
13. InstaUtttlon of officers. E. Ander- 
son. C. P.; L. G. Marlow. Rsc. Scrlb*. 

K. O. T. U. 
DrLCTH TENT NO. 1— MEETS EVEIrt 

.Monday, SIS p. m.. at Maccabee hall. 
21 Lake avenue north. VUltlng ztem- 
bers always wekozue. F. C. Freer 
commander, flat 4. Muuger row. Wctt- 
Duluth; J. B. GuUneau, record keeper. 

office In halL Hours, 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.. diJlj. 

Zenith 'phone. Grand. 610-X. 





A. O. V. W. 
FIDFJ.ITT LODGE. NO. 105 — MEETS 

at Maccabre hall, 21 Lake avenue north, 
every TliursJay at 8 p. m. Vlsltlos- 
memUrs v»'ekome. M. Cossl, M. \V. ; A. 
L. Piering. recorder; O. J. Marvuld. fi- 
nancier. 217 East Fifth street. 

MODEKN SAMAKIT.\NP. 
ALPHA COL.NCIL, NO. 1— TAKE NO- 
(1<« that Samaritan degree and Beae- 
ficient degree won't meet July and 
.August month*. Lucy A. f^l^dy. LadT 
G. S.; N. B. .Morrist.n. G. S. ; WaUacv- 
P. Waitanks. fC'Abr: T. A. (Jail, F. 8.. 
First NaUonal Bank building 

"united OhDEIl OF FOKESTEUS— 
Court Easte:,'! Star. No. 86. meets every 
first and third Tuesday at U. 0. F. 
hall, comer Fourth avenue west and. 
First streeL Charles V. Hans.-n. C. B., 
507 West Fifth street ; A. R. Olund. sec- 
reetaryT 1031 West First street. Harry Milnes, trtaf- 
urer, room 23. Wlnthrop block. Zenith "phone 1080-X. 

M. W. A. 
rWPERIAL CAMP. NO. 2206 — MEETS 
at U. O. F. hall. Fourth atenue west 
and First street, second and fourth 
Tuesdays of each monUi. Uaney W. 
Wihe. consul; C. P. Earl, clerk, box 41X: 
F. E. Doremas. deputy; addrras, N. P. 
freiglit office. 





CLAN STi;WAKT, .NO. 50, O. 8. C— 
Meets first and third Wednesdays each. 
mcnth, 8 p. ra.. at U. O. F. iiall. corner 
Fourth avenue west and First street. Next 
ugular meeting July li'. lluUn Feigu— 

_ son, chief; Den .McLenn.in, secretary; 

John Uuuietl. Fin. Sec. 312 Torrey building. 





KOY.^L AHONCM. Dululh toancU. No. 
14S3 — Meets second and fourth Tuoidty 
evenings, Macc.'ibte hall. 21 Lake avenue 
north. Clintcu Brooke, secrttao-. 401 
Columbia building. 

.Mesaba Council. No. 1493— Meete fl»t- 
and third Wednesday evenings. Colua 
bla haU. West end. A. M. Joauson. secreury, U» 
North Twentletli ave nue we^t. 

OllDEU OF OWLS. DULITTH 
Nest. No. 1200— -Meetings are Ueld 
every first and third Wednesday of 
each month at Owls' hall, 114 
Wtsl Su|»erlor street. Joscp.i E. 
I'eaks, tecreiary. 2i I^st Supe- 
rior street. 




PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

PRIVATE HOSPITAI^— PROSPECTIVE 
mothers will find a pleasant horns 
before and during confinement at 
Ashland Maternity home, 208 Tentli 
avenue west. Ashland. Wis. Infants 
cared for. 

MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 Seventli^ 
avenue east. Zenith li:;^5. 



Mrs. A. Ferguson, graduate midwife;, 
female complaints ^11 Minneapolis- 
avenue. Grand 1S71-Y. 



S. WAROE, GRADUATE MIDWIFS 
and nurse. 215 Twenty-sixth avenu» 
west. Zenitn 'phone. Dincolu 200-D. 

PERSONA!^— Private home for ladies 
before and during confinement; ex- 
pert care; everything confidential; in- 
fants cared for. Ida Pearson, .M. D.^ 
Z84 Harrison avenue, St. Paul, Minn. 

^^ ' ■-■ -■■■■■ m m 

Mrs. A. Ferguson, graduate midwife; 
female complaints. 211 Minneapolis 
avenue. Woodland. Grand 1971- 1'. 

-Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife. Pri- 
vate hospital. 329 N. 58 Av. W. Zen- 
ith 3173; Calumet 173-L. 

WO-M.VN'S HOSPITAL— .M Rs! MARY 
Barren, matron. 931 London road. 
Zenith 'phone, 1597. 



GARDEN TRACTS. 



FOR SALE— EXCELLENT PROPOSI- 
tion at Lakeside. 162 by 140 feet; nas 
eight-room house with water and 
gas; barn and some small fruit; »^ 
barpiin at $4,200, $1,200 cash, balunco 
to suit. More cheap land adjoining. 
N. J. Upiiam Co.. 18 Third avenue- 
west. 711. 



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1ST I 



T HE DULITTH HERALttB 

_=-r^?l=== ^.... .o.. ' " 'H!^-^ RICa] 




VOLUME XXIX— NO. 79. 



MONDAY EVENING, JULY 10, 1911. 



% aiMlai 



- HINT MURDER 

IN DEATHS ON 

HONOEADS 

Sawyer People Are Aroused 

Over Fate of Three 

Settlers. 

'- Blame Coroner for Not In- 
vestigating Them More 
Fully. 

Claim Otto Holt, John Saari 

and John Orni Were 

Slain. 




WALKER BOX 
PLANTBURNS 

Factory Is Entirely Destroyed 

With Loss of Ahout 

$32,000. 

Lumber Yards and Mills Are 

Imperiled By the 

Flames. 



RECIPROCrrY 
ACTIOI[NEAR 

Votes on Amendments Are 

Scheduled in the 

Senate. 

Penrose Predicts Adjourn- 
ment at Least By 
Aug. 5. 



WIRE TRUST'S 
HGHTBEGUN 

Pleas of Not Guilty Are En- 
tered By Thirty De- 
fendants. 

Delay Untfl SepL 1 Granted 
for Filing De- 
murrers. 



RlCAt^fO CENTS. 

THREE PEOffiftflSr" 

LIVES AND STEAMER 
MITCHELL IS^UNK 

Coal Laden Vessel Rammed 



HARRY ^ . ATWOOD, 

Aviator Who Makes a Specialty of 

Beating Railroad Trains. 




Sawyer, Minn., July 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Were Otto Holt, John 
Saari and John Orni murdered, or did 
they meet accidental deaths? 

This question is causing much tallt 
amonsr the residents here in regard 
to ; i'len deaths of three horae- 

8te<».it'- .n this vicinity within a 
short time. 

Holt was found dead near Iverson 
pot'toffice, Saari west of Sawyer depot. 
and (>rni otie and a half miles west of 

Citizens say that the peculiar fea- 
ture about the three deaths lies in the 
maniu'r of the finding of the bodies, 
that iill three were buried "l the ex- 
pense of Carlton county and that the 
coroners verdict of found dead or ac- 
cidental death were based on very lit- 
tle investigation and without a public 
Inquest. ^ 

Found Dead on Track. 
On March 14. 1J>U'. Henry Saari. a 
homesteader, was found dead on the 
Northern Pacific railway track, one 
mile west of Sawyer depot. The coro- 
ner said it was a clear case of acciden- 
tal death, being struck by a passing 
t- ■■■ Eo .^aaris body was taken to 
; and ouried at the expense of 
L .. . .: 11 ^ o-anty. 

T r nigiit before citizens aver Saari 
and .in"ilier man had been drinking 
heaviiv, and the death at least was 
highly suspicious, as Saari was a man 
not likely to commit suicide. 

John Orni his brother, a Finlander 
came and occupied tht- homestead, and 
strange to say. on April 7. just a year 
afterward, he was found by a fisher- 
man in his cabin, dead. The c-orpse 
was found on the floor with a deadl> 
wound and the floor covered with 

The night previous a man had been 
with Orni, staying there ail night, and 
next morning Orni prepared break- 
fast which the two ate, and then the 
visitor went two miles west of Saw- 
yer for his clothing, which he had left 
at another homestead. When this man 
returned h« found Orni dead on the 
cabin floor. -A. few formal nuestions 
were asked and Orni's body was taken 
to Cloqutrt and buried by the county. 
tMto Hult'n Cane. , 

Three weeks ago. Otto Holt s 



HEAT DRIVES 
FLYERSpOWN 

Atwood and Hamilton Halt 
in Flight to Wash- 
ington. 

Overtake and Pass Railway 

Train in Crossing New 

Jersey. 



(Continued on pa ge 9. third column.) 

more1Sn^,ooo 
get work again 

Textile Mills in New England 

Reopen Alter Annual 

Shutdown. 

Boston, July 10.— More than 31,000 op- 
eratives employed in textile mills in 
various parts of New England resumed 
work totlav after shutdowns of varying 
lengths in accordance with the policy of 
curtailing production adopted by the 
mill managements. At Manchester >.. 
H.. IK.OOO operatives returned to their 
machines in the Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing company s mills after a lay-off of 
t«n days. Six thousand hands went 
back to' the mills in Biddeford. Me., aft- 
er two weeks of idleness, and more 
than 7,000 tmploves in mills at Clin- 
ton. Chicopee and "Ware, Mass.. re- 
sumed work. 

GREET TEACHERS 
AT SAN FRANCISCO 

flational Educational Associ- 
ation Welcomed By Gov- 
ernor Johnson. 

San Francisco. Cal., July 10.— In sur- j 
roundings typifying the best of the | 
civilisation and education of ancient 
Greece, the forty-ninth convention of 
the National Educational association 
opeiul this afternoon in the Greek 
theater of the Unlverlsty of California 
ttt Berkeley. The educators were wel- 
comed to California by Governor Hiram 
W. Johnson. Mayor P. H. McCarthy of 
San Francisco, C. C. Moore, president 
of the Panama-I'aclfic exposition, and 
Prof Benjamin Ide Wheeler of the 
University of California. Response 
was made on behalf of delegates by 
Kobert J. Aley. president of the Lni- 
verslty of Maine. . , .. x^,. 

After an address by President Ella 
Flagg Young of the association, out- 
lining the work of the convention, the 
state d<.legations met to select mem- 
bers of thi nominating committee and 
a committee on resolutions was ap- 

^'''The' treasurer's report aijd.J*'^ J^: 
port of the representatives of tjie board 
of trustees received <i"r'n8 the da> 
show that the association Is^ faring 
well financially. The trustees report 
■hows $180,000 in the associations 
m'rmanetit fund, and the treasurers 
repcTri shows $9,000 added to this fund 
In the course of the year. The asso- 
ciation's receipts are Plven as ,48.909 
and its expenditures as $.J4,9<s. 

The trustees' report on the perma- 
nent ff.nd«i*cs not carry the ^ii^nature 
of Mrs. Klla Flagg Young, ex-officio 
mtmber of the board. Mrs^^oung has 
criticized the method of managing the 
fund several times since she took oi- 
flce. 



Baltimore. Md., July 10— Forced by 
the intense heat, with its accompani- 
ment of extreme y high humidity, to 
discontinue, temi.orarily at least, the 
tllght by aeroplane to Washington. 
Harry X. Atwood and Charles K. Ham- 
ilton, who left Atlantic City at 5:04 a. 
m. today in the latter's bl-plane. de- 
scended shortly after 9 o'clock near 
Stemmers Run station, eight miles east 
of this city. They have approximately 
traveled 148 mibs with but one stop, 
at Farnhurst. D. 1.. for gasoline. This 
distance was thirteen miles greatgr 
than Atwood ca -ried his mechanician 
in the flight from Boston to New 
London, Conn. .... ■ 

The airmen were in excellent spir- 
its when they appeared at a hotel 
here Atwood has announced tlieir in- 
tention of resuiaing their flight later 
in the day if t le weather conditions 
permit, with the expectation of reacn- 
!ng Washington in time for dinner this 
evealng. 

♦ 

Hamilton With Illm. 
Atlantic City. N. J., July 10.— Harry 
Atwood and Charley Hamilton chanced 
the elements tl is morning and suc- 
ceeded in making a good get-awav at 
4:50 o'clock on their flight to \\ aili- 
ington. When they sailed out of sitjht 
they were making great speed, hain- 
pered by nothing more than a gen He 
westerly breez. . The weather was 
clear and ideal for the air journey. 
Bi-th men declared they would reach 
Baltimore by H o'clock unless some- 
thing untoward occurred. 

■\ve will be a least a hundred miles 
from here by ' o clock," conftdentlv 
shouted Atwood as the machine lifted 
from the groun I after a perfect get- 

The pair worked hard all yesterday 
afternoon getti ig the Hamilton bi- 
plane in shape for its trip. Farts of 
the machine in Mfhich Atwood made his 
night from Nev/ York were removed 
from the wreck id bi-plane and taken 
to Ventnor. neir here, shortly after 
the men liad their narrow escape in 
the seventy-five foot plunge to earth 

(Continued on page 9. third column.) 

workIecretly 
on morocco case 



Walker. Minn.. July 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Walker box factory 
was destroyed by fire early this morn- 
ing, entailing a loss of $32,000. cov- 
ered by insurance to the amount of 
about $17,000. Edward I. B. Staede of 
Minneapolis Is president of the corpor- 
ation, and John Meagher and B. F. 
Nelson, also of the Twin Cities, the 
principal stockholders. The factory 
was located in the heart of the milling 
district, and the Bemidji department 
was called by telegraph to come and 
help save the mill and lumber yards, 
but the local Are department got the 
fire under control before the Bemidji 
firemen arrived. With the exception of 
one small pile, everything belonging 
to the Leech Lake Lumber company 

The origin of the fire is not known. 
The factorv was shut down, at the 
time and there has been no fire in its 
boilers for several weeks. . , , ^ 

Over two carloads of finished boxes 
as well as all the machinery were 
consumed In the fire. The destruction 
of the factory will throw half a hun- 
dred men out of employment. 

RUSSIUAUNCHES 
NEW BAHLESHIP 

Is Second of Four Dread- 
noughts Laid Down Two 
Years Ago. 



Washington. July 10.— Voting on the 
Cummins and Simmons amendments to 
the Canadian reciprocity bill was ex- 
pected to feature today's session of the 
senate, under an agreement for a vote 
on these provisions on the "executive 

day" of Monday. , ^ ,. 

Senator Simmons of North Carolina 
arranged to make a two or three hours 
speech in support of his amendments 
and those of Senator Cummins who 
also will make a few remarks before 
tlie voting begins. The amendments 
probably will be defeated and open the 
way for further reciprocity discussion 
and parliamentary maneuvering in the 
struggle over the bill. 

The house was not In session today. 

Adjourn Ry Aag. 5. 
"Nothing but speeches stand in the 
way of the complete f»uccees of the 
Canadian reciprocity bill, and we are 
working these off as fast as possible." 
said Chairman Penrose of the senate 
finance committee today. 

••We shall not be here so much 
longer. Gradually, and more rapidly 
than most people appreciate, we are 
putting the speeches behind us and I 
am sticking to a prediction made long 
since that we shall adjourn either Sat- 
urady. July 29, or Saturday. Aug. 5, 
bv which time we shall have voted up- 
on and passed the reciprocity bill and 
voted upon the free list and wool 
bills." 



St. Petersburg. July 10.— The Poltava, 
the second of the four battleships of 
the dreadnought type laid down in 
June 1909, was launched at the admir- 
alty dock yard today, the anniversary 
of the Battle of Poltava. The vessel 
Is of 23,000 tons and in dimensions and 
armnnent is the same as the .'Sevasto- 
pol, which was launched on June -'9. 
She will carry twelve 12-inch guns six- 
teen 4.7 inch guns and smaller artillery. 

