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Full text of "The Forfar Directory and Yearbook 1887"

FORFAR PUBLIC LIBRARY 



LOCAL COLLECTS® 



No. 



Presented by 



ANGUS - CULTURAL SERVICES 




3 8046 00947 083 1 



%Vl 



21 DAYS ALLOWED FOR 
READING THIS BOOK. 

Overdue Books Charged at 
lp per Day. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

National Library of Scotland 



http://www.archive.org/details/forfardirectoryy1887unse 




THE 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



AND 



^ YMR-BOOK, ►► 



FOK 



1887, 






CONTAINING ' . " ' ♦. • . .... ' 



i 



A LIST OF THE HOUSEHOLDERS OF THE BURGH, DIRECTORY 

OF TRADES AND PROFESSIONS, LIST OF PUBLIC 

BOARDS, SOCIETIES, ETC. 

ALSO, 

COUNTY INFORMATION, AND A LIST OF FARMERS IN THE 
ADJOINING PARISHES. 



r 



^PROPERTY 

PRICE ON2 PEN^. 



FORF 



.^Jhrr 



FORFAR PUBL 
LIBRARY 



PRINTED & PUBLISHED BY W. SHEPHERD, CASTLE ST. 

1886. 






MY 



9 



J&a&ie&' Qutfittexz 



PANGY BRLL I3RESSES 



JVIOURNI 



Slb^S, DRESSES, 
Hats, Bonnets, Feathers, 

SONS, LACES, & FRILLINGS, 

Mantles, & Paletots. 

:es, Crapes. 
(HOSIERY, GLOVES, STAYS, UMBRELLAS, pURS^^W) 




THE 



^ BEST VALUE 

IN FLANNELS 



SUaufeete, Cottons 



AGENTS FOR THE SALE Ot 

Vorwerk's Patent Skirt & Dress Bands 

AND 

JHexanttye's Celebrated 

GOLD MEDAL 

FRENCH ^K<^&9&^ SHEETINGS, NAPERY, CRETONNES 

Gloves. ,\ Ticks, Oowft Quilts, 

Hearth Rugs, Window Hollands, tc. 

7HE "UfcllgUE" 
Gent's TIES, SCARFS, COLLARS, 

Shirts and Shirtings 



Agents for The CHEMICAL 
Cleaning & Dyeing Co., 

Regent St., LONDON, 




i 29 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. K 



LADIES' 
DEPARTMENT. 



Silks, 
Plushes, 
Velvets, 
Crapes, 
Velveteens, 
Merinoes, 
Dresses, 
Jackets, 
Ulsters, 
Shawls, 
Mantle Cloths, 
Fur Capes, 
Muffs, 
Ties, 
Trimmings, 
Ribbons, 
Laces, 
Frillings, 
Prints. 
Umbrellas, 
Sunshades, 
Hosiery, 
Gloves, 
Stays, 
Corsets, 
Silk Squares, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, 
Buttons, 
Braids, 
Fringes, 
Trimmings, 
Skirts. 
Winceys, 
Tartans, 
Fancy 
Wool Goods, 
Small Wares, 
Waterproof 
Mantles, 
Pinafores, 
Aprons, 



ANDERSON f Co, 

Wholesale &. Retail drapers, 

Invite Public Attention to their Large 
Stock of 

(General fltapcni (Soois, 

Which for Quality and Price will bear 
favourable comparison with the largest 
houses in the country, and being selected 
from the stocks of the best Manufacturers , 
can be confidently recommended for hard 
wear. 



FLAjMNELS & PLAIOIJMGS 

Made from the best Wools, and cannot be sur- 
passed for value. 

BLAJMKETS, BLAJNKETS. 

Anderson's Real Scotch Teviot Blankets have 
have become " Household Words," and House- 
hold Comforts to Thousands. 

COTTONS & SHEETINGS 

Warranted Pure and Shrunk ; our value and 
makes are too well known to require commen- 
dation. 

HOUSEHOLD and TABLE LINENS 

Direct from the best Manufacturers, enable us to 
give reliable Goods at the Lowest Prices. 

ALWAYS IN STOCK, 

A large variety of Table Covers, Bed Covers, Bed 
Ticks, Curtains, Cretonnes, Furniture Twills, 
Rugs, Floorcloths, Window Hollands, Muslin 
Blinds, Diapers, Toilet Covers, &"c, at prices 
which cannot be beaten. 

Charities supplied at Wholesale Prices. 

PATTERN'S FREE ON APPLICATION. 



ANDERSON & CO., 

145, 1451 & 14/ EAS T HIGH STREET. 



GENTS' 
DEPARTMENT 



Worsted 
Coatings, 
Suitings, 
Overcoatings, 
Trouserings, 
Shuts, 
Shirtings, 
L. W. Pants 
and Shirts, 
Merino Pants 
and Shirts, 
Lambskin and 
Plaiding Drawers, 
Hats, 
Caps, 
Umbrellas, 
Gloves, 
Scarfs & Ties, 
Fronts, 
Collars, 
Braces, 
Belts, 
Waterproof 
Coats, 
Cardigan Jackets, 
Cords, 
Moleskins, 
Cord and Mole 
Trousers, 
Boys' Suits, 
Boys' Jackets, 
Boys' Overcoats. 
Boys' Trousers, 
Boys' Jersey Suits, 
Jersey Jackets, 
Stockings, 
Socks. 



Tim-CLASSJAILORIiro. 

SUPERIOR STYLES, AND UNEXCEPTIONABLE FITTING AT VERY 
MODERATE PRICES. 




HAVE much pleasure in informing my Customers and the 
Public that my Stock is now complete, with a magnificent 
Assortment of New Goods adapted for Gentlemen's, Youths', 
^^- and Boys' wear. The qualities, which range from medium to 
the very finest manufactured, include the Latest Novelties in WEST of 
ENGLAND COATINGS, SUITINGS, and TROUSERINGS. A 
Rich and Choice Selection of SAXONY and CHEVIOT TWEEDS, 
for Business and Travelling Suits, Ulsters, &c. As better goods are not 
to be had at any price, I feel confident they will give every satisfaction 
and wear. 

OVERCOATS. — I hardly require to assure the Public that no better 
value in Overcoats was ever offered — style, workmanship, and quality of 
material having given full satisfaction to a wide and rapidly-increasing 
circle of Customers. 

SCHOOL OUTFITS made on the shortest notice, from Cloths and 
Tweeds of the best and strongest description, specially adapted for 
school wear. 

DRESS SUITS and MOURNING SUITS Made on the Shortest possible Notice. 



&iver L ies of eueipj description j$ade to '(fhjdeij. 

Dress Shirts, Oxford and Regatta Shirts, Tweed Shirts, &c. White and Shet- 
land Flannel for Gents' Undershirts always kept in Stock. Shirts of every de- 
scription made to measure, fit and style guaranteed. Lambswool Shirts and 
Pants in all the different textures and qualities. 

^ &| 111* ^ PELT HA7§. ^ 

[N ALL THE LEADING SHAPES AND STYLES, AND OF SUPERIOR 
QUALITY, ALWAYS IN HAND. 



A. SPALDING, 

CKOSS, FORFAR. 



THE 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



AND 



•4. YEAR-BOOR, ►* 



FOK 



1887, 



i 

CONTAINING 

A LIST OF THE HOUSEHOLDERS OF THE BURGH, DIRECTORY 

OF TRADES AND PROFESSIONS, LIST OF PUBLIC 

BOARDS, SOCIETIES, ETC. 

ALSO, 

COUNTY INFORMATION, AND A LIST OF FARMERS IN THE 
ADJOINING PARISHES, 



PKICE ONE PENNY. 



FOKFAK : 
PRINTED & PUBLISHED BY W. SHEPHERD, CASTLE ST. 

1886. 



In issuing The Forfar Directory for 1887, the Publisher begs 
to thank all those who have supplied information for it, and also 
Advertisers for their liberal patronage. He has used every endeavour 
to make it complete, accurate, and useful as a book of reference on 
matters connected with the Town, and hopes that it will be as 
favourably received as those of previous years — the success of which 
has been very gratifying. 

39 Castle Street, Forfar, 
December 1886. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 



Angling Club, 

Bands, 

Bank Offices, 

Bee-keepers' Society, 

Bible Society, 

Bicycle Clubs, 

Blind, Mission to the, 

Bowling Clubs, 

British and Foreign Correspondence 

Association, 

Building Society, 

Burgh Funds, 

Charity Mortifications, 

Chess Club, 

Chicken Show, 

Children's Church, 

Churches, 

Church Societies, 67- 

Coal Societies, 

County Information, 74- 

Courts : — 

Burgh or Bailie, 

Licensing, Burgh, 

Police, 

Sheriff 

Valuation Appeal, 

Cricket Club, 

Cm'ling Association, Angus, 

Curling Club, 

Dramatic Society, Forfar Amateur,.. 

Edinburgh Angus Club, 

Edinburgh Forfar Academy Club, . . . 

Educational Institutions, 

Factory Workers' Union, 

Fairs, Markets, &c. , 

Farmers in District, 50 

Fast Days, 

Fiars' Prices, 

Football Clubs, 

Foresters, Ancient Order of, 



73 
61 
62 
66 
68 
68 
65 
■68 
70 
75 

63 
63 
63 

75 
63 
71 
72 
71 
66 
68 
68 
65 
73 
49 
■52 
52 
75 
72 
71 



Page. 

Gas Accounts, 63 

Gas Corporation, 62 

Golf Club, 72 

Good Templar Lodges, 68 

Halls, 65 

Holidays, 52 

Householders, Female, 37-48 

Householders, Male, 5-37 

Infirmary, 65 

Joiners' Association, 73 

Justices of the Peace (Forfar). 63 

Lawn Tennis Club, 72 

Library, Public, 64 

Literary Society, 67 

Magistrates & Town Council, 61 

Masonic Lodges, 71 

Musical Societies, 66 

Oddfellows' Lodge, 71 

Parochial Board, 63-64 

Plate Glass Association, 69 

Police Commission, 62 

Police Commission Accounts, 62-63 

Post Office, 73-74 

Poultry Association, 68 

Quoiting Club, 72 

Reading Rooms, 66 

Registrar's Office, 64 

Religious Societies, 66 

Savings Bank 65 

Saving Societies, 69 

School Boards — Burgh, 64 

Landward, 64 

Session Clerks, 65 

Shepherds, Loyal Ancient, 71 

Temperance Societies, 68 

Tract Society, 67 

Trades and Professions, 53-59 

Volunteers, 66 

Yearly Societies, 70-71. 



Advertisements (with Index), Pages 77-103 

Almanac for 1887 inserted between pages 76 and 77. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 




MALE HOUSEHOLDERS. 



Adam, Charles 
Adam, David 
Adam, George 
Adam, George 
Adam, James 
Adam, James 
Adam, John 
Adam, William 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, James 
Adams, James 
Adamson, Hay 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James Wilson 
Adamson, John 
Adamson, Richard 
Adamson, Robert 
Adamson, Thomas 
Adamson, William 
Adamson, William 
Addison, John 
Aitken, Charles 
Aitkenhead, David 
Aldridge, John Mullings 
Alexander, Charles 
Alexander, David 
Alexander, David 
Alexander, George Paton 
Alexander, John 
Allan, David 
Allan, Douglas 
Allan, James 
Allan, John 
Allan, William 
Allan, William 
Allardice, Charles 
Allardice, Joseph 
Allardice, William 



Bootmaker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Labourer 

Gardener 

Gardener 

Carter 

Shuttle maker 

M.D. and Farmer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Residenter 

Farmer 

Weaver 

Labourer 

Manufacturer 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Supt. of county 

Tenter [police 

Builder 

Sawyer 

Blacksmith 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Surgeon 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Tenter 

Labourer 

Carter 

Shoemaker 



13 Osnaburgh street 
3 Green street 
33 South street 
15 Manor street 
9 South street 

12 Charles street 
18 Manor street 

51 Backwynd 
78 Dundee Loan 
Oathlaw 

186 East High street 
Prior Road 
54 Backwynd 
Drumgley, near Forfar 
28 South street 
3 Bell Place 
St. James' Road 
44 West High street 
1 Strang street 

5 Yeaman street 
3 Green street 
Headingplacestone cottage 
8 Bell Place 

44 Dundee Loan 

6 Archie's Park 
57 North street 
The Parsonage 

130 East High street 

Market Place 

178 East High street 

Littlecauseway 

27 John street 

26 Nursery Feus 

50 South street 

52 South street 

144 East High street 

13 Montrose Road 
99 East High street 
3 Zoar 

Dundee Road 

169 East High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, David 
Anderson, Hector 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John Charles 
Anderson, John Peter 
Anderson, Robert William 
Anderson, William 
Anderson, William 
Andrew, David 
Andrew, William 
Andrew, William 
Archie, John 
Armstrong, James 
Auchterlonie, David 
Rain, Alexander 
Balfour, Alexander 
Balfour. David 
Balfour, William 
Balfour, William 
Balharry, William 
Ballingall, Andrew 
Ballingall, David Christie 
Balmire, Alexander 
Barclay, George 
Barclay, Robert 
Barclay, Thomas 
Barrie, Charles 
Barron, James 
Barry, David 
Barry, David 
Batch elor, Alexander 
Beattie, James 
Bell, Alexander 
Bell, James 
Bell, William 
Bell, William 
Bell, William 
Bennet, Alexander 
Bennett, Andrew 
Binny, David, jun. 
Binny, James 
Bisset, James 
Black, Alexander 
Black, David 



Factory worker 
Carter 

Factory worker 
Baker 

V.S. & blacksmith 
Draper 

Wood merchant 
Tailor 
Labourer 
Factory worker 
Solicitor 
Solicitor 

Late clerk of Supply 
Baker 
Qu airier 
Hawker 
Hairdresser 
Gardener 
Gardener 
Loco, foreman 
Tenter 
Joiner 

Leather cutter 
Carter 
Labourer 
Currier 
Innkeeper 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Labourer 
Carter 
Draper 
Painter 

Factory worker 
Coal dealer 
Grocer & spirit dlr. 
Quarry-master 
Farmer 
Coachman 
Lapper 
Salesman 
Factory worker 
Mason 
Fireman 

Horsehirer and inn- 
Labourer [keeper 
Bank agent 
Collector 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Scavenger 



76 East High street 
91 North street 
East Sunnyside 
10 West High street 
26 West High street 
145 East High street 

1 Zoar 

18 Montrose Road 
24 North street 
85 Backwynd 
Glamis 

Lochbank House 
Rose Terrace 
Chapel Park 

22 Don street 

64 East High street 
46 Glamis Road 

23 St. James' Road 
Cowiehill 
Whitehills 

33 Prior Road 
21 Manor street 
9 Backwynd 

2 Dundee Road 
18 Glamis Road 

9 Backwynd 

102 West High Street 
32 South street 

16 Montrose Road 

3 Prior Lane 

21 Wellbraehead 
29 Castle street 
56 Dundee Road 
13 North street 
18 North street 
80 Castle street 
58 Dundee Road 
Fin a von 
Beech Hill 

12 Charles street 

13 East Sunnyside 

17 John street 

6 Glamis Road 

103 Backwynd 
Castle street 

15 Glamis Road 
West High street 

10 Glamis Road 

7 Green street 
32 Dundee Loan 

4 Dundee Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Black, David 

Black, James 

Black, James 

Black, William 

Black, William 

Blair, Charles 

Blair, Charles 

Blair, David 

Blair, James 

Blyth, George 

Blyth, John 

Boath, Andrew 

Boath, Andrew Petrie 

Boath, Charles 

Boath, David 

Boath, John 

Boath, John 

Boath, Joseph 

Boath, Robert 

Boath, William 

Boath, William 

Boath, William 

Booth, David Phillip 

Bowman, Adam 

Bowman, John 

Bowman, John 

Bowman, William 

Boyle, James Douglas 

Boyle, James 

Boyle, John 

Boyle, John 8. (younger) 

Braid, David 

Brechin, Hugh 

Broadley John 

Brodie, James, M.A. 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, David 

Brown, George 

Brown, George 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, John 

Brown, John 

Brown, Kenneth 

Brown, Peter 

Brown, Silvester 

Brown, Thomas 



Tenter 

Mason 

Gardener 

Labourer 

Flaxdresser 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Tenter 

Weaver 

Tailor 

Drill instructor 

Weaver 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Poultry dealer 

Weaver 

Hawker 

Cloth inspector 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Tenter 

Labourer 

Ostler 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Book canvasser 

Fish dealer 

Fruit & fish merchnt. 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Twine spinner 

Rector 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Ploughman 

Engine driver 

Baker 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Merchant 

Labourer 

Labourer 



120 West High street 

7 Victoria street 

Easterbank 

12 Dundee Road 

35 South street 

4 Wellbraehead 

12 Nursery Feus 

2 Bell Place 
4 Bell Place 

17 North street 
51 North street 

13 East Sunnyside 

28 Dundee Loan 
56 South street 
Newmonthill 

29 Glamis Road 
77 North street 
33 North street 
4 Wellbraehead 
23 John street 
Newmonthill 

182 East High street 

68 Castle street 
96 North street 
25 Market Place 
1 Prior Road 
Kirkton 

3 Castle street 
51 North street 

69 West High street 
96 West High street 

4 Glamis Road 
42 Dundee Loan 

18 Manor street 
ManseSeld House 

17 Victoria street 

18 Manor street 
15 Dundee Loan 
Annfield Lane 
77 North street 

163 East High street 
Green street 

19 John street 
86 Castle street 
15 Canmore street 
Archie's Park 
12^ North street 
22 Glamis Road 
Laurel Bank 
Glamis Road 

22 Prior Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Brown, William 

Brown, William 

Brown, William 

Brown, William Thomson 

Brace, Alexander 

Brace, David 

Brace, George 

Brace, George 

Brace, George 

Bruce, George 

Brace, James 

Brace, James 

Brace, James 

Brace, James 

Brace, Robert 

Brace, William 

Burnett, Charles 

Burns, Alexander 

Burns, Robert 

Burns, AVilliam 

Butchart, David 

Butchart, David 

Butchart, James 

Butchart, James 

Butchart, John 

Butter, John 

Butter, John Kerr 

Byars, David 

Byars, George 

Byars, James 

Byars, James 

Byars, John 

Byars, Robert 

Byars, W 7 illiam 

Byars, William 

Byars, William 

Cable, Alexander 

Cable, James 

Cable, James 

Cable, John 

Cable, William 

Cable, David 

Caie, George Johnston 

Caird, Barron 

Caird, Charles 

Caird, James 

Caird, William 

Calder, John 

Calder, William 

Calder, William 

Callander, Alexander 



Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Salesman 

Sawmiller 

Carter 

Carter 

Coal agent 

Shoemaker 

Painter 

Weaver 

Photographer 

Carter 

Stoker 

Bank agent 

Labourer 

Factory manager 

Joiner 

Winder 

Baker [chant 

Grocer & wine mer- 

Moulder 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Farmer 

Doctor of Medicine 

Contractor 

Weaver 

Manufacturer 

Residenter 

Stationer 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Tenter (foreman) 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Quarrier 

Baker 

Tenter 

Mason 

Mason 

Cowfeeder 



12 Canmore street 
35 Glamis Road 
12 North street 

65 West High street 
46 North street 

26 North street 
41 South street 
21 South street 

66 Yeaman street 
61 Glamis Road 
Zoar 

5 Academy street 
37 North street 
3 Wellbraehead 

63 East High street 

11 Horsewater Wynd 
Lour Road 

18 Newmonthill 
7 Newmonthill 
44 Lour Road 

13 Manor street 
7 Manor street 
39 North street 

19 Littlecauseway 

19 Little Causeway 
Nether Turin 

17 East High street 
65 Glamis Road 

5 Lappiedub 

6'2 Yeaman street 

64 Castle street 
1 Glamis Road 

93£ West High street 
72 Yeaman street 

20 Dundee Road 

12 Charles street 
3 Arbroath Road 

13 John street 

1 86 East High street 
1 St. James' Road 
26 Market Place 
9 Market Place 
The Manse 

18 Dundee Road 

14 St. James' Road 
Dundee Road 

77 West High street 

Newmonthill 

25 Market Place 

5 Prior Road 

6 Dundee Loan 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Callender, David 
Callender, John 
Callender, William 
Cameron, John 
Cameron, Peter 
Campbell, David 
Campbell, George 
Campbell, John 
Campbell, Robert H. 
Campbell, William 
Campbell, William 
Cargill, Francis 
Cargill, James 
Cargill, James 
Cargill, John 
Carnegie, Alexander 
Carnegie, Robert 
Carnegy, Patrick Alexan- 
Carrie, David [derWatson 
Cathro, William 
Cathro, William 
Caulfiel, Hugh 
Chalmers, David 
Chalmers, George 
Chalmers, George 
Chalmers, William 
Chaplin, John Hurry 
Chaplin, John 
Christie, Andrew 
Christie, David 
Christie, David 
Christie, James 
Christie, James 
Christie, John 
Christie, William 
Christie, William 
Christison, William 
Clark, Alexander 
Clark, Alexander 
Clark, Alexander 
Clark, Andrew 
Clark, Charles 
Clark, Charles 
Clark, David 
Clark, David 
Clark, George 
Clark, James 
Clark, James 
Clark, John 
Clark, John 
Clark, John A. 



Rail, porter 

Cowfeeder 

Stonebreaker 

Labourer 

Ropespinner 

Blacksmith 

Quarrier 

Coachman 

Milliner 

Water inspector 

Labourer 

Draper (retired) 

Builder 

Shuttlemaker 

Retired builder 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Gentleman 

Turner 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Confectioner 

Joiner 

Coachman 

Engine driver 

Draper 

Clerk 

Weaver 

Farmer 

Shoemaker 

Night watchman 

Game dealer 

Postman 

Labourer 

Shambles keeper 

Weaver 

Spirit dealer 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Mason 

Mason 

Barber 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Draper's assistant 

Stamper 

Plumber 

Factory worker 

Agent 

Factory worker 

Watchmaker 



26 Market Place 
Dundee Road 

2 Broadcroft 

50 Dundee Road 

13 Horsewater Wynd 
71 Glamis Road 
23 Montrose Road 

4 Green street 
63 Castle street 
20 Lour Road 

124 East High street 
Bloomfield Cottage 

17 Green street 

13 Zoar 

Ferry ton Cottage 

18 Glamis Road 

51 Dundee Loan 
Lour House 

28 Nursery Feus 

14 Zoar 

25 John street 

95 East High street 
12 St. James' Road 
Fonah Close 
20 John street 

26 & 28 Castle street 

20 Montrose Road 
67 Dundee Loan 
Bankhead 

117 East. High street 
Headingplacestone 
111 East High street 

8 Glamis Road 

9 Victoria street 

5 Sparrowcroft 

9 Arbroath Road 
41 West High street 

21 Glamis Road 
Headingstone Place 

22 Arbroath Road 
5 Back wynd 

44 East High street 
132 East High street 
34 Manor street 
85 West High street 

3 Horsewater Wynd 
97 East High street 
20 Zoar 

101 Back wynd 
7 Prior Road 
62 Castle street 



IO 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Clark, Peter 
Clark, Robert 
Clark, Robert 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clementsen, John 
Cobb, Alexander 
Cobb, Charles 
Cobb, John Thomson 
Coghill, James 
Connel, William 
Constable, William 
Cook, Alexander 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, James 
Cook, sen., James 
Cook, Robert 
Cook, William 
Cook, William 
Cooper, George 
Cooper, William 
Cornfoot, Alexander 
Couttie, James 
Couttie, James 
Couttie, John 
Coutts, John 
Coutts, John 
Coutts, Frederick 
Coutts, William 
Coutts, William, jun. 
Cowie, James 
Cowie, John 
Crabb, Alexander 
Crabb, David 
Crabb, Robert 
Craig, Robert 
Craik, Alexander 
Craik, David 
Craik, James 
Craik, James 
Craik, James 
Craik, James Watson 
Craik, John 
Craik, John Fyfe 
Craik, Peter 
Craik, Robert Fyfe 



Labourer 

Saddler 

Carter 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Clerk 

Mason 

Hotelkeeper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Teacher 

Mechanic 

Engine driver 

Factory worker 

Constable 

Dresser 

Farmer 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Retired farmer 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Clerk 

Insurance agent 

Wood turner 

Factory worker 

Coachman 

Groom 

Ropespinner 

Rope maker 

Flesher 

Flesher 

Flesher 

Plumber 

Mason 

Mason 

Labourer 

Writer 

Weaver 

Manufacturer 

Residenter 

Manufacturer 

Joiner 

Tailor 

Manufacturer 

Joiner 

Manufacturer 

Tenter 

Clerk 



99 Backwynd 
Gallowhill 

12 South street 

8 Arbroath Road 

13 Prior Road 
8 Lappiedub 

8 Charles street 
8 Glamis Road 

17 Horsewater Wynd 
20 Zoar 

15 Green street 
3 Green street 
Hillside Cottage . 
20 Manor street 

1 Cath. Square 
45 Dundee Road 
County Place 

18 Charles street 
Cossens 

3 Arbroath Road 

19 Backwynd 
65 Castle street 
10 W. Sunny side 
10 Glamis Road 
40 Lour Road 
Yeaman street 

34 North street 
83 Castle street 

14 Canmore street 
Manor street 

20 Wellbraehead 
48 Castle street 
99 Castle street 

2 Manor street 

4 Manor street 
8 North street 

188 East High street 
Headingstone Place 
14 Nursery Feus 

10 Yeaman street 
126 East High street 
Hillpark 

14 Manor street 
Viewmount 

11 Johu street 

101 East High street 
Littlecauseway 
23 John street 
Manor Park 

35 John street 
Manor street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



II 



Craik, Thomas 
Craik, William Fyfe 
Crammond, David 
Crammond, James 
Crawford, Thomas C. 
Crighton, James 
Crighton, William 
Crockett, William 
Crofts, James 
Cruickshanks, William 
dimming, Alexander 
Cuthbert, Andrew 
Cuthbert, Charles 
Cuthbert, Charles 
Cuthbert, James 
Cuthbert, John 
Cuthbert, William 
Dail, James 
Dalgetty, Alexander 
Dalgetty, David 
Dall, William 
Dargie, Alexander 
Dargie, James 
Dargie, James 
Dargie, James 
Davidson, David 
Davidson, George 
Davidson, John 
Davidson, Peter 
Davie, Robert 
Davie, Robert 
Deuchar, Alexander 
Deuehar, Alexander 
Dick, Alexander 
Dick, Charles 
Dick, David 
Dick, George 
Dick, James 
Dick, James 
Dick, William 
Dick, William 
Dick, William 
Dickson, James 
Dickson, John 
Doig, Alexander 
Doig, Alexander 
Doig, Edward 
Doig, George 
Doig, James 
Doig, James 
Doig, John 



Clerk 

Clerk 

Wood turner 

Joiner 

Bank accountant 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Gamekeeper 

Factory worker 

Bootmaker 

Clergyman 

Bleacher 

Ploughman 

Lap per 

Weaver 

Bootcutter 

Baker 

Joiner 

Draper 

Tenter 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Mason 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Hatter 

Weaver 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Flesher 

Tailor and clothier 

Mason 

Stationer 

Factory worker 

Manufacturer 

Baker 

Clothier 

Tenter 

Pickermaker 

Cloth Inspector 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Draper 

iiopemaker 

Painter 

Labourer 

Cowfeeder 

Plasterer 



14 West High street 
28 Manor street 
Chapel Park 
51 Dundee Loan 

44 Castle street 
1 Charles street 

1 84: East High street 
Haughs, Glamis 
100 Dundee Loan 
3 Montrose Road 
West F.C. Manse 
18 Nursery Feus 
81 Backwynd 

9 North street 

8 Wellbraehead 

5 John street 

10 Wellbraehead 
25 Market Place 

55, 57 East High street 
47 South street 
3 Bell Place 
3 William street 

8 Dundee Loan 
22 Green street 

86 West High street 

9 Victoria street 
Helen street 

99 East High street 

6 Newmonthill 
Lochside 

85 North street 
49 Castle street 

27 Glamis Road 
35 Castle street 
William street 

1 South street 
West High street 
69 Baekwynd 
115 East High street 

28 Green street 

64 East High street 
34 Yeaman street 

45 South street 

10 Newmonthill 
Easterbank 

9 South street 
8 Watt street 
30 South street 
24 Backwynd 
Quarrybank 
30 South street 



12 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Doig, Thomas 
Doig, William 
Doig, William 
Doig, William 
Don, Gilbert W. 
Don, John Birrell 
Donald, Alexander 
Donald, Alexander Low 
Donald, George 
Donald, Henry- 
Donald, James 
Donald, James 
Donald, John 
Donald, William 
Donaldson, George 
Donaldson, George 
Donaldson, John 
Dorward, George 
Douglas, George 
Dowell, William 
Drewit, Henry 
Drewit, Thomas 
Duff, Alexander 
Duff, Donald 
Duff, John 
Duff, Thomas 
Duffus, James 
Dunbar, David 
Duncan, Alexander 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, George 
Duncan, Henry 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, John 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Dundas, David 
Dundas, James 
Dunn, David Watson 
Dunsmuir, William 
Duthie, James 
Duthie, James 
Duthie, William 
Dvce, John 
Easson, George 
Easson, John 



Factory worker 

Gamedealer (retired) 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Manufacturer 

Manufacturer 

Tailor 

Tobacconist 

Slater 

Grocer 

Bleacher 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Draper 

Painter 

Joiner 

Van driver 

Ironmonger 

Labourer 

Nurseryman 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Railway shunter 

Tailor's cutter 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Engine driver 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Mechanic 

Fireman 

Rope manufacturer 

Rope spinner 

Currier 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Signalman 



61 Dundee Loan 
Viewbank Cottage 
186 East High street 
13 St. James' Road 
Briar Cottage 
Pitmuies House 

17 Manor street 

29 New Road 

18 North street 

80 West High street 
Backwynd 

12 Watt street 

13 Wellbraehead 
134 Castle street 

88 West High street 
51 Dundee Loan 
17 Manor street 
Briar's Lodge 

1 Vennel 

17 East High street 
Couttie's Wynd 

2 Archie's Park 
68 Yeaman street 

17 New Road 

79 East High street 

61 West High street 

21 North street 

Gallowhill 

85 East High street 

7 Bell Place 

2 Zoar 

6 Dundee Road 

18 Don street 

6 Wellbraehead 
5 Backwynd 
26 Nursery Feus 
41 Dundee Road 

24 North street 

1 St. James' Road 

18 North street 

8 Don street 

3 Archie's Park 

34 South street 

35 Dundee Loan 

14 Dundee Loan 

25 Glamis Road 

30 South street 
8 Charles street 

19 Prior Place 
12 John street 
24 John street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Easson, Samuel 
Easson, William 
Eastern, James, jun. 
East on, John 
Easton, Robert 
Easton, William Fyfe 
Eaton, George 
Edmond, David 
Edward, Charles 
Edwards, John 
Edwards, James 
Edwards, James 
Edwards, William 
Edwards, William 
Elder, William 
Elliot, James 
Ellis, James 
Ellis, David 
Ellis, James 
Ellis, James 
Esplin, Alexander 
Esplin, David Boath 
Esplin, James 
Esplin, John 
Esplin, Joseph 
Esplin, Thomas Balfour 
Evans, Charles 
Ewen, James 
Fairweather, David 
Fairweather, Robert 
Falconer, Charles 
Falconer, Daniel 
Falconer, David 
Falknor, William 
Farquhar, David 
Farquhar, James 
Farquharson, Adam 
Farquharson, James 
Farquharson, William 
Fearn, Charles 
Fearn, Stewart 
Fell, David 

Fenton, Andrew Lowson 
Fenton, David 
Fenton, David M. 
Fenton, Henry Hardy 
Fenton, John Lowson 
Fenton, John M'Kenzie 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, James 



Carter 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Tinsmith 

Flesher 

Labourer 

Flesher 

Labourer 

Butcher 

Stationmaster 

Residenter 

Weaver 

Coal dealer (late) 

Missionary 

Labourer 

Fishdealer 

Mason 

Pensioner 

Painter 

Mason 

Tenter 

Gas manager 

Joiner 

Tenter 

Carter 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Wood merchant 

Factory worker 

Crofter 

Labourer 

Watchmaker 

Blacksmith 

Commission agent 

Oiler 

Butcher 

Factory worker 

Builder 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Policeman 

Carter . 

Clerk 

Baker 

Shoemaker 

Draper 

Factor and Agent 

Warder 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 



41 Prior Road 

16 Victoria street 
123 Castle street 

10 Wellbraehead 
106 Castle street 
188 East High street 
8 Castle street 

27 Nursery Feus 

8 Lour Road 
Victoria street 

72^ West High street 

42 South street 
18 John street 
68 Castle street 
Backwynd 

35 Nursery Feus 
114 East High street 
29 Backwynd 
Market Place 
32 Yeaman street 
29 John street 
North street 
156 East High street 

35 North street 

9 Backwynd 

25 West High street 
16 Dundee Loan 
Millbank House 
6 Arbroath Road 
47 Prior Road 
] 03 Castle street 
104 Castle street 
55 North street 
148 East High street 
Newford Park 
62 East High street 

11 St. James' Road 
St. James' Road 

21 Victoria street 

12 Charles street 
Lininghills 

23 St. James' Road 

36 South street 

22 North street 
5 Watt street 

70 Yeaman street 
Yeaman street 
County Place 
18 Glamis Road 
15 Watt street 
96 West High street 



14 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Ferguson, James Dewar 
Ferguson, John 
Ferguson, Malcolm 
Ferguson, William 
Ferrier, David 
Ferrier, James 
Ferrier, James 
Ferrier, John 
Fettes, John 
Fettes, Robert W. 
Findlay, Andrew 
Findlay, Charles 
Findlay, Charles 
Findlay, David 
Findlay, George 
Findlay, George 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, John 
Fleming, David 
Fleming, David 
Fleming, James 
Fleming, James 
Forbes, Alexander 
Forbes, Alexander 
Forbes, David 
Forbes, John 
Forbes, Robert 
Forbes, Robert 
Forbes, Thomas 
Forsyth, David 
Forsyth, John 
Forsyth, William 
Fowler, George 
Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Dickson 
Fraser, James 
Fraser, John 
Freeman, Alexander 
French, Alex. Ross 
Fullerton, Alexander 
Fullerton, William 
Fyfe, Alexander 
Fyfe, Andrew 
Fyfe, George 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, John 



Cloth inspector 

C urrier 

Ploughman 

Shoemaker 

Residenter 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Fireman 

Barman 

Spiritdealer 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Labourer 

Turner 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Mason 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Blacksmith 

Grocer 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory overseer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Painter 

Druggist 

Porter 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Solicitor 

Dentist 

Reedmaker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Painter 

Grocer 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Weaver 



13 Arbroath Road 
9 New Road 

9 Teuchat Croft 
43 Prior Road 
19 Newmonthill 

14 Dundee Loan 
5 Glamis Road 

7 Broadcroft 
Dundee Road 
56 Backwynd 
30 Nursery Feus 
Dundee Road 
3 Chapel street 
19 Arbroath Road 
Yeaman street 

26 Zoar 

45 Dundee Road 
42 Lour Road 
178 East High street 
19 New Road 

34 John street 
17 North street 

112 East High street 

10 Watt street 
65 Dundee Loan 
122 East High street 
16 William street 

7 New Road 

11 North street 

35 Prior Road 
41 South street 
50 Dundee Loan 
65 Dundee Loan 
48 Dundee Loan 

27 St. James' Road 
Castle street 

8 South street 

7 Victoria street 

15 East Sunnyside 
69 Glamis Road 
Broomroof Cottage 
33 East High street 
Stark's Close 

23 Nursery Feus 
64 East Lligh street 
64 Dundee Road 

1 Montrose Road 

2 Arbroath Road 
90 Dundee Loan 
St. James' Road 
10 Wellbraehead 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



15 



Fyfe, John 
Fyffe, James 
Fyffe, James 
Fyffe, John 
Fyffe, Thomas 
Fyffe, jr., Thomas 
Fyffe, William 
Garret, Alexander 
Geekie, Peter 
Geekie, William 
Gellatly, David 
Gemlo, David 
Gibb, Alexander 
Gibb, Walter 
Gibb, William 
Gibson, Alexander 
Gibson, David 
Gibson, Francis 
Gibson, Graham 
Gibson, James 
Gibson, James 
Gibson, Joseph 
Gibson, William Alex. 
Glen, James 
Glen, Alexander 
Golden, Bernard 
Goode, Peter A. 
Goodall, William 
Gordon, Alexander 
Gordon, George 
Gordon, James 
Gordon, James 
Gordon, William 
Gowans, John 
Gracie, David 
Gracie, George 
Graham, David Morgan 
Grant, Alexander 
Grant, James 
Grant, James 
Grant, John 
Grant, John 
Grant, John 
Grant, Thomas 
Grant, William 
Gray, David 
Gray, James 
Gray, James 
Gray, James Scott 
Gray, Robert 
Greenhill, Charles 



Factory worker 
Foreman bleacher 
Flesher 
Baker 
L abon r er 
Labourer 
Labourer 
Stoker 
Labourer 
Plasterer 
Joiner 

Factory worker 
Ticket collector 
Mason 

Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Farmer 
Labourer 
Broker 

Warehouseman 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Mason 

Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Shoemaker 
Gardener 
Toy merchant 
Shoemaker 
Factory worker 
Gardener 
Factory worker 
Solicitor 

Messenger-at-arms 
Factory worker 
Gas Foreman 
Auctioneer &farmer 
Manure merchant 
Sawmiller 
Factory worker 
Labourer 
Sawmiller 
Tailor 
Mason 
Librarian 
Rail, labourer 
Quarrier 
Groom 
■ Solicitor 
Grocer's assistant 
Butcher 



93£ West High street 
45 South street 

20 Newmonthill 

33 South street 

67 West High street 
67 West High street 

60 Dundee Road 
23 Nursery Feus 
116 Dundee Road 

1 Victoria street 

34 Lour Road 

19 East Sunnyside 

11 Wellbraehead 

6 Lappiedub 

34 Yeaman street 

18 Littlecauseway 

Whitehills 

4 Victoria street 

21 Dundee Loan 

47 Dundee Road 
18 Littlecauseway 
6 Charles street 

21 Dundee Loan 
51 Dundee Loan 
75 East High street 
23 Backwynd 

13 St. James' Road 
82 Castle street 
42 Dundee Loan 

10 Watt street 

18 Lour Road 

19 Arbroath Road 

20 East High street 
25 St. James' Road 

13 North street 

61 North street 
Slatefield 
Clochtow 

11 Zoar 

16 Dundee Road 

14 Dundee Road 
Bailliewellbrae 

4 Dundee Road 
36 Manor street 

2 Castle street 

17 Montrose Road 

48 Dundee Loan 

22 Lour Road 
Brigton House 

5 Wellbraehead 

143 East High street 



i6 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Greenhill, Hugh 
Grewar, Andrew 
Grewar, David 
Grewar, James 
Guild, James 
Guild, James 
Guild, William 
Guthrie, George 
Guthrie, John 
Guthrie, Thomas 
Guthrie, William 
Guthrie, William 
Hackney, James 
Hadden, James 
Halket, James 
Halkett, William 
Halley, George 
Hanick, Richard 
Hanton, Alexander 
Hanton, Robert 
Hardie, Alexander 
Hardie, David 
Harris, James A. 
Harris, William 
Hastings, Alexander 
Hastings, David 
Hastings, William Elder 
Haxton, Donald 
Hay, Alexander 
Hay, Alexander 
Hay, James 
Hay, Thomas 
Hay, William 
Heath, William John 
Hebenton, David 
Hebenton, James 
Hebenton, William 
Henderson, Alexander 
Henderson, Andrew M. 
Henderson, Charles 
Henderson, David 
Henderson, David 
Henderson, George 
Henderson, George 
Henderson, James 
Henderson, James 
Henderson, John 
Henderson, Peter 
Henderson, William 
Hendry, Andrew 
Hendry, David 



Hotelkeeper 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Mason 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Game dealer, &c. 

Late farmer 

Blacksmith 

Plasterer 

Blacksmith 

Tailor 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Broker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Currier 

Currier 

Lapper 

Ploughman 

Bakery manager 

Joiner 

Mechanic 

Quarrier 

Joiner 

Printer 

Hosier 

Ironmonger 

Shoemaker 

Tailor 

Painter 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Surfaceman 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Blacksmith 

Factor)' worker 

Van driver 

Mason 



Castle street 

6 Glamis Road 

186 East High street 
13 Charles street 
13 Wellbraehead 
Chapel Park 

17 North street 
Couttie's Wynd 
Whitehills 

20 Wellbraehead 
20 Charles street 
10 Backwynd 
69 Backwynd 
27 Nursery Feus 
52 South street 

7 Prior Road 

18 Newmonthill 

96 East High street 
7 Montrose Road 
17 Arbroath Road 

I Zoar 

26 North street 
20 Nursery Feus 
62 Dundee Road 
29 East High street 
Strang street 
95 East High street 

64 Dundee Loan 
26 Canmore steeet 

7 Academy street 
10 John street 

8 Archie's Park 

33 Nursery Feus 

34 East High street 
8 Littlecauseway 
Chapel Park 

II Green street 
70 Dundee Road 
17 Green street 
12 Market Place 

65 Glamis Road 
70 Dundee Road 
1 Teuchat Croft 
16 Prior Road 
Catherine Square 
15 Manor street 
14 Dundee Road 
24 Sunnyside 

22 Zoar 

12 Montrose Road 

23 Prior Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



17 



Hendry, James 
Hendry, Robert 
Hendry, William 
Herald, James 
Herald, James 
Herald, William 
High, David 
Hill, Alexander 
Hill, Alexander 
Hill, Charles 
Hill, David 
Hill, David 
Hill, David 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill. John 
Hill, William 
Hood, David Mollison 
Hopton, John 
Hopton, Joseph 
Hosie, James 
Hosie, William 
Hovels, William 
Howie, John 
Hunter Andrew 
Hunter, Charles 
Hunter, James 
Hunter, AVilliam 
Hunter, William 
Hurry, James 
Hutcheson, Alexander 
Hutchison, George 
Hutchison, Robert 
Hutcheon, Robert 
Hutchison, William 
Hutton, James 
Ireland, David 
Ireland, James Forbes 
Ireland, John 
Ireland, William 
Irons, Alexander 
Irons, David 
Irons, David 
Irons, James 
Irons, William 
Irvine, David 
Jack, John 
Jack, Peter 
James, Adam 
James, David 



Salesman 

Bootmaker 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Joiner 

Shoemaker 

Baker 

Cloth finisher 

Stoneware merchant 

Clerk 

Joiner 

Coachman 

Tenter 

Railway Porter 

Inspector of way 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Bootmaker 

Factory worker 

Pensioner 

Farmer 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Surgeon 

Mechanic 

Gardener 

Tenter 

Boot maker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Ploughman 

Hawker 

Foreman winder 

Tailor 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Lapper 

Ironmonger 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Baker 

Gardener 

Mechanic 

Publican 

Fish dealer 

Plumber 



62 Castle street 
22 Don street 
70 Dundee Road 
Catherine Square 
48 Dundee Road 
22 Littlecauseway 
29 St. James' Road 
6 Wellbraehead 
8-10 South street 
Vennel 
Lininghills 
65 West High street 
Hillockhead 

13 Zoar 
Victoria street 

14 Nursery Feus 
2Q North street 
2 Bell Place 

4 Canmore street 
Stark's (Uose 

12 Stark's Close 
Lilybank 

92 Dundee Loan 
22 Wellbraehead 
38 John street 

5 Prior Road 

59 East High street 
69 Dundee Loan 
54 South street 

22 North street 

73 Backwynd 

52 East High street 
9 Horsewater Wynd 
Vennel 

74 Dundee Loan 

13 St. James' Road 

17 Green street 

18 Dundee Road 
11 Watt street 

2 Archie's Park 

182 East High street 

48 North street 

26 Green street 

23 Nursery Feus 
East Sunnyside 
61 Dundee Loan 
Glamis Road 

11 Zoar 

27 & 29 South street 
Couttie's Wynd 

141 East High street 



i8 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



James, Peter 
Jamieson, dimming 
Jamieson, James 
Jamieson, John 
Jamieson, William 
Jamieson, William 
Japp, William 
Jarman, Joseph 
Jarron, Peter 
Jarvis, George 
Jarvis, William 
•Johnston, Alexander 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, George 
Johnston, James 
Johnston, John 
Johnston, John 
Johnston, Robert 
Johnstone, Adam 
Johnstone, Alex. 
Johnstone, David 
Jolly, Alexander 
Kay, Solomon 
Keay, James 
Keay, Robert 
Keay, William 
Keay, William 
Keir, Charles 
Keith, Charles 
Keith, Charles 
Keith, David 
Keith, James 
Keith, James 
Keith, Robert 
Keith, William 
Keith, William 
Keith, William 
Kennedy, Alexander 
Kennedy, Andrew 
Kennedy, David 
Kermach, John 
Kermack, James 
Kermack, John 
Kerr, Alexander 
Kerr, James 
Kerr, James 
Kerr, John 
Kerr, Joseph 
Kerr, Thomas 



Shoemaker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Book canvasser 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Hotelkeeper 

Fruiterer 

Draper 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Late Farmer 

Labourer 

Wood turner 

Blacksmith 

Labourer 

Baker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Wood turner 

Butcher 

Baker 

Mason 

Tenter 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Flesher 

Spirit dealer 

Gate keeper 

Gardener 

Weaver 

Collector of customs 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Chief Con. Forfarsh. 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Quarrier 

Carter 

Factoiy worker 

Manager, e.c. society 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Labourer 

Slater 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 



137 East High street 
Rosebank Cottage 

9 South street 

4 St. James' Road 
156 East High street 
34 Dundee Loan 
42 Dundee Loan 

98 North street 

70 West High street 
2 Nursery Feus 
68 Castle street 

7 Glamis Road 

8 Sparrowcroft 

15 Horsewater Wynd 
Service Road 
Gallowhill 

13 Charles street 
132 East High street 
26 Glamis Road 

7 Glamis Road 

93£ West High street 

38 North street 

65 West High street 

23 Castle street 

14 St. James' Road 

4 Market Place 

34 Manor street 
18 Manor street 

5 Backwynd 
100 Castle street 

10 Little Causeway 

35 South street 
112 Dundee Road 
72 Dundee Road 
12 St. James' Road 
12 New Road 
County Place 

24 Canmore street 
78 Castle street 
37 North street 
53 North street 
21 Zoar 

99 East High street 
81 Backwynd 

110 East High street 

10 Glamis Road 

Helen street 

50 Dundee Road 

Wellbraehead 

9 Wellbraehead 
7 Watt street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



19 



Kerr, Thomas 
Kerr, William 
Kettles, Robert 
Kewans, James 
Kidd, Alexander 
Kidd, David 
Kidd, Joseph 
Kinnear, Alexander 
Kinnear, Alexander 
Kinnear, Charles 
Kinnear, David 
Kinnear, Joseph 
Kinnear, Robert 
Kinsman, John 
Knox, John 
Kyd, James 
Kydcl, Alexander 
Kydd, David 
Kydd, George 
Kydd, William 
Lackie, David 
Lackie, John 
Laing, David 
Laing, James 
Laing, John 
Laird, George 
Laird, John 
Laird, John, jun. 
Laird, William 
Lakie, John 
Lakie, John 
Lakie, William 
Lamb, Robert 
Lamond, William 
Lament, Alexander 
Lamont, Andrew 
Lamont, Andrew, jun. 
Lamont, George 
Lamont, James 
Lamont, Peter 
Langlands, Alexander 
Langlands, David 
Langlands, David 
Langlands, David 
Langlands, James 
Langlands, John 
Langlands, Robert 
Langlands, Peter 
Langlands, William 
Laverock, George 
Lawrence, James 



Mason 

Mason 

Farm servant 

Retired merchant 

Weaver 

Weaver 

Lamplighter 

Quarrier 

Factory worker 

Cloth inspector 

Labourer 

Late farmer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Schoolmaster 

Clerk 

Weaver 

M.D. & farmer 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Cowfeeder 

Bleacher 

Bleacher 

Bleacher 

Manufacturer 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Coal Merchant 

Labourer 

Bleacher 

Mechanic 

Pig dealer 

Factory worker 

Pig dealer 

Cattle dealer 

Factory worker 

Spiritdealer 

Factory overseer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Baker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Tanner 

Labourer 

Stoker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 



11 Watt street 
94 Dundee Loan 

21 John street 
Rosebank 

1 Lappiedub 

2 St. James' Road 
Chapel Park 

5 Archie's Park 

4 Green street 

1 1 New Road 

6 Stark's Close 

15 Prior Road 
94 Dundee Loan 

5 Archie's Park 
St. James' Road 
8 Green street 

5 Lappiedub 
Bogindolla 

16 Dundee Road 
46 Lour Road 

12 Charles street 
West High street 

22 Wellbraehead 

4 Market Place 
1 Charles street 
Rosebank Road 
Gowanbank 
Benholm Lodo-e 
18 South street 
55 Backwynd 

82 Dundee Loan 
8 Charles street 
43 South street 
21 South street 
10 Lappiedub 
15 Dundee Loan 
10 Dundee Loan 

3 Green street 

26 West High street 

24 Dundee Road 
Bailliewellbrae 

137 East High street 
3 West High street 
Glamis 

17 Watt street 
Bailliewellbrae 

25 Canmore street 

5 Victoria street 
5 Victoria street 

18 Dundee Road 
29 Prior Road 



20 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Law son, James 
Lawson, James 
Leask, John, jun. 
Lennie, Charles 
Lees, Andrew 
Leighton, Charles 
Leighton, David 
Leith, Alexander 
Liddell, John 
Liddle, David 
Liddle, Stewart 
Liddle, William 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, Graham 
Lindsay, James 
Lindsay, James 
Lindsay, John 
Lindsay, Thomas 
Lindsay, William 
Lindsay, William 
Littlejohn, Alexander 
Littlejohn, David 
Liveston, James 
Liveston, James 
Liveston, James 
Livingston, William 
Longmuir, John 
Low, Alexander 
Low, James 
Low, James 
Low, James 
Low, John 
Low, William 
Low, William 
Lowden, William 
Lowdon, John 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Andrew 
Lowson, Andrew, jun. 
Lowson, Andrew, sen. 
Lowson, Andrew, jun. 
Lowson, George 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James, younger 



Labourer 

Shoemaker 

Fish dealer 

Agent 

Clerk 

Carter 

Tobacconist 

Labourer 

Mason 

Cabinetmaker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Dyker 

Residenter 

Book canvasser 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Draper 

Vandriver 

Cattle dealer 

Grocer 

Resiclenter 

Factory worker 

Hawker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Insurance agent 

Gardener 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Restauranteur, &c. 

Labourer 

Tailor 

Policeman 

Labourer 

Plumber 

Stationer 

Mason 

Governor 

Cattle dealer 

Vintner 

Manufacturer 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Manufacturer 

Retired saddler 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Manufacturer 



Market Place 

137 East High street 

22 Wellbraehead 

Wellbraehead 

Glamis Road 

4 Chapel street 

2^ West High street 

24 Victoria street 
14 Dundee Loan 

50 East High street 

79 Glamis Road 
52 North street 

25 Market Place 
30 Glamis Road 

17 St. James' Road 
7 Broadcroft 

110 Dundee Road 
20 Glamis Road 
16 Don street 
Academy street 

2 New Road 

38 Canmore street 
36 West High street 

43 North street 
36 Canmore street 
12 Nursery Feus 
'26 North street 
75 Glamis Road 

12 East High street 
7 Glamis Road 
12 John street 
2-6 Don street 

44 South street 
28 Lour Road 
25 Manor street 
Teuchat Croft 
52 Dundee Loan 

80 West High street 
25 Backwynd 

Poor House 

51 North street 
97 North street 
Hillbank 
Zoar 

3 Academy street 
Beech Hill 

2 Sparrowcroft 
Market Place 

18 Dundee Road 
20 Dundee Road 
Ferryton House 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



2 [ 



Lowson, John 
Lowson, John 
Lowson, John 
Lowson, John, jun. 
Lowson, Peter 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William, jun. 
Luke, David 
Luke, John 
Lunan, Robert 
Lunclie, William 
Lyall, William 
Lyon, George 
M' Arthur, Alexander 
M'Bain, Alexander 
M'Beth, James 
M'Corkindale, Donald 

Lachlan 
M 'Donald, Alexander 
M'Donald, James 
M'Donald, John 
M'Donald, John 
M'Dougal, Davi<l 
M'Dougal, James 
M'Farlane, Alexander 
M'Farlane, Donald 
M'Gregor, Alexander 
M'Gregor, Alexander 
M'Gregor, James 
M'Gregor, William 
M'Gregor, Wm. Henry 
M' Hardy, David 
M'Hardy, John 
M'Innes, Alexander 
M'Intosh, Alexander 
M'Intosh, Donald 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, John 
M'Intosh, William 
M'Intosh, William 
M'Intosh, William 
M'Kay, David 
M'Kay, John 
-M'Kay, John Trantham 
M'Kenzie, Alexander 
M ' K en zie , Ch arles 



Weaver 

Labourer 

Residenter 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Writer & bank agent 

Factory Manager 

Manufacturer 

Ostler 

Clerk 

Cowfeeder 

Joiner 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Farm servant 

Baker 

Tenter 

Clerk 

Plumber 

Clergyman 

J .labourer 

Blacksmith 

Dairyman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Carter 

Hammerman 

Carter 

Wood turner 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Factory manager 

Ironmonger 

Solicitor 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Blacksmith 

Mason 

Beltmaker 

Bootcloser 

Asylum warden' 

Labourer 

Weaver 



39 North street 
87 North street 
Strang street 
Beech Hill 

15 Newmonthill 
West High street 

16 North street 
Hillbank 

170 East High street 

Kirkton 

152 East High street 

10 Zoar 

106 Castle street 

144 East High street 

Gallowhill 

30 Nursery Feus 

33 John street 

11 William street 

14 Canmore street 

Lilybank Villa 

16 Littlecauseway 

II William street 

13 William street 
Bailliewellbrae 
18 Dundee Loan 

III Castle street 
Prior Road 

48 Dundee Road 

18 Manor street 

Gallowhill 

28 Arbroath Road 

15 Zoar 

26£ West High street 
43 North street 
104 East High street 
St. James' Road 

14 Castle street 
Dundee Loan 
13 Manor street 
45 Prior Road 
Market Place 
115 Castle street 
Lunanhead 

104 East High street 
115 Castle street 

13 Glamis Road 

14 Dundee Loan 
Newmonthill 

9 Teuchat Croft 
4 Dundee Loan 



22 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



M'Kenzie, Charles 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, George 
M'Kenzie, John 
M'Kenzie, Kenneth 
M'Kenzie, Robert 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kinnon, Arthur 
M'Kinnon, Joseph 
M'Laggan, William 
M'Laren, Alexander 
M'Laren, David 
M'Laren, James 
M'Laren, James B. 
M'Laren, W T illiam 
M'Laren, William 
M'Laren, William 
M'Lean, Alexander 
M'Lean, James 
M'Lean, James 
M'Lean, John 
M'Lean, Walter 
M'Leish, David 
M'Leod, Kenneth 
M'Math, Robert 
M'Nab, Alexander 
M'Nab, John 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Phee, Duncan 
M'Pherson, Alexander 
M'Pherson, Oliver 
Macdougall, James 
MacHardy, Alexander 
Mackay, Alexander 
Mackie, Thomas 
Mackie, William 
Macrae, John 
Maitland, Richard 
Malcolm, James 
Malcolm, James 
Malcolm, Robert 
Malcolm, William 
Malcolm, William 
Malcolm, William 
Mands, James 



Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Bicycle maker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Coal merchant 

Tenter 

Gardener 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Carter 

Baker 

Insurance agent 

Painter 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Builder 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Farmer 

Confectioner 

Tailor 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Painter 

Fireman 

Printer 

Factory worker 

Solicitor 

Shoemaker 

Teacher 

Lamplighter 

Labourer 

Blacksmith 

Labourer 

Bleacher 

Grocer 

Tinsmith 

Gardener 

Shunter 

Factory worker 



10 Charles street 
30 Manor street 
55 West High street 
8 Arbroath Road 

5 Broadcroft 

93 West High street 

Gallowhill 

Welshbarns 

50 West High street 

79 West High street 
Catherine Square 
30 Glamis Road 

21 Glamis Road 

18 William street 
Backwynd 
Gallowhill 

17 Backwynd 
46 Prior Road 
87 Backwynd 
178 East High street 

22 Manor street 

13 Strang street 
36 John street 
34 Manor street 
28 Arbroath Road 
Foffarty, Kinnettles 
97 Castle street 

14 Yeaman street 
17 Backwynd 

20 Nursery Feus 

19 East Sunny side 
150 East High street 

11 Wellbraehead 
24 Victoria street 
143 East High street 

12 Glamis Road 

80 North street 
4 Bell Place 
Easterbank 

27 North street 
Lily bank House 
188 East High street 
42 Dundee Loan 
42 John street 
7 Green street 
19 Montrose Road 
22 Glamis Road 
19 New Road 
19 St. James' Road 

6 Nursery Feus 

77 West High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



23 



Mands, William 
Mann, James 
Mann, James 
Mann, James 
Mann, John Holmes 
Mann, Joseph 
Mann, William 
Manson, William 
Marshall, George 
Marshall, James 
Marshall, John 
Marshall, Robert 
Martin, Charles 
Martin, James 
Martin, James 
Martin, William 
Martin, William 
Mason, Alexander 
Mason, Andrew 
Mason, Peter 
Massie, Joseph 
Massie, William 
Masterton, David 
Masterton, David 
Masterton, George 
Masterton, James 
Masterton, William 
Mather, John 
Mathers, James 
Mathers, William 
Matthew, James 
Matthew, William 
Matthewson, James 
Maxwell, David 
Maxwell, George 
Maxwell, George 
Maxwell, William 
Mealmaker, John 
Meek, Alexander 
Meldrum, David 
Meldrum, David 
Meldrum, James 
Meldrum, William 
Melvin, John 
Menzies, Adam 
Menzies, John 
Methven, James 
Michie, Thomas 
Michie, William 
Millar, Alexander 
Millar, David 



Mason 

Gardener 

Hostler 

Mechanic 

Tailor 

Tailor 

Carter 

Mason 

Mason 

Draper 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Tenter [chant 

Grocer & winemer- 

Blacksmith 

Ironmonger 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Plasterer 

Factorv worker 

Dyker" 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Coal agent 

Shoemaker 

Watchmaker 

Carter 

Draper 

Mason 

Mechanic 

Mechanic 

Mechanic 

Fireman 

Bleacher 

Shoemaker 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Grocer [chant 

Grocer & wine mer- 

Plumber 

Lapper 

Baker 

Police constable 

Flesher&cowfeeder 

Plumber 

Farmer 



68 West High^street 
95 Backwynd 
24 Backwynd 

24 William street 

9 Wellbraehead 
12 Littlecauseway 
Gallowhill 
Gallowhill 

39 Prior Road 
110 West High street 
26 William street 
50 Glamis Road 
37 John street 
34 Castle street 

11 Canmore street 
Cross 

3 William street 

15 New Koad 
West High street 

12 New Road 
26 Dundee Loan 
12 St. James' Road 

20 Canmore street 
26 North street 

10 Watt street 
Prior Road 

79 Backwynd 
Market Place 
7 Zoar 

86 Castle street 
26 North street 
58 Castle street 
23 St. James' Road 

16 Watt street 
William street 
Academy street 

21 Montrose Road 

15 Dundee Loan 

25 Backwynd 

95 West High street 
85 Backwynd 

16 St. James' Road 
Backwynd 
Manor street 

5 Montrose Road 

17 Sunnyside 

6 Glamis Road 
58 South street 

100 West High street 
6 Dundee Road 
Wester Oathlaw 



24 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Millar, David 
Millar, James 
Milne, Alexander 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Charles 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David, sen. 
Milne, George 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James B. 
Milne, James, jun. 
Milne, James, sen. 
Milne, John 
Milne, John 
Milne, John 
Milne, Robert 
Milne, Robert 
Milne, William 
Milne, William 
Milne. William 
Milne, William 
Mitchell, Alexander 
Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, David 
Mitchell, David 
Mitchell, George 
Mitchell, George 
Mitchell, James 
Mitchell, James 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, Skene 
Mitchell, William 
Moffat, David 
Moffat, James 
Moffat, James 
Moffat, John 
Moffat, John 
Moffat, William 
Moir, John 



Labourer 

Mason 

Land owner 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Manure agent 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Labourer 

Quarrier 

Weaver 

Blacksmith 

Labourer 

Mason 

Hallkeeper 

Joiner 

Clerk 

Coal merchant 

Mole catcher 

Shoemaker 

Tailor 

Residenter 

Tailor 

Shoemaker 

Dyker 

Plumber 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Fireman 

Flesher 

Photographer 

Sawyer 

Shoemaker 

Labourer 

Tailor 

Joiner 

Farmer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Plasterer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Draper 

Manufacturer 

Bleacher 

Signalman 

Slater 

Blacksmith 



27 Backwynd 

Horsewater Wynd 

Cherrybank 

54 Dundee Road 

67 West High street 

32 Yeaman street 

48 Dundee Road 

5 Market Place 

3 John street 

4 Montrose Road 
76 East High street 
23 Nursery~Feus 

4 Broadcroft 

169 East High street 

19 Wellbraehead 

58 Dundee Loan 

88 Castle street 

Dundee Road 

37 John street 

86 Dundee Loan 

61 Dundee Loan 

138 East High street 

Market Place 

Zoar 

15 Charles street 

50 South street 

7 Yeaman street 

6 Wellbraehead 

61 West High street 
9 Manor street 
39 South street 
79 North street 
100 East High street 
'26 Yeaman street 
12 Charles street 
83 Backwynd 

8 Don street 
39 South street 
Quilkoe 

15 Arbroath Road 

9 North street 

16 Watt street 
6 Nursery Feus 
6 Watt street 
11 New Road 
16 Lour Road 

42 West High street 
44 West High street 
14 John street 
3 New Road 
39 North street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



2 5 



Moir, Robert 
Mollison, Brimner 
Mollison, David 
Mollison James 
Mollison, William 
Moncrieff, Alexander 
Moncur, Andrew 
Monteith, John 
More, Adam 
More, David 
Morris, James 
Morris, John 
Morrison, Alexander 
Morrison, Charles 
Morrison, David 
Morrison, David 
Morrison, James 
Morrison, John 
Morrison, John 
Morrison, John 
Morrison, William 
Morrison, William 
Morton, Robert 
Moves, Thomas 
Munro, Andrew 
Munro, Bain 
Munro. James 
Munro, James 
Munro, James 
Munro, James 
Munro, Peter 
Munro, William 
Munro, William 
Murdoch, Alexander 
Murdoch, Alexander 
Murdoch, James D. 
Murray, James 
Murray, William Fettes 
Myles, Adam Whitson 
Myles, John 
Myles, Robert Freer 
Myles, William 
Neave, Alexander 
Neave, Alexander 
Neave, Andrew 
Neave, David 
Neave, David 
Neave, David 
Neave, James 
Neave, James 
Neave, Peter 



Bleacher 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Camb builder 

Turner 

Bleacher 

Auctioneer 

Railway servant 

Shoemaker 

Cowfeeder 

Labourer 

Inspector of police 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Dairyman 

Factory manager 

Book agent 

Joiner 

Lapper 

Ropespinner 

Drover 

General dealer 

Ironfounder 

Tronfounder 

Bleacher 

Toy merchant 

Architect 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Gardener 

Wood turner 

Clerk 

Watchmaker 

Gardener 

Doctor of medicine 

Solicitor [& surgery 

Writer 

Solicitor 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Tinsmith 

Factory Avorker 

Ironmonger 

Plumber 



25 Glamis Road 
79 West High street 
46 Dundee Loan 
Headingstone Place 
114 East High street 
64 East High street 
Castle street 
Zoar 

21 Glamis Road 
New Road 

5 Prior Road 
County Place 

11 Canmore street 

6 Watt street 

1 Dundee Loan 
39 South street 

22 Prior Road 
Easter Bank 
Kirkton 

51 North street 
3 Dundee Loan 

82 West High street 
3 Glamis Road 

24 Backwynd 

85 Backwynd 

89 North street 

89 North street 

186 East High street 

67 Backwynd 

85 Castle street 

1 Bell Place 

Heading Stone Place 

Beechhill 

10 Green street 

6 Wellbraehead 
19 Green street 

83 Castle street 
East High street 
Blyth Hill 
Blvth Hill 
Blyth Hill 

50 West High street 
oSj Dundee Loan 
10 Newmonthill 
3 Bell Place 
21 Zoar 

7 Bell Place 
14 North street 
17 Newmonthill 

10 East High street 
137 East High street 



26 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Neave, Ritchie 

Neave, William 

Neave, William 

Neavy, John 

Neil, George 

Neilson, Andrew 

Neish, Patrick 

Nevay, David 

Newsome, John 

Nicolson, George Shepherd 

Nicolson, James 

Nicoll, Alexander 

Nicoll, Alexander 

Nicoll, Arthur 

Nicoll, David 

Nicoll, David 

Nicoll. David 

Nicoll, George 

Nicoll, George 

Nicoll, George 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, John 

Nicoll, John 

Nicoll, John 

ISicoll, Peter 

Nicoll, Richard 

Nicoll, Robert 

Nicoll, Stewart 

Nicoll, Thomas 

Nicoll, William 

Ogg, William 

Ogilvie, David 

Ogilvie, John 

Ogilvie, William 

Ogilvy, Alexander A. 