RIBBER^OE PLANTS 

SOON TO BE CLOSED. 

Maiden Mass., July 10. — Announce- 
ment is made by the officials of the 
Boston Rubber Shoe company's factor- 
ies at Edgeworth and Fells that the 
plant will be shut down for a month, 
beginning July 15, on account of a 
shortage of orders. In previous years 
the lay-off has been of two weeks dur- 
ation. More than three thousand hands 
will be idle^ 

IS NOMINATED VoR 

immk;k.\tion post. 



GERMAN FLYER 
REACHES BERLIN 

Carries Passenger in Aviation 

Race Over the 

Circuit 

Berlin. July 10.— Buechner, with his 
passenger, arrived at Johannlsthal to- 
day, being the first of the aviators to 
complete the German circuit race. He 
wins the third prize, as Koenig and 
Volmufcller have greater totals of mile- 
age completed. ^ , ,. «„, 

These three, with Laiisch, left Hal- 
berstadt at 3 o'clock this morning 
Buechner reaching here three hours 
and six minutes later. All made the 
prescribed stop at Dessau, but the 
others descended before reaching Ber- 
lin and will continue here this evening. 
The last stage was 127 miles, to which 
25 per cent mileage Is added In the case 
of all three as a bonus for carrying a 
I passenger. 



New York, July 10.— The eighty- 
three wire manufacturers indicted 
June 29, under the anti-trust law, on 
charges of restraining trade in wire 
products, began their fight against the 
government today by entering pleas of 
not guilty and securing a delay until 
Sept. 1 to enable them to file demur- 
rers. Each man's ball was fixed at 
$1,000. 

Only thirty of those Indicted made 
appearances In the United States cir- 
cuit court today, but District Attorney 
Wise said he had received assurances 
that the attitude of all would be 
practically uniform and that the rest 
would file formal pleas In a day or two 
and be included under the action of 

that taken today. .♦^,i^^ t p 

Neither Herbert L. Satterlee, J. P. 

Morgan's 8«n-'n-lf^'„"^J:*£rfee en- 
Gould was present. Mr. batteriee en 
tered a plea through his attorney, but 
Mr. Gould was not represented. 

The district attorney said he hoped 
the cases could go to trial before the 
end of the year. . 

Separate trials were asked for in the 
pase of Henry A. Hammond and Frank 
M Potter Jr. indicted as members of 
•the Fine Magn etic Wire association. 

CLAIMSHERUNS 
STEEL CORPORATION 

Southerner Introduces Him- 
self at Offices in New 




While Off Vermifion 
Point 



Collides With William E 



Mack, Which Also 
Goes Down. 



Feared Mitchell Will Prove 

to Be a Total 

Loss. 



York City. 



ETHEL BARRYMORE. 

New York, July 10.— Rumors that 
Ethel Barrymore and her young hus- 
band, Russell Colt, were not entirely 
happy are now followed by the report 
that Miss Barrymore has signed the 
papers In a suit for a divorce. Under 
the laws of New York a divorce can be 
had on only one ground and the re- 
port has it that Mrs. Colt is naming a 
well-known society woman in her ap- 
plication. Mrs. Colt has been married 
only two years and has one baby. 



Washington, July 10.— President Taft 
today sent to the senate the nomina- 
tion of Samuel W. Backus to be com- 
missioner of Immigration at San Fran- 
cisco, succeeding Hart H. North, re- 
signed. 



PRESIDENT'S PARTY 

BACK L\ WASHINGTON. 

Washington, July 10.— President 
Taft and his senatorial yachting party 
returned to Wa.shington this morning 
after a two days' cruise down the coast 
and up the Chesapeake bay and Po- 
tomac "^ river. After the Mayflower 
docked the president went to the 
White House for breakfast. Halt an 
hour later he was at work in the ex- 
ecutive offices. 



New York, July 10 —Business in the 
executive offices of the Steel corpora- 
tion was moving along In its ac- 
customed complacency today when a 
man giving his name as C E. ^Iper of 
Atlanta Ga.. walked briskly into 
Chairman Gary's room and announced 
that he was now in charge of the cor- 
porations affairs. He fo lowed his 
declaration by calling a meeting of the 
board of directors. 

When the executive force overcame 
Ub Rurnrlse Piper was escorted from 
he the'^building^and taken to Bellevue 
hospital for examination It is sup- 
pose he was affected b y the heat. 

kickedITstomach. 

Young North Dakotan Succumbs to 
Horse's Blow. 

Lankln, N. D.. July 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Frank Kratchovill. 18 
vears of age, was kicked by a horse 
knd killed at his father's home near 
here, while engaged about the barn, 
doing the chores. The kick was re- 
ceiv'fd in the pit of the stomach and 
Kratchovill survived it only twenty- 
four hours, being m intense agony 
during a greater part of the time. 



NEW ALASKAN 
CASEJSAIRED 

Land Commissioner Dennett 

Asked About Controller 

Bay Affair. 

Taft's Action Said to Favor 

Guggenheims Probed By 

Congressmen. 



»»»»»»! 



|ti|t**i 



^ »»»») Ki (* » »»«** * *»»»t »^ * * * *** ***^ *» ** * ^* **'^^^^ 



TRIMMING OFF THE CURLS. 



W^M. * . M**** . M * M , Mrt ff t *. f »» >* jn i^ ^M^>..ff^ 



Exchanges Are Said to Be 

Entirely on Friendly 

tooting. 

Berlin, July 10 —Preliminary nego- 
tiations regard ng Morocco are being 
conducted confilentially. but nothing is 
made public ofiicially beyond the joint 
statement that the exchanges are on a 
friendly footing, and that it is expected 
they will be prolonged, and are wrought 
with sensational developments. For 
the first stage at least, the negotia- 
tions are confined to Germany and 
France, thougii the other interested 
powers are ke pt informed. 

PARTNERTNAMES 
MUST BE FILED 

New State Law Will Go 

Into Effect on 

.bly 15. 

St. Paul. Minn., July 10.— (Special to 
The Herald,)- In order to have legal 
standing in thi state courts after July 
15, each firm, co-partnership and cor- 
poration must file with the clerk of 
the district ourt of every county in 
which it does msiness the names of all 
"silent" and active" partners. 

The attention of business men ail 
over the state has been called to Chap- 
ter 271. house file No.- 3<5, laws of 1911. 
which provides for this. The act was 
approved April 1» and will go into ef- 
fect July li. 




^ 'Vi'aKblDKton, July 10. — Secretary ^ 

Sot the Interior Fluher today told * 
Freiiident Taft that a careful IJt 
^ Hcarch of Interior department rec- ^^ 
^ ord» fatted to i»how the "Dock to * 
^ Dick" letter lu which It wa« al- * 

* leged that C. P. Taft uned bin In- * 
« llnence In behalf of navigation ^ 

* intereMtM in Alaitka to Mecure con- ^ 
Iff trol of Controller bay. Secretary •#• 
^ Fisher also told the i»re«ldent ^ 
¥te that he saw the article written by ^ 

fMIss Abbott before It was printed * 
and remembered no such letter In * 
41: the article. ^ 

Washington. July 10. — Commissioner 
Fred S. Dennett of the general land 
office and Miss M. Abbott, a writer, 
both subpoenaed as witnesses, were 
present today when the house commit- 
tee on expenditures in the interior 
department began an inquiry into 
charges of an alleged "grab" of valu- 
able waterfront lands on Controller 
bay, Alaska, by the Guggenheim Inter- 
ests. 

Published charges have been made 
that Richard S. Ryan of New York, 
claimed to be a secret agent of the 
Guggenheim syndicate, wrote a letter 
to Former Secretary of the Interior 
Baliinger declaring that he, Ryan, had 
asked Charles P. Taft to speak to his 
brother, President Taft, about the Con- 
troller bay claims, and that following 
this the president "made no further 
objection to my claim." 

The land is said to have been wanted 
as a term'nus for railroads from the 
Guggenheim mine properties. 
Dennett on Stand. 

Commlscioner Dennett was sum- 
moned to tell what he knew of an 
order bv the president throwing the 
land open to entry. Miss Abbott 
claimed to have made a copy of the 
alleged letter from Ryan to Baliinger. 

Immediately following his return to 
Washington today, President Taft set 
his office force to work to investigate 
the Controller bay affair. All four of 



S'ault. Ste. Marie, Mich,. July 10.— • 
(Special to The Herald.) — Three per- 
sons perished and thirty-one. Includ- 
ing six women and a little boy, ex- 
perienced a thrilling midnight rescue 
when the steamer John Mitchell of 
Chicago was sunk early today in col- 
lision with the steamer William H. 
Mack of Cleveland, off Vermilion 
Point, Lake Superior, about sixty 
miles northwest of Sault Ste. Marie. 
The dead: _ 

ARCHIE CAUSELY of Detroit, sec- 
ond mate of the Mitchell. 

Al. CLEMANS. steward, Rochester, 

Ind. 

GEORGE AUSTIN. watchman of 
Cleveland. . , ^ 

The two vessels crashed together 
In a fog. Both were of steel structure 
and about 400 feet long. 

Several of the crew and passenger* 
of the Mitchell were taken on board 
the Mack, more or less severely in- 
jured. „ . ^ . 

Mrs. Al. Clemans of Rochester. Ind., 
wife of the Mitchell's steward, sus- 
tained a broken leg. 

Mack Not All Covered. 

The Mack is lying just above the 
point, her bow stove in below the anch- 
ors, the upper part forming a porch 
over the water. There Is no trace of 
the Mitchell, and it is feared she Is a 
total loss. She was bound up, loaded 
with hard coal for Superior. Wis., ana 
carried a crew of about twenty. 

The steamer Matoa reports passing 
through wreckage consisting of win- 
dow screens, life rafts and life preserv- 
ers, strongly indicating a total loss ok 
the Mitchell. 

The Mack was captained by Capt. O. 
K. Burnham. John Massey l« master of 

tne John Mitchell. 

^^— 

Laden \%'ith Coal. 

Chicago. July 10. — The John Mitchell 
was coal laden from Buffalo. She wa« 
420 feet long and had a gross tonnage 
of 4,468. The William H. Mack is 
354 feet long and her gross tonnage 
8,781. 

PLANK ON TRACK 
DERAILS TRAIN 



'^-^-^^ 



(Continued on pa ge 9. third column.) 

TWO MISSING 
FROM SANTA ROSA 

Steamship Officials Claim 

These Will Be Fomid 

to Be Safe. 

San Francisco, Cal., July 10.— All but 
two passengers are accounted for out 
of over 200 on the steamer Santa Rosa, 
which broke up at Point Arguello Fri- 
day night, according to announcement 
here by representatives of the Pacific 
Coast Steamship company, which 
owned the boat. The missing are: 

C. H. STARK. Oakland, for Los 

' MRS. S. PAYNE. San Francisco, for 

^*Company officials say they believe 
these persons will report within a day 
or 80. 



Bloodhounds Are Used in 

Effort to Trail 

Wreckers. 

St. Louis, Mo.,- July 10— Train No. 91 
of the Illinois Traction system, which 
left here last night at 11:45 o'clock for 
Springfield, 111., was partly derailed 
at Hamel, 111- early today. The motor 
and day coach, which is used as bal- 
last, were thrown on their sides, but 
the sleeper remained upright. Only 
one person, the motorman, was hurti, 
according to reports. ,^ .^ * 

Offlcla^of the road later said that 
a plank placed across the tracks 
caused the derailment. Bloodhounds 
from Springfield. 111., were taken to 
Hamel. The dogs took up a trail ana 
followed it off into the country. 

cornInd 
wheat low 

Government Crop Report 

Says Condition Is Below 

the Average. 

Also Shows Loss Since Fig- 

ures for June 1 Were 

Given OuL 



Washington. July 10. — The July croi> 

report of the United States department 

of agriculture crop reporting boards 

Issued at 2:15 p. ra. today, shows the 

condition on July 1 and the yield per 

acre, as Indicated by the condition on 

that date, of the principal farm cropa 

and the acreage of those not already 

announced, as follows: 

Corn— Condition, 80.1 per cent of 
normal, compared with 85.4 per cent 
in 1910 and 84.7 per cent, the average 
for the last ten years on that date; 
Indicated yield per acre. 25.5 bushels. 
compared with 27.4 bushels, the 1910 
final yield, and 27.1 bushels, the aver- 
age for the last five years; s^r*:* 
pfanted to corn this year. 115.939.000 
acres, compared with 114.002.000 acre» 

"winter ^lieat— Condition, 76.8 per- 
cent of normal, compare<i with 80.4 
per cent on June 1. 1911. 81.5 per cent 



In 1910. and 81.4 per cent, the ten-year 

age: Indicated yield per acre. 14.6^ 

buRhefs. compared with 15.8 bushels in 



averai 



1 



(Continued on page 15, 7th column.) 



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DEFECTIVE PAGE 





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Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 10, 1911. 



RAILROAD 
COALTAXED 

Assessor Fmds $300,000 Item 

to Add to the 

Books. 



Recent Decision Holds It Is 

Not Exempt Under Gross 

Earnings Law. 



Board of trade memberships are not 
tinUiue In being put on the tax rolls 
for the f.rat llttie in Duluth. What has 
been known as "railroail coal" was also 
put ' ; h had never 

been ■ .:. i-.c i...6i. .idding |30o,000 

to r,i',i' c->tul. 

This valuation was not Included in 
the tlsurt's recently announced at the 
office iti t'lty Assessor J. AUyn Scott, 
per. Hrt; imther consideration of tne 
li ' :th.>ut the revisions whicli 

li, uade bv the city board of 

«<iualiz.ia..ti. which closed Its hearings 
this inorninj?. this will make the total 




NOBBY 
STRAWS 

with summer coolness 
in every shape; natty 
styles — the latest, of 
course. 

— Straws are only good one 

smr.nier. 

— Broad brims, high crowns, 

soft Straus, panamas. 

— OK! names I'Ut new shapes — 

Sennets $1.50, S2 and $2.50 
Panamas $5— Bangkok's $5 
Milan Straws S2, $2.50, $3 
Spilt Straws $1.50, $2, $2.50 
and $3 



gain in the personal property assess- 
ment, for purposes^ of taxation, oyer 
»2.396.000. These t gurea are allowing 
for exemptions. which, if Included, 
would make the ji ggregate gain ap- 
proximately $3,000,000. Exemptions 
are estimated at $615,000. 

The railroads ha 'e agreements with 
the different coal companies to supply 
them with coal tha year around, the 
under-standln^s hoisig In the nature of 
contracts Horetof.>re, when the per- 
sonal property ass.^ssraenls have been 
made, tho coal con panies would state 
that such and such a railroad used so 
manv thousands to is of coal last year- 
and "that about the same amount would 
likely be used thit year. These esti- 
mates have been deducted from tie 
total stocks on tli s docks, under the 
theory that it could not be taxed as 
the railroads paid j^ross earnings taxes 
In lieu of all otht r taxes. 

Under a compat atively recent Wis- 
consin supreme co irt decision it was 
held that this coaJ was not the prop- 
erty of the railroals and was not ex- 
empt under the groic earnings law. but 
that it was the p operty of the coal 
company. The coal Is said to be owned 
bv the companies i.nd paid for by tne 
railroads accordin i to the amounts 
they use. It appears that the roads 
have had a lower price because of the 
quantity and the kind of coal used, but 
that they have n* ver put their own 
coal on the local dicks. 