Oram, Andrew 

Oram, David 

Oram, Wilham 

Oram, William 

Orchison, John 

Orme, John 

Ormond, Abram 

Ormond, Charles 

Ormond, David 

Ormond, George 

Ormond, James 



Weaver 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Plasterer 

Teacher 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Residenter 

Mechanic 

Editor 

Merchant 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Draper (late) 

Weaver 

Cowfeeder 

Flesher 

Tenter 

Farmer, &c. 

Labourer 

Cattle dealer 

Lapper 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Cattle dealer 

Gardener 

Town- officer 

Factory worker 

Late Farmer 

Labourer 

Mason, &c. 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Blacksmith 

Shepherd 

Coal Merchant 

Hostler 

Ropespinner 

Lapper 

Fruiterer 

Joiner 

Milliner 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Residenter 

Baker 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 



9 Green street 
21 Wellbraehead 

81 Backwynd 

8 Charles street 

16 East High street 
Couttie's Wynd 

1 Lappiedub 

17 Canmore street 
24 North street 
Craigard House 

82 East High street 

1 Osnaburgh street 
13 Charles street 
21 Littlecauseway 

2 Broadcroft 

7 Arbroath Road 

103 East High street 
17 Glamis Road 
South Mains, Forfar 

104 East High street 
Kingston Cottage 
144"East High street 
96 West High street 

3 Broadcroft 
Lilybank Villa 
Welshbarns 

24 Arbroath Road 
21 East Sunnyside 
Bellfield House 
17 Backwynd 
17 Dundee Loan 
7 Horsewater Wynd 

6 Watt street 
North Mains 
Academy street 
46 South street 

17 Prior Road 
53 North street 
Couttie's Wynd 

18 John street 
Strang street 

19 West High street 
5 Prior Road 

13 West High street 

14 Glamis Road 

86 West High street 
Fernbank 

7 William street 
123 Castle street 
12 Stark's Close 
61 Dundee Loan 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



2 7 



Ormond, John 
Ormond, John 
Ormond, John 
Parshe, Ignatz 
Paterson, Alexander 
Paterson, George 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Patterson, William 
Paton, James 
Paton, William 
Patullo, Alexander 
Pattullo, Andrew 
Patullo, Andrew 
Patullo, David 
Pattullo, David 
Patullo, James Lowson 
Peacock, David 
Peacock, George 
Peacock, William 
Pearson, Andrew 
Pearson, David 
Pearson, John 
Peffers, Andrew 
Peffers, John 
Peter, Andrew 
Peter, David 
Peter, John 
Peters, William 
Petrie, Alexander 
Petrie, Alexander 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, George 
Petrie, George, jr. 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petiie, James 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie. John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 



Retired agent 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Butcher 

Tenter 

Baker 

Labourer 

Mechanic [Rates 

Collector of Public 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Joiner 

Painter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Coal merchant 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Spiritdealer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Carter 

Dyer 

Dyer 

Labourer 

Dresser 

Clothier 

Fireman 

Baker 

Mechanic 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Gas worker 

Residenter 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Baker 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Lapper 



9 Cross 

59 Glamis Road 

26£ West High street 

8 Don street 

11 Wellbraehead 

5 Backwynd 

18 Canmore street 

Zoar 

Backwynd 

10 Wellbraehead 

15 Watt street 

10 Arbroath Road 

12 Watt street 
32 South street 
4 Nursery Feus 

161 East High street 
146 East High street 

7 Teuchat Croft 
22 Arbroath Road 
169 East High street 
41 Dundee Loan 
Dundee Loan 

44 South street 
Newford Park 
12 New Road 

9 Victoria Street 
9 Canmore street 

6 Dundee Road 

3 Archie's Park 

4 Newmonthill 

8 Academy street 

17 Little Causeway 
8 Glamis Road 

49 Dundee Loan 

16 Charles street 

5 Montrose Road 
184 East High street 
81 Backwynd 

22 Market Place 
Hillockhead 
108 Backwynd 
Newmonthill 
5 Glamis Road 

18 North street 
16 Dundee Road 
10 Stark's Close 
Hillockhead 

7 Archie's Park 
108 Backwynd 

1 William street 
53 West High street 



28 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



Petrie, Robert 
Petrie, Thomas, jun. 
Petrie, Thomas 
Petrie, William 
Petrie, William 
Petrie, William 
Philps, George M. 
Pickard, Thomas 
Piggot, David 
Piggot, James 
Piggot, Walter 
Piggot, William 
Pirrie, James 
Porter, George 
Porter, William 
Potter, James 
Potter, John 
Preston, James 
Procter, David 
Procter, John 
Proctor, Charles 
Proctor, James 
Proctor, Robert 
Proctor, William 
Proctor, William 
Prophet, Frederick 
Prophet, James 
Prophet, John 
Prophet, William 
Purvis, Alexander 
Rae, Alexander 
Rae, David 
Rae, David 
Rae, James, jun. 
Rae, Joseph 
Rait, James 
Ramsay, Alexander 
Ramsay, Allan 
Ramsay, Andrew 
Ramsay, David 
Ramsay, George 
Ramsay, James 
Ramsay, James Milne 
Ramsay, John 
Ramsay, Thomas 
Rankin, James Anderson 
Rankin, John 
Rattray, Alexander 
Rattray, James 
Rattray, John 
Rattray^, John 



Factory worker 

Dresser 

Shoemaker 

Hawker 

Hotel keeper 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Potato merchant 

Butcher 

Joiner 

Vintner 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Watchman 

Weaver 

Weaver 

Baker 

Farmer 

Joiner 

Weaver 

Mason 

Labourer 

Draper 

Painter 

Factor}' worker 

Ploughman 

Factory worker 

Turner 

Farm servant 

Factory worker 

Tinsmith 

Dyker 

Turner 

Clerk 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Joiner 

Factoiy worker 

Clerk 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Druggist 

Dnunnst 

Carter 

Storekeeper 

Labourer 

Farmer 



184 East High street 

17 John street 

2 Backwynd 

136 East High street 
170 East High street 

18 South street 
East F. C. Manse 

I Chapel street 

21 Arbroath Road 

II Wellbraehead 

13 Zoar 

15 Backwynd 

22 William street 

51 Dundee Loan 
Castle street 

10 Market Place 

3 Academy street 
71 Backwynd 

24 South street 
20 Nursery Feus 
186 East High street 

25 Glamis Road 
17 North street 

15 Manor street 
42 Dundee Loan 
35 North street 
22 Lour Road 

47 West Lligh street 
97 West High street 

26 Montrose Road 

1 67 East High street 
30 Green street 
90 Dundee Loan 
26 Arbroath Road 

16 Glamis Road 

52 Dundee Road 
37 North street 

166 East High street 
12 Don street 
80 North street 

14 Charles street 
57 North street 
84 North street 

12 North street 

13 St. James' Road 
17&19 East High street 

19 East High street 

137 East High street 
6 Zoar 

108 Backwynd 
Templebank 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



2 9 



Rattray, Peter 
Ilea, Hendry 
Redford, Alexander 
Ree, Alexander 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, David 
Reid, James 
Reid, Joseph 
Reid, Peter 
Reid, William 
Reid, William 
Reid, William 
Renny, David 
Reoch, Andrew 
Rew, William 
Riddle, William 
Ritchie, Alexander 
Ritchie, Alexander 
Ritchie, David 
Ritchie, George 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, Peter 
Ritchie, William Air 
Robb, David 
Robb, Joseph 
Robb, William 
Robb, William 
Robb, Wyllie 
Robbie, Charles 
Roberts, Charles 
Roberts, James 
Roberts, John, jun. 
Roberts, William 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, David 
Robertson, David 
Robertson, Donald 
Robertson, George 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James Watson 
Robertson, John 
Robertson, Peter 
Robertson, Peter 
Robertson, Thomas 



Mechanic 

Tenter 

Railway guard 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Tenter 

Bleacher 

Clerk 

Confectioner 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Policeman 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Clerk 

Factory worker 

Cowfeeder 

Farmer 

Twinespinner 

Veterinary surgeon 

Engine driver 

Salesman 

Postman 

Toy merchant 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Publican 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Hosier 

Draper 

Engine driver 

Factory worker 

Innkeeper 

Joiner 

Joiner 

Shoemaker 

Mason 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Painter 

Contractor 

Waggon Inspector 

G-ame & fish dealer 

Factory worker 



10 South street 
Wellbraehead 
22 Don street 
(3 Montrose Road 
22 Arbroath Road 
26 John street 
15 Wellbraehead 
18 Zoar 

9 Sparrow Croft 

56 East High street 

57 North street 

10 Glamis Road 
9 Watt street 

15 Montrose Road 
37 North street 

97 West High street 
5 Broadcroft 
7 Sparrowcroft 

11 Montrose Road 
Windyedge 

21 Dundee Road 
30 North street 
East Port Cottage 
20 John street 

22 Yearn an street 
Rosebank Road 
67 Backwynd 

52 Dundee Road 
110 Dundee Road 
95 East High street 
18 Dundee Road 
Backw} r nd 
3 Wellbraehead 
20 Wellbraehead 
43 East High street 
20 Wellbraehead 
82 North street 
5 Charles street 

23 Osnaburgh street 

16 Charles street 
Gallowhill 

22 Yeaman street 

9 Watt street 

3 Bell Place 

13 Watt street 

32 East High street 

52 Castle street 

35 South street 

87 North street 

1 & 6 West High street 

5 Glamis Road 



3° 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Robertson, William 

Rodger, David 

Rodger, James 

Rodger, John 

Rodger, William 

Rolland, Peter 

Rolland, Alexander 

Rolland, Maxwell 

Rose, James 

Ross, Alexander 

Ross, David 

Ross, James 

Ross, James 

Ross, James 

Ross, William 

Ross, William 

Ross, William 

Ross, William 

Rough, Alexander 

Rough, Alexander 

Rough, George 

Rough, James Pattison 

Roy, Thomas 

Ryder, John 

Saddler, James 

Samson, David 

Samson, James 

Samson, John 

Samson, John 

Samson, John 

Samson, William 

Savage, David 

Savage, James 

Scott, Charles 

Scott, David 

Scott, David 

Scott, George 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, John 

Scott, Robert 

Scott, William 

Scott, William 

Scott, William 

Scott, William 

Selby, David 

Sharp, William Westland 

Shepherd, Alexander 



Farmer 

Painter 

Inspector of Poor 

Surfaceman 

Factory Manager 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Policeman 

Plumber 

Labourer 

Tenter 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Grocer, &c. 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Post Runner 

Compositor 

Pensioner 

Confectioner 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Cattle salesman 

Warehouseman 

Mason 

Saddler 

Auctioneer 

Mason 

Pig dealer 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Potato merchant 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Coal merchant 

Baker 



Cossens of Glamis 

21 West High street 
50^- East High street 
167 East High street 
Dovehillock 

4 Dundee Road 

63 West High street 
.'34 Dundee Loan 
Newmonthill 

7 Green street 
17 Charles street 
105 Backwynd 

1 Lappiedub 

5 Bell Place 

11 Wellbraehead 
5 Academy street 
St. James' Road 
108 Backwynd 

22 Glamis Road 

8 Arbroath Road 
5 Arbroath Road 

25 East Sunnyside 
91 Castle street 

21 Nursery Feus 

65 West High street 
10 Dundee Loan 

2 Dundee Road 
15 Charles street 

23 Sunnyside 

26 South street 
Lunanhead 

10 Glamis Road 
48 Glamis Road 
15 Zoar 
Whitehills 
30 John street 
13 Newmonthill 
7 Lappiedub 
47 North street 
26 Dundee loan 

64 East High street 

22 Yeaman street 
Whitehills 
Newford Park 

93 West High street 

157 East High street 

Zoar 

7 Lappiedub 

57 Backwynd 

23 Victoria Road 

9 Osnaburoh street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



3 1 



Shepherd, Alexander 
Shepherd, Alexander H. 
Shepherd, Andrew 
Shepherd, Charles 
Shepherd, Chaises 
Shepherd, James, jun. 
Shepherd, James 
Shepherd, James sen. 
Shepherd, William 
Shepherd, William 
Shepherd, jr., William 
Sheriff, George 
Sime, James 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Andrew 
Simpson, David 
Simpson, David 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, John 
Simpson, John 
Simpson, Robert 
Simpson, Thomas 
Simpson, William 
Simpson, William 
Sinclair, David 
Sievewright, Colin 
Skene, Keith Kennedy 
Skeen, Thomas 
Small, David 
Small, Leonard 
Small, Leonard 
Smart, Alexander 
Smart, Andrew 
Smart, George 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Andrew 
Smith, Allan 
Smith, Charles G. 
Smith, David 
Smith, David 
Smith, Davidson 
Smith, Edward 
Smith, James 



Factory worker 

Slater 

Baker 

Slater 

Baker 

General merchant 

Mason 

General dealer 

Mason 

Printer & stationer 

Bookseller 

Drapery agent 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Teacher 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Weaver 

Reedmaker 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Boot merchant 

Labourer 

Gas inspector 

Factory worker 

Ploughman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Manager West Port 

Mason [Association 

Factory worker 

Seedsman 

Labourer 

Tenter [teacher 

Organist and music 

Seedsman 

Tenter (foreman) 

Mason 

A ! echanic 

Labourer 



59 Dundee Loan 
114 East High street 

22 & 24 West High street 
2 Charles street 

26 Arbroitth Koad 
2-1 Glamis Road 
163 East High street 

10 North street 
15 William street 
41 Castle street 
69 Castle street 
133£ East High street 
63 West High street 
31 Prior Road 

20 Bailliewellbrae 

11 St. James' Road 
11 St. James' Road 
39 Dundee Road 
Gallowhill 

23 Strang street 

11 Lour Road 

4 Montrose Road 

17 Arbroath Road 
Helen street 

12 Nursery Feus 
15 Newmonthill 
Catherine Square 

24 Market Place 
20 Glamis Road 
61 Dundee Loan 

8 Don street 

100 Dundee Loan 
75 Castle street 
114 Dundee Road 
Horsewater Wynd 
40| Dundee Loan 

25 Glamis Road 
24 Montrose Road 

37 Dundee Loan 
22 Dundee Loan 
12 Glamis Road 
30 Yeaman street 
30 Glamis Road 

5 Teuchat Croft 

18 St. James' Road 
New Road 
Broomroof 

9 William street 

2 St. James' Road 
46 South street 

38 Lour Road 



32 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Smith, James 

Smith, James 

Smith, James 

Smith, James 

Smith, James 

Smith, James 

Smith, John 

Smith, John 

Smith, John 

Smith, John 

Smith, John 

Smith, John Kerr 

Smith, Peter 

Smith, Peter 

Smith, Robert 

Smith, William 

Smith, William 

Smith, William 

Snowie, John 

Soutar, Alexander 

Soutar, Alexander 

Soutar, Andrew 

Soutar, David 

Soutar, James 

Soutar, John 

Soutar, Joseph 

Soutar, William Murray 

Spalding, Alexander 

Spark, James 

Spark, William G. 

Stark, Alexander 

Stark, David 

Stark, David 

Stark, David 

Stark, David 

Stark, George 

Stark, William 

Steele, Andrew 

Steele, David 

Steele, John, jun. 

Stephen, Alexander 

Stephen, William 

Steven, John 

Steven, John 

Steven, John 

Stewart, Alexander 

Stewart, Alexander 

Stewart, Alexander 

Stewart, Alexander 

Stewart, Andrew 

Stewart, Charles 



Lapper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Seedsman 

Railway inspector 

Teacher 

Engine driver 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Railway servant 

Hawker 

Ploughman 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Hawker 

Factory worker 

Engine driver 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Agent 

Weaver 

Mason 

Clothier 

Grocer 

Joiner 

Gardener 

Mason 

Mason 

Railway labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Farmer 

Bank agent 

Manufacturer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Baker 

Labourer 

Engine driver 

Joiner 

Police sergeant 

Tailor 

Vanman 

Factory worker 

Labourer 



18 Zoar 

39^- Dundee Loan 

3 Charles street 

14 Dundee Loan 
157 East High street 
Academy street 

59 West High street 
28 Yeaman street 
Newmonthill 

1 William street 

21 Victoria street 

28 Yeaman street 
24 Backwynd 

11 John street 

1 1 Horsewater Wynd 
186 East High street 

29 Backwynd 
13 South street 
Dundee Road 

3 Prior Road 

2 Stark's Close 

22 Don street 
28 Nursery Feus 
43 Prior Road 
10 Yeaman street 
Prior Road 

8 Wellbraehead 

4 Sparrow Croft 
Market Place 

18 Dundee Loan 
13 Glamis Road 
8 Stark's Close 

24 Yeaman street 
21 St. James' Road 

15 Glamis Road 
13 Charles Street 

12 Glamis Road 
Mid Langlands 
East High street 
East High street 
52 Dundee Road 
40 John street 

126 East High street 

127 Castle street 
Gallowhill 

25 Backwynd 
Cross 

4 Green street 
31 John street 
East Sunnyside 
85 North street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



33 



», Charles 

t, Charles 

t, David 

t, David 

t, David 

i, David 

i, David 

t, David Mackie 

fc, George 

t, George 

t, George 

t, George 

;, James 

t, James 

b, James 

!», James 

fc, James 

t, James 

t, John 

,, John 

b, John 

t, Robert 

:, William, sen. 

:, William 

b, William 

u, William 

t, William 

b, William 

b, William, jun. 

;, Andrew 

r, Andrew 

>•, James 

I, John 

j, John 

'-, John 

j, Thomas 
j, William 
Stirton, David 
Stormont, Robert 
Stormonth, James 
Storrier, Charles 
Storrier, William 
Strachan, Alexander 
Strachan, Alexander Duff 
Strachan, Andrew 
Strachan, George 
Strachan, James 
Strachan, James 
Strachan, John 
Strang, James 
Strang, James 



Labourer 

Shoemaker 

Watchman 

Weaver 

Railway servant 

Slater [facturer 

Lemonade manu- 

Foreman tanner 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Railway Porter 

Contractor 

Flesher 

Mason 

Mason 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Vintner 

Painter 

Builder 

Draper 

Mason 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Ploughman 

Joiner 

Quarrier 

Quarrier 

Supt. of Police 

Quarrier 

Shoemaker 

Quarrier 

School board officer 

Spirit dealer 

Manager 

Sawmiller 

Potato salesman 

Residenter 

Mechanic 

Printer 

Sawmill manager 

Shoemaker 

Keeper 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Watchmaker 

Weaver 

Postrunner 



19 Victoria street 

13 Osnaburgh street 
Gallowhill 
Archie's Park 

33 John street 
12 St. James 1 Road 
Backwynd 
Castle street 

7 Charles street 

8 Broadcroft 

17 Horsewater Wynd 
22 Glamis Road 

20 Montrose Road 

14 Zoar 

94 North street 

28 West High street 

Rescobie 

16 Charles street 
12 Newmonthill 

1 Prior Road 

1 Arbroath Road 
Gallowhill 
Backwynd 

140 East High street 
Roslin Place 
78 North street 
12 Wellbraehead 
28 Zoar 
Green street 
11 Lour Road 
96 Dundee Road 
Melbourne Cottage 
28 Glamis Road 

9 South street 

2 St. James 1 Road 
Kirkton 

I Green street 

3 John street 

15 Glamis Road 
81 North street 

17 Backwynd 
20 South street 
3 Vennel 

22 Green street 
14 Don street 
Court-House 
Market Place 
8 Dundee Loan 

II Newmonthill 
Newmonthill 
37 Backwynd 



34 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Strang, John 
Strang, Robert 
Sturrock, Adam 
Sturrock, Alexander 
Sturrock, Andrew 
Sturrock, Andrew 
Sturrock, David 
Sturrock, James Edward 
Sturrock, William 
Sturrock, William 
Symon, Archibald A. 
Tarbat, Alexander 
Tarbat, Alexander 
Tarbat, David 
Tarbat, William 
Taylor, David 
Taylor, James 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, Peter, sen. 
Taylor, Peter, jun. 
Taylor, Robert Grant 
Taylor. William 
Thom, Alexander 
Thorn, Alexander 
Thom, Andrew 
Thorn, Charles 
Thom, David 
Thom, James 
Thom, James 
Thom, James 
Thom, John 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thomson, James 
Thomson, James 
Thomson, John 
Thomson, John Alex. 
Thomson, William Hodge 
Thornton, Archibald 
Thornton, Charles 
Thornton, David P. 
Thornton, James 
Thornton, Thomas 
Tindal, David 
Todd, Alexander 
Todd, James 
Tosh, Charles 



Slater 

Barber 

Baker 

Bootmaker 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Architect 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Hatter 

Town-clerk 

Carter 

Tailor 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Watchmaker 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Billposter 

Shoemaker 

Clerk 

Draper 

Labourer 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Insurance agent 

Tenter 

Late postmaster 

Goods agent 

Registrar 

Joiner 

Quarrier 

Shoemaker 

Carter 

Railway guard 

Slater 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Ironmonger, &c. 



9 Little Causeway 
94 East High street 
7 Watt street 

29 Strang street 

10 Glamis Road 
18 William street 

10 Newmonthill 
St. James' Road 
18 South street 

11 Little Causeway 

50 East High street 
52 South street 
Nursery Feus 

23 Castle street 

17 New Road 
60 Castle street 
St. James' Road 

22 John street 
10 Littlecauseway 
28 Nursery Feus 
135 East High street 
7 Watt street 

99 East High street 
1 Victoria street 
14 Glamis Road 

33 Backwynd 

7 Littlecauseway 
97 West High street 
New Road 

23 Castle street 
5 John street 

22 Canmore street 

12 Glamis Road 
16 Little Causeway 
26 Lour Road 

14 Charles street 

42 North street 

75 Backwynd 

161 East High street 

Rosebank Road 

Whitehills 

73 East High street 

13 North street 
20 Nursery Feus 

51 West High street 
16 Prior Road 
Whitehills 

28 Yeaman street 
10 East High street 

34 Dundee Loan 

18 West High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



35 



Tosh, Peter A. 
Tosh, William 
Tough, Peter 
Towns, George 
Tyrie, Charles 
Tyrie, David 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, Robert 
Urquhart, Alexander 
Urquhart, Duncan 
Valentine, James 
Valentine, John 
Wacldell, Hay 
Waddell, James 
Waddell, James 
Waddell, John 
Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker, James 
Walker, James 
Walker, Robert 
Walker, William 
Walker, jr., William 
Wallace, Thomas 
Wallace, Thomas 
Wallace, William 
Warden, David 
Warden, David 
Warden, Frank 
Warden, William 
Waterston, Charles 
Waterston, James 
Waterston, John Edmund 
Waterston, William 
Watson, Alexander 
Watson, Alexander 
Watson, Thomas 
Watson, William 
Watt, Alexander 
Watt, James 
Watt, John 
Watt, Robert 
Watt, William 
Webster, Charles 
Webster, George 
Webster, George 
Webster, James 



Auctioneer 
Labourer 
Factory worker 
Weaver 
Lapper 
Cambmaker 
Tenter 

Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Game dealer 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Coach painter 
Factory worker 
Baker 

Factory worker 
Labourer 
Engine driver 
Butcher 
Telegraph lineman 

Sawmiller 

Police sergeant 

Labourer 

Farmer, &c. 

Clerk 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Railway guard 

Farmer 

Draper 

Weaver 

Builder 

Farmer 

Residenter 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Blacksmith 

Weaver 

Grocer 

Labourer 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Hall keeper 

Labourer 

Factory worker 



16 Lour Road 

9 Glamis Road 

64 East High street 
122 East High street 
45 West High street 
184 East High street 
75 North street 

10 Dundee Road 
40 Dundee Loan 

49 Dundee Loan 
St. James 1 Road 
28 North street 
Nursery Feus 

22 Wellbraehead 
170 East High street 
127 Castle street 

24 William street 
6 Dundee Road 
131 Castle street 

50 North street 

2£ East High street 
44 John street 
20 Victoria street 
Lochside 
3 Lappiedub 
Heatherstacks 
Heatherstacks 
70 Dundee Loan 
97 West High street 

6 Lappiedub 
Cowiehill 

23 North street 
Cotton of Lownie 
27 East High street 
63 Glamis Road 
Glamis Road 

of Pitreuchie 
Newtonbank 
49 Prior Road 

7 Watt street 
83 North street 
108 Castle street 

8 Don street 
5 Backwynd 

9 Backwynd 

St. James' Road 
154 East High street 
7 Charles street 
Reid Hall Lodge 
9 Littlecauseway 
St. James' Road 



36 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Webster, James 
Webster, Patrick 
Webster, William 
Wedderburn, Alexander 

M'Lagan 
Weir, John 
Welsh, David 
Welsh, John 
Welsh, John 
Whammond, David 
Whiteford, Alexander 
Whitson, Andrew H. 
Whitton, James 
Whitton, William 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Andrew, jun. 
Whyte, Andrew, sen. 
Whyte, David 
Whyte, Henry 
Whyte, James 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, Joseph 
Whyte, Robert 
Whyte, Thomas 
Whyte, William 
Wighton, Alexander 
Wilkie, Alexander 
Wilkie, Alexander 
Wilkie, James 
Wilkie, Walter 
Wilkie, William 
Willis, William 
Williams, James 
Wilson, Alexander 
Wilson, James 
Wilson, Robert 
Wilson, William 
Winter, Alexander 
AVinter, George 
Wish art, Charles 
Wishart, George 
Wishart, James 
Wishart, John 
Wishart, John 
Wood, Charles 
Wood, Charles 



Quarrier 

Gentleman 

Dyker 

M.D. 

Clergyman 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Cabinetmaker 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Policeman 

Moulder 

Tailor 

Turner 

Coal merchant 

Factory worker 

Hawker 

Potato merchant 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Tanner 

Residenter 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Solicitor 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Hotel keeper 

Factory worker 

Spirit dealer 

Engine driver 

Spirit dealer 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Currier 

Grocer 

Coal merchant 

Cattle dealer 

Tenter 

Bleacher 

Mason 

Tenter 



19 St. James' Road 
Westfield 

51 Dundee Road 

East High street 

St. James' Manse 
13 Zoar 

24 Victoria street 
11 Canmore street 
38 Canmore street 
76 Dundee Loan 

6 Littlecauseway 

43 North street' 
23 Victoria street 
Headingplacestone 
3 John street 

25 Prior Road 
Market Place 
Market Place 

1 1 Market Place 

20 North street 
30 South street 
10 Arbroath Road 
Sparrowcroft 

50 South street 

101 East High street 

Helen street 

East High street 

15 Horsewater Wynd 

37 Prior Road 

44 North street 

3 Arbroath Road 

19 New Road 

167 East High street 

5 Academy street 
40 West High street 
Castle street 

6 Charles street 

155 East High street 

Zoar 

105^- East High street 

28 Lour Road 

10 Lour Road 

21 Victoria street 
28 Dundee Loan 
15 Green street 

120 East High street 
13 Little. Causeway 
58 Dundee Loan 
5 Academy street 
53 West High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



37 



AVood, George 
Wood, James 
Wood, James 
Wood, John 
Wood, William 
Wood, William 
Wood, William 
Wright, Peter Stirling 
Wyllie, Alexander Blues 
Wyllie, David 
Wyllie, William 
Wyllie, William 
Yeaman, x^lexander 
Young, Allan 
Young, Andrew 
Young, Charles 
Young, David 
Young, David 
Young, David 
Young, Peter 
Young, William 
Young, William 
Young, William 
Younger, George 



Sawyer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Weaver 

Joiner 

Tanner 

Labourer 

Clergyman 

Solicitor 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Linen manufacturer 

Factory Avorker 

Lapper 

Lapper 

Farmer 

Joiner 

Cowfeeder 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Teacher 



2 Prior Lane 

52 West High street 
'26 South street 

3 Victoria street 
33 Glamis Road 
3 Victoria street 
Newmonthill 
U.P. Manse 

11 Green street 

Roslin Place 

80c West High street 

13 Broadccoft 
33 Dundee Loan 
182 East High street 
6 Bell Place 

6 Bell Place 
Blairyfadden, Oathlaw 
32 John street 
Fruithill 

14 Charles street 
West High street 
Go North street 

1 St. James' Road 

Miss E. Black's, Castle st. 



FEMALE HOUSEHOLDERS. 



Adam, Marjory 


Widow 


Adam, Martha 


Spinster 


Adamson, Isabella 


Widow 


Addison, Jane 


Spinster 


Alexander, Catherine 


Spinster 


Alexander, Catherine 


Widow 


Alexander, Isabella 


Widow 


Allan, Agnes 


Widow 


Allan, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Allan, Mar)' 


Spinster 


Allan, Mary 


Spinster 


Anderson, Betsy 


Spinster 


Anderson, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Anderson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Anderson, Isabella 


Spinster 


Anderson, Isabella 


Widow 


Anderson, Martha 

D 


Spinster 



St. James' Road 
18 Glamis Road 
24 Montrose Road 
5 Vennel 
67 Backwynd 
17 Glamis Road 
7 Osnaburgh street 
78 Dundee Loan 
30 North street 

5 Prior Road 

99 East High street 
95 East High street 
186 East High street 
9 Archie's Park 

6 Nursery Feus 
11 Dundee Loan 
137 East High street 



38 



FORFAR DIRECTORY 



Anderson, Mary AYidow 

Anderson, Mary Widow 

Anderson, Mary Spinster 
Anderson, Susan 

Andrew, Margaret Widow 

Arnot, Mary Spinster 

Arthur, Catherine Spinster 

Arthur, Margaret Spinster 

Balfour. Elizabeth Widow 

Barclay, Elizabeth Widow 

Barclay, Margaret Spinster 

Barrie, Elizabeth Widow 
Beattie, Mary . Widow 

Belford, Elizabeth Widow 

Belford, Mary Spinster 

Bell, Agnes Widow 

Bell, Elizabeth Widow 

Bell, Elizabeth Widow 

Bell, Jessie Widow 

Bell, Margaret Spinster 
Bell, Margaret Thornton Widow 

Bennet, Amelia Widow 

Binny, Jane Widow 

Black, Elizabeth Spinster 

Black, Mary Spinster 

Boath Agnes Widow 

Boath, Elizabeth Widow 

Boath, Helen Spinster 

Boath, Jane Widow 

Boath, Jane M'Xab Spinster 

Boath, Mary Spinster 

Boath, Mary Spinster 

Boath, Mary Spinster 

Boath, Mary Spinster 

Boath, Margaret Widow 
Bowman, Agnes 

Boyle, Jessie Spinster 

Boyle, Jessie Spinster 

Boyle, Jessie Spinster 

Boyne, Barbara Widow 

Bradbear, Sarah Spinster 
Bremner, Marjory 

Brew, Jane Widow 

Brown, Catherine Spinster 

Brown, Elizabeth Spinster 

Bruce, Ann Spinster 

Bruce, Elizabeth Widow 

Bruce, Margaret Widow 

Buick, Margaret Spinster 

Bunch, Ann Spinster 

Burnett, Margaret Widow 



Chapelbank 

13 Wellbraehead 

46 Prior Road 

5 East H!gh street 

13 Littlecauseway 

14 St. James' Road 
25 Victoria street 
Broomroof Cottage 
40 Prior Road 

4 West High street 

10 Glamis Road 
37 South street 

188 East High street 

47 Dundee Road 
19 New Road 

182 East High street 
51 Dundee Loan 
37 Glamis Road 
85 West High street 

3 Bell Place 

85 West High street 
9 Archie's Park 

22 Prior Road 
46 Castle street 
1 j8 Backwynd 

100 West High street 

4 Academy street 
27 Strang street 
Chapel Park 

33 North street 
61 Glamis Road 
143 East High street 
72 Dundee Road 

5 East High street 
36 Prior Road 

4 North street 

Backwynd 

42 South street 

11 Horsewater Wynd 
Castle street 

33 John street 

1 St. James' Road 

24 Market Place 

1 8 Manor street 

Kirkton 

3 Horsewater Wynd 

16 Yeaman street 

23 Nursery Feus 
80 East High street 
1 Bell Place 

13 South street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Burns, Helen Spinster 

Butchart, Isabella Widow 

Butehart, Margai'et Spinster 

Butehart, Mary Spinster 

i.uttar, Jane Widow 

Byars, Ann AA idow 

Cable, Helen Spinster 

Cable, Jane Spinster 

Cable, Snsan Spinster 

Caird, Mary Ann AVidoAv 

Cairns, Janet AVidow 

C alder, Jessie Spinster 

Calder, Madalene YVidow 

Campbell, Ann AA r idow 

Cant, Mary Spinster 

Cargill, Elizabeth Spinster 

Cargill, Mary AVidow 

Chapman, Annie Spinster 
Christie, Elizabeth 

Christie, Fanny Spinster 

Christie, Margaret Spinster 

Christie, Marianne AVidow 

Christie, Margaret AVidow 

Christie, M«ry Spinster 

Chrystal, Catherine Widow 

Christison, Elizabeth Spinster 

Clark, Catherine V« idow 

Clark. Catherine Spinster 

Clark, Elizabeth AVidow 

Clark, Elspeth AVidow 

Clark, Isabella AVidow 

Clarke, Agres, Spinster 
Clarke, (Teorgina Murray Spinster 

Colville, Jane Widow 

Cook, Anderson AA'idow 

Cook, Mary Spinster 

Coupar, Isabella \\ idow 

Crabb, Agnes Spinster 

Craig, Jane Widow 

Craig, Margaret Spinster 

Craik, Catherine AVidow 

Craik, Elizabeth Spinster 

Craik, Jane Ann Spinster 

Crighton, Betsy Spinster 

Croll, Margaret Widow 

Dakers, Jane Spinster 

Dakers, Margaret Widow 

Dakers, Margaret AVidow 

Dalgetty, Ann Widow 

Davidson, Agnes Spinster 

Davidson, Isabella Spinster 



9 Zoar 

1 Arbroath Road 

2 Lappiednb 

66 Dundee Road 
AnehleiK-hrie 
1(! Nursery Feus 

10 MarketPlaee 

50 North street 
4 Bell Place. 

32 North street 

18 South street 

1 St. James' Road 

15 Newmonthill 

42 Prior Road 

2H Nursery Feus 

162 East High street 

4 Archie's Park 

Lour Road 

12 Stark's Close 

48 South street 

17 Manor street 

Ivirkton 

10 Don street 

72 East High street 

.~>2 West High street 

1 7 AVatt street 

9'5 Baekwynd 

12 i East High street 

51 Prior Road 

125 East High street 

12 Wellbraehead 

80 South street 

53 East High street 

89 John street 

14 New Pvoad 

93 East High street 

38 Prior Road 

14 Nursery Feus 

30 South street 

93 East High street 

Manor House 

3)7 North street 

28 Nursery Feus 

12 St. James' Road 

150^ Fast High street 

114 East High street 

22 Dundee Road 

19 Baekwynd 

114 West 'High street 
8 Arbroath Road 
■22 Market Place 



40 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Davidson, Janet 
Davidson, Matilda 
Davidson, Margaret 
Dewar, Janet 
Dickson, Agnes 
Doig, Ann 
Doig, Ann 
Doig, Marjory 
Doig, Mrs John 
Donald, Ann 
Donald, Agnes 
Donald, Elizabeth 
Donald, Isabella 
Donald, Isabella 
Dunbar, Agnes 
Duncan, Elizabeth 
Duncan, Jane 
Dnndas, Isabella 
Duthie, Ann 
Duthie, Joan 
Dyce, Margaret Mollison 
Edward, Mary 
Edwards, Elizabeth 
Elder, Isabella 
Ellis, Jessie 
Erskine, Margaret 
Esplin, Mary Ann 
Evans, Eliza 
Ewart, Marjory 
Ewart, Mary 
Fairweather, Ann 
Fairweather, Jane Marr 
Fairweather, Sarah 
Farquliarson, Margaret 
Fenton, Ann 
Fenton, Mary 
Ferguson, Jane 
Findlay, Agnes 
Findlay, Ann 
Findlay, Jane 
Findlay, Matilda 
Findlayson, Helen 
Fodd, Catherine 
Ford, Ann 
Forbes, Annie 
Forbes, Betsy 
Forbes, Isabella 
Forbes, Margaret 
Fordyce, Elizabeth 
Fordyce, Elizabeth 
Forsyth, Margaret 



Spinster 


26 Market Place 


Spinster 


14 St. James' Road 


Widow 


11 William street 


Spinster 


13 Arbroath Road 


Spinster 


100 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


36 West High street 


Widow 


51 Prior Road 


Spinster 


Helen street 


Widow 


23a Victoria street 


Spinster 


17 Green street 


Widow 


11 Zoar 


Widow 


19 Wellbraehead 


Widow 


14 Watt street 


Widow 


1 Nursery Feus 


Widow 


27 John street 


Spinster 


96 North Street 


Widow 


110 East High street 


Widow 


1 William street 


Widow 


Horsewater Wynd 


Spinster 


1 St. James' Road 


Widow 


12 Cross 


Spinster 


13 Manor street 


Widow 


4 Victoria street 


Spinster 


29 Manor street 


Spinster 


33 West High street 


AVidow 


36 North street 


Widow 


25 Market Place 


Spinster 


11 New Road 


Spinster 


Archie's Park 


Spinster 


4 Archie's Park 


Spinster 


29 Strang street 


Spinster 


113 Castle street 


Spinster 


9 South street 


Spinster 


3 Charles street 


Spinster 


162 East High street 


Spinster 


64 East High street 


Spinster 


20 West Hisdi street 


Widow 


17 Zoar 


Widow 


12 Wellbraehead 


Widow 


Hillockhead 


Spinster 


178 East High street 


Spinster 


52 South street 


Widow 


Prior Road 


Widow 


105 Back wynd 


Spinster 


17 Littlecauseway 


Widow 


91 Castle street 


Spinster 


30 South street 


Spinster 


30 South street 


Widow 


26 Backwynd 


Widow 


59 Glamis Road 


Widow 


1 Green street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



41 



Fraser, Betsy Spinster 

Fraser, Elizabeth Spinster 

Fyfe, Elizabeth Widow 

Fyfe, Isabella Barrie Spinster 

Fyfe, Margaret Widow 

Fyfe, Mary Widow 

Fyffe, Janet Widow 

Fyffe, Margaret Widow 

Fyffe, Marjory Spinster 

Gall, Mary Widow 

Gairns, Christina Spinster 

Gemmell, Margaret Spinster 

Gibb, Agnes Spinster 

Gibb, Helen Thomson Widow 

Gibb, Jane Spinster 

Gibb, Mary Widow 
Gibson, Elizabeth 

Gibson, Harriet Widow 

Gibson, Jessie Widow 

Gibson, Mary Spinster 

Gibson, Mary Spinster 

Gibson, Mary Widow 

Glen,* Agnes Spinster 

Glen, Margaret Widow 

Goodall, Margaret Widow 

Gordon, Agnes Widow 

Gordon, Helen Widow 

Grewar, Jane Widow 

Grant, Isabella Widow 

Grant, Jane Widow 

Grant, Mary Spinster 

Gray, Marjory Widow 

Gray, Mary Spinster 

Gray, Mary Widow 
Gray, Mary 

Gray, Susan Widow 

Guild, Janet Widow 

Guthrie, Barbara Widow 

Guthrie, Jean Spinster 

Hamilton, Jessie Spinster 

Hastings, Jane Widow 

Hastings, Janet Widow 

Hebenton, Margaret Spinster 

Henderson, Ann Spinster 

Henderson, Flora Spinster 

Henderson, Jean Spinster 

Henderson, Margaret Spinster 

Hendry, Jane Spinster 

Henry, Jane Spinster 

Herald, Jean Widow 

High, Jessie Widow 



72£ West High street 
125 Castle street 

6 New Road 
Mylnhall 
Couttie's Wynd 

17 Backwynd 
5 Prior Road 

156 East High street 
Littlecauseway 

4 Market Place 
54 South street 
15 Glamis Road 

5 Bell Place 

1 Lappiedub 

70 Dundee Road 

3 William street 

Bankhead 

4.'< Dundee Road 

18 Littlecauseway 
162 East High street 

10 South street 
49 Dundee Road 
15 Green street 

75 East High street 
Catherine Square 
15 Prior Road 

5 Glamis Road 
Market Place 

2 Bell Place 
Barnhill 

11 Zoar 

17 Backwynd 

17 New Road 
48 South street 

18 North street 
24 Victoria street 

7 Montrose Road 
20 Charles street 

12 Wellbraehead 
Newmonthill 

3 Chapel street 
27 Prior Road 

8 South street 
St. James' Road 
Boal 

70 Dundee Road 

6 Dundee Road 
15 Arbroath Road 
10 Zoar 

17 Manor street 
26 Glamis Road 



4 2 



FORFAR DIRECTORY 



Hill, Helen 
Hill, Margaret 
Hill, Mary 
Hill, Susan 
Hilton, Jane 
Home, Agnes 
Hood, Catherine 
Hood, Catherine 
Hood, Elizabeth 
Howie, Isabella 
Hutchison. Barbara 
Hutchison, Madaline 
Hutchison, Alary 
Hutchison, Mary Ann 
liutton. Agnes 
Ilutton, Isabella 
Ilynd, Agnes 
Inverarity, Margaret 
Inverwick. Ann 
Jack. Elizabeth 
rlarvis, Mary Ann 
Johnston, Agnes 
Johnston, Agues 
Johnston, Ann 
Johnston, Betsy 
Johnston, Elizabeth 
Johnston. Jane 
Johnston, Margaret 
Johnston, Margaret 
Jones, Jean 
Keith. Elizabeth 
Kelaehy. Ann 
Kennedy, Betsy 
Kerr, Jessie 
Kerr, Mrs Robert 
Kewans, Margaret 
Kinnear, Isabella 
Laing, Elizabeth 
Laird, Jane 
Lamond, Mary Ann 
Langlands, Ann 
Latto, Jane 
Law, Mary 
Lawson. Margaret 
Lavvson, Elirabeth 
Leith, Catherine 
Liddle, Mary 
Lindsay, Catherine 
Lindsay, Helen 
Lindsay, Isabella 
Lindsay, Jane 



Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

AVidow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

AVidow 

Widow 

AVidow 

AVidow 

Spinster 

AVidow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

AAldow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

AVidow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

AVidow 

AA r idow 

Spinster 

AVidow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widuw 

Spinster 

AVidow 



21 Wellbraehead 
10£ Wellbraehead 
24 Victoria street 
17 Manor street 
57 AVest High street 

89 Backwynd 

I Can more street 

II Prior Road 
Nilebank 

74 East High street 
Newmonthill 

1 12 East High street 
West Sunnyside 
2:> St. James' Road 

1 7 Wellbraehead 

10 South street 
Mill bank House 

19 Manor street 
7>i Backwynd 
Market Place 

2 Nursery Pens 

90 Dundee Loan 
!> Green street 
Service Road 

2 Watt street 
9 Cross 

92 East High street 
4o Dundee Loan 

8 Lour Road 

120 East High street 
52 South street 
14 Castle street 

75 Backwynd 
30 Glamis Road 
1 Zoar 

o4 Yeainan street 

3 Teuchat Croft 

21 East High street 
6 Newmonthill 
Reedmakers Close 
1!) Backwynd 
Castle street 
Belmont House 
21 Canmore street 
14 Nursery Feus 

1 1 Osnaburgh street 
4;J North street 

149 East High street 
1G Zoar 

20 Dundee Road 

9 Broadcroft 



KORKAK DIRECTORV. 



Lindsay, Jessie 
Lindsay, Mary 
Littlejohn, Elizabeth 
Liveston, Ann 
Logan, Marjory 
Low, Isabella 
Low, Isabella 
Low, Jane 
Low, Jessie 
Low, Margaret 
Low, Mary Ann 
Low, Margaret 
Lowden, Isabella 
Lowson, Catherine 
Lowson, Elizabeth 
Lowson, Helen 
Lowson, Helen 
Lyall, Margaret 
Lyon, Betsy Shaw 
Lowson, Isabella 
Lowson, Margaret 
Machar, Elizabeth 
Maekie, Martha 
Mackie, Mary 
Mann, Elizabeth 
Mann, Jane 
Masterton, Elizabeth 
Masterton, Elizabeth 
Matthewson, Jean 
Maxwell, Mrs David 
Mehlrum, Isabella 
Meldrum, Ann 
Melvin, Margaret 
Michie, Margaret 
Millar, Ann" 
Millar, Charlotte 
Millar, Elizabeth 
Millar, Margaret 
Miller, Susan 
Milne, Agnes 
Milne, Ann 
Milne, Betsy 
Milne, Isabella 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Janet 
Milne, Mary 
Mitchell, Agnes 
Mitchell, Ann 
Mitchell, Betsy 
Mitchell, Elizabeth 



Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Husband abroad 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

W idow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 



31 Zoar 

20 Dundee Road 
38 West High street 
88 East High street 

24 Caninore street 
16 Yeaman street 

10 Montrose Road 
00 Lour Road 

15 Charles street 

63 West High street 

20 Glamis Road 
13 Charles street 
93 North street 
28 Yeaman street 

16 North street 

21 Glamis Road 

25 Glamis Road 

11 Arbroath Road 
Letham 

11 Charles street 
Chapel Park 
Littlecauseway 

9 Cross 

57 West High street 
122 West High street 
42 Dundee Loan 
63 Castle street 
7 Prior Road 
3 Green street 
13 Market Place 
136 East High street 
2 Chapel street 
19 Castle street 
38 Canmore street 

2 Chapel street 

10 Lappiedub 
Chapel Park 

79 Glamis Road 
73 Castle street 

12 Nursery Feus 
23 Nursery Feus 
136 East High street 

21 Manor street 

26 Marketplace 
51 North street 
Montrose Road 
10 Wellbraehead 

22 Nursery Feus 
12 St. James' Road 

3 West High street 
34 Canmore street 



44 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Moffat, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


11 Broadcroft 


Mollison, Jane 


Spinster 


3 Vennel 


Morris, Euphemia 


Widow 


59 West High street . 


Morris, Mary Ann 


Spinster 


15 Wellbraehead 


Morrison, Ann 


Widow 


22 Dundee Loan 


Morrison, Cecilia 


Spinster 


17 Horsewater Wynd 


Morty, Ann 


Spinster 


7 Zoar 


Mudie, Helen 




36 Dundee Loan 


Murray, Jessie 


Widow 


Rosebank House 


M'Aulay, Ann 


Spinster 


186 East High street 


M 'Donald, Ann 


Spinster 


21 New Road 


M'Dougall, Susan 


Spinster 


86 West High street 


M'Farlane, Helen 


Widow 


31 Zoar 


M'Farlane, Mrs 


Widow 


21 Nursery Feus 


M'Gregor, Jane 


Widow 


75 East High street 


M'Gregor, Mary 




68 East High street 


M'Intosh, Agnes 


Widow 


1 Victoria street 


M'lntosh, Catherine 


Widow 


Hillside 


M'Intosh, Catherine 


Spinster 


123 Castle street 


M'Kay, Christina 


Spinster 


18 Prior Road 


M'Kenzie, Isabella 


Spinster 


72^ West High street 


M'Kenzie, Isabella 


Spinster 


11 Teuchat Croft 


M'Kenzie, Mrs 


Widow 


6 Wellbraehead 


M'Lean, Ann 


Widow 


Newmonthill 


M'Laren, Allison 


Widow 


Headingstone Place 


M'Peat, Jane 


Widow 


11 Horsewater Wynd 


M'Rae, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


1 Bell Place 


M'Rae, Jane 


Spinster 


57 West High street 


M'Rae, Jane 


Spinster 


37 West High street 


M'Reddie, Jane 


Widow 


6 Backwynd 


Neave, Jane 


Spinster 


14 North street 


Neave, Mary 


Spinster 


84 Dundee Loan 


Neave, Rebecca 


Spinster 


9 Green street 


Neish, Catherine 


Widow 


18 Wellbraehead 


Nicoll, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


4 Watt street 


Nicoll, Jane 


Widow 


24 Arbroath Road 


Nicoll, Margaret 


Widow 


4 Stark's Close 


Nicoll, Mary 


Widow 


8 Watt street 


Nicoll, Mrs George 


Widow 


26 Glamis Road 


Nicolson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Catherine Square 


Norrie, Jessie 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


Ogg, Margaret 


Spinster 


93 East High street 


Ogilvie, Annie 


Spinster 


27 North street 


Ogilvie, Helen 


Widow 


38 Canmore street 


Ogilvie, Jane 


Widow 


1 William street 


Ogilvie, Jessie 


Widow 


3 West High street 


Oram, Mary 


Widow 


26 Nursery Feus 


Orchar, Catherine 


Spinster 


64 East High street „ 


Orchison, Charlotte 


Spinster 


14 Charles street 


Ormond, Agnes 


Widow 


12 North street 


Ormoncl, Cecilia 




6 Stark's Close 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



45 



Ormond, Matilda 
Paterson, Ann 
Paterson, Jean 
Pattullo, Ann 
Pattullo, Jessie 
Paul, Agnes 
Pearson, Elizabeth 
Peter, Betsy 
Peter, Margaret 
Petrie, Ann 
Petrie, Mary 
Petrie, Mrs Thomas 
Piggot Mary 
Piggot, Mary 
Porter, Ann 
Porter, Jane 
Prophet, Isabella 
Prophet, Sarah 
Pullar, Helen 
Queen, Ann 
Rae, Ann 
Rae, Annie 
Rae, Betsy 
Rae, Jane 
Ramsay, Isabella 
Ramsay, Isabella 
Ramsay, Margaret 
Reid, Isabella 
Reid, Jane 
Reid, Jessie 
Reid, Jessie 
Reid, Margaret 
Reid, Margaret 
Rennie, Euphemia 
Richard, Jessie 
Richard, Mary 
Richard, Mrs John 
Robb, Catherine 
Robb, Emily 
Robb, Mary 
Robbie, Isabella 
Robbie, Mary 
Roberts, Agnes 
Roberts, Bella 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Rpberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Jane 
Robertson, Agnes 
Robertson, Ann 



Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

AVidow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Married 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 



122 East High street 
10 Glamis Road 
40 East High street 
9 Wellbraehead 

20 Arbroath Road 
99 East High street 
5 Watt street 

36 John street 
Lochside 

21 John street 

134 East High street 

9 John street 

4 Canmore street 

2 Bell Place 

81 Backwynd 

81 Castle street 

William street 

80 East High street 

Vennel 

10 Stark's Close 
7 Zoar 

130 East High street 
7 Charles street 
44 West High street 
103 Castle street 
90 Dundee Loan 

63 Dundee Loan 

26 Dundee Loan 
38 John street 
77 Glamis Road 
12 Wellbraehead 
Couttie's Wynd 
98 Dundee Road 
20 Arbroath Road 

16 New Road 

15 Charles street 
10 Charles street 

27 Dundee Loan 
12 Broadcroft 
Dundee Road 
15 Market Place 

17 Dundee Loan 

64 Yeaman street 
East Sunnyside 
17 North street 
12 North street 

157 East High street 
1 Watt street 
Westby House 

12 Nursery Feus 

13 Watt street 



4 6 



FORFAR DIRECTORY 



Robertson, Helen Widow 

Robertson, Margaret Widow 

Rodger, Ann Widow 

Rose, Jane Spinster 

Ross, Betsy Spinster 

Ross, Mary Spinster 

Rough, Mary Widow 

Saddler. Ann Spinster 

Saddler, Isabella Widow 

Saddler, Mar} - Widow 

Seott, Ann AVidow 

Sievewright, Susan Spinster 

Sim. Mary Ann Spinster 

Simpson, Agnes Widow 

Simpson, Ann Widow 

Simpson, Elizabeth Widow 

Simpson, Jessie Widow 

Simpson, Mary Widow 

Simpson, Mary AVidow 

Shaw. Jessie Spinster 

Shaw. Margaret R. Widow 

Shepherd. Elizabeth Widow 

Skeen, Annie Widow 

Skeen, Elizabeth Spinster 

Small, Isabella Spinster 

Smart, Ann Widow 

Smart, Mary AVidow 

Smith, Agnes Widow 

Smith, Ann Widow 

Smith, Ann AVidow 

Smith, Emily AVidow 

Smith, Georgina Spinster 

Smith, Helen Spinster 

.Small, Isabella Spinster 

Smith. Isabella Widow 

Smith, Janet AVidow 

Smith, Jessie Spinster 

Smith, Margaret AVidow 

Smith, Margaret Spinster 

Smith, Margaret AVidow 

Smith, Mary Spinster 

Smith, Mary Spinster 

Smith, Mary Ann Spinster 

Soutar, Agnes Spinster 

Soutar, Agnes AVidow 

Soutar Annie Spinster 

Soutar, Elizabeth AA 7 idow 

Soutar, Margaret AA r idow 

Spence, Jean Widow 

Stark, Ann Spinster 

Stark, Betsy Spinster 



21 South street 
23 Nursery Feus 

10 Little-causeway 
1:25 East High street 
186 East High street 

29 Glamis Road 
51 Dundee Loan 

2 St. James' Road 
9 Archie's Park 

9 Archie's Park 

2 A Vest Sunny side 
18 Charles street 
-16 John street 
Newmonthill 

11 Grlamis Road 

16 St James' Road 

34 Glamis Road 

1 William street 

10 Charles street 
8 Don street 
Annfield House 

17 Victoria street 
16 Dundee Road 
16 Dundee Road 
6 Zoar 

30 South street 
49 Dundee Loan 

72 West High street 

23 Nursery Feus 

33 Prior Road 

1 62-4 East High street 

Academy street 

97 East High street 

6 Zoar 

12 Arbroath Road 
'26 St, James' Road 
79 Backwynd 

4 Horsewater Wyn'd 

Hilloekhead 

15 Canmore street 

18 Dundee Road 
12 Nursery Feus 

35 North street 

162 East High street 

2 Victoria street 
119 East High street 
Strang street 

1 AA^illiam street 

11 New Road 
6 Glamis Road 
74 Castle street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY 



47 



Stark, Jean Widow 

Stark, Mary Spinster 

Stark. Mary Ann Widow 

Steele, Ann Widow 

Steele. Helen Widow 

Stephen, Helen Spinster 

Stewart, Ann Widow 

Stewart, Annie Widow 

Stewart. Isabella Widow 

Stewart, Joan Widow 

Stewart, Elizabeth Widow 

Stewart, Elsoeth Widow 

Stewart, Isabella Widow 

Stewart. Helen Spinster 

Stewart, Jean Widow 

Stewart, Jessie Spinster 

Stewart, Mary Spinster 

Stirling-. Isabella Widow 

Stormont, Margaret Widow 

Stornionth, Jane Widow 

Strachan, Jessie Spinster 

Strang, Elizabeth Widow 

Sturroek, Isabella Widow 

Sturroek, Jean Widow 

Sturroek, Jane Spinster 

Tarbat, Ann Spinster 

Tarbat, Elizabeth Spinster 

Tarbat, Elizabeth Spinster 

Tarbat, Mary Widow 

Taskar, Betsy Widow 

Taylor, Ann Widow 

Taylor, Helen Spinster 

Taylor, Margaret Spinster 

Tear, Esther Widow 

Thorn, Allison AVidow 

Thorn, Ann Spinster 

Thorn, Bella Spinster 

Thorn, Susan AVidow 

Thomson, Christina Widow 
Thomson, Elizabeth Lunan Spinster 

Thomson, Jane AVidow 

Thomson, Mary Spinster 

Thornton, Ann AVidow 

Thornton, Elizabeth AVidow 

Thornton, Helen Widow 

'Thornton, Margaret Spinster 

Thow, Mary AVidow 

Towns, Ann Spinster 

Tyrie, Mrs George AVidow 

Valentine, Ann Spinster 

Walker, Ann AVidow 



8 Stark's Close 
12 Glamis Road 
Anufield Lane 
18 East High street 
of! South street 
68 Dundee Road 

5 AVatt street 

21 Osnaburgh street 
17 Dundee Loan 
6 4 East High street 
10 Newmonthill 
in Marketplace 
10 Dundee Road 
8!) John street 
84 East High street 

14 Newmonthill 
67 Glamis Road 

12 St. James' Road 

15 Glamis Road 
Broadcroft 

4 Market Place 
20 Littlecauseway 

1 Sparrowcroft 

4 Arbroath Road 

2 Bell Plaee 

166 East High street 

20 Dundee Loan 
10 Backwynd 

168 East High street 
1 7 Littlecauseway 
lieadingstone Place 
•"»() South street 
52 Dundee Road 
28 John street 

6 West Sunnysidc 
25 Glamis Road 
128 East High street 
186 East High street 
>)^ Yeainan street 
liosebank 
Melbourne Cottage 

5 Glamis Road 

&2 West High street 
84 AVest High street 
72| West High street 

6 Archie's Park 
88 Dundee Loan 
8 Stark's Close 

102 East High street 

21 AVellbraehead 
10 Littlecauseway 



4 8 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Walker, Ann 


AVidow 


Walker, Margaret 


AVidow 


Walker, Catherine 


Spinster 


Wallace, Ann 


AVidow 


Wallace, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


Wallace, Isabella 


Spinster 


Wallace, Mary 


AVidow 


Warden, Betsy 


Spinster 


Waterston, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Waterston, Margaret 


AVidow 


Waterson, Mary 


AVidow 


Watson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Watson, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Watt, Ann 


Spinster 


Watt, Mary 


Spinster 


Webster, Margaret 


Spinster 


Webster, Robina 


Spinster 


Welsh, Euphemia 




Welsh, Mary 


Widow 


Whammond, Angelica 


Widow 


Whitton, Mary 


Spinster 


White, Mary 


Spinster 


Whyte, Isabella 


Spinster 


Whyte, Margaret 


AVidow 


Wight on, Janet 


Spinster 


AVilkie, Ann 


AVidow 


Wilkie, Elizabeth 


Widow 


AVilkie, Margaret 


Widow 


Will, Isabella 


Spinster 


Williamson, Betsy 


Spinster 


Williamson, Margaret 


Spinster 


Wilson, Agnes 


Spinster 


AVilson, Agnes 


Spinster 


Wilson, Ann 


AVidow 


Wilson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Wilson, Jessie 


Spinster 


Wishart, Annie 


Widow 


Wood, Agnes 


Spinster 


AVood, Jane 


AVidow 


AVyllie, Ann 


Spinster 


AVyllie, Mary 


Spinster 


Yeaman, Agnes 


Spinster 


Yeaman, Jane 


Spinster 


Yeaman, Jessie 


Spinster 


Yeaman, Joan 


AVidow 


Yeaman, Margaret 


Widow 


Young, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Young, Margaret 


Widow 


Young, Margaret 


Spinster 


Young, Margaret 


Widow 



Orchardbank 
30 John street 
91 Hackwynd 

34 Lour Road 
14 AVatt street 
48 Dundee Loan 
Strang street 

16 Charles street 
38 Castle street 
24 Market Place 
40^ Castle street 

4 Chapel street 

14 AVatt street 

5 Zoar 

2 Bell Place 

2 Victoria street 
51 Dundee Road 
42 South street 

6 Zoar 

35 AVest High street 
94 Dundee Loan 
186 East High street 
9 AA r ellbraehead 
Manor Place 

1 Broadcroft 
Market Place 
81 Backwynd 

15 St. James' Road 

9 Backwynd 

13 Newmonthill 

10 Dundee Loan 
5 Manor street 

17 Littlecuseway 

10 Arbroath Road 
34 Manor street 

3 Broadcroft 

4 Nursery Feus 
42 South street 

22 St. James' Road 
27 Dundee Loan 

I St. James' Road 
Manor House 

11 Manor street 
Manor House 

14 Littlecauseway 

II Manor street 

18 Yeaman street 

23 Nursery Feus 

5 Newmonthill 
23 Nursery Feus 

# 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



49 



FAIRS, TRYSTS, 



CATTLE MARKETS IN FORFARSHIRE. 



When the appointed day falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Monday, it is generally defer- 
red until the following Tuesday, o.s., i.e., old style, twelve days after date in Calendar. 



January. 

Arbroath, hiring and general business, last Satur- 
day 

Coupar- Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 

Brechin, cattle every Tuesday ; feeing, last Tues- 
day 

Kirriemuir, 1 Monday 

February. 

Brechin, cattle every Tuesday ; horses, last Tues- 
day 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Kdzell, hiring, cattle, &c ., 3 Thursday 
Kirriemuir, 1 Monday 

March. 

Brechin, every Tuesday 

Coupar-Angus, horses and cattle, 3 Thursday 

Kirriemuir, 1 Monday ; 2 Friday 

April. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir), sheep and cattle 3 Wed- 
nesday 
Canny Hie, cattle, 3 Tuesday o s 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Forfar, cattle, horses, 2 Wednesday 
Glamis, 1 Wednesday 
Glasterlaw, cattle, last Wednesday 
Kirriemuir 1 Monday 

May. 

Arbroath, hiring, 26 if Saturday; if not, Saturday 

after 
Brechin, feeing, Tuesday after 25 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Dundee, hiring, 26 if Tuesday or Friday ; if not, 

Tuesday or Friday after 
Dun's Muir, 1 Tuesday, o s 
Edzell, cattle, sheep, 1 Monday ; feeing, 26 
Forfar, cattle, horses, 1 Wednesday, o s ; feeing, 

Saturday after 26 
Froickheim, hiring, cattle, last Thursday 
Glamis, 1 Wednesday and Wednesday after 26 
Kirriemuir 1 Monday and Friday after 26 
Letham, Forfar, cattle and hiring, 26 
Montrose, Friday after Whitsunday, o s 

June. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir), begins 2 Wednesday, and 
continues 3 "days ; 1st day sheep ; 2nd cattle ; 
3rd horses 

Dun's Muir, cattle, horses, 3 Thursday 

Forfar, cattle, 3 Friday 

Glasterlaw, cattle, 4 Wednesday 

Kirriemuir, Wednesday after Glamis 

July. 

Arbroath, hiring, and general business, 18 if Sat- 
urday ; if not, Saturday after 
Coupar-Angus, cattle, &c, 3 Thursday 
Brechin, wool, Monday after Inverness wool fair 
Dundee, (Stobb's), cattle, sheep, and horse, Tues- 
day after 11 



Edzell, cattle, Friday after 19 

Forfar, cattle, horses, Wednesday after 1 Tuesday 

Friockheim, hiring and cattle, Monday after Ar- 
broath 

Kirriemuir, horses and cattle, 24 if Wednesday ; 
if not, Wednesday after; sheep day before 

August. 

Brechin (Trinity Muir), sheep, cattle, and horses, 

2 Thursday 
Dundee, (First), cattle, &c, 26 
Edzell, cattle and sheep. Wednesday after 26 
Forfar, sheep, cattle, horses, and wool, Wednesday 

after 1 Tuesday 
Glasterlaw, cattle, 3 Wednesday 

September. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir), sheep cattle, horses, 

Tuesday before last Wednesday 
Cullew, cattle, Tuesday before last Wednesday 
Dundee, (Latter), cattle, horses. 19 
Forfar, horses and cattle, last Wednesday 
Gienisla, sheep and cattle, Thursday before last 

Wednesday 

October. 

Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday till April Trinity 

Muir Tryst 
Cullew, sheep, day before Kirriemuir 
Dundee, (Bell's], feeingrTTriday 
Edzell, sheep, catfle, and horses, Friday before 

Kirriemuir 
Forfar, cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Glamis, Saturday before Kirriemuir 
Glasterlaw, cattle, 1 Monday after Falkirk 
Kirriemuir, horses, cattle, Wednesday after 18 ; 

sheep, day before 

November. 

Arbirlot, (Arbroath), cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Arbroath, hiring, 22 if Saturday ; if not, Saturday 

after 
Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday; feeing Tuesday 

after 22 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Dundee, hiring, 22 if Tuesday or Friday; if not, 

Tuesday or Friday after 
Edzell, feeing, 22 
Forfar, cattle, 1 Wednesday; feeing, Saturday 

after 22 
Friockheim, hiring and cattle, 22 if Thursday ; if 

not, Thursday after 
Glamis cattle and hiring, Wednesday after 22 
Kirriemuir, cattle, Wednesday after Glamis 
Letham, cattle and hiring, 28 
Montrose, Friday after Martinmas, o s 

December. 

Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 



5o 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



FARMERS, AND OTHER RESIDENTERS, 

In the Parishes of Aberlemno, Dunnichen, Forfar, Glamis, Inverarity, Kinnettles, 
Kirriemuir, Oathlaw, Rescobie, and Tannadice, 



ABERLEMNO. 