The present as lessment has been 
characterised by Mayor Cullum as the 
best and most Just which has ever been 
made in Duluth. "hat it was not en- 
tirely dis.satisfactoi y to the large part 
of the public Is shown by the compara- 
tively small numUer of complaints 
which have been n ade to the board of 
eaualization, consisting of the mayor, 
the comptroller an. the assessor, borne 
adjustments will h. made by the board. 
In these cases the i roperty owners will 
be informed by carl. Where no change 
Is made no card w 11 be sent, the non- 
receipt of which Mill indicate that no 
action was taken >n the co mplaint. 

SAYS SK hid" 
BEHIND SKIRTS 



Prosecutor Makes Scathing 
Denunciation of the 



DRUGGISTS' 
CONVENTION 

Annual Meeting of State 
Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion This Week. 



Program of Business and 

Pleasure Extends Over 

Four Days. 



Delegates to the twenty-seventh an- 
nual meeting of tlie Minnesota State 
Pnarmaceutlcal association began com- 
ing in this afternoon. It is expected 
that nearly 300 will be on hand when 
the first business meeting of the con- 
vention is called tomorrow morning 
in the assembly room of the Duluth 
Commercial club. 

The "Olad-U-Kun." club, composed 
of 125 local men, will meet Incoming 
trains thi.s evening and extend the gla<l 
hand to the delegates as they arrive. 
A large crowd is expected on one of 
the early evening trains and the en- 
tire club will journey to Superior and 
make the trip acro.ss the Interstate 
bridge with the visitors. 

The meetings will begin tomorrow 
and will continue up to and including 
•July 14 The meeting tomorrow morn- 
ing will be called to order at 9 o'clock 
by President J. P. Jelinok. An ad- 
dress of welcome will be made by 
Mavor Cullum and a response will be 
given by Charles H. Huhn. The dele- 
gates will then get down to business 
and both the morning and afternoon 
meetings will be devoted to the read- 
ing of reports, communications 




"PropheL" 



Chicago, July 10. —Evelyn Arthur See 
wag accused of Mdlng behind the 
skirts of women w len argument on the 
evidence was l>egun in Judge Honore's 
court. Assistant States Attorney 
Burnham pointed uut that four women 
had been called to the wUnes.<( stand, 
and that two of them had admitted 
the writing of what the prosecution 
considers the mos damaging portions 
of the "Book of Truth." He declared 
that the testimony had been of a na- 
ture which probaf)ly would not be 
heard again In m iny years. 

Attorney Cantwell. of the defense, 
made the usual -notion to take the 
case from the Jv ry, and was over- 
ruled. Burnham's arraignment of the 
defendant as a h /procrlte and profll 
gate, veiling his misdeeds with 
cloak of religion, was scathing. 



LOOKING FOR 
CHILDREN 

Qoquet Man Says Wife Took 
Them Away After Quar- 
rel With Him. 



Says He Is "Done With Wife" 

Following Finding of 

Letter. 



Here Is a Picture That Should Interest Summer Visitors to Duluth. These 
Two Young Men, William E. Zuck and Harvey Lueck, Caught the Trout 
Shown in the Picture Within the City Limits, in Less Than an Hour, 

LOOKING FOR KEEP UP HUNT 
SPARE ROOMS FOR LEHERS 



Declaring that he is "done" with his 
wife for all time, but that he loves his 
children and wants to care for them. 
John B. DauviUe came to Duluth from 
Clo<^uet this morning in search of his 
family. 

Following a quarrel between them 
over an alleged "afflnlty," to whom 



Mrs. Dauville is said to liave given » 
considerable sum of her husband's 
money, she took their three children 
last evening and l.s thought to have 
come to this city. Dauville followed on 
the next train going through the town. 

According to the husband's state- 
ment to tiie police he found a letter 
which informed him of his wife's affair 
with the other man. Yesterday he told 
her of his knowledge, and he believes 
that she became frightened and 
thought that he might liarm her. He 
said that she asked him to forgive her 
and take her back, but that he refused 
Jlatly to do so, this being the second 
offense of the same nature, he claims. 

'I've always kept my family well." 
he said at headquarters this morning 
in speaking of the case. "Aly wife la 
an unusually good looking woman and 
I hcve always provided her with good 
clotties. She is exceptionally well 
gowned and has the hats and the jew- 
elry to accompany them. And tlie chil- 
dren have always had all they needed. 
I will not live with her any longer, 
but I want to bring up the children 
properly. I am willing to see that 
Mrs Dauville does not want for any- 
thing, and desire the children to be 
well cared for and get a good educa- 
tion" , , ^ ^, 

Dauville Is a cruiser and timber estl- 
mater, and according to what he says, 
earns large wages the year around. 
He is a typical woodsman, rather 
roughly clad. 

Dauville made a round of a number 
of the downtown hotels and rooming 
houses this morning. He found one 
place at which a woman and three 
children answering the description of 
those he sought iiad sought lodgin 
but the proprietor had no rooms 
He did not know where they had gone 
' from there. 






I 



4 


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i 


1 
















i 
i.- 


1 


« 







injr. 

left. --- 



r 



the 



THE COOLEST SOFT CUFF 
SHIRTS ARE 
HERE FOR.... 



$1.50 



— These in the coolest colors, 
too — pure white, cream and tuii. 
Coat styles, with patch pockets 
and turn back cuffs — $1.30. 
— Wear a linen collar with them 
now, if you wish, or one of 
tlusc soft collars — 15c, 2 for 25c. 

— And Underwear — better buy a 



stilt 



if Porus Knit tomorrow. 



You'll find it particularly coul, 
w:t!i it< "poro.^" yveave that lets 
t'.\'j ii "ly breathe. 
— All sizes, in both two-piece 
and union suits — 50c and $1.00. 
—Pure Silk Socks— Wonderful 
values are here. Silk from top 
to toe. in blue, tan, gray and 
black— 50c pair; 4 pairs, $2. 
Guaraiitcod to wear 3 months. 



PAYING TELLER 
UNDER ARREST 

L A. Kerrigan of Pittsburg 

Accused of Taking 

Funds. 

Pittsburg. Pa., July 10.— L.. A. Kerri- 
gan, paying teller of the Exchange Na- 
tional bank, was arrested today by the 
federal authoritie.- charged with mis- 
appropriating more than $5,000 of the 
bank's funds. Kerrigan had charge of 
the checks that ca ne from the clearing 
house, and it is all !ged that by manipu- 
lation he would cause the bookkeeper 
to make two entrit s of the same checks 
and thus cover up the alleged discrep- 
ancies. 




Commercial Club Preparing 

to Care for Carnival 

Crowi 




Superior St. «t Second Ave. W. 



SIXTEEN NONRESIDENTS 
LICENSED TO FISH HERE. 

Sixteen non-resident fishing licenses 
have been issued i p to the pre.^ent time 
from the county ; udltors office. 

It Is thought that many more have 
been granted, as game wardens have 
the right to issut them and have un- 
doubte.lly been ct lied on for thent. 
Sixteen are all tl at are on the audi- 
tor's books. 

Non-resident licenses cost $1. 

Usually there are a great number 
who come to M nnesota from other 
states to fish, b it according to the 
record this has not been the case this 
year. 

The north shore streams have In 
other years been very popular with 
Eastern ftshermet.. Many have come 
from as far Kast as New York for an 
outing In the wonds of Minnesota. 

TAFT WILL DIRECT 

STORM RELIEF WORK. 



J. p. JELINEK 
Of St. Paul. President of the Society. 



Wa.shlngton, Ju y 10. — President Taft 
today promised Representative Clayton 
of Alabama, and Adamson of Georgia 
to direct the .serving of twenty day ra- 
tions to the suif. rers from the severe 
storm of July 4 in Lee county, Alabama 
'and Harris countj, Ga. 




Herrick Refrigerators 

the only high grade refrigerators on the iiarket today. 
Our prices are so low you can't afford to 1 uy elsewhere. 
Time given if desired. Below are some exceptional bar- 
gains should you take advantage of, as they .'re sold at act- 
ual cost. 

No. A— «.'V-»h. Ire capacltyt 
rrgularly f Iti 50; itperiMl — 




?fo. 30 — W 
Ice rapaelty 

iipefia!— 



itf lined, ti5-ll>. 
regalarir M'-iS; 



tile reading of papers. 

In the evening there will be a re- 
ception at the Commercial club. A 
vaudeville program will also be given 
during the evening under the auspices 
of the Commercial club. 

Wednesdav will be occupied with 
business sessions and an automobile 
ride about the city. In the evening 
the members of the association will 
dance in the ballroom of the Spalding 
hotel. 

The session to be held Thursday 
morning will be devoted to the elec- 
tion of officers for the coming year 
and unfinished business. 

While the men are finishing up their 
business Thursday mornln? the women 
will be taken on a sight-seeing trip 
over the city which will end at the 
cafe of the Duluth Boat club, where 
a luncheon will be given for them. 

Thursday afternoon the members and , 
their wives will leave for a trip up 
the river and around the harbor on the 
steamer Columbia. 

On Friday the delegates and their 
wives win leave bv special train for 
Hibbing. Wiiere they will visit the 
HuH-Uust mine. The train will ar- 
rive In Duluth in time for those who 
wish to leave the city, to catch the 
evening trains. 

The local entertainment committee 
consists of A. C. Le Rlcheux. chairman: 
E. M. Tredway, W. A. Al)bett and Max 
Wlrth. It has been the intention of 
the committee to have something doing 
for the vi.sitors every minute of their 
stay in the citv. The same association 
met in Duluth some years ago and the 
meeting was such a success that they 
eagerly accepted the invitation of the 
local men when It was tendered at the 
White Bear convention last summer, 

laboTday 
road race 



Amateur Atbletes May Com- 
pete in Long Distance 
Run. 



Many Rooms Will Likely Be 

Needed to Accommodate 

Visitors. 



The bureau of Information of the Du- 
luth Commercial club is on a hunt for 
rooms for carnival visitors, and is 
meeting with Indifferent success. IC 
Duluth Is to take care of its vlsitor.s, 
Duluth homes must be thrown open to 
receive the city's guests, the members 
yf the carnival committees say, and 
people with spare rooms are not re- 
sponding as well as It was thought 
they would. 

The Commercial club, having made 
several Indirect appeals to people to 
list spare rooms, is making a direct 
aiipeal. A man i.x working outside, call- 
ing on people advertising rooms for 
rent, and making arrangements for the 
accommodation of transients here for 
the carnival. 

He finds that many visitors are al- 
readv coming into the city and picking 
up spare rooms l»y their own efforts. 
Many rooms which were listed with the 
Commercial club bureau are now occu- 
pied by people who will remain in tho 
city until alter tne carnival. 

The crowd that will come to Duluth 
for the carnival Is a doubtful quantity. 
From the amount of talk that Is heard 
by Duluthlans traveling through the 
Northwest. It Is certain that Duluth 
will be called upon to entertain thou- 
sand.s of visitors. The Commercial 
club wants to be prepared for every 
emergency, bo that the crowd will be 
cared for. regardless of size. 

Th different hotels will care for a 
great number and the Commercial club 
Is anxious that as many rooms as pos- 
sible may •be obtained In private 
homes. If the necessity arises, cots 
will be placed in the Armory, the Audi- 
torium and other places where many 
can be accommodated. 

The number of summer visitors in 
Duluth this year Is greater than ever 
before. Duluth has been the one cool 
place on the map and the heat through 
the Middle West has been Intense. 
Many rooms have been taken by people 
who are here foe July and August, so 
that the number. which would ordinar- 
ily be available tor the carnival crowd 
Is cut down. 



Authorities .4re Trying to 

Get at Stokes' 

Epistles. 

Nine or More Said to Have 

Been Taken From 

Collection. 



ed 



CHILD DIES WITH 
PLEA FOR MATE 



Holiday 



HERRICK 

REFRIGERATORS 

WATERLOO, IOWA 



$18.73 

>o. 22 — !)."»- lb. Of* oapacttyi 
regularly f2:i Np«c*lal— 

$18.TS 

Xo. 41 — White llneil, O-'r-lb. 
Ipv capacity resulariy $28 
Vfclue; .sfieola — 

1.8S 



QUAYLE-LARSEN CO. 

14 and 16 West Superior Street. 



Indoor Baseball League for 
Sunday Schools Being Or- 
ganized at Y. M. C. A. 



Physical Instructor Wegener of the 
Duluth Y. M C. A. is thinking seriously 
at the present time of getting up a 
big amateur road race for Labor day. 

The road race for amateurs has not 
been tried here for a very long time, 
and Mr. Wegener believes It would be 
.succes.sful and would aldo go far in 
sitimuhxting interest In. outdoor run- 
ning, one of the most healthful of all 
forms of exercise. 

Hi.s Idea Is to have the race from 
Fairmont park down Into the central 
p.irt of the city. Mr. Wegener believes 
there are a number of young athletes 
in the city who would ))e very much 
Interested In the race, and requests all 
those Interested in getting the race up. 
to .send In their names, either to the 
Y. M. C. A. physical department, or 
the Duluth Herald siHJrtIng depart- 
ment. 

A Sunday school indoor baseball 
league will be organized in the near 
futur?. Three games a week will be 
plaved in the big Y. M. C. A. gym- 
n.islum. In addition to the baseball 
games the boys will have the privi- 
leges of the swimming tank, so that for 
three evenings during each week of 
tile summer the Sunday school ba.so- 
ball players are assured of a most en- 
joyable time. 

jVU boys Interested In this are re- 
quested to send their names to the Y. 
M C. A. physical department. 



Wounded Boy Says "Art 

Didn t Do It on 

Purpose/' 

Lima. Ohio. July 10. — With the words 
"Art didn't do It on purpose." mamma, " 
upon his lips, Dewey Schockency, 13 
years old, of Ada, Ohio, died here to- 
day. The boy was shot Saturday by 
Aruthur Parks, 13 years old, a play- 
mate, while playing Indian. 
. . 

BIflr Strike In ParlM. 

Paris. July 10. — Twenty-five thou- 
sand union building workers struck to- 
day to enforce a demand that the piece 
work system be abolished and their 
dally wages Increased. 



New York, July 10. — The police, aid- 
by the defendants, redoubled their 
efforts today to solve the mystery of 
the lost letters In the Stokes shooting 
case. Tomorrow the court will receive 
the last evidence to show whether Lillian 
Graham and Ethel Conrad should be 
held to the arrand jury on the charge 
of trying to murder W. E. D. Stokes, 
the millionaire hotel man, and without 
these letters the young women say 
their cause is badly handicapped. 
They admit that tlicy shot Stokes, but 
declare that the circumstances which 
these letters would help reveal were 
such as to make the shooting justi- 
fiable. 

Done by Private .Sleuth. 

The superintendent of tlie apartment 
house where tiie shooting occurred was 
summoned before Police Commissioner 
,. .11 today, The commissioner is in- 
terested in the case on account of 
charges that some one of his men per- 
mitted Stokes' detective to ransack 
Miss Graham's suite and carry away 
the bundle of letters while the city 
detectives were present. 

The defendants say that the letters 
already made public In connection with 
the case were returned after nine or 
more which Stokes wished to suppresi 
had been taken from the collection. 
The defendants' lawyers have threat- 
ened to bring charges against the 
Stokes detective, who admitted on the 
stand that he had carried away the 
letters. Whether the charge would bo 
larceny or the suppression of evidence 
they have not decided. 

Will Plan ConrMe. 

Magistrate Freschl, who has been 
conducting the preliminary hearing.* in 
the case, and District Attorney Whit- 
man win confer today with a view to 
deciding what action ought to be tairen 
about the disappearance of the letters. 

At the close of the examination to- 
morrow the magistrate probably will 
Issue a summons for James Cummlngs, 
.Stokes' private house detective. For- 
mal proceedings will then begin to le- 
termlne whether a crime has been com- 
mitted. 