Bush, James, TOlywhandland 

Butter. John, Nether Turin 

Cattanach, James, North Mains of Bal- 

gavies 
Davidson, James, Pitkennedy 
Dickson, John, Muirside of Melgund 
Fail-weather, James, Oraiksfolds 
Falconer, Bobt. , Wood of Killockshaw 
Fettes, J*'., Bog of Pitkennedy 
Gourlay. James, Blebherhill 
Jarron, J. N , Mains of Melgund 
Kennedy, Mrs, Crosston 
Kiddie, William, Milldens 
Eeitch, John, Damside 
Lowson, William, Kirkton 
M'Baren, James, Balgarroek 
Martin, John, Netherton 
Matthew, dames, (Keprs.), Balnacake 
Milne, D., jr., North Mains of Turin 
Milne, Peter, Wandershill 
Nome, James, Howmuir 
Paxton, Alex., Broomknowe 
Patullo. D., Balglassie 
Beid, William, Bellyhill 
Salmond, William, Woodwrae 
Scott, George, Southton 
Scott, Robert, Turin 
Webster, B., jr., Flemington 
Wedderspoon, Wm., Mains of Balgavies 

DUNNICHEN. 

Bairnsfather, B., Dumbarrow 

Borthwick, William, Home Farm 

Donald, Charles, Bast Dumbarrow 

Duke, David, Drum 

Fettes. F. , Pitkennedy 

Gray, David, Blairs 

Melville, J.. Mains of Craichie 

Middleton, D., East Dumbarrow 

Osier, David, Upper Tulloes 

Osier, William, Nether Tulloes 

Ramsay, David, Hill Kirk 

Bamsay, Mrs J., Drummietennont 

Roberts, Charles, Corston 

Shepherd, James, New Dyke of Bownie 

Smith, D., (Beprs. ), Bast Lownie 

Smith, David i D • -, 

Smith, Mrs S. J Buraside 

Soutar, John, East Mains 

Sturrock, Charles, Mill of Craichie 

Warden, D. (Reprs.), Cotton of Bownie 



Warden, David, West Bownie 
Warden, Wm., East Mains of Craichie 

FORFAR. 

Adam, Bobert, Ladenford 
Alexander, David, Muirton 
Alexander, Thomas, ( 'locksbriggs 
Allan, William, Meadow Green 
Bell, David, Lochlands 
Carnegy, B. A. W., Bour 
Carruthers, James, Craignathro 

< 'hristie, James, Bankhead 
Craik, Bobert F., Kingston 
Dalgety, John, Caldhame 
Gold, William, Canmore 
Graham, D. M , Slateheld 
Grant, David, Mosside 

Lister, George, Mains of Restenneth 
Low, James, White well 
Mount, W. B., Halkerton 
Murray, Dr \V. F., Suttieside 
Nicoll, George, South Mains 
Nicoll, Thomas, North Mains 
Nicoll, William, Inchgarth, &c 
Betrie, William. Greenordie 
Bobbie, James, Boanhead 
Smith, Beter, Bankhead, Lour 
Taylor, James, East Mains, Lour 
Taylor, James, (Trustees), Hillend, 

Bumside 
Thorns, George, Mid Dod 
Thorns, William, Auchterforfar 
Waterston, John K., Pitreuchie 
Webster, P., Westfield 
Welsh, A. B., (Reprs ), Bochhead 
Whitton, Andrew, West Caldhame 

GLAMIS. 

Alexander, H. M., Easter Denoon 
Annand, Alex., Newton 
Arnot, William, Glamis Mains 

< 'athro, James, Berryhillock 
Bell, Alexander, Handwick 
Brown, Wm. D , Easter Drumgley 
Bruce, James, Knockenny 

Cook, Charles, Meikle Cossens 
DiifF, John, Nether Handwick 
Gibson, John, Chamberwell 
Grant, Bobt., Over Middleton 
Knight, William, Haughs of Cossens 
Jack, David, Ewnie 
Johnston, James, Tilework 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



51 



Johnston, John, Nether Airneyfoul 
Langlands, David, Hatton of Qgilvy 
liyon, Joseph, Kilmundie 
M'Kenzie, James, Dry burn 
.Milne, Mrs John, Holemill 
Nicoll, John, Nether Middleton 
Porter, James, Lochmill 
Rattray, John, Templebank 
Reid. James, Little Kilmundie 
Reoch, David. Scroggerfield 
Robertson, Hugh, Drumgley 
Ross, William, Nether Drumgley 
Stewart, Charles, Upper Drumgley 
Thomson, John, Rochilhill 
Toplis, Robert, Glamis 
Whyte, Archibald, Nether Hayston 
Whyte, James, Upper Hayston 
Whyte, John, Wester Dunoon 

INVERARITY. 

Adam, Wm., Wester Meathie 

Brown, Thomas, Carrot 

Dargie, David, (Reprs..) Tarbrax 

Dron, Robert. Fotheringham 

Duncan, William, Newton 

Kwart, A. P. , Mains of M eathie 

Call, David and Alexander, Tarbrax 

Grant, James, jr., Ovenstone 

Jarron, George, Bonnyton 

M 'Gilchrist, James, Keirton 

Millar, James, Mains of Happas 

Millar, Robert, East Grange 

Milne, William, Kincreieh 

Moir, Peter, Kincreieh Mill 

Nicoll, Wm. , North Bottymire 

Peters, Thomas, Seggieden 

Ramsay, Robert, Labothie 

Robertson, Thomas, Hatton 

Salmond, Mrs, Little Loiir 

Sime, John, Mill 

Stark, H. A., Washing-dales 

Suttie, John, East Grange, Kincaldrum 

KINNETTLES. 

Arnot, Mrs, West Ingliston 

Duncan, John, Turwhappie 

Easton, David, Spittalburn 

Fairweather, William, East Ingliston 

Guthrie, James, Brigton 

Luke, Peter, Mains of Kinnettles 

M'Laren, John, South Leckaway 

M'Lean, W., Foffarty < 

Nicoll, Robert, Invereighty Mill 

Paterson, Jas., North Mains, Invereighty 

Patullo, John, Mid Ingliston 

Rae, David, North Leckaway 

Roy, George, Kirkhill 

Scott, James, Mains of Brigton 

Smith, William, Kinnettles Mill 



KIRRIEMUIR. 

Alexander, John, Ballindarg 

Bain, J. & J., Newmill 

Barrie, John, Pluckerstone 

Black, J. M., Auchlishie 

Bruce, George, Easter Kinwhirrie 

Cathro, William, Balmuckety 

Clark, James, Knowhead 

Coupar, David T. , Upper Migvie 

Crabb, Alex., Lady well 

Crabb, D. , Rosewell 

Dougall, Robt. . Wester Lednathie 

Ewart, James, Kilnhill 

Ewart, Wm., Sandyford 

Kalconer, J., Culhawk 

Ferguson, William, Glenny 

Ferguson, William, Millball 

Geekie, Wm., East Muirhead 

Guild, Thomas, Herdhill 

Hay, James, Pathhead 

Henderson, G, Chapelton 

Lamb, Alex., New Kihy 

Lindsay, John, Herdhill 

Lumsden, Alex., Wester Kinwhirries 

Lyall, Leonard, Lochside 

MTntosh, John, East Garlowbank 

MTntosh, J., East Inch 

M'Kay, Thomas, Whitelums 

Milne, Chas., Drumshade 

Milner, James, Barnsdale 

Mitchell, Jas,, jr.. Nether Migvie 

Mitchell, James, Haugh 

Munroe, Win., Woodhead 

Osier, Andrew, Kintyrie 

Osier, William, Meams 

Robbie, James, Netherbow 

Robertson, John, Denmill 

Rough, George, Fletcherfield 

Rough, William, Longbank 

Sime. Thomas, Overbow 

Smith, J., Meikle Inch 

Thomson, Alexander, Burnside 

Tosh, D., (Reprs.) Plovermuir 

Whyte, Alex., Blackbeard 

Whyte, Wm.. Spot, etc. 

Wilkie, D., Bastard 

Winter, I). & J., Balnagarrow 

Wood, D., Caldhame 

Wyllie, James, Mains of Glasswell 

Wyllie, Mrs, Balbrydie 

OATHLAW. 

Adams, Jas., M.D., Easter Oathlaw 
Batch elor, Alex., Milton, Finavon 
Batchelor, Geo., West Mains, Finavon 
Carnegie, James, Battledykes 
Carnegie, Wm., Birkenbush 
Davidson, Robert, Woodside 
Dick, Forbes, Bankhead 
Duke, Wm., Newbarns 



52 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Key, John, Wolflaw 
Kydd, David, M.D., Bogindollo 
Millar, David, Oathlaw 
Ritchie, W., Bourtreebush 
Webster J. , Parkf ord 
Webster, Joseph, Meadows 
Wyllie, James, Drumchine 
Young, David, Blairyfeddan 

RESCOBIE. 

Absalon, Misses, Wemyss 

Cobb, Alex,, Pitscandly 

Gibson, Mrs, Baldardo 

G-rant, David, jr., Finnieston 

Grant, David, sen., Clochtow 

Guild, Mrs, Mains of Burnside 

Kyd, George, Forester Seat 

Lakie, David, Drimmie 

Martin, J. & J. , Milldens 

Martin, William, Greenhead 

Milne, D., jr., North Mains, Turin 

Mitchell, Geo., Chapelton, Ochterlony 

Mitchell, James, Quilkoe 

Murdie, W. & J. , Baggerton 

Nicoll, Wm., jr., East & West Carsebank 

Powrie, James, Esq., of Reswallie 

Ramsay, David, Fonnah 

Ramsay, James, East Mains of Burnside 

Rough, George, Wardmill 

Sinclair, Alex., Newmill, Balgavies 

Simpson, James, Hatton of Carse 

Storrie, Alex., West Mains, Turin 

Taylor, James, Heatherstacks 

Tyrie, George, Hagmuir 

Watson, Wm., Mains of Ochterlony 

Wishart, Mrs James, Haresburn 



TANNADICE. 

Bell, Wm., Midtown, Glenquiech 

Butter, David, Auchleuchrie 

Cameron, J., Miltonbank 

Carnegie, Wm., jr., Coul 

Davidson, W., Easter Balgillo 

Dow, James, Wester Memus 

Duncan, Pat., Easter do. 

Farmer, Alex., Easter Marcus 

Farquharson, John, Glenley 

Findlay, D., Auchleish 

Forbes, William, Murthill Mains 

Gordon, W., Kinalty 

Gracie, Jas., Horniehaugh 

Hay, Alex., Tobees 

Hendry, Wm. , West Mains of Coul 

Keay, John, East Mains of Whitewell 

Lindsay, Arch., Redheugh 

Low, Wm., Strone 

M'Kay, John, Soutra 

M'Kenzie, Angus, Cairnton 

M'Kenzie, John, Goynd 

M'Laren, J., Wester Balgillo 

Nicoll, William, Sturt 

Reid, Andrew, Cairn 

Robbie, C, Barnyards 

Rough, David, Newton 

Scott, C. W., Mains of Whitewell 

Stewart, David, Craigeassre 

Stewart, George, Marcus Mill 

Stewart, John, Noranbank 

Thow, John, Turfachie 

Todd, James, Howmuir 

Turnbull, George, Baldoukie 

Wallace, P., Nether Balgillo 



HOLIDAYS AND FAST DAYS IN FORFAR. 



NEW YEAR'S DAY, 1st January, 1887— Saturday. 

ST. JAMES' MARKET HOLIDAYS— commence Friday, 5th August. 

SPRING FAST DAY— Thursday, 5th May. 

AUTUMN FAST DAY— Thursday, 13th October. 



SHOPKEEPERS' HALF-HOLIDAY— Thursday Afternoon. 



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And at EDINBURGH, GLASGOW. DUMFRIES. & AYR. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



53 



DIRECTORY OF TRADES & PROFESSIONS. 



Every endeavour has been used to ensure correctness in this List. Inaccuracies 
and omissions on being pointed out will be corrected for next issue. Advertisers' 
Names appear in dark type. 



Aerated Water Manufacturer 

Stewart, D. , Backwynd 

Architects 

Carver, John, 34 Castle street 
Munro, James, 85 Castle street 

Auctioneers 

Graham, D. M. , Littlecauseway 
Scott, James, 6 East High street 
Tosh. P. A. , Castle street 

Bakers 

Anderson, James, 10 West High street 
East Port Association, 133 East High 

street — Alex. Watt, Manager 
Edwards, William, 10 Castle street 
Esplin, T. B. , 25 West High street 
Fen ton, D. C. , 3 North street 
Free Trade Association, 151 East High 

street — D. Robertson, Manager 
Fyffe, John, 33 South street 
High Street Association, East High street 

— Alex. Wighton, Manager 
Tolly, Alexander, Backwvnd 
Low, William, & Co., 105 Castle st.— 

Alex. Hay, Manager 
Myles, William, 48 West High street 
Northern Association, in Castle street — 

James Brown, Manager 
Ormond, Charles, 49 East High street 
Ross, William, 107 Backwynd 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Andrew, 22 and 24 West 

High street 
West Port Association, 52 West High 

street — George Smart, Manager 

West Town-End Association, 118 West 

High street — James Simpson, Salesman 

Basketmaker 

Robb, David, 40 Castle street 
E 



Berlin Wool Repositories 

Ferguson, Miss, 20* West Highfstreet 

Hebenton, D. , 7 East High street 
Littlejohn, E. & A. , 38 West High street 
Pullar, Miss, 22 East High street 
Roberts, John, 41 and 43 East High street 

Bicycle Dealer, etc. 

Keith, William, 78 Castle street 

Billposters 
Thom, C. & Son, 5 Littlecauseway 

Blacksmiths 

Anderson, James, 26 West High street 
Constable, James, Academy street 
Guthrie, William, Castle street 
Haddon, James, South street 
MTntosh, William, East High street 
Stewart, William, & Sons, Backwynd 

Booksellers and Stationers 

Byars, John, 1 Glamis Road 

Dick, David, East Port 

Laing, Mrs, 24 East High street 

Lawrance, James, 78 East High street 

Lowdon, John, 80 West High street 

Shepherd, W., 39 Castle street 

Thomson, W. H., 73 East High street 

Boot and Shoemakers 

Adam, Charles, Osnaburgh street 
Balfour, Wm. , Leather Cutter, Backwynd 
Christie, David, 1x1 East High street 
Clark, John, East High street 
Deuchar, Alexander, 49 Castle street 
Dunn, R. & J., 36 Castle street 
Findlay, James, Lour road 
Fullerton, William, 30 Castle street 
Glenday, James, 103 East High street 
Hebington, William, 36 West High street 
Hood, David, 96 Castle street 



54 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Lawson, James, 139 East High street 
M'Dougall, James, 40 East High street 
M'Intosh, James, 11 Castle street 
Meek, A., 42 Castle street 
Petrie, T. , 2 Backwynd 
Smith, Miss, 93 Castle street 
Tarbat, D., 13 East High street 
Thornton, D. P., 82 West High street 

Brewers and Bottlers. 

Stewart, David, Backwynd 

Walker, Wm. , junr. , West High street 

Brokers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Gibson, Graham, Dundee loan 
Hanick, Richard, East High street 

Builders and Quarrymasters 

Adamson, William, Headingplacestone — 

Leysmill Quarries 
Cargill, James, 17 Green street 
Dick, Charles, Montrose road 
M'Lean, James, 36 John street 
Simpson, P. D. , Forfar Pavement Works 

and Myreston Quarries 
Stewart, William, Yeaman street 
Watterston, James, Glamis road— Balma- 

shanner Quarries 

Butchers 

Coutts, William, 89 Castle street 
Coutts, William, junr., 28 West High st. 
Deuchar, Alex., 45 West High street and 

115 East High street 
Dundee Butcher Meat Co. , North street 
Eaton & Fyfe, Castle street 
Farquhar, James, 62 East High street 
Greenhill, Charles, East High street 
Mitchell, Charles, 69 North street 
Nicoll, George, 107 East High street 
Nicoll, William, 88 East High street 
Pirie, James, 116 West High street 
Walker, David, 2^ East High street 

Carters 

Adam, William, Backwynd 
Bennet, Alex. , Canmore street 
Bruce, John, Whitehills 
Callander, Alex. , Dundee loan 
Callander, John, Dundee road 
Crighton, James, 7 Charles street 
Kennedy, Alex., North street 
Masterton, D. , Canmore street 
Miller, David, Dundee road 
Miller, Wm. , Horsewater wynd 

Chimney Sweeps 

Carrie, James, 10 South street 



Langlands, Alex. , 79 East High street 
Shepherd, Alex., 59 Dundee loan 
Simpson, William, 18 Glamis road 

China Merchants 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Gray, Robert, 46 Castle street 
Hill, Alexander, South street 
Munro, Andrew, East High street 
Shepherd, James, junr,, 2 Glamis road 

and 12| West High street 
Shepherd, James, North street 

Clergymen 

Aldridge, Rev. J. M. , The Parsonage 
Caie, Rev. G. J. , The Manse 
Gumming, Rev. A. , First Free Manse 
Downie, Rev. J., Inchgarth 
M'Corkindale, Rev. D. L. , Lilybank Villa 
Philps, Rev. G. M., East Free Manse 
Weir, Rev. John, St. Tames' Manse 
Wright, Rev. P. S., U.P. Manse 

Coachbuilders 

Greenhill, Hugh, Littlecauseway 
Stewart, W. , & Sons, Backwynd 

Coal and Lime Merchants 

Barron, James, 18 North street 

Bruce, George, dealer, South street 

Ewen, James, Victoria street 

Forfar Co-operative Coal Society — A. Lees, 

Glamis road, Secretary 
Kennedy, Andrew, Victoria street 
Lackie, John, West High street 
Lakie, John, Railway Station 
Maxwell & Hampton, Auldbar station 
M'Kenzie, George, 93.7 West High street 
Milne, James, junr., 86 Dundee loan 
Muir, Thomas, Son, & Patton, Railway 

Station 
Patullo, David, 146 East High street 
Roberts, Alexander, Whitehills 
Sharp, W. W., 23b Victoria street 
Victoria Co-operative Coal Society — T. 

Stirling, Kirkton, Secretary 
Webster, G. , Railway Station 
Whyte, Alex. , 25 Prior road 
Whyte, David, 11 Market place 
Wishart, George, Victoria street 

Confectioners 

Coutts, J., Castle street 
Fraser, Miss, 123 Castle street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High st. 

Hazels, Miss, 23 West High street 
Milne, James, 148 East High street 
M'Leish, David, 97 Castle street and 31 
East High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



55 



Murray. James, 83 Castle street 

Oram, David, 19 West High street 

Ormond, Charles, 49 East High street 

Reid, Peter, 51 Castle street 

Saddler, James, 35 East High street 

Shepherd, Andrew, 22 and 24 West 

High street 
Spark, James, 93 & 95 Market place 
Wilkie, James S. , 2 East High street 

Coopers 

Matthew, George, Backwynd 
Robb, David, 40 Castle street 

Cowfeeders and Dairymen. 

Barry, William T. , Ballinshoe 
Byars, David, Glamis road 
Callander, Alexander, 6 Dundee loan 
Callander, John, Dundee road 
Deuchar, Alex. , Glamis road 
Doig, James, Quarry bank 
Lackie, John, West High street 
Liveston, Mrs John, East High street 
Luke, David, 154 East High street 
Michie, William, Stark's Close, West High 

street 
Morrison, John, Easterbank 
Nicoll, David, 7 Arbroath road 
Nicoll, Thomas, North Mains 
Nicoll, W. , Turfoeg 
Proctor, James, Glamis road 
Ritchie, D. , Windyedge 
Ritchie, George, Dundee road 
Robbie, John, Caldhame 
Steele, Andrew, Midlanglands 
Stewart, John, Arbroath road 
Watson, James, Butterwell 

Curriers and Leather Merchants 

Ferguson & Whitson, Academy street 
Hastings, Alex., North street 
Whyte, John, Castle street (Tanner) 

Cutler 

Andrew, William, West High street 

Dentist 
French, Dr., 33 East High street 

Drapers 

Anderson & Co., 145, 145|, and 147 East 

High street 
Bell, Mrs, 85 West High street 

Chalmers, W. A., 26 Castle street 
Dalgety, Alex. , 55 East High street 

Doig, Alex., 9 South street 

Kenton, H. H. , 158 East High street 

Guild, James, 30 East High street 



Hendry & Warden, 83 East High at. 

Jamieson, W. , 156 East High street 
Jarvis Brothers, 72 Castle street 
Marshall, James, 110 West High st. 
Neish, Patrick, 55 Castle street 
Roberts, John, 41 & 43 East High street 
Roberts, Wm. , Wellbraehead 
Simpson, J. W. , Cross 
Steele, John, & Co. , 1 & 5 Castle street 
Stewart, William, no East High street 
Thorn & Barclay, 29 Castle street 
Warden, William, 23 East High street 

Dressmakers, Milliners, &c 

Those marked * are Milliners only. 

Allan, Miss, 99 East High street 
Bell, Mrs, 85 West High street 

Boath, Jane, North street 
Cable, Miss, 50 North street 
*Campbell, R. H. , 63 Castle street 
Donald, Miss, Green street 
Ellis, Jessie, West High street 
Esplin, Agnes, 156 East High street 
Fairweather, J. M. , Castle street 
Fenton, H. H., East High street 
Guild, James, 30 East High street 
Inverwick, Miss, Backwynd 
Jarron, Miss, 70 West High street 
Jarvis Bro r hers, 72 Castle street 
Latta, Mrs, Castle street 
Lowson, Miss, Glamis road 
*Mitchell, Miss, 43 Castle street 
Oram, Miss, 13 West High street 
Orchison, Miss, Dundee road 
Paterson, Jane, 38 East High street 
Paul, Miss, 99 East High street 
Petrie, Miss, Newmonthill 
Robertson, Miss, Market place 
Simpson, J. W. , Cross 
Smith, Miss, 54^ East High street 
Stark, Miss, Glamis road 
Steele, John, & Co., Castle street 
Stewart, W. , 113 East High street 
Strachan, Miss, Newmonthill 
Thorn & Barclay, 29 Castle street 
*Thom, Miss, 130 East High street 
Walker, Miss, Newmonthill 
Warden, William, 23 East High street 
Webster. Miss, 33 East High street 
*Yeaman, Miss, 87 Castle street 

Druggists 

Abel, John, Cross (A. H. Simpson) 
Anderson & Co. , 38^ Castle street 
Ranken, James A., & Son, East High st. 

Dyer 

Peffers, John, Canmore street 



56 



FORFAR DIRECTORY 



Fishmongers 

Boyle, John, 69 West High street 
Boyle, John S., 96 West High street & 
18 Castle street 

Edwards, Alexander, West High street 
Elliot, James, Nursery Feus 
Jamie, Adam, Couttie's Wynd 
Leask, J., junr. , 26 Wellbraehead 
Robertson, Peter, 4 and 6 West High street 
Taylor, James, Strang street 
Troup, B. , 118 East High street 

Founder (Iron) 

Munro, James, Foundry, Whitehills 
Fruit Merchants and Greengrocers 

Black, Wm. , 98 West High street 
Boyle, John S., 18 Castle street 
(wholesale) 

Christie, James, East High street 
Christie, Mary, 72 East High street 
Guthrie, G.,East High street 
Hazels, Miss, 23 West High street 
Murray, James, 83 Castle street 
Oram, David, 19 West High street 
Piggot, Mary, 92 Castle street 

Furniture Dealers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Findlay, James, 176 East High street 
Gray, R ', 45 Castle street 
Lamont, James, 26 West High street 
Liddell, David, East High street 
Low, Alexander, 7 Glamis road 
Tosh, P. A. , 70 Castle street 
Whamond, David, Castle street 
Walker, David, 2| East High street 

Game Dealers 

Christie, James, in East High street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High street 
Martin, James, 32 & 34 Castle street 

Robertson, Peter, West High street 
Urquhart, Duncan, North street 
Walker, David, 2^ East High street 

Gardeners (Jobbing) 

Adam, John, Manor street 
Adams, James, 12 Charles street 
Andrew, Wm. , 23 St. James' road 
Black, James, 18 Yeaman street 
Doig, Alexander, Easterbank 
Hunter, Wm. , 54 South street 
Kidd, Joseph, Chapel Park 
Mann, James, Backwynd 

Mavor, , Zoar 

M'Kenzie, Kenneth, Lour road 
Murray, James, Castle street 
Nicoll, John, Arbroath road 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 



Gardeners (Market) 

Archie, John, Cowiehill 
Dick, Walter, Cherryfield 
Duff, Charles, East High street 
Kydd, James, Caldhame 
Low, Mrs, Welshbarns 
I Piggot, Alexander, Padanaram 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 
Snowie, John, Dundee road 
Stark, Alex., Glamis road 
Stark, David, St. James' road 

Grocers (not Licensed) 

Boath, William, 23. John street 
Dick, Charles, Montrose road 
East Port Association, 133 East High street 

— Alexander Watt, Manager 
East High street Association— Alexander 

Wighton, Manager 
Free Trade Association, 151 East High 

street — D. Robertson, Manager 
Fyfe, James, 2 Arbroath road 
Gray, Robert, Wellbraehead 
Liddle, William, North street 
Low, Wm., & Co., Castle street, East 

High street, & West High street 
Mollison, David, Dundee loan 
Northern Association, in Castle street- 
James Brown, Manager 
Spark, James, 95 Market place 
Tarbet, Mrs, East High street 
West Port Association, 52 West High street 

— George Smart, Manager 
West Town End Association, 118 West 

High street— James Simpson, Salesman 
Wishart, Charles, Dundee loan 

Grocers (Licensed) 

Adamson, John, 40 West High street and 

East High street 
Barry, David, 80 Castle street 
Butchart, D. . 33 Castle street 
Donald, David, 19 Glamis road 
Donald, Henry, 80 West High street 
Martin, James, 32 & 34 Castle street 
Melvin, B. & M., 17, 19, and 21 Castle st 
Nicolson, James, 82 East High street 
Prophet, Mrs, Prior road 
Ross, William, 12 East High street 
Smith, Mrs L. , 164 East High street 
Smith, Agnes, 72 West High street 

Simpson, Alex. Henderson, Cross (wine 
and spirits only) 

Bell or Boath, Mary Ann, North street 
(table beer only) 

Gunsmith 

Findlay, William, Kingston, Forfar 

Hair Dressers 

Andrew, W. , 29 West High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



57 



Clark, C. , 44 East High street 
Clark, William, 92 West High street 
Ross, James, 94 Castle street 
Strang, Robert, 3 East High street 

Hatters 

Davidson, John, 97 2 East High street 

Taylor, John, 60 Castle street 

Also, various Clothiers <b° Drapers in town 

Horsehirers 

Bennet, Alexander, Castle street 
Greenhill, Hugh, Royal Hotel 
Petrie, W. , East High street ; and County 
Hotel Stables, Castle street 

Hotels 

Those marked * have Stabling 

*Clementsen, John, Zoar 
*Dyce, Mrs, Cross 
*Greenhill, Hugh, Royal Hotel 
*Jarman, Joseph, Star Hotel 
*Petrie, W. , Salutation Hotel 
* Robbie, Isabella, Market place 
Willis, Wm. , County Hotel 

Innkeepers 

Balharry, Wm. , " Eagle Inn," West High 

street 
Barry, Elizabeth, 37 South street 
Bennet, Alexander, Castle street 
Bowman, Mrs, " Forfar Arms Inn," East 

Port 
Christison, W. , "The Vine," 48 Little- 
causeway 
Dalgety, Mrs, " Strathmore," West High 

street 
Drummond, Andrew, " Burns' Tavern," 81 

East High street 
Henry, James, 121 East High street 
Hume, Walter, 112 Castle street 
Jack, Peter, 27 South street 
Keir, Charles, " The Globe," Castle street 
Killacky, Mrs, " Stranger's Inn," Castle st. 
Lamont, James, 26 West High street 
Liveston, Ann, 90 East High street 
Low, James, 2 Don street 
Lowdon, Mrs, " Auction Mart Inn " 
Lowson, Andrew, Market place 
M'Gregor, Mary, "Crown," East High 

street 
Peacock, William, Dundee loan 
Porter, Jane, Castle street 
Porter, William, " Stag Inn," Castle street 
Quinlin, Robert, " The Pump," 101 West 

High street 
Robbie, Charles, 47 Backwynd 
Robertson, Alexander, Osnaburgh street 



Stewart, John, 1 Montrose road 
Stirling, William, Backwynd 
Wilson, Alexander, 155 East High street 
Wilson, Robert, "Masons' Arms," East 
High street 

Ironmongers 

Crichton, Alexander, Cross 
Dull, Alexander, 34^ East High street 
Hebenton, James, 57 Castle street 
Irons, David, 14 East High street 
Mackintosh, Alexander, 16 Castle street 
Tosh, Charles, 18 and 20 West High street 

Joiners and Cabinetmakers 

Bain, Alexander, 26^'IWest High street 
Farquharson, James, Chapel street 
Findlay, James, 176 East High street 
Hay, Alex. , & Co. , Academy street 
Liddell, D. , East High street 
Low, Alexander, 7 Glamis road 
Martin, William, 21 South street 
Morrison, William, Dundee loan 
Stewart, Wm. & Sons, Backwynd, Cart- 
wrights and Coachbuilders 
Whamond, David, Castle street 

Manufacturers ( Power-loom ) 

Boath, John, junr. , & Co., Academy Street 

Works — W. Lowson, Manager 
Craik, J. & A., & Co., Manor Works 
Don, Wm. & John, & Co., St. James' 

Road and Station Works — Charles 

Burnett, Manager 
Laird, William, & Co., Forfar Linen and 

Canmore Works — William Rodger, 

Manager 
Lowson, John, & Son, Haugh and South 

Street Works — John Morrison, Manager 
Lowson, John, junr., & Co., Victoria 

Works — David Stirton, Manager 

Manufacturers (Hand-loom) 

Byars, J. & W. , Nursery Feus 
Waterston, Charles, Glamis road 
Yeaman, Alexander, 33 Dundee loan 

Medical Practitioners 

Alexander, G. P. , Littlecauseway 
Butter, J. K., East High street 
Cable, J., 22 Littlecauseway 
Hunter, Charles, 59 East High street 
Murray, W. F. , East High street 
Wedderburn, A. M'L. , East High street 

Messenger-at-Arms 

Gowans, John, 25 St. James' road 



5* 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Music Teachers 

Ewen, Misses, Mill Bank 
Kerr, John, East High street 
Neill, James, Whitehills 

Smith, C. J., New road, Organist 

Newsagents 

Byars, John, Glamis road 
Dick, David, East Port 
Laing, Mrs, East High street 
Lawrance, James, 78 East High street 
Lowdon, John, 80 West High street 
Shepherd, W., Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., East High street 

Newspaper Offices 

Dundee Advertiser, Peoples' Journal, 
Peoples' Friend, and Evening Tele- 

Sraph. Branch office— 1<H West 
[igh street 

Dundee Courier and Argus, and Weekly 
News. Branch office — 18 East High st. 

Forfar Dispatch, (Thursdays, gratis), 
76 East High street 

Forfar Herald, (Fridays,) 13 Castle st. 

Nurserymen 

Duff, Charles, East High street 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 

Smith, Alexander, Glamis road 
Smith, David, Broomroof 
Williamson, James, Victoria street 

Painters 

Barclay, Mrs, 5 West High street 
Barclay, Thomas, 74 Castle street 
Dowell, William, 47 East High street 
Henderson, Andrew M., 17 Green street 
M'Laren & Fyfe, East High street 
Prophet, John, 47 West High street 
Robertson, J. W. , 52 and 54 Castle st. 
Rodger, David, 21 West High street 

Photographers 

C alder, John, Newmonthill 
Dowell, William, East High street 
Mitchell, Charles, 48 East High st. 

Plasterers 

Doig, John, 30 South street 
Guthrie, Wm. , Charles street 
Masterton, David, 20 Canmore street 

Plumbers and Tinsmiths 

Clark, James, 97 East High street 
Fyfe, John, Couttie's Wynd 



Keith, William, 78 Castle street 
Langlands & Milne, 1 West High street 
M'Beth & Milne, East High street 
Malcolm, W. , 15 West High street 
Neave, James, 10 East High street 
Neave, Peter, 135^ East High street 
Soutar, Alexander, 19 South street 

Potato Merchants 

Jack, Peter, 27 and 29 South street 
Maxwell & Hampton, Auldbar Station 
Piggot, William, 15 Backwynd 
Scott, Robert, Newford Park 
Scott, James, East High street 
Whyte, David, 11 Market place 
Wishart, George, Victoria street 

Poultry Dealers 

Boath, David, Newmonthill 
Christie, James, in East High street 
Clarke, David, 85 West High street 
Guthrie, George, East High street 

Printers 

Christie & Nicolson, Castle street 
Heath & Co. , Backwynd 
M'Pherson, Oliver, East High street 
Shepherd, W., 39 Castle street 

Reedmakers 

Ramsay, William, 35 West High street 
Tyrie, David, 102 East High street 

Refreshment Rooms (Temperance) 

Coupar, Mrs, 61 Castle street 
Duncan, Miss E. , 96 North street 
Petrie, Thomas, 2 Backwynd 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Andrew, West High street 
Sturrock, Mrs, 58 Castle street, Forfar Cafe 

Rope spinners 

Brodlie, Philip, & Co., 83 West High st. 
Dunn & Paterson, Manor street 
Ogilvie, A., Castle street 

Saddlers 

Clark, Robert, Cross 

Harris, William, 50^ West High street 

Hutchison, Robert, Cross 

Steele, Alexander, 67 Castle street 

Seedsmen 

Crichton, Alexander, Cross 
Duff, Alexander, East High street 
Hebenton, James, 57 Castle street 
Irons, David, 14 East High street 
Mackintosh, Alex., 16 Castle street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



59 



Smith, J. & A., 59 West High street 
Tosh, Charles, 18 & 20 West High street 

Sheriff Officers 

Gowans, John, 25 St. James' road 
M'Keran, John, 19 Osnaburgh street 

Slaters 

Donald, G. , 20 North street 

Moffat, William, New road 

Shepherd, A. & C, 116 East High street 

Shepherd, David, West High street 

Solicitors 

Anderson, J. C. , 109 Castle street 
Anderson, J. P., Littlecauseway 
Anderson, R. W. , 53 East High street 
Gordon, William, East High street 
Gray, J. S. , 20 East High street 
Lowson & MacLean, 9 West High street 
MacHardy, Alexander, Council Buildings 
Macintosh, D. , Town Hall Buildings 
Myles, J. & A. W., & Co., 68 Castle street 
Taylor, James, Council Buildings 
Whyte & Freeman, East High street 
Wyllie, A. B. , 53 East High street 

Tailors and Clothiers 

Booth, D. P., 66 Castle street 
Brown, James, 84^ Castle street 
Dalgety, Alexander, East High street 
Dick, William, 92 West High street 
Gibson, W. A. , 25 Dundee loan 
Hendry & Warden, East High street 
Jamieson, J., & Co., Castle street 
Jarvis Brothers, Castle street 
Low, John, 42 Lour road 
M'Nab, Robert, 150 East High street 
Mann, J., 14 West High street 
Marshall, James, 110 West High st. 
Peter, John, East High street 
Petrie, John, 109 East High street 
Spalding, Alexander. 4^ West High st. 
Steele, J., & Co., Castle street 
Todd, Alex., 10 East High street 



Warden, Wm., 23 East High street 

Watt, William, Osnaburgh street 

Tanner and Skinner 

Wood, William, 3 Victoria street 

Tobacconists 

Andrew, William, West High street 
Donald, A. L. , 10 Castle street 
Leighton, Mrs, 2^ West High street 
M'Leish, David, East High street 
Smart, William, jj East High street 

Toy Merchants 

Andrew, William, West High street 
Goodall, William, 82 Castle street 
Lovvdon, John, West High street 
M'Leish, D. , Castle street and East High st. 
Munro, James, 46 East High street 
Robb, David, Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., East High street 

Veterinary Surgeons 

Anderson, James, 265 West High street 
Ritchie, James, East Port Cottage 

Watchmakers 

Clark, John A., 64 Castle street 
Falconer, D. , East High street 
Murdoch, J. D. , 20 Castle street 
Strachan, John, 10 Cross 

Taylor, William, Castle street 

Wood Merchants 

Anderson, James, Railway Station 
Ewen, James, Victoria street 
Johnston, A., & Son, Service road 
Sharp, W. W., 23b Victoria street 

Wood Turners 

Crammond, David, Backwynd 
Johnston, A., & Son, Service road 






6o 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. SHEPHERD, 

39 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 



BUSINESS BOOKS, all sizes and Rulings. 

Machine and Hand- made PAPERS. 

Official, Business, and Private ENVELOP ES, all sizes. 

BOOKS Ruled, Printed, and Bound to any Pattern. 

ALBUMS, INKSTANDS, & LEATHER GOODS, 

OF THE BEST MAKES. 




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]\\\ ©rders receive Prompt Attention, are tastefully Designed, 

and Well [Finished. 

SPECIMENS & PRICES on application. ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 



Sngrabxjtg, pthogrupht), pic-stamping. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



61 



BURGH OF FORFAR. 



Population in 1881 — 12,818. Constituency — Males, 1644 '< Females, 577. 

Parliamentary Representative — John Shiress Will, Q. C. 
Valuation f Lands, ... ... ... j^SS.^S 12 



for 1886-87. ) Railways in Burgh, 



1680 



MAGISTRATES AND TOWN COUNCIL. 



The Council meets in Council Buildings on the first Monday of each month at 6-30 p.m. 
Special Meetings are also held from time to time to dispose of urgent business. 

Wm. Doig, Provost and Chief Magistrate ; John Ferguson, First Bailie ; David Whyte, 
Second Bailie; James M'Lean, Third Bailie ; John Moffat, Treasurer. John Laird, junr. , 
Daniel Falconer, William Dowell, Peter A. Tosh, David Johnston, Robert Fyfe Craik, 
James Ewen, David Smith, John L. Fenton, John P. Anderson. 

Officials and Committees. 

James Taylor, Town-Clerk ; Alex. MacHardy, Town Chamberlain. 

Law. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Messrs Tosh, Falconer, Johnston, J. P. Anderson, 
Ewen, (Convener). 

Property. — Provost Doig, Bailie Whyte, Messrs Moffat, Falconer, Dowell, Smith, 
Bailie M'Lean (Convener). 

Finance. — Provost Doig, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Fenton, Ewen, Craik, Johnston, 
Treasurer Moffat, (Convener). 

Cemetery. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Tosh, Johnston, 
Fenton, Smith (Convener). Geo. Patterson, Superintendent. 

Committee under Cattle Diseases Act — Provost and Magistrates. 

Burgh Committee under Licensing Act — Provost and 1st and 2nd Bailies. 

Representatives for 
Prison Committees — Perth, Bailie Whyte ; Dundee, Bailie Ferguson ; Forfar, Provost 

Doig and Mr Ewen. 
Under Sheriff Court Houses Act, . ... ... Bailie Ferguson. 

Provost Doig. 

Provost Doig and Bailie Whyte. 

Provost Doig and Bailie Ferguson. 

Bailie M'Lean. 

James Munro, Distributor. 



Lunacy Board, 
Arbroath Harbour, 
Morgan Hospital, 
Roads and Bridges, 
Wyllie's Bequest, 



BURGH FUNDS (Town Council) 



Burgh Property and Funds as at Oct. 6, li 
Debts and Obligations, ... 



Balance in favour of Burgh, 



£87,706 o 7 
28,905 14 8 

£58,800 5 11 



Annual Revenue, 
Expenditure, ... 



£ 2 497 
2917 



8 11 

8 1 



Deficit for the year, 



£419 J 9 2 



62 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



CHARITY MORTIFICATIONS. 

Charity Mortifications under the administration of the Magistrates and Town Council of 
Forfar, per the Town-Clerk. Funds as at 6th October, 1886. 

Dr Wyllie s Bequest. — Capital, ^3536, 16s 6d. Interest expended in charity during the 
year, ^138, 6s 2d. On hand, ,£49, 2s 2d. 

Provost Potter 's Bequest of £1000. — Interest, &c. , expended on coals for the poor, in 
terms of the bequest, ^48, 19s 3d. Over expended, ^3, 8s lod. 

Bailie Brown ' s Bequest of £\oo. — Interest, &c. , on hand, ^29, 17s 7d. 

Bequest bv John Philip, Chicago, amounts, with interest, to ^2801, 17s iod. 

POLICE COMMISSION AND GAS CORPORATION. 

Meet on the third Monday of each month at 6-30 p.m. 

Officials. 

William Gordon, Police Clerk; Alexander MacHardy, Treasurer; James Stirling, 
Superintendent of Police; D. B. Esplin, Gas Manager; Jonas Harris, Burgh Surveyor; 
William Patterson, Collector of Rates. 

Committees. 

Paving, General Improvement, and Road Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Whyte, 
Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Falconer, Johnston, Moffat (Convener). 

Sanitary Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Anderson, Smith, Fenton, Tosh, Dowell 
(Convener). 

Watching, Lighting, and Fire Engine Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie M'Lean, 
Messrs Falconer, Tosh, Moffat, Johnston, Bailie Ferguson (Convener). 

Finance Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Bailie Whyte, Messrs Dowell, 
Moffat, Craik, Anderson (Convener). 

Sewage Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Craik, 
Moffat, Ewen, Bailie Whyte (Convener). 

Water Com?nittee. — Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Anderson, Craik, Moffat, 
Ewen, Provost Doig (Convener). 

Gas Corporation Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Fenton, Tosh, Falconer, Smith, 
Johnston, Craik (Convener). 

POLICE COMMISSION ACCOUNTS, as at 16th May 1886. 

I.— General Police Purposes. 

Surplus last year, ... ... ... ... .£255 16 2 

Annual Revenue, ... ... ... ... 1892 4 1 



Annual Expenditure, 






^2148 
1922 7 


3 



Surplus this year, 


^225 13 


3 


II. — Account under Roads Act. 










Surplus last year, ... ... ... ... ^38 

Annual Revenue, ... ... ... ... 229 


11 
10 


6 
10 


£268 2 
203 


4 
5 


Annual Expenditure, ... ... 






Surplus this year, 






£65 i 


11 


III.— New Shambles Account. 










Annual Revenue, 
Do. Expenditure, 






£222 5 
212 11 


6 

5 



Surplus, ... ... ... £9 14 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 63 



IV.— The Local Authority. 

Balance last year, ... ... ... ... ^ J 6i 3 3 

Annual Revenue, ... ... ... ... *746 3 11 



&907 7 



Annual Expenditure, ... ... ... 1725 10 6 

Balance this year, ... ... £ 1 & I 16 8 

V. — Water. 

Annual Revenue, ... ... ... ... ^3° 2 9 4 9 

Do. Expenditure, ... ... ... 2976 12 11 

Balance, ... ... ... ^52 11 10 

Total Expenditure on Construction of Works, ^48,404 6 o 

VI.— Gas. 
Annual Revenue, ... ... ... ... ^6890 6 6 

Do. Expenditure, ... ... ... Z598 1 19 3 

Annuities payable, ... ... ... ... 588 15 o 

^6570 14 3 

Balance on year, ... ... ^3 X 9 I2 3 

Gas Corporation Office, North Street. Open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. On Saturdays, 
from 9 to 3. 

Police and Water Assessment Office, Council Buildings. Open from to a.m. to 3 p.m., 
and from 6 to 8 p.m. On Saturdays, from 10 to 2. 

POLICE COURT. 

Held every lawful day when there is business. Judges — The Provost and Magistrates. 
William Gordon, Solicitor, Clerk and Assessor. James Stirling, Superintendent and Pror.- 
Fiscal. 

BURGH OR BAILIE COURT. 

Held as occasion requires. Magistrates Judges. James Stirling, Fiscal ; Tames Taylor, 
Town-Clerk, Clerk and Assessor. 

BURGH LICENSING COURT. 

For the renewal or granting of Hotel, Public-House, and Grocers' Liquor Licenses. 
Held by the Magistrates on 2nd Tuesday of April and 3rd Tuesday of October. 

VALUATION APPEAL COURT. 

Held by the Council on a date between the 10th and 30th September. 

FORFAR JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, John Lowson, jun. , John Myles, John Whyte, P. Webster 
(Westfield), R. W. Anderson, Alexander Craik, John Fyfe Craik, James Lowson, yr. , 
William Lowson, Dr Wedderburn. 

PAROCHIAL BOARD. 

The Board is composed of owners of Lands and Heritages of the yearly value of ^20 and 
upwards, the Provost and Bailies of the Burgh, and the following -.—Elected by the Rate- 
payers — Alexander Johnston, 38 North Street ; William Gordon, Solicitor, East High St. ; 
Peter A. Goode, 13 St. James' Road ; Alexander Strachan, 3 Vennel ; James Williams, 8 
Charles Street ; Henry Rae, Wellbraehead ; Robert Smith, 11 Horsewater Wynd ; Charles 
Kinnear, 9 New Road ; David Hardie, 26 North Street ; Thomas Petrie, 2 Backwynd. 



64 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Committees. 

Poorhouse. — Alexander Johnston (Chairman), Thomas Petrie (Vice-Chairman), Henry 
Rae, James M'Lean, David C. Forsyth, Provost Doig, Robert Smith, Robert F. Craik, 
David Hardie, James Dargie, John L. Fenton, Robert D. Paton, James Williams. 

Finance. — Bailie Ferguson (Convener), Provost Doig, Robert D. Paton, John Moffat, 
James Williams, Alexander Strachan, David C. Forsyth, Peter A. Goode, Henry Rae, 
Alexander Johnston. 

Consulting. — James Dargie (Convener), Provost Doig, John Cargill, Bailie Ferguson. 

Feuing. — Provost Doig (Convener), John Cargill, Robert Smith, James M'Lean, James 
Dargie, John L. Fenton, John Moffat. 

Revising. — Robert F. Craik (Convener), Charles Kinnear, Henry Rae, Thomas Petrie, 
John L. Fenton, James Williams, Alexander Strachan, Peter A. Tosh, David Hardie, Peter 
A. Goode, David C. Forsvth. 



Poorhouse — Alexander Lowson, Governor ; Mrs Lowson, Matron. 

Medical Officers — Drs Hunter, M ' Lagan- Wedderburn , Alexander, Butter, Cable, and 
Murray. Inspector of Poor and Collector of Rates — James Rodger. Auditor — A. B. Wyllie. 

Offices, Newmonthill Street, open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturdays, 

from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

REGISTRAR'S OFFICE. 

Parochial Buildings, Newmonthill Street. Open daily from 10 to 12 noon, and from 
6 to 7 evening; and on Saturdays, from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. Births must be registered 
within 21 days, Marriages 3 days, and deaths 8 days. Notice of Marriage to be given to 
the Registrar under Marriage Notice Act, Eight clear days previous to Marriage. 
Registrar — W. H. Thomson. 

BURGH SCHOOL BOARD. 

Meets in Council Buildings on first Thursday of each month at 6-30 p.m. Members — 
Rev. G. M. Philps (Chairman), Messrs John F. Craik, A. L. Fenton, John Laird, junr. , 
Gumming Jamieson, David Whyte, J. K. Butter, M.D. , J. W. Adamson, D. M. Graham. 
J. C. Anderson, Clerk ; A. MacHardy, Treasurer ; T. Stirling, Officer. Next election, 
March, 1888. 

LANDWARD SCHOOL BOARD. 

Meets in Clerk's Office, Town-House, Forfar, on Mondays, at 10-30 a.m., when neces- 
sary. Members: — Patrick Webster of Westfi eld (Chairman) ; David Whyte, 11 Market 
Place; William Findlay, Gunsmith, Kingsmuir ; Patrick Webster, jun., Flemington ; and 
Andrew W. Welsh, Lochhead. D. Macintosh, Solicitor, Town House, Clerk and 
Treasurer ; John Laird, Lunanhead, Officer. Schools : — Kingsmuir School — George 
Neill, Teacher; Lunanhead School — John Yuille, Teacher. Next election, March, 1888. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Lending department open daily from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., except Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 

3 P- m - 

Committee from Council. — Provost Doig, Bailies Ferguson, and Whyte, Messrs Fenton' 
Dowell, Falconer, Ewen, Johnston, Craik, Tosh. From Householders. — Mr James Moffat, 
Manufacturer; Rev. P. Wright; Messrs A. Freeman, Solicitor; J. Morrison, Factory 
Manager; Wm. Falknor, Painter; John Smith, Teacher; Alex. Murdoch, Clerk; John 
Knox, Teacher; James Brodie, Teacher ; P. Goode, West End Reading-Room. 

Sub-Committee. 

Mr Knox, Chairman ; Rev. P. Wright, Messrs James Moffat, James Brodie, Alex. 
Freeman, Tohn Smith, Wm. Falknor, James Ewen. Andrew L. Fenton, Clerk and 
Treasurer; fames Sim, Accountant, National Bank, Auditor; Wm. Grant, Librarian. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 65 



FORFAR INFIRMARY. 

Patron — The Right Hon. The Earl of Strathmore ; President — John Laird, junr. , Esq., 
Benholm Lodge ; Vice-President, William Lowson, Esq., Banker. Medical Attendants : — 
Drs. M' Lagan- Wedderburn, Alexander, and Murray. David Steele, Treasurer; James 
Taylor, Secretary ; Miss Tod, Matron. 

NATIONAL SECURITY SAVING'S BANK. 

Established 1853. Office, 9 West High Street. Open on Monday from 9 A.M. to 12 
noon; Friday, 6 to 8 p.m. ; and on Saturday from 10 to 12 noon. Receives deposits of 
one shilling and upwards. Total sum due to depositors at 20th November, 1886, £28,415, 
9s 3d. Robert Bruce, Treasurer ; W. Lowson, Actuary and Cashier ; J. Lawrie, Accountant. 

BANK OFFICES. 

Bank of Scotland — Robert Whyte & D. Binny, Joint Agents. L. R. Falconer, Accountant. 
British Linen Company's Bank — William Gordon, Agent. Andrew Binnie, Accountant. 
Commercial Bank — Robert Bruce, Agent. S. McLees, Accountant. 
National Bank — T. Henderson, Agent. J. Sim, Accountant. 
Royal Bank — David Steele, Agent. T. C. Crawford, Accountant. 
Union Bank — Wm, Lowson, Agent. J. Lawrie, Accountant. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

,-> , . , ) Tas. Brodie, Rector and Mathematical Master. Geo. Younger, 

Burgh Academy, ^ Classical Master. 

Public School, ... ... ... ... ... John Knox. 

East Burgh School, ... ... ... ... Thomas Mackie. 

West Burgh School, ... ... ... ... John T. Cobb. 

North Burgh School, ... ... ... ... John Smith. 

Wellbraehead School, ... ... ... ... Miss Campbell. 

Industrial School, ... ... ... ... Miss Chapman. 

Ladies' Seminary, ... ... ... Misses Smith, Academy Street. 

Teacher of Drawing, ... ... ... T.A.Watson.'. 

Teacher of Music, ... ... ... ... John Kerr. 

CHURCHES. 

Parish, ... ... ... ... ... Rev. G. J. Caie. 

St. James' Parish, ... ... ... ... Rev. J. Weir. 

First Free, ... ... ... ... ... Rev. A. Cumming. 

East Free, ... ... ... ... ... Rev. G. M. Philps. 

United Presbyterian, ... ... ... ... Rev. P. Wright. 

St. John's Episcopal, ... ... ... ... Rev. J. M. Aldridge. 

Congregational, ... ... ... ... ...Rev. D. L. M'Corkindale. 

Baptist, ... ... ... ... ... 



SESSION CLERKS. 

Forfar Parish — John Knox, Public School, St. James' Road. 
St. James' Parish — W. Hebington, Green Street. 



HALLS. 



Reid Hall 

West End Reid Hall 

Masonic Hall 

Drill Hall 

Town Hall 

The Guild Hall, Green Street, 

Greenhill's Hall 

Osnaburg Street Hall 

St. James' Hall 



accommodates 1400 J Q Webster> Hall-keeper. 



650 — J. Milne, do. 

1000 — W. Niddrie, do. 

200 — Mrs Stewart, do. 

100 — John Longmuir. do. 
400 — H. Greenhill, Proprietor. 
400 — Alex. Robertson, do. 
300 — John Milne, Backwynd, Hall-keeper. 



66 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



VOLUNTEERS. 

A aiidB Companies Angus Rifles. — Captains — Alex. MacHardy (major-commanding), and 
Geo. Younger ; Lieutenants — Wm. Findlay and John A. MacLean. Surgeons — Dr Murray 
(Battalion) ; Dr Alexander (Detachment). Drill Instructor — Sergt. John Biyth. Drill 
Hall and Armoury — New Road. 

READING ROOMS. 

Young Men's Christian Association Reading Room.— No. 35 Castle Street. Open 
from 8 a.m. till 10 p.m. Annual subscription, 6s. ; apprentices, 3s. 

Chess Club meets on Thursday evenings at 6 o'clock in above rooms. W. J. Abel, 
Secretary. 

West End Reading Room.— Dundee Loan. Sheriff Robertson, Patron ; Peter A. 
Goode, President ; David Simpson, Vice-President ; William Littlejohn, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Open daily, 9 a.m. till 9 p.m. ; and on Saturdays, 9 a.m. till 11 p.m. 

West End Reading Room Saving Society.— Open every Saturday from 5 to 6 p.m. 
Secretary, James A. Goode ; Treasurer, Peter A. Goode. 

East End Reading Room.— East Port. Sheriff Robertson, Patron ; Henry Rae, Presi- 
dent. Open daily from 9 a. m. till 10 p. m. 

MUSICAL SOCIETIES. 

Forfar Choral Union.— Robert Why te, Esq., President; Samuel M'Lees, Hon. Secre- 
tary and Hon. Treasurer. Committee— Alex. Freeman, W. Melvin, G. S. Nicolson, A. B. 
Wyllie, and Edward Cowan. C. J. Smith, Conductor. Meets in the Academy on Wed- 
nesday evenings at 8-15. 

Forfar Tonic Sol-Fa Certificated Choir— D. M. Stewart, President; P. T. 
Shepherd, 46 Prior Road, Secretary; John Cuthbert, Treasurer; Committee — Messrs 
Esplin, Mavors, and Thomson. John Kerr, A.C. , Conductor. Session — September to 
March. Meets in Academy on Mondays at 8 p.m. 

Forfar Amateur Musical Society.— J. Mann, President; J. Scott, 7 Lappiedub, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Allan Young, James Moir, Thomas Doig. C. 
Young, Conductor. Meets every Wednesday in the West Burgh School at 8 p.m. 

THE FORFAR AMATEUR DRAMATIC SOCIETY. 

Instituted 1880. William M'Lean, 36 John Street, Secretary and Treasurer. Members 
of Committee — James M'Kay, William Meldrum, James Christie. Rehearsals held every 
Tuesday and Friday in Robertson's Hall, Osnaburgh Street, at 8 o'clock. Intending 
members may call at the Hall on any of the above evenings. 

RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. 

Young Men's Christian Association. — Hon. Presidents— Sheriff Robertson and Wm. 
Lowson, Esq. ; President, Dr. Cable; Vice-President, William Jarvis ; Directors, Messrs. 
Tarbat, Wishart, Thomson, Hutcheson, Thorn, and Roberts ; Lake R. Falconer, Bank of 
Scotland, Secretary ; John Anderson, Cross, Treasurer. Evangelistic Meetings at 
Kingsmuir on Sabbath evenings, and in First Free Mission Hall on Wednesday evenings. 

Juvenile Branch — (Membership, 500) — President, James Thorn ; Vice-President, G. 
Wishart ; Secretary and Treasurer, D. Tarbat. Meets in Masonic Hall on Thursday 
evenings at 7 o'clock. 

Young Women's Christian Association.— Ofnce-Bearers— President, Miss Taylor; 
Vice-President, Miss Milne ; Secretary, Miss Marshall ; Treasurer, Mrs Edwards. Com- 
mittee — Misses Stewart, Fenton, Patullo, and Welsh. Meets in St. James' Hall every 
Saturday evening at 6-45, and on Sabbath morning at 10 o'clock. 

Salvation Army. — Meetings are held in Masonic Hall, Castle Street, every evening. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 67 



FORFAR TRACT SOCIETY. 

John Ormond, President; D. Steele, Vice-President; Wm. Warden, Treasurer ; Rev. 
P. S. Wright, Secretary. 60 Distributors; monthly circulation, 3100 Tracts. The 
Superintendent meets distributors on the evening of second Saturday each month in U.P. 
Session-House. 

Y.M.C.A. LITERARY SOCIETY, 

Dr Cable. Hon. President ; J. Campbell, President ; L. R. Falconer, Vice-President ; A. 
Knox, Secretary. Meets in the Academy every alternate Friday at 8-30 p.m. 

FORFAR AUXILIARY TO THE NATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY OF 

SCOTLAND. 

Sheriff Robertson, President; A. W. Myles, Esq., Secretary and Treasurer. Committee 
of Management — The Ministers of the Town ; and Messrs R. W. Anderson, W. Lowson, 
John Laird, jr. , Alex. Freeman, and W. Sturrock. 

FORFARSHIRE MISSION TO THE BLIND. 

Organised to care for the blind, specially teaching them to read at their homes, and 
and lending them books (free), of which there are fully 1000 in the Library. On the Roll 
there are 143 blind persons, 50 of whom can read. 

Annual Meeting, beginning of September, in Town Hall, Forfar. President — The Earl 
of Dalhousie. Secretary and Treasurer — David Steele, Esq., to whom subscriptions may 
be sent. Mr Edwards, Missionary, to whom names of blind persons may be sent ; as also 
orders for work such as knitting, pianoforte tuning, net cash bags, &c. 

CHURCH SOCIETIES, &c. 

Forfar Parish Church.— Bible Classes every Sabbath at 3-30 by Mr Geo. Neill ; and at 
6-30 by Mr John Smith. Band of Hope meets' monthly during winter. Clothing Society 
meets weekly during winter. Sunday School at 3-30 — Mr Mackie, Superintendent of Female 
Department; Mr A. D. Strachan, Superintendent of Male Department ; Mr S. M'Lees, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

St, James' Parish Church..— Sunday School at 3-40 p.m.— Mr John Monteith, Super- 
intendent. Minister's Bible Class for Young Men and Women, 4-40 p.m., every Sabbath, 
at St. James' Hall. Children's Service in Church in afternoon of first Sabbath of March, 
June, September, and December. 

First Free Church — Church Temperance Society — Rev. Alex. Cumming, President ; 
Charles Wood, Vice-President; John Petrie, Secretary; D. Tarbat, Treasurer. Meets in 
Hall on the first Wednesday of each month at 8 p.m. Clothing Society, conducted by 
Ladies of the Congregation, meets on Thursdays during November and December. Tract 
Society — Rev. Alex. Cumming, President ; John Anderson, Treasurer. Distributes Tracts 
fortnightly. Sabbath Schools. — Congregational at 4 p.m. in Hall — W. Lowson, Superin- 
tendent. In West Burgh School-room at 4 o'clock — W. Jarvis, Superintendent. In West 
End Mission Hall — Mr Nicoll, Superintendent. West End Mission Hall, Dundee Loan — 
Service on Sunday evenings at 7 o'clock. Children's Service in West End Mission Hall 
every Sabbath forenoon. 

East Free Church. —Congregational Sabbath School meets at the close of the afternoon 
Service. Superintendent, Mr A. A. Symon. Lunanhead Sabbath School, at 5 p.m., con- 
ducted by Messrs Wishart, Superintendent, and A. Hutcheson. The Minister's Bible Class 
meets every Sabbath evening at half-past 6. The Industrial Class— Mrs Christie, Superin- 
tendent, at 7 o'clock on the Monday evenings of the winter months. The Congregational 
Prayer Meeting at 8 o'clock. The Backwynd District Meeting, conducted by Mr J. B. 
Maclaren is held on every second Monday evening at eight. 

United. Presbyterian Church. — Missionary Association — Contributions gathered 
monthly by Lady-Collectors. Bible Class and Sabbath School meet on Sabbath Afternoon 
at the close of the service. 



68 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



St. John's Episcopal Church.— Sunday School at 2-45 p.m. in the Academy. Children's 
Service in the Church at 3 p.m. , the last Sunday in each month. Church Visitors' Meeting 
at the Parsonage at 3 p.m., the first Monday in each month. Young Men's Guild every 
Monday, from October to Easter, at 8 p.m. Young Women's Guild every Wednesday, 
from October to Easter, at 7-30 p.m. The meetings are held in the Guild Hall. There is 
a Reading-room in connection with the Young Men's Guild, open every evening from 6-30 
to 9-30 ; and on Saturdays from 3 to 9-30. 

FORFAR CHILDREN'S CHURCH. 

William Arthur, Balgavies, President; William Jarvis, Castle Street, Vice-President; 
David Sturrock, East High Street, Treasurer. Office-Bearers — George Jarvis, Superintend- 
ent of Boys ; Miss Howie, John Street, Superintendent of Girls. Mr Shepherd, Leader of 
Praise ; Miss Janet Pullar, Harmoniumist. Service every Sunday forenoon at 11 o'clock 
m the Masonic Hall. 

GOOD TEMPLAR LODGES. 

"The Dawn of Peace" Lodge, No. 507.— James M'Dougall, Chief Templar ; Andrew 
Hunter, Lodge Deputy ; David Johnston, West High Street, Secretary. Meets in St. 
James' Hall every Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. 

"The Forfar" Lodge, No. 717— William M'Dougall, Chief Templar; John Petrie, 
Lodge Deputy ; James Hebenton, Chapel Park, Secretary. Meets in St. James' Hall every 
Monday evening at 8 o'clock. 

"Hope of Forfar" Juvenile Lodge.— A. D. Strachan, Superintendent. Meets in St. 
James' Hall every Friday evening at 7-30. 

"Free Caledonia" Lodge St. Andrews Order of Reformed Templars.— Andrew 
Shepherd, Senior Trustee ; D. Gourlay, 161 East High Street, Secretary. Meets in St. 
James' Hall on Wednesday evenings at 8 o'clock. 

BRITISH WOMEN'S TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Mrs Cumming, President ; Mrs Law and Mrs John Craik, Vice-Presidents ; Miss E. 
Myles, Treasurer; Miss Caie and Miss Crighton, Secretaries. Meetings open to all 
Women. Sewing Class on Wednesday evenings of winter months in First Free Church 
Hall at 7 o'clock. 

EDINBURGH ANGUS CLUB. 

The Right Hon. the Earl of Strathmore, Lord-Lieutenant of Forfarshire, Patron ; The 
Rev. James C. Haldane, Kingoldrum, President ; The Right Hon. the Earls of Southesk, 
Northesk, Camperdown, Dalhousie, Kintore, Home, and Airlie, Vice-Presidents ; Alex- 
ander C. Logan, W.S. , 7 North St. Andrew Street, Edinburgh, Secretary; Robert Bruce, 
Commercial Bank, Forfar, Local Secretary. 

EDINBURGH FORFAR ACADEMY CLUB. 

Instituted 1885. President, W. Spink, Esq., S.S.C. ; Secretary and Treasurer, Mr James 
A. Lowson, 40 Marchmont Crescent, Edinburgh. The object of the Club is to bring 
together all former pupils of the Forfar Academy ; also, to promote as far as possible the 
interests of the Academy in Educational matters. 

POULTRY & PIGEON ASSOCIATION. 

George Dick, West High Street, President ; David Petrie, East High Street, Vice-Pre- 
sident ; James Fyfe, St. James' Road, Secretary. Committee — D. Kennedy, Geo. Maxwell, 
John Nicoll, Geo. Cable, Geo. Hogg. Annual Exhibition in Reid Hall on istand 3rd Jan. 

CHICKEN SHOW. 

Secretary, George Maxwell, Kirkton. Annual Show in September or October. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 69 



BEEKEEPERS' SOCIETY. 

President, Andrew L. Fenton, South Street ; Vice-President, A. Patullo, South Street ; 
Treasurer, James Binny, Glamis Road ; Secretary, James Saddler, East High Street. 
Committee — William Neave, 81 Backwynd ; William Black, South Street ; John Pearson, 
27 New Road ; Andrew Sturrock, Hillend of Lownie ; David Rae, Leckaway. Exhibition 
of Bees, Honey, and Hives, held in Forfar annuallv. 

VOLUNTEER BRASS BAND. 

This Band consists of 17 players. William Brown, Bandmaster, 2nd F. R. V., 132 East 
High Street, Forfar. 

THE BAXTER BRASS BAND. 

William Soutar, 3 Prior Road, Bandmaster; Alexander Duncan, 1 Gallowhill, Secretary. 
Meets on Tuesday and Friday evenings in Wellbraehead School. 

FORFAR PLATE GLASS MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Committee of Management — Messrs D. P. Booth (Chairman), John Melvin, William 
Warden, Joseph Mann, and William Fullerton. Messrs James D. Boyle and John Roberts, 
Auditors ; W. H. Thomson, Secretary ; William Dowell, Valuator. The operations of the 
Society are strictly confined to Forfar. The Annual General Meeting is held on the third 
Tuesday of October each year. 

THE FORFAR NORTHERN SAVING ASSOCIATION (Limited). 

David Falconer, 53 North Street, President ; James Easton, 123 Castle Street, Secretary ; 
David M. Stewart, 117 Castle Street, Treasurer. Committee — David Ramsay, 80 North 
Street ; Adam Bowman, 94 North Street ; John Welsh, 13 Canmore Street ; Peter 
Langlands, 5 Victoria Street ; David Aitkenhead, 57 North Street. Committee meets at 
7-30 p.m. on Monday evenings in Rooms, 111 Castle Street. 