Cummlngs swore he found the let- 
ters while the city detectives wlio ac- 
companied him in his search of the 
girls' apartment were not looking. The 
superintendent of the apartment house 
lias told the police commission that 
all letters In the apartment were re- 
moved by city officials on the night 
Stokes was shot, June 6. Therefore if 
Cummlngs, in a second search tliree 
days later, found the letters produced 
In evidence, as he swore In court, the 
comml.ssloner believes someone m.ust 
have "planted" them there, in the 
meantime having removed the eight or 
more letters missing. 



Get a Permit to Smoke All dealers 
win issUe Permits to Smoke. 



DUBLIN KEEPS HOLIDAY 

IN HONOR OF THE KING. 



Dublin July 10. — Keeping holiday In 
honor of their majesties, most of the 
shops remained closed today. 

Iteplylng to addresses occupied King 
George In the early morning. Tlie 
king subsequently held a levee in the 
throne room of the castle, among those 
present being American Consul Ed- 
ward L. Adams. Later their majesties 
went to Leopardstown. where a ma- 
jority of the population of the Irtsii 
capital seemed to have congregated. 




^ 




Our Semi' Annual 

Reduction 
Sale ! 

Commencing Monday* July lOth; we 
will taiior all Spring and Summer Suit- 
ings at greatly reduced prices. 

A large and exclusive line of En2lish 
and Scotch patterns to select from. 

This sale offers you a splendid op- 
portunity to fit yourself out with a 
Summer wardrobe at small cost. 




404 West Superior St. 







.^ ^ 



^ 



Closing Hours 6:30 — Saturdays, 6 o' Clock 





**Oidding Corner^ — Superior St. 




at F%r$t Av€. TK 



July Clean-Ups! 

Suits V2 Price 

Women's, Misses' and Juniors, in great variety. 

Gowns and Dresses Va and V4 Off 

Our entire stock of Afternoon and Evening Dressses, in Chiffon, 
Satin, Foulard and Colored Marquisette. 



Coats V4, V3 and Va Off 

Our entire stock of Colored Cloth Coals participate 
(excepting Polo Coats.) 

Satin Coats are Va Price. 

White Marquisette Dresses 

4t*10 Cn Regularly $25.00, 
^ZZ.OU $27.50 and $29.50 

A special group of about 30 Frocks — a few colored 
ones also included. 

Linen Suits 

$12.50 and $13.50 Values 

$10.00 

Sailor Collar effects and Plain Tail- 
ored Models — in white and shades. 



It 



■ ■ > 

■ ■' ■ 



$18.50 Values 

$13.50 



White Wool Suits 

Heretofore 1 A. /^f•P 
$35.00 to $55.00 /H' \JLL 

A selected lot, comprising a limited number of fashionable models, 
in white, basket weaves and novelties. 



mt 



^-=4 



■CSTABUSHED 18SS< 



DULUTH TRUNK CO., 

220 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 

1/ t%r^ ON TRAVELERS SAMPLES IN BAGS AND CASES- 
•/± llrr NOW IS THE TIME TO GET JUST WHAT YOU WANT 

/^E Wl I AT A RARAAIN. 



AT A BARGAIN. 



D. H.. 7-10-'lL 







itfb«lMk 



And here are the vacation suits at vacation prices 
■ — 50c up. 

First wash suits — excellent cloth, white and col- 
ors; some plain, others embroidered or trimmed 
with contrasting colors. 

Also Norfolks and double-breasted suits. French 
and Russian styles in tan linen crash and duck. 

And other vacation suits of every description. 

TWO SPECIALS FOR. 
TOMORROW! 



Boys' washable white and linen 

colored Fifty cent Tam Caps 

at 

A new lot of our famous ladies' pure 
silk hose with lisle garter tops and 
feet at 



15c 
50c 



'Ke Columbia 



at Third 
Ave. West 



Sole Sellers of the official Boy Scout Outfit. 



^,-^ 



■^ 




^TVOAA^S 




Monday, 








aracterlRea 





weak- 



t 



The girls of the Patrick factory are 
trying to raise about $40 to cover tiie 
expenses of sending a delegate from 
among their number to the convention 
;u. bnTRAL noK HT HT HT HT 
Of the Young Women's Christian asso- 
ciation which is to be held in Geneva, 
the mi.idle of August. They 
have a start of $10 towards 
and hope to add materially 
Friday even»ng of this week 
proceeds frimi a concert 
will give at the Young 



already 
this end 
to it on 
from the 
which they 
Women s Chris- 
tian association auditorium. The great- 
part of the program will be taken 
with numbers by the violano vlr- 
ihe self, playing violin and pi- 



ENGLISH SHOW GIRL 

DOES NdVEL WALTZ 



MAY WED SON 

OF AMBASSADOR 



er 
up 

tuosi 



ano and a Utile sketch will be given 
bv three girls. "The Girl Bachelors' 
Is the name of the luHe sketch in 
which the parts will be played by Miss 
Ada Uinfleld. MUs Jessie J^^nson and 
Miss Vera Campbell. Ml?s Campbell i^s 
the extension secretary of th*" Y. NV 
A., who Is at the head of the 
■which these girls have formed 
T. W C. A. 

The girls of 
diligently to 
and iri-m thf 
lold the returns 

the Y. W C. 
A. will be taken up 



i 

C 

club 

at the 



the club are working 

sell tickets for this affair 

number alreadv reported 

ought to be a good 

addition to the fund. 

The week otherwise _. -^- 

- as usual with me 

Bwtmmlng classt-s and r^S "''I'L jiff^^'fa 
This evening a party of members is 

planning to make up «■ . ^''^''Vk^ frio 
mounlight excursion taking the trip 
around the horn. 

FAREWELL ^RECEPTION. 

Mrs. Latshaw Honored by Church 
Women. 

Mrs. J. Latshaw, who leaves tomor- 
row with her two sons. Max and Glen. 
for Lus Angeles. Cal . t'' -^f ^'J,*' ""^'' 
sons finish at the Leland Stan- 
iiRiversltv. was the guest of honor 
farewell reception this afternoon 
at the residence of Mrs. K. \v. 
^ ISOl East Third street by the 

.f the First Baptist church. 

informal musical program was 

during the afternoon before 

forty guests. ,, , . , 

rooms were prettily decorated 

daisies and branches of eldei - 




Blue eyes are said to 
est. 

Upturned 
tion. 

Wide-open 
rashness. 

Side-glancing 
distrusted. 

The downcajit eye h«8 
been typical of modesty. 

Small eyes are commonly supposed to 
indicate cunning. 

People of melancholic temperament 
rarely liave clear blue eyes. 

Kyos in rapid and constant motion 
betoken anxiety, fear or care. 

Eyes with long, sharp corners Indl- 



eyes are typical of devo- 
eyes ar« indicative of 
eyes are always to be 

> ■ 

ib all ages 



cate great discernment and penetration. 

The white of the eye siiowing be- 
neath the iris is indicative of a chol- 
eric temperament. 

When the ui>per lid covers half or 
more of the pupil the indication is of 
cool deliberation. 

An eye, the upoer lid of which 
es horizontally across the pupil, 
cates mental ability. 

Unsteady eyes, rapidly jerking 



pa.«s- 
indi- 

from 



side to side, are frequently indicative 
of an unsettled mind. 

Eyes of any color with weak brows 
and long, conclave lashes are indicative 
of a weak constitution. 

Eyes that are wide apart are said by 
physiognomists lo indicate great In- 
telligence and tenacious memory. 




ivmg for Show 



VIRGINIA HARLAN. 



her 
ford 
at a 
given 

N . ■ ■ • : ■ 

\U'..: ~~ 
.Vn 

given 

about 
The 

with 



berries. 



UNITARIAN MEETING. 

National Officers Visit Local 

Alliance. 

An interesting meeting of the "J^'f*"^- 
ens Alliance of tlie Unitarian church 
will be held tomorrow afternoon at 
the home of Mrs. John A. Keyes 20.9 
Ea.«t Third street. Mrs. I'ejano of Chi- 
cago vice president of the National 
Alliance of I'nitarian women, will 
speak on the work. ^ , .», i.« 

Mr" Kelano will come to Duluth by 
boat somi.rrow morning, afrompanied 
by Mr« Underwood and Mrs. Jarvls 
of Hinesdale. the latter of whom is the 
director for the state of Illinois of the 
National Alliance of Unitarian women. 

The visitors will return to their 
homes tomorrow tvenii.g. 

All women of the church are Invited. 

DANCING PARTY. 
Girls Hostesses at Boat 



LILY ELSIE. 

England Is goin^r to send America 
another pretty shov; girl. She is Lily 
Elsie. She has jus: made a sensation 
in the light opera tailed "The Count 
of Luxembourg." The hit of the piece 
is a '"staircase wattz,"" In which she 
and her partner, t > a waltz step, go 
up and down a JligHt of stairs. Klaw 
& Erlanger are to bring her over un- 
der an arrangement with George 
Edwardes. 



Six 




Hostesses 
Club. 

Informal dacing party 



An informal dacing party will be 
eiven Thursday evening ot this weeK 
at the Duluth Boat club, at winch tlie 
following girls will be hostesses: 
Misses Mary Whipple. Helen ^^niith. 
Gladvs Lenr.lng. Chelsie Final. Kutli 
Neimever and Madeline CheiuUe. In- 
vitations have been issued for abouv 
forty o'uples, mostly high school stu- 
dents and the chaperones will be Mr. 
and Mrs. H. D. Final Mr. and Mr?. J. 
O. Lenning. Mr. and Mrs, Charles Nei- 
meyer. Mr and Mrs. Henry W. Cheudle, 
and Mrs. William Smith. 



DULUTH GIRL. 



Her parents are n sldents of Chicago 
now, liviig at the l.iessing apartments. 

HERALD* OUTING. 
Excursion to For d du Lac Today. 

A large crowd wmt to Fond du Lac 
on the Herald exci rsios this morning 
on the new steamer Columbia. His- 
toric Fond du Lac offers a delightful 
setting for a day"8 outing. 

Thursday The Herald will have a 
lake excursion on he Steamer Eas^ton 
with two Harbors as the destination, 
and again next Mo iday morning there 
will be another excursion to Fond du 

The low price of these trips add an 
especial attraction to them, as the 
whole family can g > at a low cost- 



HELEN DEMAREST. 

Helen Demarett Is the pretty daugh- 
ter of Warren I>emarest of New York. 
She has spent a great deal of time 
abroad and while there she met J. G. 
A. Lelshman, Jr., the son of our am- 
bassador to Italy. It is now reported 
that they are engaged. Mr. Lelshman's 
father may be made ambassador to 
Germany. 



served as maid of honor and Mrs. J. H. 
Miller acted a.** ring bearer. Miss Hen- 
rietta S. Graybill played the wedding 
march from ""Lohengrin." 

"The bride's gown was of a deep 
cream peau de cygne silk, with lace 
and pearl trimmings. Her bocjuet was 
pink roses. The maid's dress was of 
Persian lawn with emproidery trim- 
mings. 

"The decorations through the house 
were extremely pretty. Boquets of 
marguerites, pansies, roses and sweet 
peas being arranged in a tasteful man- 
ner. Following the ceremony a wed- 
ding supper was served. 

A musical program was a feature or 
the evening. Miss Henrietta Graybill 
sang a solo, "Absent." Miss Pogue 
played a piano number and Miss Clara 
Graybill sang the wedding benediction. 
The Road of Life." Dr. Hutchinson and 
his bride sang a duet. 



I cannot understand a young married 
couple with real life before them, •liv- 
ing for show.'" 

And yet so many young married 
cou{des do. The best thing about her 
servant is her cap and tlean apron — 
they ""look so nice.'" And the cap of 
the servant must have long white 
strings, that get in the way (and t>ften 
in the soup) and bother the wearer. 

Can anything be more foolish than to 
do things just because such and such a 
person does them? There must be as 
swell a drawing room as can be pro- 
vided. It isn't wanted, really, but how 
<ould the world be faced without a 
drawing room'/ 

The old, comfortable furniture that 
has to be sold dirt cheap to make room 
for the '"proper" articles was 50 per 
cent more approi'rlate and rest-glvlng, 
but what of that? 

And in the district where the young 
couple go to live, probably dinners 
are given, select little affairs. There- 
fore the young couple, who have Just 
come Into the place, must follow suit. 
It means worry, cudgeling of brains, 
unwarrantable stretching en of a 
cramped Income. But there you are — 
Its the thing. . 

Unless one can really: afford to go on 
as the others do, it is foolish to run 
into debt Just for the sake of appear- 



Jenswold farm in honor of her guest. 
Miss Laura Pinkerton of Paynesville. 

Minn. Z 1 

• • • * ' 

Mr. and Mrs. A. M. MorrlFon of Glen 

Avon have as their gu^ts for a short 

time Mrs. Johnston and Mrs. McKenzle 

of Sault Ste. Marie, Can. 



HOW-CAREY. 



Duluth 



Normal 



Man to Wed 
School Teacher. 

Calvin F. How las gone to Cleve- 
land, Ohio, where his marriage to Miss 
Anna Carey of that city will take place 
Friday morning 
member of the 
Normal school. 



Miss 
faculty 



Carey 
of the 



was a 

Duluth 



AUTHORl':SS 
Mrs. Eaton 



HERE, 
at Stryker 



Mrs. James Pettit was Formerly , wo 
Miss Sadie Prescott. ' ^' 

Mrs. James Pettit. whf)se husband, 
James Pettit. president of the Peavy 
Grain company, was drowned 
Michigan Saturday morning 
Moraine hotel at Highland 
before her marriage. Miss 
cott, daughter of Mr. and 
Prescott formerly of 



in Lake 

near the 

P'ark. was 

Sadie Pres- 

Mrs. D. Clint 

West Duluth. 



Gaest 
Heme. 

Mrs. Charlotte I aton of New York 
is the guest of Mrs. J. D Stryker of 
odland. She is an author of both 

ose and poetry aid her book of son- 
nets, published a few years ago attract- 
ed much attention from lovers of poetry. 

Mrs. Eaton is th j widow of the late 
Wyatt Eaton, the irtist. 



She was well known in society circles 
during their residence in this 
She is left with a 3-year-old son. 



here 
city. 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

Moles and Warts permanently re- 
moved. 

KNAUF SISTERS, 

24 Went Superior Street, 
Kecoud Door East of Glddlnga. 



All Negligee, Pullman Robes, 
Boudoir Caps and French Lin- 
gerie, reduced for this week 
only. 

JANE USTMAN, 

5«U Kant Superior Street. 



Church Meetings. 

The West side a ixiliary of the First 
Presbyterian chur« h will meet tomor- 
row at the summer home of Mrs. James 
Crawford, at Fond du Lac. The ladles 
are asked to board the Columbia from 
Fifth avenue west at 9 o'clock. 
^ 

Linnae.i Society. 

The members of the Linnaea society 
will be entertained tomorrow afternoon 
bv Mrs. J. H. Jen and Mrs. A. W. 
Lindstrom at the home of the latter 
on the corner of Ogden avenue and 
Twelfth street, S> perior. Wis. 
who wish to go together 
1:30 o'clock at the 
nue west and Suj 



Personal Mention. 

Miss I>orothy Seymour will leave 
.this evening for Chautauqua, N. Y., 
to spend several weeks. Mrs. R. M. 
Seymour will join her there later. 

• • • 

Mrs. H. Montgomery and Miss Dale 
Montgomery left today for their home 
on the range after a visit with friends 
here. Miss Montgomery is on her way 
home from Grinnell college, where she 
was a member of the graduating class 

this year. 

• • • 

Miss Lea Block and Miss Grace Cul- 
len have returned from Minneapolis 
where they attended the civic celebra- 
tion last week. 

« « • 

Mrs. L. R. Bondy and daughters, 
■Tlsses Hortense and Estella, returned 
Saturday on the Hamonic from Detroit 
where Miss Hortense has been attend- 
ing school the past term. 

* * • 

Mr and Mrs. B. E. Baker of Lester 

Park went to Minneapolis Saturday, 
called there by the unexjiected death 

of Mrs. Clothier, who was a former 
resident of Lester Park. 

* • • 
Miss Helen Jenswold of Lakeside 

was hostess at a week-end party at the 



* • 

Miss Katherine Morton Is visiting in 
Chicago and later will go to Three 
(ivers, Mich., to spend the remainder 
of the summer with friends. 

• • • 

Miss Agnes Ross of 813 East First 
street is visiting Miss Blanche Ellis of 
St. Paul for a week. 

• ♦ • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Peyton of Four- 
teenth avenue east and Superior 
street have as their guest. Mrs. G. \ 1. 
Brown of Milwaukee. Selby Brown Is 
the guest of Dr. and Mrs. G. Herbert 

Jones. 

• • • 

Mrs E. O. Gates of Denver Is In the 
city, the guest of her father, S. F. 
Boyce. Mrs. Gates was better known 
here as Misa Ida Boyce. 

• « • 

Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Hawkes of 210 
Sixteenth avenue east have as their 
guests Mr. Hawkess sister. Miss 
Hawkes of Springlield, Mass.. and Dr. 
Howard H. Mitchell of the Sheffield 
Scientific School of New Hampshire. 

• « • 

Theron Hawkes, Jr.. has returned 
from Hotchklss. where he lias been at- 
tending school. He visited friends for 
a short time after the close of school 
before returning. 

• * * 

Mrs. M. M. Hanna and children of 
Park Point have returned from Mil- 
waukee, Wis., where they spent two 

weeks. 

• • • 

Misses Clara and Nellie Stark re- 
turned last evening from Minneapolis, 
where they spent a week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Graff of 1601 
East First street have returned from 
a two weeks" trip to Eastern points 
where they visited friends. 

• ♦ • 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert N. May. 2820 
Helm street, have gone to Northwest- 
ern Canada to visit friends. 



ances and what others might think. 
Just have the people in to see you that 
really like your simple way of doing 
thinss, and if a cup of tea and cake 
is all that you can give iliem, you 
would hone.-^tly know that they were 
coming for the pleasure they found in 
your company. 

Whatever ""fashion"' or custom had 
somehow been set for the inhabitants 
of the neighborhood in which you live, 
doirt follow it unless It absolutely 
suits you to do so. 

"Cut your coat according to your 
cloth," not only in the matter of the 
money you have, but In the greater 
matter of living your own life accord- 
ing to your rnlnd. If you do otherwise, 
ai>art from anything else, you lose your 
riglitful pride, your judgment of things, 
your confidence In yournelf that sus- 
tains you against the troubles of life. 
The material penalty for catching 
the ""right thing" fever is obvious. The 
hills run up alarmingly. And is-n t it 
the hardest thing in the world, once 
you have set a certain standard of 
financial expense, to step down from 
that standard, and to lop off such and 
such expensive Items that have grown 
up, as it were, in the night, almost 
without their being noticed? It takes 
remarkably strong-willed people to do 
It. 



ing my lesson from your experience. It 
doesn't pay to know men in your own 
boarding house, iropinciuity, you know 
— and eventually they begin to rant."" 

""But you can't Imagine Mr. Hastings 
would ever tall in love with a woman!" 
exclaimed Miss Ranier, in astonish* 
ment. 

with a man." dryly 



gracefully "The Count" presented arms * 
"I never saw him look so pleased. 
You know he has tiuite washed his 
hand.s of me." 

"Ho doesn't like to see you playing 
with his protege. You know he has a 
i^ort of fatherly interest in "The Boy. 

"I assure you I'm not playing with 
'The Boy." What are you going to do 
tonight'.' " 

"I'm going up with Miss "Van Dyke. 
She is ill." 

""Oh. that"8 too bad. Tell her I was 
asking for her. I'm going out with 
The Boy." "" 

"Good! Have a nice time. Good 
night." 

The skirmishing continued until Sun- 
day when Mr. Hastings discovered 
Gertrude in the parlor singing some 
oUl-fasliioned airs. He joined in wah 
his ricli tenor. Gertrude pleading that 
she couldn't accompany him and sing 
too. stopped. He called in Mr. Lewis to 
play for them. The music soon brought 
others Into the room and to their sur- 
prise they they found Gertrude a 
regular store house of exquisite, old. 
half-forgotten songs, popular airs, and 
college songs dear to the heart of Mr. 
Lewis. 

"Why didn't you tell me you knew 
all these songs?" he asked, admiration 
showing in tone and manner. 

Gertrude dropped her eyes and 
answered meekly, ""you never asked 
me " . , , 

When the laugh that this remark 
caused, subsided, he said, ""Miss Walsh, 
you are incorrigible. I ask you now 
to come in and sing these every night. 
Will you?"" . ^ 

'"Yes indeed. If you like," she said 
cordially, then turning to Mr. Hnst- 
incs. "it is a case of wlien you wind 
up" the phonograph it plays until you 
are tired of it, then you put it away in 
the box — " ^ , 

"Miss Walsh. I beg of you to stop! 
You know I didn't mean that." 

"We-ll" — siowlv and doubtfully, then 
laughing, ""But I'd love to be a phono- 
grapii."" 

•"Please!" he begged. ""Oh, come 
back!"' as she was leaving the parlor. 
"If you come back, 1"11 never ask you to 
sing again — "' . , 

"Then I certainly will not come back 
for I like to sing." , . ^ , .„ 

"The Boy" threw up his hands in 
despair and appealed to Miss lianier, 
but Gertrude had disappeared. 

The next evening, evidently to make 
amends he asked her to go with him 
to see the ""Balkan Princess." Gertrude 
refused gently but firmly, and tuld no 
one of the invitation, two things Miss 
Ranier would never think of doing, 
but Gertrude was the better flirt, evt-n 
she did come from the country. She 

make a man 
a second, yes, 



if 



from 



But, honestly, I 
moon going to his 
like that. Can you'^' 
with conviction. 



can't 
head 

"■I"m 



tryr* Ger- 
her hand$ 



. You 
In a 



Those 

can meet at 

corner of Third ave- 

?rlor street 



This meeting Is to 
purpose of discussing 
of a society in 



Tae held for the 
the organization 
Sui erior. 




Sl- 
at 



West 
an In- 



Dinner Party. 

Mrs. Charles J-hogran. 
Seventh street, ei terlained 
formal dinner party Sa^^r^^ay ,%^t"'"/ 
In honor of Mrs. J.»hn Mayland of Aber 
and Mrs. John 
Mo. 



deen, Minn.. 
St. Joseph, 



Golwick of 



WHERE TO DINE 

l?^r Vr ti^r gVt^^a^^s?L?i^^raf'^d%l?r- 
fce at the Oriental Restaurant, where 
only dainty dishes are served. Music 
evenings. Try it today. 

The Mandarin, 

103 \\*ut Superior Street. 



ll First ^^«^4^^^^^ 
Ave, W. niicirose-1284 



In 



afternoon 
the party 



Picnic Party. 

A party of students at 
School of'Englisti enjoyed 
party yesterday 
Point. Those 
Misses: 

J. Tanis, 

T. Nelson, 

B. Haffld, 
Messrs: 

R. Call, 

R. Litman, 

I. Sukov, 



the Tanls 
a picnic 
on Park 

were: 



"The flowers that bloom 

in tbe eprlDK— tra la. 
Having Dotbltjfc to do 
witb tbe case 
It lioids sucb a trearare 
Of comfort and pleasure 
Ab Dowers couid uevor 
replace.'* 



Tell your wife about them 

She is naturally a 
better judge of soup 
than you are. She will 
appreciate the plain 
facts better than any 
man can. Call her 
attention to what we 



THE EVENING STORy] 



Gertrude's Campaign 



By Aileen R^illy. 






M. 

G. 
S. 

A. 
E. 



Litman. 

Flax. 

Tulman. 

Litman, 
Sukov. 



Bndge Party. 

Mrs M. W. Turner of 1910 East Su- 
perior' street was hostess at bridge this 
afternoon at her hnme. The guests 
played at three t itles. 

Informal Tea. 

Mi.=s Dolly Hibbtng was hostess at an 
afternf>on tea Saturday at her home 
1830 East Superioi street In compliment 
to Miss Dale Montgomery. Her guests 
were: 



say about 




FURS 



emodeled 

epaired 

edyed 
Stored and 
Made to Order 

at Summer Prices 

Grand 624. Melrose 4836. 
325 West First Strest 




Misses: 

Montgomery, 
Marie Erd, 
Helen Cant, 
Frances Burrls, 
Grace Weston, 
L. S. Parks, 



Marguerite Tur- 
ner, 
Alva Patenaude, 
Helen Harbison. 
Lucile Bradley, 
Helen McKlndley. 



. 




Hutchinson-Laughlin. 

Dr. and Mrs. C harks B. Hutchinson 
have arrived froia their wedding trip 
and will make their home In this city, 
Dr. Hutchinson 



was married last 
ss Clara J. Laughlln 
The Decatur Review 
'Wing notice of the 

Laughlln of this city 

3. Hutchinson of Du- 

marrled Wednesday 

o'clock at the resi- 
ide's brother. P. P. 

fe, 605 West Macon 



Wednesday to M 
of Decatur, 111. 
printed the foil' 
wedding. 

"Miss Clara J. 
and l>r. Charles 
luth. Minn., wer« 
evening at 8:30 
dence of the bi 
Laughlln and w 

street. The officiating clergyman was 
Rev. J. H. Miller )f Gibson City, nephew 
of the bride. Ml is Clara May Graybill 



1 



^ TOMATO 

Soup 

Point out how 
satisfactory and whole- 
some they are; how well 
suited to every occasion; 
and how they relieve her 
of needless bother and 
fuss. Ask her to prove 
all this for herself. 

And you'll both be glad 
of it. 

21 kinds 10c a can 



Just addhot water, 

bring to a boil, 

and serve. 

Joseph Campbell 
Company 

Cnmden N J 

Look for the 

red-and-white 

label 



•I cant, cnn't standflltV 'Gertrude 
Walsh let her book drf»t> to the table, 
leaned back in her chair, and clenched 
her hands. It seemed ad it she were 
trying to hold back by force all the 
homesickness and loneliness that was 
expressed in that short sentence. 

•Oh, if I could only have a good cry, 
she continued. "Oh, what a baby I 
am. I've worried and worked myself 
almost sick over that class B exam- 
ination.' She began to pace the floor 
of her room, the typical second-story 
room of the typical New York boarding 
house— so small that, as she said she 
always got dizzy when she walked the 
floor. She didn't have time to get 
dizzy tonight, however, for there was 
a gentle tap at the door. , . „ 

• Who is It; you. Miss Ranier? Come, 
she called, and the face that met Miss 
Ranler'B was brightly smiling. 

"Oh, how are you. little one? Did 
you go to the library today? asked 
Miss Ranier. a tall, dark-haired, blue- 
eyed girl, whose straightforward ex- 
pression and quick, decisive manner 
stamped her as a business woman of 
the best variety New York has to 

'"Yes—and, oh, what a lot of work I 
had to do— filing and filing! Sit down. 

'You poor child, you should have 
stayed home another day and, laugh- 
ingly, "let me entertain you with the 
next chapter of my romance. Did yoii 
ever see anything quite as bad as that 

boy''" " 
•Aren't congratulations in order 

yef" 

"No. Indeed." indignantly from Miss 
Ranier. then more gently, but .really 
he was terribly cut up. Now. will you 
tell me what there Is about me that 
makes a man rant so? " ,,.*.,.„ 

"I'm sure I dont know," meekly from 
Gertrude. , , .. .,_ 

•Well, I don't know either, and that a 
the third I've had to turn Jown In a 
year." This was said without any 
Khadow of boasting. • .I'"5,<^t''*''"l« 
Walsh was startled sh^ida^t show it, 
simply asked: , . , "• 

"Well, Is this all overf 

we've decided to be good 




rn lout from 
4wn pecul- 

}Ar that?" 



"Yes; 
friends." 

• Um-m-m," long d 
Gertrude. She smiled 
iar little smile. ; 

"Now, what do you mesan 

•Oh, nothing. Platwlc ..friendship 
don't appeal to me." '',:*: ^ , . 

"Be careful, little one.'Uteaslngly. 
"You have (lulte a frlendsh»— Platonic 
or Homeric — with "the coual, as you 
call him." ■. ^. _., 

"Oh. he's only sympathetic. He 
thinks I'm most unfortunate to have 
been sick in a boarding house. He was 
onlv kind. But really.' with a soft 
laugh, "I wouldn't carj^ to know him 
any better than I do n'**. «• fact, tak- 



"No — only 
Gertrude. 

"Oh, you! 
imagine the 
or anything 
"Oh, yes," 
sure he would make an adorable lover 
"No, decidedly, no.' 
"Would you be willing to 
trude sat up and clapped 
gently together. 
"Oh, no!" 

"Ah-ha, you contradict yourself 
are afraid of making It four 
year." 

"You are perfectly horrid! I'm going 
upstairs Oh. I must,' as Gertrude 
made a protest, "I was up very late 
last night. I must get some rest. That 
boy has upset me with his ranting so 
that I was nearly sick. But, thank 
goodness! it's all over now and were 
the best of friends." 

"Kine! I'm awfully glad you came 
in tonight. It was fearfully lonely. 
Wait — the light is out — there — good- 
night." Gertrude closed and locked the 
door, went over to the mriror, looked 
at her reflection long and earnestly, 
then began lo enumerate: "Light 
hair, high forehead, greenish eyes, 
(pleasant when they smile) rather 
pretty nose, don't know what kind — 
sure it isn't Grecian — yes — lips pretty 
too, always red, no color in cheeks — 
on the whole not very ugly — oh, yes, 
nice teeth when it smiles." She laughed 
aloud at herself and turned away from 
the mirror. After a few thoughtful 
minutes, "That girl is a flirt. She 
openly threw herself at Mr. Lewis 
head. Now If I were going to flirt. Id 
try the modest violet way. I reaP.y 
can't see why I shouldn't make men 
like me. I'm surely not ugly. Funny 
I never thought of that before. Guess 
I've always been too busy. Like tlie 
little miller, 'I didn't care for anybody, 
nor nobody care for me.* Things were 
so different at home. But here, where 
there Is no one, I don't see why I 
can't make the men in this house take 
a little active Interest In the poor 
little country girl — a real active in- 
terest. I'm going to try — and I wont 
lose my reputation for shyness and 
modesty either. Miss Ranier. your 
romance was a lesson to me. I'll profit 
in my campaign by your mistakes. I'm 
just going to see if that self-satisfied 
Intellectual Lord Chesterfield of a -Mr. 
Hastings couldn't be shaken a little 
from his admirable pedestal. And 1 
haven't a doubt but that I could 
catch Mr Lewis' heart on the rebound. 
But, then what would I do? I wouldn't 
V ant either of them to begin to rant. 
Oh I wouldn't let It go that far. I 
Just want to see what I could do If I 
tried." , . ^ • 

It was hard for Gertrude to begin, 
but during the week she had what she 
called "little skirmishes." The -weap- 
ons used, on her side, were down- 
cast eves, with now and then quick 
upward glances, pretty 'thank you s 
when any one of the men in the din- 
ingroom picked up her handkerchief, 
which began to form a habit of drop- 
ping at almtrst every meal, and half 
embarrassed, half appealing questions, 
directed always to Mr. Hastings, about 
the different parts of the city. When 
he teased her for not going out and 
investigating she exclaimed with 
childish surprise. , ■,, , 

•VV'hy — how could I go alone! Id 
surely get lost and besides I don t 
like to wander around the city alone. 

•"ihe -Jount" answered smilingly. ' «ut 
I do, I hunt up some new place every 
Sunday — " 

••Oh, but you're a man. 
man I'd go out, too." 