EAST-PORT SAVING ASSOCIATION, Limited. -(Founded 1829). 

Alexander Watt, Manager ; William Stewart, President ; James Fyfe, Secretary ; John 
L. Fenton, Treasurer. Place of Business — 131 .md 133 East High Street. 

WEST TOWN-END SOCIETY (Limited). 

James Williams, Chairman ; John Ireland, Secretary ; James Todd, Treasurer. Com- 
mittee — James Herald, Robert Smith, David Forsyth, Alexander Smith, George Donald- 
son. Meets on Monday evenings at 8 o'clock in Committee Room, 118 West High Street. 

FREE TRADE SAVING SOCIETY (Limited). 

Andrew Hunter, Prior Road, President ; Thomas Stirling, Secretary ; David RoDertson, 
Treasurer and Manager. Committee — James Cable, East High Street ; Alexander Rae, 
East High Street ; George Maxwell, William Street. Meets every Monday evening in 
Committee Rooms, 157 East High Street, at 7-30. 

WEST-PORT SAVING SOCIETY, Limited.— (Established July 1838). 

John Lowdon, 80A West High Street, President ; William Wyllie, 8ob West High 
Street, Secretary; George Smart, 22 Dundee Loan, Treasurer. Committee — Alexander 
Littlejohn, 36 West High Street ; Charles Kinnear, New Road ; Alexander Strachan, 
3 Vennel ; David Keith, Dundee Road ; Alexander Mason, New Road. Meets on Monday 
evenings at half-past Seven in Society Rooms. 



70 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



FORFAR CO-OPERATIVE COAL SOCIETY (Limited). 

Alexander Strachan, President ; James Herald, Vice-President ; Andrew Lees, Secretary; 
James M'Intosh, Treasurer. Committee — William Duncan, David Henderson, James 
Edward, Henry Rae, Robert Langlands. Collectors — James Binny, William Milne, 
Charles Alexander, Robert Simpson. Meets every Tuesday at 7-30 p.m. in office, Glamis 
Road. 

VICTORIA COAL SOCIETY (Limited). 

James Cable, 186 East High Street, President ; Thomas Stirling, Kirkton, Secretary 
Adam Bowman, Market Place, Treasurer. Committee — Robert Hanton, Arbroath Road 
David Aitkenhead, North Street ; Joseph Massie, Dundee Loan ; David Craik, Prior Road 
George Maxwell, Kirkton ; Alexander Hill, Wellbraehead. Collectors — Robert Lamb 
South Street ; James Allan, South Street ; James Smith, Dundee Road. Meets every 
Tuesday evening in the office at Kirkton at 7-30 p.m. 

FORFAR MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

James Williams, President ; Charles Aitkenhead, Vice-President ; Charles Wood, Secre- 
tary for Males ; James Todd, Secretary for Females ; John Lowdon, Treasurer for Males ; 
Wra. Thorn, Treasurer for Females. Committee — James Williams, 6 Charles Street ; 
Charles Aitkenhead, 6 Archie's Park ; John Byars, 3 Glamis Road ; John Tyrie, 73 Mar- 
ket Place ; William Byars, Dundee Road ; Adam Ferguson, St. James' Road ; George 
Towns, 89 East High Street ; David Forbes, 7 New Road ; Alex. Strachan, 3 Vennel ; 
Alexander Shepherd, 59 Dundee Road ; Alexander Easson, 13 North Stieet ; Charles Wood, 
51^ West High Street, Secretary of Committee. Auditors — Andrew Lees and David 
Gellatly. Arbitrators — Gumming Jamieson, James Dargie, Wm. Lowson, Factory 
Manager. Meets in West Burgh School-Room every Saturday evening from 6. o'clock to 
half-past 7. Thirty-fifth year of the above-mentioned Society. 

EAST-END MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Douglas Allan, President ; Alexander Soutar, Vice-President ; James Brown, 17 John 
Street, Secretary for Males ; John L. Fenton, Yeaman Street, Treasurer for Males ; Andw. 
L. Fenton, 36 South Street, Secretary for Females ; James Paton, 10 Arbroath Road, 
Treasurer for Females. Committee — 9 Members distributed over the district. Has over 
1200 of a Membership. Meets on Saturday evenings from 6-30 to 8 in East Burgh 
School. 

THE CASTLE STREET MALE & FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

John Findlay, 34 John Street, President; John Easton, Wellbraehead, Vice-President; 
Dickson Fraser, Secretary ; James Easton, Treasurer. Committee— James Moffat, 16 
Lour Road ; John Welsh, Canmore Street ; David Fleming, 2 Wellbraehead ; Robert 
Langlands, 25 Canmore Street. Meets from half-past 6 to half-past 7 o'clock on Saturday 
evenings in the North Burgh School — North Division. 

NORTH-END MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Alexander Ritchie, 10 Montrose Road, President ; Alexander Brown, 32 Manor Street, 
Vice-President ; Alexander Hastings, Castle Street, Secretary ; David M. Stewart, Tan- 
works, Treasurer. Auditors — Thomas Petrie, Castle Street; William Grant, Castle Street. 
Committee — George Winter, 21 Victoria Street ; William Morrison, 82 West High Street ; 
John Donald, 13 Wellbraehead ; John Thorn, 22 Canmore Street. Meets in North Burgh 
School-Room, South Division, on Saturday evenings from 6 to half-past 7. Hours for pay- 
ment of Sick and Funeral Money — from 9 to 9-30 a.m. ; 2 to. 2-30 p.m. ; and 7 to 7-30 p.m. 

UNITED MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Peter A. Goode, St. James' Road, President ; Alexander Rae, 167 East High Street, 
Vice-President ; William Wyllie, 80B West High Street, Secretary for Males ; Andrew P. 
Boath, Sunnyside, Secretary for Females ; John Ireland, 5 Archie's Park, Treasurer for 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



71 



Males ; James Fyfe, St. James' Road, Treasurer for Females. Committee — William 
Prophet, West High Street ; David H. Dundas, Archie's Park ; James Irons, Sunnyside ; 
James Neave, 6 Newmonthill ; John Small, Couttie's Wynd ; Adam Bowman, 94 North 
Street ; William Brown, Canmore Lane. Meets at No. 2 Vennel every Saturday from 6 to 
half-past 7 o'clock. 

LOYAL ANCIENT SHEPHERDS— BURNSIDE LODGE, No. 2046. 

William Duncan, W.M. ; A. H. Simpson, P.M. ; Tohn Dundas, D.M. Committee — D. 
Tyrie, C.S. ; D. Oakley, M.S. ; H. Adams, M. ; D. Stewart, l.G. ; D. Milne, O.G. 
Visiting Stewards — James M'Intosh and William Lakie ; Treasurer, A. Esplin ; Secretary, 
D. H. Dundas. All information of the Order can be had from the above Office-Bearers. 
Meets in Masonic Hall Buildings, Castle Street, on the evening of alternate Thursdays. 

ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS— Court " Beech Hill," No. 6540. 

John Lowson, jun., Esq., Patron. David Morrison, Chief Ranger; Charles Mitchell, 
Sub-Chief Ranger ; William M'Nab, 98 Dundee Loan, Secretary; Henry Rae, Treasurer. 
Meets every alternate Monday at 8 o'clock, in Masons' Arms Hall, 105 East High Street. 

MASONIC LODGES. 

Kilwinning Lodge, No. 90.— John Kermach, R.W.M. ; William Paterson, Secretary; 
Robert Clark, Treasurer. Meets in Robertson's Hall, Osnaburgh Street. 

Lour Lodge, No. 309.— James P. Rough, R.W.M. ; John L. Fen ton, Secretary; Wm. 
Keith, Treasurer. Meets in Lodge Room, Masonic Hall Buildings. 

THE ROYAL AIRLIE AND FORFAR LODGE OF ODDFELLOWS. 

James Gordon, M.N.G. ; Alexander Irons, V.G. ; James Ramsay, Treasurer; William 
Clark, 8 Arbroath Road, Secretary. Committee — Adam Bowman, James Smith, xAlex. 
Peacock, David Anderson, George Rough, Charles Whyte. 

CANMORE ANGLING CLUB. 

William Langlands, Victoria Street, President ; James Grewar, Charles Street, Vice- 
President ; David Maxwell, Watt Street, Secretary and Treasurer ; Alexander Stewart, 
Horsewater Wynd, Captain. Committee — James Mands, Alexander M'Donald, James 
Smith, David Shepherd. Annual Meeting on the first Saturday of February at 8 o'clock in 
the Eagle Inn, West High Street. 

BOWLING CLUBS. 

Forfar. —George Younger, President; D. M. Graham, Vice-President ; Dr Alexander, 
Curator; A. B. Wyllie, Hon. Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Messrs James Biodie.' 
T. C. Crawford, John Strachan, John Anderson, W. Melvin, and Office-Bearers. Kenneth 
M'Kenzie, Greenkeeper. 

Canmore.— A. H. Whitson, President; William Milne, Vice-President ; James M' Beth, 
Curator ; D. Wighton, North Street, Secretary ; James Sim, Treasurer. 

Victoria. — George Donaldson, President; Allan Smith, Vice-President; William 
Peacock, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Joseph Robb, Alexander Gordon, Wm. 
Irons, and David Mason. Meets on first Thursday of every month in Club Room. 

STRATHMORE CRICKET CLUB. 

The Earl of Strathmore, Patron ; John Fyfe Craik, Manufacturer, Manor Park, Presi- 
dent ; William Lowson, Manufacturer, Hill Bank, Vice-President ; James M. Ramsay, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — D. M'Laren, John Marshall, D. Stewart. 

FORFAR CURLING CLUB. 

Patron, the Earl of Strathmore ; President, Sheriff Robertson ; Vice-President, J. W. 
Adamson ; Secretary, D. M. Graham ; Treasurer, D. M. Stewart ; Representative Members 
John Whyte and James Moffat. Committee — John Whyte, George Lowson, James Brodie, 



7 2 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



John Clementsen, Keith K. Skene, H. Greenhill, and John Strachan. Pond Committee— 
Wm. Waterston, James M'Lean, D. M. Stewart. Annual general meeting on or about 
25th September in the Reference Room of the Free Library. 

ANGUS CURLING ASSOCIATION. 

Patron, the Right Hon. the Earl of Strathmore ; Patroness, the Countess of Strathmore ; 
President, Walter T. S. Fothringham, of Fothringham ; Vice-President, John Black,' 
Cortachy ; Secretary and Treasurer, D. M. Graham, Forfar ; Committee of Management! 
P. Webster, junr. , J. Johnston, Glamis ; George Jarron, James Dewar, G. Turnbull, Geo. 
Young, Panmure. Annual meeting on second Monday of September, 1887. 

FOOTBALL CLUBS. 

Forfar Athletic— President, Robert Hanton ; Vice-President, O. M'Pherson ; Treasurer, 
Wm. Anderson ; Financial Secretary, D. Christie, junr., East High Street. First Eleven- 
Adam Ogilvie, Captain ; Charles Evans, Vice-Captain ; James Black, 109 Back Wynd, 
Match Secretary. Second Eleven— James Dundas, Captain; James Low, Vice-Captain. 
Alex. Strang, 5 Newmonthill, Match Secretary. Committee— David Liddle, Tames Scott, 
Robert Hanton, and Ofnce-Bearers. Record for last season— 36 matches played, 25 won, 
7 lost, and 4 drawn. Ground, Station Park. 

Athletic Rangers.— Captain, Robert Adamson ; Vice-Captain, Alex. Strachan ; Match 
Secretary, Andrew Peffers, Canmore Street. 

Thistle.— Captain, David Milne; Vice-Captain, Charles Malcolm; Treasurer, Tames 
Taylor ; Secretary, William D. Dalgety, Ivy Bank, Forfar. The office-bearers to form the 
committee, along with D. H. Maxwell. 

FORFAR GOLF CLUB. 

Lady Dempster Metcalfe, Patroness ; John Lowson, Hillbank, President ; William 
Shepherd, junr., and John S. Whyte, Vice-Presidents; James Brodie, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Committee— James A. Lowson, Wm. Nicoll, George Younger, Harry Craik, 
and John Strachan. Golf course at Coninghill. Spring meeting, second Saturday in April.' 
Autumn meeting, third Saturday in October. Medal (Handicapped) Competition on the 
1st Thursday and Saturday of each month except June, July, and August. 

LAWN TENNIS CLUB. 

President, A. W. Myles, Solicitor; Secretary, Edward Cowan, Solicitor; Treasurer, 
J. S. Whyte, Castle Street. Committee— Wm. Lowson, Manufacturer, Hillbank ; Thomas 
Henderson, Bank Agent ; R. F. Myles, Solicitor. 

ANGUS BICYCLE CLUB. 

Hon. Presidents, Sir Thomas Munro, Bart., of Lindertis, and Thomas Thornton, Esq., 
Solicitor, Dundee ; Captain, George H. Douglas ; Vice-Captain, Tames Duncan ; Hon. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Mitchell, Prior Cottage ; 1st Bugler, Robert Young ; 
2nd Bugler, James Hill. Committee— William Duncan, William Keith, Tohn Addison,' 
and John Guthrie. Meets in Robertson's Inn, Osnaburg Street. Membership, 30. 

BURNSIDE CYCLING CLUB. 

Hon. President, Sheriff Robertson ; Captain, Frederick T. Coutts ; Vice-Captain, 
Thomas P. Neil ; Bugler, William Anderson. James S. Anderson, Hon. Secretary and 
Treasurer. Committee— William Milne, James W. Hunter, John M'Intosh, David 
Watterston, David Duncan, and David Callender. Meets in Masonic Hall, Castle Street. 

ALBERT QUOITING CLUB. 

President, Wm. M' Lagan, Montrose Road; Captain, William Cook, Dundee Loan; 
Treasurer, Charles Barry, North Street ; Secretary, John Cowie, 188 East High Street. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



73 



FORFAR FACTORY WORKERS' UNION. 

Established in October, 1885, as a Trade Protection Society. General meeting of mem- 
bers annually. Committee of ten (factory workers) meets monthly. Balance-sheets 
published quarterly. Secretary, Thomas Roy, 91 Castle Street ; Collector, D. Dalgety, 
47 South Street. 

ASSOCIATED CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF SCOTLAND. 

William Lundie, 144 East High Street, President ; Alexander Burns, 18 Newmon thill, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Meets every alternate Friday at 8 o'clock at No. 2 Vennel. 

FORFAR BUILDING AND INVESTMENT SOCIETY. 

A. B. Wyllie, Esq. , Solicitor, (Jhairman ; George Strachan, Secretary. Directors — A. 
B. Wyllie, David Johnston, James M'Lean, R. D. Paton, David Milne, William Scott, 
David M'Kenzie, Andrew Oram, W. H. Thomson, David Rodger. Trustees — Robert 
Whyte, William Shepherd, David Steele, and William Lowson. Robert Bruce, Auditor. 
Meets every alternate Saturday from 8 to 9 p.m. in No. 2 Vennel. 



THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE ASSOCIATION. 

(Instituted ist June, 1882.) 

Forms of application for membership and full particulars may be had by enclosing stamp 
to the Secretary, Mr Angus M'Lean, 12 Kilblain Street, Greenock, or to Mr William 
Brown, junr. , Canmore Street, the official local representative at Forfar. 



POST-OFFICE ARRANGEMENTS. . 
Arrivals at Forfar Post-Office. 

Edinburgh, London, and the South, Dundee, Glasgow, Perth, Meigle 

Coupar- Angus, 
Dundee and Arbroath, 
Kirriemuir and Padanaram, ... 
Letham, Dunnichen, and Craichie, 
Edinburgh, London, and the South, Dundee, Glasgow, Perth, Aberdeen 

Brechin, and Montrose, 
Perth, 

Kirriemuir, ... 
Aberdeen, North, Montrose, Arbroath, Brechin, Fordoun, Laurencekirk 

Stonehaven, Guthrie, and Dundee, 
Kirriemuir, Arbroath, Aberdeen and North, ... 
Glamis, Kincaldrum, Aberlemno, Tannadice, and Douglastown, 
Up Special (North), ... 



5 A.M. 

5 A.M. 
8 15 A.M. 

7 40 a.m. 

8 25 a.m. 

1 45 p.m. 

2 55 p.m. 

2 55 p.m. 

6 45 p.m # 
1 30 p.m! 
4 30 p.m. 



74 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Despatches from Forfar Post-Office. 

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and South, Alyth, Montrose, Aberdeen, 

Brechin, and Kirriemuir, ... ... ... 7 40 a.m 

Aberdeen, Arbroath, Brechin, and Montrose, ... ... ... 1 p.m 

Edinburgh, England, Glasgow, Dundee, Perth, Alyth, Meigle, Coupar- 

Angus, and South, ... ... ... ... 155pm 

Up Special (South), ... ... ... ... ... 3 40 p.m! 

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and South, Kirriemuir, Perth, & Glamis,... 5 20 p.m. 

Aberdeen, and the North, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee, Fife, Perth, and 

Perthshire ; also, all English Letters, ... ... ... ... 10 p.m. 

^Kirriemuir and Padanaram, . . ... ... 50am 

*Glamis, Tannadice, Aberlemno, Kincaldrum, Douglastown, ... 7 a.m. 

*Guthrie, ...... P n 

6 A.M. 

* Box cleared for these despatches at 5 a.m. 
fLetham, Dunnichen, and Oraichie, ... Q AK , „, 

. T ' •• ••■ ••• ... o 40 A.M. 

fLour, ...... n OK 

' ' •■ ■- •• ••• - ... 9 35 a.m. 

fBurnside, &c, ... n oc 

9 35 a.m. 

fBox cleared for these despatches at 8-45 a.m. 
Money Order Office open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Saturdays till 8 p.m. 
Telegraph Office open from 7 a.m. to 8 P. M. , and on Sundays for one hour— viz 9 a h 

to 10 A.M. 

Miss E. Lunan Thomson, Postmistress. 



Letters can be posted in boxes now attached to mail trains on payment of \d extra postage. 



COUNTY OF FORFAR. 



Area of the County, 890 square miles. Acreage, 569,840. 
Valuation ( Lands, />„« ^ Vo tCJ n 

for J Railways, :." '" m - ^ 6 % 9 g ^ o 1 Gross Total, 

1886-87. (Waterworks, ... ]" ^307 o o j> ^^g l8 g 

Population in 1881-266,360. Parliamentary Representative-James W. Barclay. 

Constituency^i 1 ,478. 
Lord Lieutenant-Earl of Strathmore. Clerk of Lieutenancy-John Myles, Solicitor, Forfar. 

Convener of County— Sir John Ogilvy, Bart. 
Sheriff-John Comne Thomson ; Sheriff-Substitutes-Alexander Robertson (Forfar), and 

John Campbell Smith (Dundee). 
Hon. Sheriff-Substitutes- W. Lowson, George Lyon, John Myles, Tames Taylor 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



75 



County Procurator-Fiscal — Robert Whyte ; Assistant do. — Alex. Freeman. 
Sheriff-Clerk and Commissary Clerk — James Ross. 
Depute do. do. — W. Y. Esplin. 

Auditor of Court — W. Y. Esplin. Collector of Taxes— James S. Gray. 
Clerk of the Peace — Thomas Congleton, Dundee ; Depute do. at Forfar — A. W. Myles. 
Commissioners of Supply meet on the first Wednesday of May, and the first Tuesday 
after Michaelmas ; and Committees as occasion requires. 
Road Trustees meet on 29th September. 

Collector of County Rates — James S. Gray. 

Clerk of Supply, 

Clerk of County Police Committee, ... 

Clerk to Local Authority, ... 

Treasurer to Local Authority — J. P. Anderson. 
Assessor under Valuation Act — R. S. Smith, Dundee. 
County and Forfar District Roads Clerk and Treasurer, 
Forfar District Roads Collector, 

Chief Constable- 



A. W. Mvles. 



County Auditor — A. B. Wyllie. 



"" I J. P. Anderson. 
-Robert Adamson. 



SHERIFF COURTS. 

Courts for Ordinary Court cases are held at Forfar on Thursdays weekly during Session 
at Eleven o'clock forenoon. Summer Session commences on the first Thursday of May, 
and ends on the last Thursday of July. Winter Session commences on the first Thursday 
of October, and ends on the last Thursday of March. There is a recess of not exceeding 
15 days at Christmas. 

Commissary business is disposed of on same days as Sheriff Court. Small Debt and 
Debts Recovery Courts are held weekly on Thursday during Session, at 12 o'clock noon. 

Small Debt Circuit Courts are held at Kirriemuir on the third Monday, at Brechin on 
the third Tuesday, at Arbroath on the third Wednesday, and at Montrose on the third 
Friday of the months of January, March, May, July, September, and November. 



Circuit Courts are held in Dundee quarterly. 



Wheat, 
Barley, 
Chester Bear, 
Potato Oats, 
•Common do. , 
Peas and Beans 
Rye, ... 
Oat Meal, per Boll of 140 Imperial Lbs 



FORFARSHIRE FIARS PRICES, Crop 1885 

Struck at Forfar on rst March, 1886. 

Per Imperial Quarter. 
6 



£1 

1 
o 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Per Old Boll 
7 



o 16 8 



o 

o o 
J 5 
° 15 
o 14 
o 10 
o 16 



FOR INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS, SEE LAST PAGE. 



HOLY ISLAND, 




"BEND THE WILLOW WHILE IT 18 YOTJNO." 



INCIDENTS OF HISTORIC NOTE. 



London Missionary Society 
established, 1795. 

Penance introduced into the 
Church, 157. 

Allspice introduced into Eng- 
land from Carolina, 1726. 

Amontillado wine first im- 
ported into England, 1811. 

The acacia was brought from 
North America in 1640. 

^Eolian harp invented in 1784 
by John James Schnell. 

Agnacobites were a sect that 
first appeai-ed in 701. 

The first abattoir was erected 
in Paris, 1818 ; in Edinburgh, ia5l ; 
and in London, at Islington, 1855. 

Lanterns were invented by 
King Alfred in 870, and London 
was lighted with them in 1415-16. 

The harpsichord was first made 
by Hans Rucker, in Germany, in 
1510. 

The damask rose was intro- 
duced from the south of Prance 
in the sixteenth century. 

Mr. Nasmyth invented and 
patented the steam-hammer on 
the 9th of June, 1842. 

Almonds came from the East, 
and were introduced into England 
in 1570. 

Anthems were first composed 
by Hilary, Bishop of Poictiers, 
and others, about 350. 

The Albert medal for saving life 
from shipwreck was instituted by 
Her Majesty, March 7, 1866. 

The Anabaptists (or those who 
baptise a second time) sprang 
up in 1521 at Wittenburg, in 
Saxony. 

March was the first month in 
the year, and the legal year began 
on the 25th until 1752, when it was 
made the third month. 

Abstinents were a mild sect 
of religionists who appeared in 
France and Spain about the year 
SuO, and repudiated wine, flesh- 
meat, and marriage. 

Trimmers M r as the name of a 
contemptible set of politicians, 
so called by the two great par- 
ties in England in the reign of 
Charles II. 

The invention of the trumpet 
is ascribed to the Etruscans. It 
was first sounded in England be- 
fore the sovereign in the time of 
Offa, King of Mereia. 

The Alcoran (the divine book 
of the Mohammedans and the 
standard of the Arabic language) 
was composed by Mahomet about 
the year 610. 

Adamites were a sect that 
arose in 130, and met naked in 
imitation of Adam before the fall ; 
Prodicus was their leader. This 
sect was introduced into Germany 
in 1416, and revived in Poland in 
the fifteenth century. 



Troy weight was first used at 
Troyes, in Prance. 

Anemometer invented by Wolf 
in 1709. 

The first aniline dves patented 
by W. H. Perkins in 1856. 

The Greek anthology first 
printed at Floi'ence, 1494. 

A religious sect, the Anto- 
nines, first appeared in 329. 

Arable land restrained, and 
pasture enforced, 1534. 

Arbutus tree brought to 
England from the Levant, 1724. 

Opium was first cultivated in 
Turkey in the fifteenth century. 

Tea was cultivated by the 
Chinese before a.d. 783. 

Oxygen gas was discovered by 
Priestley, Aug. 17, 1774. 

The first Roman aqueduct was 
built by the Censor Appius, b.c. 
312. 

Argo was the first long ship 
built by the Greeks to carry the 
Argonauts, B.C. 1263. 

The Armstrong gun was first 
introduced into the artillery ser- 
vice of Great Britain, Feb. 26, 1859. 

The artichoke, native of Italy, 
was brought to England in the 
sixteenth century. 

Pens were first made from 
quills in 635, and from steel in 
1845. 

The Irish " Peep-o'-Day Boys," 
a species of "Moonlighters," first 
appeared in July, 1784. 

St. Paul's Cross, London, was 
pulled down by order of Parlia- 
ment in 1643. 

Discovery of the colouring 
principle of orseille by a French 
chemist, 1829. 

Ophites were a religious sect 
which believed that the serpent 
who tempted Eve was a god, 187. v 

The Antoninus wall was the 
third rampart built to check the 
inroads of the Northern barba- 
rians into England, a.d. 140. 

The Marble Arch at Cumberland 
Gate, modelled on that of Con- 
stantine, 1828, and set up first in 
St. James's Park, London, was 
removed to its present site in 1851. 

Arohontics were a sect of 
Christian heretics who pretended 
that God engendered the devil, 
who begot Abel and Cain of Eve, 
and that woman was the work of 
Satan. The sect came into notice 
about 203. 

The name of the "Court of 
Arches" is derived from the 
arches below St. Mary-le-Bow 
Church, Cheapside, London. All 
ecclesiastical suits wereheld there 
until the removal of the court to 
Doctors' Commons in the middle 
of the sixteenth century, but occa- 
sional courts were held at Bow 
Church down to the year 1825. 



Asparagus was first produced 
in England in 1608. 

Assay of gold and silver estab- 
lished in England, 1248. 

The Astronomical Society 
was founded in London in 1820. 

Auricula imported into Eng- 
land from the Alps, 1509. 

Auricular confession first en- 
joined, 1215. 

The first aurora borealis was 
seen in London on Jan. 30, i860. 

Auto-da-fiS, the public punish- 
ment of heretics, established 1203. 

Baffin's Bay first explored, 
1616. 

Kissing the Pope's toe first 
practised in 709. 

Knitting stockings invented 
in Spain, 1550. 

Lady Day is said to have been 
instituted in 350 ; but authorities 
declare that it was more probably 
in 700. 

Laburnum was brought into 
England from Hungary in 1576. 

Cloth and paper made of 
asbestos, a.d. 74 ; spun at Venice, 
1500. 

Bachelors first taxed in Eng- 
land, May 1, 1685; tax increased 
upon their servants, 1785. 

The Koh-i-Noor Diamond was 
brought from India to England 
and presented to the Queen, June 

24, 1850. 

The trade of bakers was estab- 
lished in Italy, b.c. 173; there 
existed a brotherhood of this 
craft in England in the year 1155. 

Babe, a dwarf kept by the King 
of Poland, only thirty-three inches 
high, aged twenty-three, died in 
1764. 

The Augsburg Confession of 
Faith drawn up by Melanctbon, 
and by him and Luther presented 
to the Emperor Charles V"., June 

25, 1530. 

Teetotaler, as a term of 
designation of total abstainers 
from all intoxicating drinks, was 
first applied by a working man at 
Preston in June, 1832. 

The tea-tree was brought to 
England from China in 1709-70. 
Attempts to cultivate the plant 
for any useful purpose at Kew 
failed. 

Eighteen clasped knives, such 
as are used by sailors, were found 
in the stomach of William Cum- 
mins, a seaman, who swallowed 
them in drunken frolics. He died 
in Guy's Hospital March, 28, 1809. 

The paper currency known as 
assi gnats was made to support 
the credit of the French Republic, 
April, 1790 ; forged in England, 
1793, to send into France ; aban- 
doned and the plates broken up 
in March, 1796. This led to a 
general bankruptcy. 



I 



"DISTRUST is poison to FRIENDSHIP. " 



WIT AND WISDOM. 



The best way to keep good acts 
in memory is to refresh them 
with new ones. 

Waste of wealth is sometimes 
retrieved ; waste of health, sel- 
dom ; but waste of time, never. 

Mankind generally seem will- 
ing to admit that the world re- 
volves on its axis. The great 
mistake made is that each man 
thinks he is the axis. 

In the exhaustless catalogue of 
Heaven's mercies to mankind, the 
power we have of finding some 
germs of comfort in the hardest 
trials must ever occupy the fore- 
most place. 

Every day sends to their graves 
a number of obscure men, who 
have only remained in obscurity 
because their timidity has pre- 
vented them from making a first 
effort. 

Woman has to wait until she is 
asked before she can marry. She 
has no voice in the matter until 
after the ceremony. Then she 
knows how to make up for lost 
time. 

It should be known that a small 
quantity of vinegar will generally 
destroy immediately an insect 
that may find its way into the 
stomach: and a little salad oil 
will kilL an insect that may enter 
the ear. 

Woman' s Wrongs.— " My dear,' ' 
he remarked to his wife, " our club 
is going to have all the home 
comforts." "Indeed," sneered his 
wife, "and when is our home to 
have all the club comforts 1 " He 
gave it up, yet she wants an 
answer to her question. 

One day, just as an English offi- 
cer had arrived at Vienna, the Em- 
press, knowing that he had seen a 
certain princess much celebrated 
for her beauty, asked him if it 
was really true that she was the 
most beautiful woman he had 
ever seen. " I thought so yester- 
day," he replied. 

For my part, when I hear of the 
marrying and giving in marriage 
that is constantly being trans- 
acted, I can only sigh for those 
who are multiplying earthly ties 
which, though powerful enough to 
detach their hearts and thoughts 
from heaven, are so brittle as to 
be liable to be snapped asunder 
by every breeze.— George Eliot. 

The late Dean Stanley was once 
travelling in a railway carriage, 
when a blustering man exclaimed, 
" 1 should like to meet the Dean 
of Westminster. I'd put a ques- 
tion to him that would puzzle 
him." "Very well," said a voice 
out of another corner, " now is the 
time, for I am the Dean." The 
man was rather sta.rtled, but pre- 
sently recovered, and said, " Well, 
sir, can you tell me the way 
to heaven?" "Nothing easier," 
answered the Dean ; " you have 
only to turn to the right and go 
straight forward." 



Circumstances are beyond the 
control of man ; but his conduct 
is in his own power. 

-Pride is increased by igno- 
rance ; those assume the most 
who know the least. 

It is not our beliefs that 
frighten us half so much as our 
fancies. 

The disappointment of man- 
hood succeeds to the delusion of 
youth ; let us hope that the heri- 
tage of age is not despair. 

My daughter, if the cross comes 
to you as a.wife, you must carry 
it as a wife. You may say, " I will 
forsake my husband," but you can- 
not cease to be a wife.— George 
Eliot. 

The true should welcome all 
truth. It is a half-faith that 
trembles for its own existence at 
every rumour of a new discovery 
in science. A strong faith fears 
nothing. God is one; He will not 
contradict Himself. 

Better to hunt in fields for wealth 
unbought, 

Than fee the doctor for a nauseous 
draught. 

The wise for cure on exercise de- 
pend ; 

God never made His work for man 
to mend. 

We are ruined, not by what we 
really want, but by what we think 
we do ; therefore, never go abroad 
in search of your wants. If they 
be real wants tbey will come home 
in search of you : for he that buys 
what he does not want, will soon 
want what he cannot buy. 

Brush and Pencil.— It is not 
a waste of time to test the natural 
capacity for drawing and paint- 
ing. If the faculty exists, it is 
sure to develop under any sort of 
attentive culture and practice. 
If it does not exist, the pastime 
growing out of the attempt to 
find out whether it is there or 
not is a good fillip to the mind. 

It being agreed at a party of 
twelve, equally composed of ladies 
and gentlemen, that a disputed 
question should be settled by the 
opinion of the majority, the six 
ladies expressed themselves op- 
posed to the six gentlemen, and 
claimed the victory. A gentle- 
man objected to this, as the num- 
ber of votes was equal, saying 
that they were "half and half." 
" True," replied a witty fair one, 
" but we are the better halves." 

An American strolled into a 
fashionable church just before the 
service began. The sexton fol- 
lowed him up, and tapping him 
on the shoulder, and pointing to 
a small cur that had followed 
him into the sacred edifice, said, 
" Dogs are not admitted." " That's 
not my dog," replied the visitor. 
" But he follows you." "Well, so 
do you." The sexton growled, 
and removed the dog with un- 
necessary violence. 



A man of maxims only is like a 
Cyclops with one eye, and that 
eye placed in the back of his head. 