Still smiling, he asked, 
you feel Just as safe -vk-ith ,a 
you were a man yourself.' 
"That — de — pends," she 
slowly and thoughtfully. Th 
forth a laugh from all whp 
conversation and Gertrude 
dining room, covered with 
coming confusion. „..^at 

But the day she had her first great 
success, 'in .shocking the whole dining 
room," as she put it in a letter to her 
mother, was March 17lh. When Mr. 
Lewis came In to dinner, he stopped 
by her chair displaying his blue-green 
shamrock with the gold binding, 
you like It, MKss Walsh?' he 

"It would be handsome if it were the 
right shade," she said with a 

•But what is the matter with 
Walsh?" cut In Mr. Hastings, 
added quickly, "Oh, that s all 
"I beg your pardon, M 

^"'•i '^h'ought" you had deserted your 

^""flh" no." and Gertrude laughingly 
displayed her green tie. Then ex- 
claimed in mock surprise, "But, oh Mr 
Hastings, you are not decorated. That 
isn't fair. You are the only one. Let 

'"^'C^ertainlv!'^and Mr. Hastings Jumped 
uD and presented himself before Ger- 
trude's chair like a soldier presenting 
arms. This was even more than Ger- 
trude expected, but she gaily broke 
leaf from the artificial fern on 
table and pinned It to his coat lapel, 
onlv daring to shoot one swift glance 
?nto hU laughing eyes The whole 
dining room gasped. This country grl 
was developing entirely new PO«sibl ; 
ties Miss Ranier, who thought she 
knew Gertrude, stared. She jletained 
her on her way up stairs with "Oh 
Miss Walsh, what a sensation! And 
how gracefully you did .It! 
Gertrude laughed 'No— but 



knew how to refuse to 
come back to be refused 
and a tliird time. 

The affair seemed to be growing one 
sided. She had no desire to rob Miss 
Ranier entirely, just once in a while, 
.so one evening offered to teach Mr. 
Hastings to play solitaire. He de- 
cided he needed a lesson every night 
Gertrude was at home. There were 
also certain polnt.s that he liked to 
talk over in the morning. He found 
he could do this without being dis- 
turbed by getting down to breakfast 
five minutes earlier. That was because 
Gertrude, who ip till this time, had 
always come do-vn to breakfast early, 
now "came down ten minutes later. It 
was Burpri.slng what interesting topics 
of converastion they could find in tlie 
morning. So interesting, that Gertrude 
began to come eacli day a little earlier 
iintil she was back to her regular time 
"The Count " with her. One morning he 
said to her: 

Miss Walsh, why is it we don t see 
you evenings any more?" 

"Oh, I'm studying. ^ My 
comes off next week." 

"And then?" questioningly. 

"If I'm successful. I am eligible 
an appointment as assistant chief, 
is assistant to the liead librarian. 

"Oh! Splendid: You must let 

know If you are successful, as 

sure you will be, but don't work 

hard." , , ,. 

A week later he asked after her 



examination 



for 
that 

me 
I'm 
too 



examination, 
very severe 
her success. - 

"Good." he exclaimed, "we must cele- 
brate ' (Gertrude raised her eyebrow*^ 
at the "we.") 

"I have tickets for the "Bohemian. 
Girl" for next Wednesday. You will 
come?" 

Gertrude hesitated one dreadful min- 
ute, that is, dreadful for "The Count." 
Then gave him one of her soft glances* 
and answered. "Yes. thank you." 

That night they went out together, 
"The Boy'^ stayed in his room and, as* 
Ml.«.s Ranier s^aid. "He sulited." but she- 
was certain she had done nothing to 
offend him. The other members of th^ 
cosmopolitan family smiled knowingly. 
Gertrude said in a letter to her 
mother that she had crossed her "Rubi- 
con" by going out with Mr. Hastings, 
and it seemed so by the invitatlott 
which followed she -began to have 
trouble inventing excuses that would 
have a "next-tlme-ril-go ' sound. 

Things might have gone on in this 
delightfully " uncertain way for 
montlis more but for two slight cir- 
cumstances. One was that Gertrude's 
six weeks' vacation began the l&lh 
of August, and the other was a letter 
which gave Mr. Lewis ciiarge of the 
Bermuda branch of his company. Ha 
was to leave the 1st of September. 
tJertrude was to leave the next day 
for home and was supremely happy. 
He said to her that evening in th© 
jarlor: 

•'I suppose we won't meet again very 
soon. Miss Walsh?" 

"Gracious, I don't Intend he shall be- 
gin to rant to me." thought Gertrude, 
"1 didn't think I'd let him get so far.'* 
Then aloud In a very matter-of-fact 
t<'ne. •'No. I don't suppose so. but yoa 
should be very proud of yourself. Mr. 
Hastings tells me that it la a great ad- 
vancement — " 
"Yes, but — " 

"Oh. here Is Miss Ranier,' 
Gertrude, 'You are going 
are y<iu not. Miss Ranier'^ 
Before she had time to 
Hastings, who was liehind her 
out gaily. ••Yts. we all are. come, th© 
air v.ni be fine in the park near th© 
lake. Who says No!" 

"The Boy" was sulking again. Mies 
Ranier turned to him in s-urprlse. "Ar© 
you not comir.g. Mr. Lewis? We are all 
going, even Miss Van l>yke." 

"I don t think 111 go. It's too hot. 
Gertrude could not resist one mor© 
try. She turned and txclaimed, 
Mr. Lewis, please do come!" 

He Jumped and made for her 
Meantime she had slipped her arm 
through Miss Van I'ykes and the thic© 
walked together as fac as the lake, 
where they rested and where "Th© 
Ocunl" by nuans of iiis elbi.ws mad© 
place for himself at Gertrude's side. 
The walk home was not quite as pleas- 
ant "The Boy' felt cheated. Miss 
Ranier saw she was defeated at her 
own game and consequently was not In 
a delightful frame of mind, and L.er- 
trude v.hose bubbling overJ<.y at the 
thought of liome made her the life or 
the party, was about three blocks back 
of the others with Mr. Hastings. In 
all the other walks the party had taken 
together Gertrude had been scolded for 
always taking the lead. 

was much bantering when th© 
ones arrived. Gertrude met 
the Jests gaily. •The Count " ^v as un- 
usually silent. Gertrude bade the men 
gof.d night and went up to her room 
with the ladles who teased her wick- 
edly. She did not commit herself until 
they were leaving. Then she called aft- 

*^' "1 know "The Count" makes an ador- 
able lover." , , . „, 
They have always wondered what 
happened i n the park. 

Rtorekeeplng consists of buying and 
«ellinl^ And you cannot buy roods you 
do riot ''-"••' oh"ii« nor can you sell 
unless 
sell. 



■ Interrupted 
for a walk, 

answer, Mr. 
called 



Oh, 

sidsu 



There 
two tardy 



consists of 
And vou cannot buy root 
know' about, nor can 
others khow what you have 



to 



Store closes 5:30 p. m. 



Saturdays, 6 r. m 



1 




Tlie July Clearance 



If I were a 

"Wouldn't 
man as If 



answered 

!3 brought 

heard the 

left che 

very be- 



Opens its second -week with all reserves 
money-saving advantages. For instance: 

Tailored Suits L 



brought forward and additional 



Every cloth-tailored 


half price. 






$25 


Suits 


are 


$35 


Suits 


arc 


$15 


Suits 


are 


$50 


niMl $ 


75 S 



ess 

suit (except white serge) 



Half 



TKan 

ia offered at less than 



.$10 

.$15 

$20 

$25 



now 

now 

now 

Suits arc now 

This may be your last week to get these vaules. as the suits 
last long at these prices. 

Wkite Serge Suit Special 



will not 



received Satur<iay a shipment of ,,- ra 

sold up to now for JSv.&t). 



sell and have 



We 

intended to 

at $29.50. 

This model is of flr.t French serge 

inis moaei ^^^^^ ^^.^^ fastened in front with 



25 White Serge Suits that were 
r.ft On sale Tuesday 



Peau de Cygne 



and cuffs of white 



handsomest model we have 



— altogether the 
price is $29.50. 

Another model at $25; was $35. 

Another model at $35; was 45. 



lined, sailor collar 

silk loop and frog 

shown this year. Sale 



All Tailored Skirts Half Price 



'Do 
asked, 
were 
smile. 

Miss 
then 
right." 
Hastings," 



a 

the 



This includes every cloth In the store- 
black, navy, tan and white, no exceptions. 

$7.50 Skirts ore now. 

$10.50 Skirts are now 

$12.50 Skirts arc now 

$19.50 Skirts are now 



-voiles, Panamas, serges in 



• • • • ' 



. $3.75 
.$5.25 
.$«.25 
.$9.75 



IXJUt 



Coats Half Price 



Every cloth coat included except 

All Street Coats. 

All Automobile Coats. 

All Opera Coats and Capes. 

All Rain Coats. 

Silk and ClotK D 



black and navy. 



resses m 

store without 



Clearance 

exception, one-fourth 



Every silk and cloth^dress ^^l^f^^^- ^, ^^^, ^, „„, ,„ .^^^d .tyle or 

absolutely up-to-the-minute, high-class line to 
crepe de chines, foulards, messalines. 



off. Not one carried 
perfect condition. An 
select from, in crepe 
serges and mixtures. 



meteors. 



Tke Undermuslin Out-Clearing 



each day only to be piled up again from 
reserve stocks 

$1.00 and $1-50 for $1.D0 and 

$2.50 and $3.00 for $5 and $6 

$1.50 to $2.50 for $3.50 and $4.50 combination suits. 

48c for 75c corset covers. 

All French Unccrle 10 per cent discount. 



Sees heaping \\t.les^di.^appear^^.^- .^^^^.^^^ ^.^^^^^ ^^^ extraordinary. 

$2.50 gowns, 
skirts. 



T 



rimmed Hats $5.00 



This ought to be tho last week for Trimmed Hats, when $5 buys ab- 

This ougnt ^«^ t,^„ai and high-class hats as ours are known to 

pattern hat at $50 or $75, or a tailored hat at HS or 

$26. It will be delivered to you for $5. Our only reservation Is felt hats 

just in. 



solute choice of 
be. It may be a 




-r^ 



i^^m* 



m I ■! -.-■■ > 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 






HIH 




W 


!■■ 








- 






- V 



t 

\ 

i 

; 



/ 



Monday, 



THE D U L-U TH HERALD 



July 10, 1911. 



^€ST DwWft ff f «S 



A. Jcniieii. 330 Norfli 57tb 



BRANCH OFFICESi 

Ave. W. J. J. Moran. Sie'4 Sfortli Ceatral At*. 



He lid*) 

at Ilia 

SUtl«?th 

of tlie 



afternoon, 
subject to 

surviveil 

vvatcliman at 

company and 

the Northern 

1.1 this afternoon 
i)lic church at 2 
at Oneota ceme- 



DEATH COMES 
VERY SUDDENLY 

Joseph Yax Passes Away 

After Eating His Lunch 

at Midnight 

Jos. pi Vax. -m-^d »2. a watchman for 
F McKoniieil. the contractor who ia 
pavinK Crand avenue, dropped dead 
flft^-en mlriMii-s after he had finished 
•work. >it iiiidniKlit .Saturday. 

tui*t finished eating a lunch 
poarding hnise, 4;jo North 
avenue west. A hemorrliage 
lungs crjused his death. 

The t.iidy was removed to the Kicn- 
ter uiidi«itakinK rooms, where an au- 
topsy wa.s lield yesterday 
It i.H .said that Yax was 
attack.^ for several years. 

Yax w ».s a widower and Is 
by two 'orotliers. .John, a 
the Zenith Furnace 
Mltfhell. employed on 
Pacific t.ridge crew. 
The fut'.erril was h« 
from St Jam- ■' ' 

o'ch>ck Bur;.i 
tery ^ 

RIFLED POCKETS 
OF SWIMMERS 

Sneak Thieves Colled About 

$20 at West Duluth 

Baths. 

Guat M.iki. John Telka and Gust 
Buainni r-'.Iow boarders at a place 
at Fifty-rourth avenue weat and Roose- 
velt .street, learned by experience to 
hide tlietr clothes when they go awlm- 

Snlnis- 

Ye.s> rnoon the three men 

deiiU-l f > lak' a dip and went to the 
Wil \ swimming; place at the foot of 
of Sixtv-third avenue west. 

When they came out of the water 
they found that .some one had rifled 
tli'-ir pockets and had taken all the 
money tlutC the three men had with 
them. 

Maki h.id over |15. Teika about |4, 
and Suarimi less than a dollar They 
reported that matter to the police. Aa 
yet no cluea have been furnished that 
■would enable the authorltea to find the 
thief 



smoke, howeer. did considerable dam- 
age to the furniture. 

The house Is owned by J. J. Frey 
and was occupied by two families. A. 
T. McOann. living upstairs and C. 
Johnson in the 1 )wer portion of the 
building The alarm was turned In 
about T:30 o'clock 



was 
under- 



INITIATED THE 

"HIGH DIVE" 

Boy Breaks His Arm Trying 

Carnival Feature 

Act 



DISTRKT MEFTING OF 

MODERN BROTHERHOOD. 

Fraternity lodg.-. No. 860. will send a 
delegation to the district meeting of 
the Modern Brotherhood of America, 
whicli will be h. Id Saturday evening 
in Pvtliian hall. Duluth. where lodge 
No 450 will be holts. About fifty dele- 
gates from all pai ts of the Eightli con- 
gressional dlstric are expected to at- 
ten.l At thl.< convention three dele- 
gates to the so oretne convention at 
Denver, t^ol , will be elected. The ses- 
sions will be held Aug. 8, 9 and 10. 

THIEF G0ES^THR7)II(,H 

BOARDINCJ HOUSE. 

The theft late Saturday afternoon of 
a revolver, several -watches and some 
clothing from a boarding hou.se run 
by Steve Modovlc » at Nh.w Duluth has 
b'^en reported to the police. The burg- 
lary was a davli«h affair, the roblier 
taking advantage of the situation when 
Mrs Modovich I (ft the house unoc- 
<iipled for a few moments. The police 
have been given a description of a 
man thought to have committed the 
burglary, but he has not been appre- 
hended as yet 

Lemanh Funeral. 

The funeral of -^jorog Lemarch, aged 
>7 the laborer who was crushed to 
death when a crane tumbled over Fri- 
day morning at the steel plant 
held today from die Filiatrault 
taking rooms, Interment was made 
in oneota cemeterjr 

WestlVuluth Briefs. 

Flat for rent 10.12 Raleigh street. 

Rev Thomas Grice. former pastor 
of A.shbury M. E church, now lo- 
cated at Detroit Minn, i.s a gue.st at 
the home of Rev and Mrs. VV . u. 
Bovle of 6009 Raleigh street 

John C Caincr )ss of Lafayette. Ind.. 
is spending a few days in West Duluth. 
tlie guest of ri^rids 

Cool underwear. B. V. D and For- 
ousknlt. long atid short sleeves, for 
men and boys. T he Great Kastern. 

Miss Anna Ber«uine of Fargo. N D.. 
is visiting with relatlvea in West Du- 

Nobhy straw ^nd Panama hats. 50c 
to $b "The Grent Ea.-tern 

Rev E F. StlJd. pastor of Merritt 
Memorial M. E church, and family 
left today for iiille Lacs lake, where 
they will spend i month on a camping 
trip There will be no preaching serv- 
ices at Merritt > hurch durln«r his ab- 
sence, but Sunday school will be held 
as usual. . . , 

Keep cool In ii black alpaca or blue 
.xergj coat, ♦IS* to |5, The Great 
Eastern. 

Mr. and Mrs ^ O. Larkin have re- 
turned to th^ir liome at Spooner after 
a visit with We.-t Duluth friends 

The Norden .Si ;k Benefit society Will 
hold its quarter y meeting this even- 
Ifig at Victor h. 11. Fifty-sixth avenue 
we!»t and Grand avenue All members 
are expected to ittend. 

D Davis of th ' Davis house at Bay- 
field, Wis., is visiting in West Du- 

Hurat. watch rftpairing. West Duluth. 

Thomas Woat a lal)orer. was in- 
jured .Saturday afternoon while em- 
ploye.l by the ( reat Lakes Dredge & 
Dock company at one of the local 
docks. A chain snapped and struck 
him in the head. He was taken to the 
Duluth hospital. 



EXPERIMENT 
SUCCEEDS 

Briquets Cut of Lipite 
out Use of Binding 
Material 

Tests By Bureau of Mines 

Prove of Great 

Value. 



Washington. July 10. — The bureau of 
mines, througli its experiments at the 
Pittsljurg testing station, believes that 
it has developed a fuel supply for the 
Western part of the country that will 
be of immense value. It has succeeded 
In making briuuets without the use 
of a binding material out of lignite 
from Caiaornia. Texas and North Da- 
kota. Tlie difrtculty heretofore with 
the manufacture of bricjuets has been 
the cost of the pitch which Is con- 
sidered necessary to hold the coal dust 
together. 

Lignite is a poor form of coal, brown 
in color, and is found in great abund- 
ance In several Western states, no- 
tably North and South Dakota. Mon- 
tana and Texas. Its use has been 
greatly restricted because of its ten- 
dency to slack or turn to dust shortly 
after It i.s mined and l)rought to the 
surface. Because of the great amount 
of moisture it contained — between 30 
and 40 per cent — the lignite has been 
difti(-ult to burn under boilers or in 
stovfs. Tii«re is .said to be 150.000 
square miles of territory underlain by 
lignite and millions of acres belong to 
the government. The bureau of mlne.s. 
some time ago. conducted a aeries of 
exp^^riments at the pumping plant of 
the reclamation service, at Willlston. 
' N D.. and succeeded In developing a 
furnace that would burn the lignite 
satisfactorily. But this did not solve 
the prol lem of the transportation of 
the lignite. The bureau therefore sent 
to (Jermany. where the briquetting of 
lignite is much farther advanced, and 
obtained from that country a powerful 
briquettlng machine. The experiments 
liave gone far enough to Indicate that 
lignite can be satisfactorily briquetted 



>00 LATE 
TO CIASSIFY 

One Cmut m Ward Each laaartloa. 
He AAvartlacniaat Laaa Thaa IB Oaate 



at a cosPthaT makes the manufacture 
of brlquetes commercially possible. 
K«»altH of Value. 

The results of the experiments are 
contained in a bulletin ••Briquettlng 
Testa of Lignite." Just issued by the 
l)ureau (JT mffles. The author. Charle.s 
L. Wrlgiwt. ^ys; "The results of the 
brlquettiftg Investigations conducted 
by the #+»ve#flment are expected to 
prove of coit*derable value, not only 
to the g«verMient itself as the owner 
of extenirtveWgnite deposits and the 
largest Stns!fc' purchaser of fuel, but 
also to thfr*4people In the regions 
where ll|:nit« Is found. The probletn 
of a fueKsujmJy in those regions is of 
peculiar InteT^st. for many of the lig- 
nite deposlLs are situated long dis- 
tances from" fields of high-grade 
coal. The problem assumes still larger 
proportions when one realizes that the 
development of manufacturing indus- 
tries in those regions depends upo.i 
the ability to obtain a cheap and sat- 
isfactory fuel." 

.Mr. Wright gives the approximate 
cost of briquets, loaded on cars, from 
a briquet plant located at the mines, 
as 12.51 in Texas; $3.53 in North Da- 
kota: and in California as $$5.24. This 
applies to briquettlng run-of-mlne Ug: 
nite to Improve Its heat value and 
weather resisting properties rather 
tlian to briquettlng slack or waste 
coal. It i.s believed it will be possible 
to make briquets from the waste coal, 
which will reduce the cost materially 



CITY BRIEFS 



Your 

Gredit is 

Good 




Your 

Gredit is 

Good 



PrlBtlns and Bookblndlns 

Thwlng-Stewart Co. Both 'phones. 114 

♦^ ■ 

Open Meeting ny Club. 

The Fifth Ward Hillside Improve- 
ment club has planned a large meet- 
ing for tomorrow night, having ex- 
tended a general invitation to other 
clubs In the city and to the public geji- 
eially. A number of senators and ^ov- 
resentatlves of the last legislature 
liave been asked to addre.ss the meet- 
ing as liave several candidates for the 
school board. The meeting will be 
held at the Emerson school. 



hllU.m at Atlaatle City. 

George Munsey. J. L. Crawford. F. H, 
Chandler. R. H. Sessions and A. W. 
Lynch have left for Atlantic City to 
represent the Duluth lodge of Elks at 
the national convention. 






Mnat Serve Five Year*. 

Sheriff Melning left this afternoon 
for Stillwater with Adam Kampinskl, 
who will enter the prison at Stillwater 
to serve a five-year term for rape. 
Kampinski ia 30 years old. He was ar- 
rested and convicted in district court 
some time ago on evidence given by 
Rachel Taylor. 



County Board Meetn. 

The board o( county commissioners 
met this afternoon for the semi-annual 
session. 



SPEGIAL GLEARANeE 

MAHOGANY and DARK OAK 
DINING ROOM FURNITURE 

25^0 to 50% Discount 

SALE BE GAN M ONDAY, JULY JO 

Nearly 200 pieces of medium and fine Dining Room Furniture included in this sale 
at prices that make every dollar do double duty. You can obtain a beautiful Dining 
Room Set in dark oak or mahogany at prices that will surprise you. If you desire to 
match up a dining set you already have, this is your opportunity, for the saie includes 
hundreds of odd pieces, such as Chairs, Dining Tables, China Closets, Buffets and Side 
Tables in all sizes and designs. We mention a few items below to give an idea of 
the exceedingly low prices you will find here : 

$32.00 

Regular $38 Mahogany djl Q AA 
China Closets for ^Xii.\9\9 



While trying to imitate the 
aive' act at the carnival last 



•high 
week. 
Thomas Beaudy. ;in 11 -year-old West 
Duluth boy yesterday afternoon broke 
his right arm, „,,,.., 

Thomas lives at 5ala Raleigh street 
■with his mother, who keeps a con- 
fection store. After the accident the 
bones were set by a doctor and he Is 
resting easily today „^i^u 

A number of the boys in the neigh- 
borh'Mjd had erected a scaffold and an 
arrangement similar to the net. used in 
tlie real "high dive" at the carnival. 

Thomas was chosen for the honors 
ami on his first trial jumped about 
twenty feet, alighting on ins right 
Bide and fracturing one of the bones 
In his iirm 

FIJNER.XL SERVirES FOR 

VU TIM OF RINAWAY. 



SPEND YOUR VACATION 

at the Island L «ke lun, olnliteen aad 
one-half mllen out on RIee Lake ro>.d. 
Fine I- tobiuK and Hunting, and tlie 
Bent of >leal» mimI l.odi&inK. HateH. »10 
per week. ln«>hidi«K boat.x nmi uiinno^vN, 
\« niontiuiloen. I'or furtlier Informa- 
tirand, ^Vri; Duluth, 



Gypay la Fined. 

Sophia Traho. a gypsy, arrested at 
New Duluth Saturday afternoon on a 
charge of having stolen $3 from a wom- 
a:. whose fortune she wanted to tell, 
and for taking a can of tomatoes from 
a hotel, was found guilty in police 
court this morning and fined $50 and 
costs or thirty days in the county jaiL 



YOU WILL FI.ND THE ACME OF SAT- 
isfactory service in hair dressing, 
scalp treatment, facial massage and 
manicuring at MLss Horrigans Hair 
Shop. 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR. MOLES, 
warts, removed forever. Miss Kelly's 
Manicuring and Massaging Parlors, 
131 West Supe rior street. 

LA CLAIRE. BASKET BRAID. BIS- 
cuit colls of real human hair. 25 per 
cent off for one week only. Beauty 
Comfort shop. 20 West Superior 
street, upstairs. 

FOR RE.N'T— FOIR-ROOM Ht)U8E. 321 
East Fifth street: water, sewer and 
electric light. Call Bloom & Co.. Hi 
W. St First street. 



lion eall 
Melrose. 



'/.eiiiih 



10 o'clock 
Catholic church, 
west and Superior 
Burial will be in Calvary ceme- 



1 I vicHs for Pasquale Marie, 
ji vc,;.-, ..i I. who was killed Saturday 
afternoon in a runaway accident at 
Kew Duluth. will be held tomorrow 
rnornlns? al 9:30 o'clock from the Ftlia 
trault undertaking rooms at 
from the Italian 
Kle.enth avenue 
street. 
tery. 

( ARMVAL LEAVES: (ITIZENS 
WELL PLEASED WITH SHOWS 

Saturdav night finished the week's 
■tay of the Parker Canlval company 
and the trainload of shows pulled out 
for Crookaton. Sunday morning 

West Duluth business men are 
pleased with the efforts of the cele- 
bration committee and had no fault to 
find with the carnival attractions. The 
shows wore above the standard and 
were i5lean and wholesome 

During the week, there was but lit- 
tle rowdyism and only on one night. 
«aturd»iv. did the police allow the 
throwing of confetti. On Saturday 
evening, two children were reported 
lost but both were found. 

At 3 o'clock Sunday morning, the 
West Duluth police picked up the 7- 
year-old son of Victor Sands of 313 
North Fifty-ninth avenue west in the 
doorwav of a house on Central ave- 
nue, where the youngster had fallen 

asleep 

.* ■ 

Johnson Funeral. 

The funeral of Walter Herbert. 
2- year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Cliris 
Johnson of 419 North Fifty-eighth ave- 
nue west, who died of pnumonta yes- 
terday at Solon Springs, Wis., will take 
place Wedne.sday afternoon at 2 o clock 
from Westminster Presbyterian church, 
Fifty-eiKhth avenue west and Ramsey 
street. Burial will be made In Oneota 

cemetery. 

• 

Fire in Resitlence. 

A fire which started from the ex- 
plosion of a kerosene atove, damaged 
the home of A. T. McCann. 5119 Roose- 
«It street to the extent of $300 last 
eening. The blaze was confined mostly 
to the kitchen and upstairs. The 



TWO PARTNERS 

PA^ AWAY 

Duiuth MaE Hears of One's 

Death While Attending 

Other's Funeral 

While CharU* Miki was at Tower 
today attending the funeral of a man 
who was in pa 'tnersriip with him In 
the saloon busin'j.-s in that town, l,<a 
received a telefram announcing the 
death of John Helbakka. who was 
also in the saloon business with Miki 
here. Their place of business id at 
322 Lake avet ue cOUth. Helbakka 
UKU at St. Mar -'a hospital this morn- 
ing of blood pousoning. He was about 
t5 years old ar d had no relatlvea in 
this funtry. 



DRESSM.VKINO _ PLAIN SEWING 
done reasonable. &121 Colorado 
street. 



Scatenee la Suapeuded. 

Owen McGlnnls. arrested on the com- 
plaint that he had obtained $3 from 
reterson Bros.. Lake avenue saloon- 
keepers, several days ago, was ar- 
raigned in police court this morning oa 
I charge of drunkenness. He pleaded 
guilty, but on his earnest representa- 
tion that he wanted to go to a home in 
Milwaukee, sentence was suspended. It 
was claimed that he deposited a worth- 
less check for $300 ua security for the 
$3. 



Hanated the Depot. 

John H. Shoi>erg walked up and down 
the streets and tiirough the depots so 
long yesterday that he attracted the 
attention of the police. He was carry- 
ing a suit case but did not take any 
train. When questioned he at first re- 
fused to say ii'word. He was booked 
on a charge of suspected insanity but 
was later sent to his home. 



WANTED— AT ONCE — WASHWOMAN 
to call for washing. Apply Esmond 
hotel, Twentietli avenue 
Mi<-iilgan street. 



west and 



Fi)H RENT— FURNISHED ROOM FOR 
light housekeeping; all conveniences. 
Call Melrose 4389. 410 West Fourth 
street. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR. MOLES, 
warts, removed forever. Miss Kelly's 
Manicuring and Massaging Parlors, 
131 West Superior street. 



Launches and all kinds of small boats. 
H. S. Pattersoi.. «th Ave. west slip. 



For Motor Parties 

linn out eighteen and one-half niilen 
on the Hlee Luke road to the I.tland 
Lake Inn and lift one of thone Sprlna 
4 hieken r>innei» at any hour, or na 
afternoon luneh -on, Merved on tb«* larite 
Moreeued porehe* overlookiuu the lake. 



\\- ANTE D— C HAM B E R 
McKay. 



MAID. HOTEL 



F-OR RENT— TO COUPLE WITHOUT 
children, five-room furnished cottage 
in fine condition, electric ll;fht, gas 
for cooking, fine yard. 1522 Minne- 
sota avenue. Park Point. Call Mel- 
rose 925 or Grand 600. 



FOUND— TOP OR SIDE OF AUTOMO- 
blle. Owner can have same by call- 
ing at 209 Eleventh avenue wes'i. 
and paying for this ad 

BIRTHS. 

CATE — .V daughter was born to Mr. 

and Mrs. C. W. Cate of 1008 East 

Eighth street. July 6. 
SALO — -A daughter was born to Mr. and 

Mrs. V. .Salo of 803 East Second 

street. July 6. 
r-OLE.MAN — A son was bom to Mr. 

and Mrs. C F. Coleman of 2020 East 

First street. July 1. 



PleadM Not Gnllty. 

George Leary, a painter, pleaded not 
guilty in police court this morning to 
having stolen a $5 bill from Claus Jer- 
onlmous. His trial waa set for tomor- 
row afternoon. It is claimed that Jer- 
ontmous gave him the bill with the re- 
quest that he make a purchase for hira, 
but he failed to come back with either 
the package or the money. 

Another Smallpox Caae. 

One more case of amallpox at Arnold, 
which la said to have had an epidemic 
of the disease this year, was reported 
to the health department this morning. 
The patient had been employed In a 
downtown store and had never been 
vaccinated. He and his family will be 
kept under quarantine until all danger 
is past. 



Regular $18 Dark Oak 
Dining Tables for 

Regular $28 Dark Oak 
Dining Tables for 

Regular $40 Dark Oak 
Dining Tables for 

Regular $35 Dark Oak 
Buffets for 

Regular $50 Dark Oak 
Buffets for 

Regular $20 Dark Oak 
China Closets for 

Regular $25 Dark Oak 
China Closets for 

Regular $40 Mahogany 
Dining Tables for 

Regular $50 Mahogany 
Dining Tables for 

Regular $58 Mahogany 
Dining Tables for 

Regular $50 Mahogany 
Buffets for 



$9.00 
$14.00 
$22.00 
$17.50 
$27.00 
$10.00 
$14.50 
$19.50 
$27.00 
$32.00 
$25.00 



Regular $60 Mahogany 
Buffets for 



•^r 



•• 



Regular $48 Mahogany MC AA 
China Closets for ^>^UaVU 

Regular $6.50 Mahogany 
Dining Chairs for , 

Regular $10 Mahogany 
Dining Chairs for 

Regular $3.00 Dark Oak 
Dining Chairs for 

Regular $4.50 Dark Oak M C A 
Dining Chairs for ^^-^V 

Dark Oak Dining Sets, 
complete, for 

Including Table, Buffet and 6 Chairs. 

Same, including China 
Closet, for 

Mahogany Dining Sets, 
complete, for 

Including Table, Buffet and 6 Chairs. 

Same, including China 
Closet, for 



$3.85 
$6.75 

$1.50 

$2.50 

$35.00 

6 Chairs. 

$44.00 
$69.50 

6 Chairs. 

$88.50 



1 



r 



ALL SOLD ON EaSY PAYMENTS 




THE LADIES' AID OF 
GRACE M. E. CHURCH 

will give a pirnle Wedneiiday After- 
noon, July llith, at I.int'olu I'ark. All 
liidleH of the aid and eongreKatlon are 
Invited to hrlag tlieir baMltrtn and pre- 
pare for a good time, Wednewday at 
2:30. 




HANGS HIMSELF IN 

REAR OF SALOON. 



I DEATHS AND FUNERALS \ 

H.\N.s«»N — H»-rman Hanson, aged 71 
years, a settlor at Beartrap, near 
Burnett on the Duluth. Mlssabe & 
Northern railroad, died Sunday morn- 
ing at St. Luke's hospital. The fu- 
• neral will be held Thursday after- 
noon at 2 o'clock from Flood & Hor- 
gan's un dertaking rooms. 

Monuments direct from factory, no 
store rent, no agents; you save 21 
per cent. Charles Benson, cut stone 
contractor, 2301 West Second street. 
or'phon« me, Lincoln 334, new 'phone. 

MONUMK.NTS AT COST, to save expense 
of moving them to our new building 
at 2C0 E. Sup. St. P. N. Peterson 
Granite Co.. 332 E. Sup. St. 



PERSONAL 



GOPHER 



THE NAME OF- 



SHOE REPAIRING 

FAME 

WHILE YOU WAIT 




John Olene. rO years old. a familiar 
figure about So ith Range and Superior, 
committed suicde Saturday by hang- 
ing. He was d scovered in a shed at 
the rear of Ct le's saloon at South 
Range yesterdi y morning. The body 
was suspended from the roof of the 
building by a \ ortlon of a clothes line 
tied around h s neck. Olene is be- 
lieved to have been driven to the I'^t 
by the drink l.ablt to which he had 
been a slave for the past few years. 



TWO BUILD INTiS 

DAMAGED BY FIRE. 



A fire whic! started in the meat 
market of Waler Konzcski, 301 West 
Fifth street. Saturday, practically de- 
.stroyed that b lildlng and the adjoin- 
ing structure, « ccupied by H. F. Booth, 
confectioner, v as also badly gutted. 
The loss is about $2,300. Both struc- 
tures were owned by the occupants. 



Boy Is Injured. 



Melvin John." on. ll-year-old son of 
Adolph JohnsoT . 606 Hammond avenue, 
was Injured Saturday afternoon at the 
carnival grounds, when playmates 
pushed him up against the merry-go- 
round and for' ed him against one of 
the large flvwtieels. The fiesh was 
torn from his leg and hlg foot badly 
lacerated. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To J. Stuart, remodeling. East 
Tenth street between Third 
and Fourth avenues $ .. 150 

To O. Thorstad. frame cottage. 
West Fourth street between 
Forty-second and Forty- 
third avenues 500 

To H. Carlson, frome dwelling, 
West Eighth street between 
Fifty-eighth and Fifty- 
ninth avenues 2.500 

To Cora A. Underbill, frame 
dwelling. East Fourth street 
Twenty-first and Twenty- 
second avenues 4.000 

To G. Collatz. repair church 
roof. East Second street be- 
tween Second and Third ave- 
nues 200 

To H. E. DItzell. basement and 
repairs. .Jefferson street be- 
tween Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth avenues 600 

To A. Johnson, addition, 
Oneota street between For- 
tieth and Forty-first avenues 
west 200 

To S. M. Kaner. porch and 
foundation. East Fifth street 
between Eleventh and 
Twelfth avenues 500 

To A. Peterson frame dwell- 
ing. East Seventh street be- 
tween Twelfth and Thir- 
teenth avenues ^ 1,600 



F. A. Hathaway, member.ship secre- 
tary of the y. M. C. A., has returned 
from the Lake Geneva. Wis., confer- 
ence. J. R. Batchelor physical direc- 
tor, remained at Lake Geneva. 

Dr. C. W. Benson left today for Eau 
Claire to attend the meeting of the 
Wisconsin State Dental association. Dr. 
Benson will give a clinic on crown and 
bridge work. 

F. O. Bradley, wife and party, re- 
turned this morning from Lake Ver- 
milion, where they enjoyed a week's 
outing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Collins and 
Miss Hertha Engleder of New York will 
arrive Wednesday to be the guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin J. Collins of ,2J01 
East Fifth street. 

Thomas Binne of Port Arthur Is at 
the Lenox. 

J. Litman of Virginia is at the 
Lenox. 

Mrs. Bert Shilas of Deer River is at 
the Lenox. 

A. W, Dokkin of Eveleth is at the 
McKay. 

S. A. Sanford of Rainy River is at 
the McKay. 

L. J. Mecka of Hibblng Is at the 
McKay. 

P J. Ryan of Hibblng Is at the St. 
Louis. 

William Grekala of Hibblng is at the 
St. Louis. 



optimistic as had been expected. The 
metal stocks were expected to decrease 
about lO.UOO.OOO pounds. 

The report of the United States Steel 
corporation unfilled tonnage, 3.361.000. 
was mildly favorable. It was a day of 
reports and trading was light as trad- 
ers were busily engaged in digesting 
tne figures on various crops and metal 
supplies which were is.sued in quick 
succession. . „ . 

Butte Alex Scott sold at 75c, Calumet 
& Montana at BOc, Carman at 71c. San 
Antonio at $4.12 Va and Summit at 4'Jc 
and 50c. 

Amalgamated sold at $68.8714. 
$70.12 V» to $69.50. Calumet & Arizona at 
$59 to $58.50 to $59 to $58.75, GirouK at 
$6.50, $6.62^2 and $6.50. Greene at 
$7.37Vi. North Butte at 33.25, $33. $33.50 

and $33.25. 

• • • 

New York. July 10. — The monthly re- 
port of llie Cojiijer Producers' associa- 
tion for June was in all respects rather 
favorable the most noteworthy featuro 
oeing a decrease of over S. 500, "00 
pounds in stocks on hand compared 
wl'h the previous month. Prviduction 
for June was some 2,400,>»0y pouiKl.s 
under May. Domestic d?^liverles fell 
oft' almost 3. 000. 000 pounds, but this 
was more than offset by an increase 
of almost 9.500.000 pounds in evports 
The detailed statement follows: 

Stock of marketable copper of a'l 
kinds on hand at all points In the 
United States. June 1, 165, 99^,, 932 
pounds. Production of niarketabli 
copper during June fmni ail domestic 
and foreign sources, 124.J;rt4,312 
oounds. Deliveries of marketai)le cop- 
i)er during June, for domestic consump- 
tion, 61.655.561; for export. 71,460,519; 
total. 133,116,080 pounds. Stock of 
marketable copper of all kinds on hand 
at all point..? in the United .-Staten, July 
1, 157.434,164. 

• • ♦ 

Closing quotations on the Duluth 
Stock exchange today follow: 



ELKS' COLORS 
IN EVIDENCE 

Atlantic City Is Gathering 

Place of Grand 

Lodge. 

Booms for Office in the 

Order Get an Early 

Start 



they had experienced a change of 
feeling. 

AttcMid Y. P. S, C. E. Me^tiiiic. 

In the crowd that packed the audi- 
torium was August Herrman of Cin- 
cinnati, grand ex.alted ruler of the 
Elks and nearly his entire delegation. 



PETITION FOR WOMAN. 

Thousands 



in United Stale.s 
With Canada. 



Plead 



LUted StocfcM — 



i Bid. I Asked 



COPPERS LOWER; 
STRENGTH LOST 

Values Decline Toward Close 

on Poor Crop Estimates 

i)f Government. 

The stofck market opened strong to- 
day and advanced. After noon values 
began to ease off and when the gov- 
ernmenfscrop reports were made pub- 
lic the entire list declined. The poor 
showing for spring wheat was the chief 
bearish factor. Winter wheat also was 
less favorable than had been expected. 
All crops 3how great deterioration. 

The copper report showing a decrease 
of 8.500,000 pounds in metal stocks was 
regarded as favorable although not as 



.Vmertcan Saginaw . 
Butte Coalition .... 
Butte Alex-Scott, fl. 
Butte-Ballaklava . . 
Calumet & Arizona. 
Cactus Development 

Copper Queei^ 

Denn- Arizona 

Giroux Consolidated. 
Greene-Cananea . . . 

Keweenaw 

Live Oak Development. 
North Butte .. 

Ojlbway 

Red Warrior 
.Savanna, pt. pd 
-avanna. fl. pd. 
Shatiuck-Arizor.a 
Warren Development 
Warrior Development 

Unlisted $t 
Amazon Montana 

Butte & Ely 

Butte & Superior 
Butte & Superior, old. 
Calumet &. Montana 
Calumet & Corbin 
Calumet He Sonora 
Carman Consolidated 
Chief Consolidated 

Cliff 

Elenlta Development 
Keating Gold 
North American 

Summit 

San Antonio 

St. Mary 

Tuolumne 

Vermilion Steel & Iron 




Total number shares 2,720. 



MARTIN COLE TALKS 

TO LONGSHOREMEN. 



Toledo, Ohio, July 10. — The nine- 
teenth annual convention of the Inter- 
national Longshoremen's association 
convened in Memorial hall here today. 
Mayor Brand Whitlock extended the 
hospitality of the city to the delegates 
and their wives. Addresses also were 
delivered bv President T. V. O'Connor 
and Secretary Joyce and Capt. Martin 
Cole of Duluth, Minn., vice president of 
the Tugmen's union. 

President O'Connor stated that he | 
was not aware of any grievances that 
would come before the present conven- 
tion. 



Atlantic City, N. J., July 10. — 
Purple and white envelopes this re- 
sort, and elks' heads and clocks with 
their hands pointing to the mystic 
hour of 11 are in almost every nich«i 
m honor of the visitng members of 
the Benevolent and Protectlv Order 
Elks, who have been coming into 
town by hundreds from every sec- 
tion of the country since Saturday. 
The convention -will begin tonight 
when Governor Woodrow Wilson will 
bid the degelates welcome. 

The annual reports of Grand Ex- 
alted Ruler Garry Herrman and 
Grand Secretary Robinson show that 
forty new lodges have been insti- 
tuted. The net increase in member- 
ship for the year was 28,389. bring- 
ing the total number of Elks up to 
359,677. The order distributed near- 
ly $500,000 in charity last year and 
the total assets of all the Elks' 
lodges are more than $17,000,000. 
Booms For Office Started. 

Booms for office in the grand lodge 
are already under way. The Louisi- 
ana Elks are backing Col. John P. 
Sullivan, former district attorney of 
Xev Orleans, for grand exalted ruler. 
Charles A. Rasbury of Dallas, Tex.. 
Is the favorite son of the Lone Star 
state. New York has 
Arthur C. Moreland. 
set for Tuesday. 

Ihe men's meeting on the Million 
Dollar pier Sunday afternoon, in con- 
nection with the twenty-fifth Inter- 
national Christian Endeaver conven- 
tion, was one of the largest ever held 
in this re.sort. Men were moved to 
tears by some of the stirring ad- 
dresses. Fred B. Smith of New 
York, secretary of the international 
committee of Young Men's Christian 
associations was one of the principal 
sneakers. The title of his address 
was "The Fatal Mistake." Before 
the services came to an " end more 
than 100 men rose and testified that 



Ottawa, Ont.. July 10 — Three more 
sacks full of petitions praying for ex- 
ecutive clemency In the case of Mrs. 
Angelina Neapolitana, under sentence to 
be hanged at Sault .Sie. Marie. Ont., 
next month for the murder of her hus- 
band, have been received by the jus- 
tice department. The petitions now 
numbers tens of thousand-s. represent- 
ing all parts of the continent. 

Because of its peculiarly distressing 
conditions, the case has excited special 
interest in the United States. Petitions 
have been received by hundreds from 
Chicago and other American cities. 
Even from Oklahoma and other points 
thousands of miles away have come re- 
quests for mercy and offers to pay for 
legal assistance for the woman if her 
case comes before the cabinet for final 
consideration. 

In only one instance has capital 
puni.shment ever been imposed on a 
woman in Canada 



SHRINERS GATHERING 

AT ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



a candidate in 
The election is 



Rochester. N. Y.. July 10.— While tha 
formal sessions of the annual conven- 
tion of the Imperial council of the An- 
cient Arabic Order. Nobles of the Mys- 
tic Shrine, do not begin until Tuesday, 
hundreds of Shriners representing all 
sections of the country are already in 
the city and their entert.Vnnient Is 
under wav. The convention proper will 
extend through Tuesday. Wednesday 
and Thur.«day. Last night there was 
an informal reception at headquarters 
and a special service itl Central Pres- 
byterian church. 

Two cities, Baltimore and Los An- 
geles, are In the field for the conven- 
tion next year. 

KILLS SELF WHEN BODY 

OF HUSBAND ARRIVES. 



t 



«a*. 



Chicago, 111.. July 10. — Mrs. Mabelle 
Seymour, wife of Joe Seymour who 
died suddenly at Inkster. N. D., a few 
days ago, committed suicide here Sat- 
urday upon the arrival of the body of 
her husband. Their home is in To- 
ronto, Can. 

MAY HAVE DIED IN 

STORM ON LAKE ERIE. 



I 



i^i^ 



Sandusky, Ohio, July 10. — No word 
has been received here from Alfred 
Sharlow, a fisherman of this city, who 
with his wife and infant son started 
on a cruise on Lake Erie .Saturday In 
a small sailboat. It is feared they have 
been lost in the gale that swept the 
lake Thursday. 



I- 



V I 



Read The 
HeraldWants 



TWIN PORTS TRUNK CO. 

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THE DULUTH HERALD: 



July 10, 1911. 



Nviuk. N. Y.. July 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Itasca II, the largest and 
-"ist beautiful cruising motor yacht 

ever seen in the Erie canal, and in fact 
one of the finest ever constructed, 
started on Saturday from Nyack en 
route to Chippewa bay on the St. Law- 
rence river, the summer home of her 
owner. ex-Senator E. B. Hawkins of 
Duluth. Itasca II was launched re- 
cently at the shipyards of the Hudson 
Yacht & Boat company at Nyack. The 
vessel, which is ninety-eight feet long, 
with beam measurement of sixteen 
leet, six inches, was built fi>r Mr. Haw- 
kins under the immediate supervision 
of her designers. Whittelsey & Whit- 
telsey of New York. ^ ,» 

The owners wish was for a yacht of 
unu«ual s-treiigth. and his desires iiave 
been met in every particular. The keel 
and frame are of heavy white oak, the 
ribs i'elng set much closer together 
than js customary. The deck beams 
are of the same material. Floor frames 
and keel are backed up by powerful 
keelsons and the whole of the struc- 
ture work is through riveted. The deck 
Is of white pine calked, with mahogany 
plank shear, waterways, etc. There 
are six watertight bulkheads, cutting 
the boat into seven compartments, and 
two other compartments with diagonal 
bulkheads, intended mainly to increase 
the vessel's strength. 

Another notable feature of Itasca II 
Is the sumptuousness of her fittings. 
These, of the finest mahogany, were all 
manufactured at the plant of the Hud- 
son Yacht & Boat company. The in- 
terior decorations are mahogany arid 
white. The owner's room is located 
amlilships. It iias a large divan with 
alcoves and lockers above fitted to 
Btari'oard, and double berth to port. 
It Is upholstered in green silk. To 
starboard is a private wardrobe and to 
port a private toilet ruom. a bureau 
being between. Aloft this large room 
to starboard, bv the companlonway. 
are a private buffet and Icebox, and a 
trunk room. There are two other com- 



modious stateroom 
spectlvely in pink 
bathroom for guesti 

Tiie pilot house, 
fitted structure, is 
and