Consider how few things are 
worthy of anger, and you will 
wonder that any but fools should 
be in wrath. 

There are nettles everywhere, 
But smooth, green grasses are 

more common still; 
The blue of heaven is larger than 

the cloud.— Mrs. Browning. 

If there were no enemy, there 
could be no conflict ; were there 
no trouble, there' could be no 
faith ; were there no fear, there 
could be no hope. . 

Fine sense and exalted sense 
are not half so valuable as com- 
mon sense. There are forty men 
of wit for one man of sense ; and 
he that will carry nothing about 
him but gold, will be every day 
at a loss for want of readier 
change. 

There are two beings in each 
of us — the animal and the angel : 
our business is to resist the one 
in order that the other may 
reign supreme, up to the moment 
when, freed from its burdensome 
shackles, it can take flight to- 
wards higher and better regions. 

Home Tenderness.— No matter 
how busy a man may be, he should 
find time every day to tell his 
wife he loves her. No matter 
what social demands may be made 
upon the woman, she should find 
time to kiss her husband and give 
him one of the smiles that were 
so sweet to him when he came 
courting her. No matter what 
their daily cares, the parents 
should find time to take the 
children upon their knees and 
caress them with kind words and 
tender touches. 

The little I have seen of the 
world teaches me to look upon 
the errors of others in sorrow, not 
in anger. When I take the his- 
tory of one heart that has sinned 
and suffered, and represent to my- 
self the struggles and tempta- 
tions it has passed through— the 
brief pulsations of joy, the fever- 
ish inquietude of hope and fear, 
the pressure of want, the deser- 
tion of friends— I would fain leave 
the erring soul of my fellow-man 
with Him from whose hand it 
came. 

It is needful to be very care- 
ful what habits we fall into. It 
is almost easier to give up life 
than fixed habits. It is said of 
Sir David Wilkie, the painter, 
that he had a drawling way of 
pronouncing the word " really," 
which he used very often. A 
friend once said to him, " Do you 
know that people complain of 
your continual ' rea-al-ly V" After 
musing for an instant, Wilkie 
rejoined, "Do they, ' rca-al-ly ? " 
" Don't repeat it ! " cried the 
friend, "it annoys me." Wilkie 
looked up smiling. "Bea-al-ly?" 
1 said he. 



1387 J ANUAR Y 31 days. 




- 



ABDUCT1UK AXD MURDER OF Slit JOHS GOODERE. 



I 


S 


New Year's Day. 


2 

3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 


s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 


2nd Sunday aft. Christmas. 

General Monk died, 1670. 
Douglas Jerrold born, 1803. 
Edward the Confessor died, 1066. 
Epiphany. — Twelfth Day. 
Calais lost, 1558. 
Birth of Prince Albert Victor, 1864. 


9 

IO 

II 

12 

13 
14 
15 


s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 


1st Sunday aft. Epiphany. 

Penny Postage commenced, 1840. 
General Chesney died, 1872. 
Fernando (Cruel),Duke of Alva.d. 1582. 
Death of George Pox the Quaker, 1690. 
Queen Elizabeth crowned, 1559. 
British Museum opened, 1759. 


16 

17 
18 

19 

20 
21 
22 


s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 


2nd Sunday after Epiphany. 

Battle of Abu Klea, 1885.— Colonel 

Burnaby killed. 
German Empire proclaimed, 1871. 

Birth of Sir Henry Bessemer, 1813. 

Death of David Garrick, 1779. 

Louis XVI. guillotined at Paris, 1793. 

St. Vincent's Day. 


23 

24 

25 
26 

27 

28 

29 


s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 


3rd Sunday after Epiphany. 

Charles James Fox born, 1749. 
Conversion of St. Paul. 

General Gordon perished at Khar- 
toum, 1885. 
Death of Peter the Great, 1725. 
General Charles G. Gordon born, 1833. 
Paris forts occupied by Germans, 1871. 


30j 

3i| 


s 

M 


4th Sunday after Epiphany. 

Defeat of the Ashanteesat Coomassie 
by the British, 1874. 



En-g. 



Scot. 



g « <B 


3 -2 3. 


a u 

O M 


4 3s 


3 51s 


10 


8 8r 


8 46r 


11 


1 5s 


3 54s 


12 


8 7r 


8 44r 


13 


4 8s 


3 57s 


14 


8 6r 


8 43r 


O 


4 10s 


4 0s 


16 


8 5r 


8 41r 


17 


4 13s 


4 3s 


18 


8 4r 


8 39r 


19 


4 16s 


4 6s 


20 


8 2r 


8 37r 


21 


4 19s 


4 10s 


d 


8 Or 


8 35r 


23 


4 22s 


4 14s 


24 


7 58r 


8 32r 


25 


4 26s 


4 19s 


26 


7 56r 


8 29r 


27 


4 29s 


4 23s 


28 


7 54r 


8 26r 


29 


4 33s 


4 27s 


e 


7 51r 


8 23r 


i 


4 36s 


4 31s 


2 


7 49r 


8 19r 


3 


4 40s 


4 35s 


4 


7 46r 


8 16r 


5 


4 43s 


4 40s 


6 


7 43r 


8 13r 


7 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 2nd,.. 21 rain, past after. 
Full Moon 9th,.. 32 min. past 10 after. 
Last Quar. 16th, ..23 min. past 3 after- 
New Moon 24th,.. 1 min. past 3 morn- 



Bcfrrcncc to Ellustration. 



AMONG the most famous families in 
Worcestershire two or three cen- 
turies ago were the Charlton Dinelys. 
They traced a descent from the Koyal 
House of Plantagenet ; they possessed 
extensive estates, and flourished until 
the close of the seventeenth century, 
when the last male heir died. Hereupon 
the estates fell into the hands of Sir 
John Dinkly Goodere, Bart., of Charl- 
ton and Burghope, whose abduction 
and murder is the subject of our illus- 
tration. For a series of years he lived 
on bad terms with his brother, Captain 
Samuel Goodere, lt.N. A mutual friend, 
however, a Mr. Smith, attorney-at-law, 
of College Street, Bristol, invited the 
brothers to dine with him, with a view 
of effecting a reconciliation. At dinner 
Sir John and the captain appeared to be 
as good friends as ever, and as the latter 
was departing he took leave of the 
baronet in the most affectionate manner 
imaginable. It was then dark and about 
six o'clock in the evening. Early in the 
morning of that day Captain Goodere 
had ordered dinner for six men at the 
" White Hart " on College Green. The 
latter were dressed like seamen, and in 
conversation during dinner mentioned 
very frequently a man named Mahony. 
In the afternoon, after dinner was over, 
Captain Goodere sent to the landlord 
of the "White Hart" the order to make 
tea for the six men, " which greatly 
surprised him : it being very uncom- 
mon drink for Jack Tars." They all 
eventually went away of a sudden, and 
joined Captain Goodere, who pointed 
out to them the stately figure of his 
brother, the baronet, on his way home. 
Acting up to previous arrangement, one 
of the six seized the old gentleman, and 
they all dragged him along towards the 



""WHERE EVERY ONE MINDS HIS OWN BUSINESS THE WORK IS DONE. 



Rope Walk, where was a gang: of twelve more of 
them l who were ready to assist according to the 
captain's instruction. The victim was hurried to- 
wards the Hot-wells, where a boat was waiting to 
receive him. Captain Goodere was directing the 
gang all the time, and when his brother cried out, 
"Murderl murder! lam Sir John Dinely Goodere," 
the captain stopped his mouth with his cloak, so 
that the people, not knowing his name, only asked 
what was the matter. The explanation given to 
these inquirers was that Sir John was a thief and a 
murderer, and having made his escape from the 
ship, they were going to take him aboard to secure 
him in order for his trial. Having got the victim 
into the boat, he was allowed a little more liberty. 
He spoke to his brother thus:— "Brother, I know 
you have an intention to murder me. I beg that, if 
you are resolved to do it, you would do it here, 
and not give yourself the trouble of taking me 
down to your ship." To which the captain replied, 
" No, brother, I am going to prevent your rotting 
upon land ; but however, I would have you make 
your peace with God this night;" and so, without 
more ado, Captain Goodere hurried his brother 
aboard the ship Ruby, the crew of which were told 
" that they need not mind his noise, because he was 
mad ; and that he had brought him on board on 
purpose to prevent his making away with himself." 
The victim was then conveyed to the purser's cabin, 
and all of the ruffians, except two, named Mahony 
and White, were ordered ashore, with directions to 
conceal themselves and keep out of the way of 
inquiry. The conspirators in the outrage were re- 
warded by Captain Goodere with a guinea each. 
None of them belonged to Goodere's ship, but to 
another lying out, by name the Vernon Schooner. It 
was the night of the 23rd January, 1742, upon which 
the outrage was committed. Sir John was kept in 
the purser's cabin till five o'clock in the morning 
of the following day, when the outrage was con- 
summated. Lieutenant Berry, the cooper of the 
ship, and his wife witnessed the whole transaction 
through a crevice in the partition. The agreement 
between Goodere, White, and Mahony was, that 
Mahony should have £200, White £150, and what 
money the deceased had in his pockets, and his 
gold watch. After the agreement was concluded. 
Mahony and White went about their bloody work, 
the captain standing sentry, with his drawn sword 
in one hand and a pistol in the other, to kill the 
first person that should make any opposition to 
what they were about. The first thing they did was 
to take a handkerchief out of the baronet's pocket ; 
White held his hands, while Mahony put it about 
his neck, and then each of them pulled as hard as 
he could, in order to strangle him at once ; but Sir 
John making a desperate struggle, the ruffians 
could not effect it so as to prevent his crying out, 
"Murder! for God's sake don't kill me! take all I 
have, but save my life ! Dear brother ! What, must 
I die? Help! help! murder!" &c. To prevent 
further noise, Captain Goodere ordered Mahony to 
take a cord he had laid ready. Mahony then slipped 
off the handkerchief, and put the cord about Sir 
John's neck, which cord had a noose at the end ; 
then Mahony. holding the cord in one hand, thrust 
the other in the victim's throat, and his knee against 
his stomach. In the meanwhile White held his 
hands, and took out of his pocket eight guineas 
and a gold watch. Then White came directly to 
Captain Goodere, and acquainted him with what was 
done, and showed him his brother's watch and money. 
The captain then asked Mahony and White whether 
the job was quite completed. They answered, 
"Yes." Then he gave Mahony and White what 
money he had ahout him, and bade them get ashore 
directly, that they might the more easily make their 
escape before daylight came. The manner in which 
the diabolical murder was first brought to light, 
notwithstanding that it had been witnessed by 
officers of Goodere's ship, was somewhat singular. 
Mr. Smith, the gentleman at whose house Sir John 
Dinely Goodere and his brother spent a sociable 
hour together the day before, accidentally heard 
that a person who had the appearance of a gentle- 
man was hurried in a very violent manner over 
College Green, and that a gentleman, who, by the 
description of him, answered to the person of the 
captain, assisted. Mr. Smith, knowing the ship was 



to sail the first fair wind, and remembering that the 
brothers left the house nearly together, .thought the 
captain had taken Sir John on board with intent to 
destroy him when he came upon the high seas. 
This suspicion, being strengthened by other circum- 
stances, made so deep an impression on his mind, 
that early in the morning he appiied himself to 
Henry Coombe, Esq., the mayor, for an officer to go 
and search the ship before she sailed out of the 
liberty of the city. The officer the mayor thought 
fit to send was the water-bailiff, with proper assist- 
ance, and full orders to search the ship for Sir John 
Dinely Goodere, Bart. The officer obeyed his orders ; 
and coming to the ship, the cooper, his wife, and 
Lieutenant Berry acquainted ■•him that they had 
been just consulting about the affair, and discovered 
to him what they knew of the whole matter, the 
captain being then safe in his cabin. The water- 
bailiff sent immediately this account to the city 
magistrates, who reinforced him with a strong 
guard to secure the captain, but before the guard 
came the cooper and lieutenant had done the busi- 
ness. On the 26th of March, Captain Goodere, Mat- 
thew Mahony, and Charles White were arraigned 
for the murder. Captain Goodere's defence was 
that he was innocent ; that his brother was a lunatic, 
and had strangled himself in a fit of frenzy. All 
were sentenced to death, and accordingly executed 
and hung in chains to the north of the Hot-wells, 
in sight of the place where the ship lay when the 
murder was committed. 

The deceased gentleman was a Herefordshire 
baronet, and the fourth son of Sir Edward Goodere. 
The family had formerly enjoyed the honour of 
knighthood, and had been of considerable note and 
esteem in their respective counties. His father, 
Sir Edward Goodere, was created a Baronet of Burg- 
hope, in Herefordshire (the seat of the family), in 
the sixth of Queen Anne ; and afterwards had a seat 
in the House of Commons, as knight of the shire for 
the county of Hereford. Before the death of Sir 
Edward, a person named Dinely, a relation, who was 
possessed of a very plentiful fortune, and who lived 
near Evesham, in Worcestershire, having a great 
respect for the late Sir John, made him his heir, on 
condition that he should change his name ; for which 
purpose he obtained an Act of Parliament. Sir John, 
when young, was not very tractable, and his father 
sent him on a voyage to the East Indies. As he 
could not learn much gentility on board ship, he 
returned to his father (who had some thought of 
getting him a commission in the Royal Navy), and 
expressing a dislike of being sent from home, de- 
clared he would never more go to sea ; and it is said, 
his rather on this declaration of his told him he 
was more fit for a boatswain than to enjoy the title 
of baronet. 



HOLY ISLAND. 

Holy Island measures from east to west about 
two miles and a quarter in length, and its breadth 
from north to south is scarcely a mile and a half. 
At the north-west part there runs out a slip of land 
about a mile in length ; the circumference of the 
entire island comprehends about eight miles. It is 
included in the county of Northumberland, to which 
it is joined at low water by flat sands, over which 
a practicable road for vehicles leads to the island. 
The island derives its name from a monastery 
founded on it in 635 by Oswald, King of North- 
umbria. Its ruins were described by bcott as "a 
solemn, huge, and dark red pile." Years ago, in 
the middle of what was called the Market Place— it 
was a square, from which branched a few irregular 
narrow streets— there stood the stump of an old 
Market Cross, which was called the " Petting 
Stone." Over this stone newly-married couples 
were made to leap for luck. In the place of this 
remnant of a curious custom, modern improvement 
a long time since erected a Norman cross. There is 
a castle on the island, situate to the east of the 
villae-e, on a basaltic rock about 90 feet high. It 
dates from a very early period. In 1646 it was gar- 
risoned by Parliament, and in 1715 an abortive at- 
tempt was made by two Jacobites to hold it for the 
Pretender. The village, not so large as it used to 
be, is now a favourite summer resort. 



1887 F E B KUARY 28 days. 




"JOHN HEMLING, WILL YOU BE MY PUPIL?" 



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Partridge and Pheasant Shooting ends. 

Candlemas Day. 

Marquis of Salisbury born, 1830. 

G. Herbert (poet and divine) died, 1633. 
The British Government began to 
work postal telegraphs, 1870. 



Septuagesima Sunday. 

6. General fast on account of cholera 
in England, 1832. 

Mary, Queen of Scots, beheaded, 158". 

Sir Evelyn Wood born, 1838. 

Battle of Kerbekan, 1885.— Major-Gen. 
Earle killed. 

Sir James Bacon born, 1798.— Catholic 
meeting in Dublin— in truth, the ori- 
gin of the " United Irishmen," 1791. 



Sexagesima Sunday. 

St. Valentine's Day. 

Joseph Pease (the first Quaker) ad- 
mitted to House of Commons on 
affirmation, 1833. 

Duchess of Albany born, 1861. 

More than 100 vessels destroyed in a 

storm at Gibraltar, 1828. 
Pieschi executed, 1836. 



Quinquagesima Sunday. 

Battle of Alumbagh, 1858. 

Shrove Tuesday. French Revol., 1848. 

Ash Wednesday. 

Mr. Spekc discovered, 1868. 

Sir Christopher Wren died, 1723. 

Treaty of Versailles, 1871. 



Quadrag.— 1st Sun. in iient. 

Sir Robert Rawlihsoh born, 1810. 



Eno. 


Scot. 


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7 58r 


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7 28r 


7 53r 


5 3s 


5 3s 


7 25r 


7 49r 


5 7s 


5 8s 


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7 44r 


5 lis 


5 12s 


7 17r 


7 40r 


5 14s 


5 17s 


7 13r 


7 35r 


5 18s 


5 21s 


7 9r 


7 31r 


5 22s 


5 26s 


7 5r 


7 26r 


5 25s 


5 30s 


7 lr 


7 21r 


5 29s 


5 34s 


8 57r 


7 16r 


5 33s 


5 40s 


6 53r 


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5 36s 


5 44s 



February is short, its discomfort long. ■ 
'.:...; _ ; Italian Proverb. 



TUB MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 1st,. .27 min. past 8 morn. 
Full Moon 8th, -.14 min. past 10 morn. 
Last Quar. 15th,.. 32 min. past 1 morn. 
New Moon 22nd, ..40 min. past 9 after. 



3Rtfmnce to Illustration. 



JOHN HEMLING, the clever minia- 
ture painter of the Flemish School, 
was indebted to a very extraordinary 
and casual incident for the education 
which gave him his honoured position 
in later years. The incident is depicted 
in the illustration. It was at the early 
age of fourteen that he was fortunate 
enough to attract the notice of the great 
painter, John Van Eyck, under some- 
what peculiar circumstances. The boy's 
father, known as " tall Hans," was 
a farmer, and periodically attended 
the market of the important mercan- 
tile town of Bruges with his produce 
and game for sale, and was a very suc- 
cessful business man. He complained 
of his " good-for-nothing son, who 
dreamt day and night of the great 
painter, Van Eyck, and as his father 
sayl, "blackened all his walls and tables 
with his drawings." The boy was at- 
tending his father as usual one October 
day at his stall in the Bruges market- 
place, but the Jad's thoughts were far 
away, and he stood as one in a dream. 
Presently one of his father's eccentric 
but well-to-do customers appeared, Ma- 
grew Vandermeer, the goldsmith's 
widow, who always had sharp words for 
"tall Hans" over the price of his produce. 
On being informed the price of one of 
the birds which she had examined, she 
burst out in her usual way and com- 
plained of its being thin and sick and 
not worth the money. "Tall Hans" be- 
came quite rude, and the altercation was 
attracting several persons to the scene. 
Suddenly, in the midst of the disturb- 
ance, an exclamation burst from Ma- 
grew's servant, "Ah! that is just like 
Magrew," and all eyes were turned to 
the speaker, and from her to the boy, 
who unperceived had sketched a carica- 



A FOOL IS LIKE OTHER MEN AS LONG AS HE IS SILENT. 



tare of Magrew Vandermeer on a corner of the 
table. This evoked much laughter and amusement 
from those around. The old lady -was much in- 
censed, and would have rubbed out the amusing 
sketch, but several hands were at once stretched 
out to protect it. During the disturbance a tall, 
mild-looking man walked slowly across the market- 
place. His brown velvet dress was trimmed with 
tur.and he had a black cap on his long wavy hair. 
Hewas accompanied by young men similarly dressed 
who seemed to show him considerable respect. On 
his approaching the group and seeing a disturbance, 
he asked what was the matter, and at once a way 
was made for him 
by the people, when 
he went up to the 
table ; but the boy 
ran to him, and 
falling upon his 
knees before him. 
exclaimed, " Ah ! 
noble master, Van 
Eyck, do not look 
at my bad work." 
The great painter, 
however, bent over 
the drawing, and 
attentively studied 
it. The boy jumped 
up and stood by his 
side, whereupon the 
painter asked him 
his name. "John 
Hemling," said 
"Van Byck. — "John 
Hemling, will you 
become my pupil? " 
The boy echoed a 
cry of delight, and 
with gleaming eyes 
exclaimed, " Indeed 
I will!" He could 
say no more, but 
pressed the artist's 
hand to his heart. 

Magrew "Vander- 
meer never forgave 
the boy for the cari- 
cature of her he had 
drawn, and later 
in life, when the 
clever and success- 
ful artist solicited 
from her the hand 
of her daughter 
Ursula, she sternly 
refused him. The 
disappointment was 
so great that he 
joined the army, 
and after enduring 
the hardships of 
war, he ultimately 
retired into the Car- 
thusian Monastery 
of Miraflores, where 
he died. 

It may add to the wolsey' 

interest of the epi- 
sode to briefly refer to the master, Eyck. He was 
born about 1390, and was taken charge of by Hubert, 
his elder brother, who made him his disciple. Under 
this tuition John learned to draw and paint, and mas- 
tered the properties of colours from Pliny. Later, 
Hubert admitted him into partnership, and both 
were made Court painters to Philip of Charolais. 
After the breaking-up of his own household, John 
became his own master, and took an engagement as 
pamtor to John, King of Bavaria, at that time resi- 
dent at the Hague as Count of Holland. Prom the 
Hague he returned, in 1424, to take service with 
Philip, now Duke of Burgundy, and from that time 
till his death John Van Eyck remained the faithful 
servant of his prince, who never treated him other- 
wise than generously. Philip the Good sent him 
with the Embassy to beg the hand of Isabella of 
Portugal, the portrait of whom, by Eyck, fixed the 
duke's choice. He settled Anally at Bruges, one 
of hie most successful pupils being young Hemling. 




WOLSEY'S TOWER. 

The village of Esher, pleasantly situated on a hill 
to the south of Thames Ditton and Molesey, is a 
picturesque and interesting spot. Among its many 
scenes of attraction is Esher Place, the grounds of 
which extend from the village down to the banks 
of the Mole. Here, about a mile from Esher station, 
and in the rear of Sandown Park, stands the curious 
Gothic building and castellated gateway of our il- 
lustration, and which is always styled in the neigh- 
bourhood " Wolsey's Tower." Though it was not 
built by that statesman, it was once tenanted by 
him shortly before 
his fall from the 
king's good graces, 
and when ho had 
begun to have rea- 
son to cry aloud, 
" Farewell, a long 
farewell to all my 
greatness." And 
doubtless here he 
often walked at 
eventide ; and on 
the grassy banks of 
the Mole, which 
flowed deep and full 
beneath his win- 
dows, mused upon 
the transitory na- 
ture of royal fa- 
vour. This gate- 
way is all that now 
remains of a house 
which, from a sur- 
vey of the manor 
of Esher taken early 
in the reign of Ed- 
ward VI., appea rs to 
have been "sump- 
tuously built, with 
divers offices, an 
orchard and gar- 
dens." There was 
also, we are told, 
a park adjoining, 
three miles in cir- 
cuit, well stocked 
with deer. In the 
early part of the 
last century, the 
mansion of Esher 
Place consisted of 
little more than this 
old tower or gate- 
way ; but Mr. Hy. 
Pelham, brother of 
the Duke of New- 
castle, and then 
owner of the pro- 
perty, made consi- 
derableadditions to 
the building in a 
style supposed to 
correspond with the 
original ; " but," 
to WEIL says Mr. Edward 

"Waif ord, " rather in 
the Gingerbread Gothic fashion of Strawberry 
Hill." The additions, consisting of wings and 
offices, were designed by Kent, the architect of the 
eastern front of Kensington Palace ; but they were 
inferior to the central part of the edifice, and, as 
"Walpole himself remarks, " were proofs how little 
he conceived either the principles or graces of 
Gothic architecture." 

The name of Kent, however, whom Walpole styles 
"the inventor of an art that realises painting," has 
been inseparably connected by the poet with 

" Esher's peaceful grove, 

Where Kent and Nature vie for Pelham's love." 

Several engravings of the house and grounds at 
Esher have been published at different times : one 
of tlio earliest, a bird's-eye view by Knyff and Kip 
another and larger plan was engraved by Rocgue in 
1737 ; another was published in the same year by 
Buck, and in 1759 yet another appeared. 



1887 M ARC H 31 days. 




THE IIIXG OF POLYCRATES. 



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St. David's Day. 

Death of John Wesley, 1791. 

Louis Philippe reached England in 
disguise, 1S4S. 

Roman Catholic Hierarchy re-estab- 
lished in Scotland, 1878. 

Correggio died, 1534. 



2nd Sunday in Lent. 

Death of Admiral Collingwood, 1810. 
Death of William III., 1702. 
Royal Institution founded. 1799. 
Prince of Wales married, 1863. 
Income Tax imposed, 1842. 
George Pcabody gave £150,000 for the 
London poor. 

3rd Sunday in Lent. 

Admiral Byng shot, 1757. 

Julius Caesar assassinated, B.C. 44. 

Birth of Me'.ancthon, 1497. 

St. Patrick's Day. 

Princess Louise horn, 1848. 

Abolition of Slavery, 1807. 



1th Sunday in Lent. 

Battle of Alexandria, 1S01. 
Emperor of Germany born, 1797 
Planet Pallas discovered, 1803. 
Death of Queen Elizabeth, 1603. 
LADY DAY — 

Duke of Cambridge born, 1819. 



5th Sunday in Lent. 

War with Russia, 1854. 

John Keble died, 1866.— First French 
law decreed abolishing the slave 
trade. 1815. 

Italian Kingdom recognised, 1861. 



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19 


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20 


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6 31r 


21 


3 4s 


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23 


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24 


6 81 


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25 


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6 24s 


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THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 3rd,.. 8 min. past 1 morn. 

Full Monti 9th,. -34 min. past 8 after. 

Last Quar. 16th, -.42 min. past 1 after. 

New Moon 24th, ..10 min. past 4 after. 

Reference to Illustration. 



IN Grecian history there is not a more 
unique figure of a tyrant than that 
of Polyceatks, who ruled in the island 
of Santos, from about the year 537 B.C., 
when the island succumbed helplessly 
to his despotism. He secured himself 
against his enemies by attracting the 
support of the poorer citizens through 
his liberality, and by an alliance with 
Ainasis, King of Egypt. He prospered 
greatly, and his fame was wide in Greece. 
His ships and bowmen enabled him to 
gratify his rapacity for war, which he 
made indiscriminately on friends and 
foes alike, declaring, it is said, with 
grim humour, that lie "gratified his 
friends more by returning them their 
own than by not taking it at all." His 
court was one of extraordinary magnifi- 
cence and splendour, and whatsoever be 
did, into whatever warfare he plunged 
himself, he met with invariable success. 
Islands fell before him, as «ell as cities 
on the mainland, Rhenen being among 
the former, which he attached by a 
chain to the neighbouring island of 
Delos, and dedicated it to the Deliau 
Apollo. He conquered and captured the 
Lesbians in a sea-fight, when they would 
have succoured Miletus, and he em- 
ployed them in the digging of a moat 
round his fortress. The abnormal pros- 
perity (if Polycrates was his curse. It 
filled his ally and guest Ainasis with 
fear. The latter wrote to Polycrates 
reminding him that God is jealous, and 
the man who was elevated very high 
must needs fall very low. Therefore 
Amasis besought him that he would 
avert the jealous wrath of Heaven, and 
he adjured him to voluntarily cast from 
him the most precious thing he was 
possessed of to propitiate the heavenly 
powers. In the possession of Polycrates 



A THIEF THINKS EVERY MAN STEALS. 



was a superb signet-ring, the work of one Theodoras 
of Saiuos, consisting of emeralds set in gold, and 
this was prised by the tyrant beyond all else. 
Having hearkened to Amasis and regarded his 
counsel, Polycrates threw the imperial signet into 
the sea. The gods, however, rejected the offering, 
for shortly afterwards a fisherman brought a large 
fish to the ruler, in which, upon being opened, was 
found the ring. When Amasis heard of this, he 
felt that Polycrates was doomed, and he renounced 
the alliance, that he might not in future have to 
lament the fall of a friend. Before the forebodings 
of Amasis were fulfilled, however, the latter died ; 
but misfortune came to Polycrates soon enough. 
When the Persians, under King Cambyses, were 
preparing to invade Egypt, Polycrates, anxious to 
conciliate the growing power of Persia, sent forty 
6hips to their help. But the squadron , largely 
manned by malcontents (of whom Polycrates wished 
to get rid in this way), had hardly reached the 
island of Oaparthus when the crews mutinied, and 
turned the ships' heads back to Samos. They de- 
feated the tyrant in an action at sea, but were 
themselves overthrown on land, and were com- 
pelled to flee the island. Having taken refuge in 
Sparta, they prevailed upon the Spartans to make 
war on Polycrates. A powerful Spartan armament 



(2) a great breakwater round the harbour; and (3) 
the great Temple of Hera, patron goddess of Samos, 
said by Herodotus to be the largest he had ever 
6een. The Temple of Hera would seem to have 
been begun before the time of Polycrates. He 
imported Spartan and Molo^sian hounds, goats from 
Naxos and Scyros, sheep from Attica and Miletus. 
The splendour of his palace is testified by the design 
which, many centuries later, Caligula formed of 
rebuilding it. Foreign artists worked for him at 
large wages ; from Athens he brought Damacedes, 
the greatest physician of the age, at a salary of two 
talents. Polycrates was also a patron of letters; he 
collected a library, and lived on terms of intimate 
friendship with the poet Anacreon, whosi verses 
were full of his references to his patron. The 
philosopher Pythagoras, however, quitted Samos in 
order to escape his tyranny. 



LARGS CHURCH. 

The church at Largs, we are told, is of some an- 
tiquity. Largs is a parish in the county of Ayr, a 
little over sixty-five miles south-west by west of 




LARG8 OHtJEOH. 



laid siege to Samos, but had to retire, after forty 
days, without effecting its object. Not very long 
afterwards Oraetes, the Persian satrap, by working 
on the avarice and ambition of Polycrates, lured 
him to Magnesia, where they crucified him. The 
island, impoverished and devastated, was after- 
wards given to a brother of Polycrates. Herodotus 
says of Polycrates that he was the first within 
historical times who aimed at the sovereignty of 
the seas, and his ambitious schemes embraced not 
only the Greek islands, but also Ionia. In magni- 
ficence none of the Greek tyrants, save those of 
Syracuse, could compare with him. According to 
Aristotle, his great public works were executed for 
the purpose of employing his subjects, and diverting 
their thoughts from the recovery of their freedom. 
There were three great engineering and architec- 
tural works for which Samos was remarkable : (1) a 
tunnel about 1,400 yards long dug through a moun- 
tain, and serving to bring water to the capital ; 



Edinburgh. It is pleasantly situated on the shore 
of the Frith of Clyde, immediately opposite to the 
island of Bute, and there are few situations which 
exhibit more romantic scenery- Adjacent to the 
town is the battle-field of Largs, where Alexander 
III. defeated Haco, King of Norway, in 1263. This 
Haco the Fifth was surnamed the Old, and he was, 
on the death of his father, excluded from the throne 
on aocount of his supposed illegitimacy. He, how- 
ever, became king in 1223, after his mother, to estab- 
lish his rights, had undergone the ordeal of fire. 
He greatly increased the prosperity of Norway, and 
he also added to his kingdom Iceland and Green- 
land. His dispute with Alexander III. of Scotland 
was in regard to the sovereignty of the Hebrides, 
and he set sail in 1263 on a great expedition against 
the west of Scotland. He took possession of Arran 
and Bute; but suffered such a severe defeat at 
Largs that he was compelled to put to sea agaia. 
He sailed to Orkney, where he died. 



1887 A PRI L 30 days. 




CONSPIRATORS' CONFESSIONS— OLD ST. PAUL'S CBOSS. 



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All Fools' Bay.— Prince Bismarck b. 

1815. 
Richard Cobden died, 1865. 



Palm Sunday. 

Oliver Goldsmith died, 177^. 
Funeral of the Duke of Albany, 1884. 

George Washing-ton, first President 

U.S.A., 1789. 
Wordsworth horn, 1770. 

GOOD FRIDAY. 

Lord Townshend dismissed from the 
Lord Lieutenancy of Ireland, 1717. 



Easter Sunday. 

EASTER MONDA Y. BANK HOLIDAY. 

Five-pound Bank-notes first issued, 

1793. 
Frederick I. fBarbarossa) caused the 

crown of Lombardy to be placed on 

his head, 1155. 
First Prince of Wales horn, 1284. 
Battle of Culloden, 1746.— Grattan's 

motion for Irish Indepen.carr., 1782. 

Low Sunday. 

Justus Liebig (chemist) died, 1873. 

Lord Beaconsfleld died, 1881— Grat- 
tan's famous demand in Parliament 
for Irish Independence, 1780. 

Garibaldi having entered London on 
the 11th of the month, received the 
Freedom of the City, 1864. 

St. George's Day. 



2nd Sunday after Easter. 

St. Mark. 

Septennial Act passed, 1716. 

Lord Shaftesbury born, 1801. 

"A kindlier gentleman trod not the 
earth," Merch. of Venice. 



Royal proclamation against 
" Hell-fire Club," 1720. 



the 



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TEE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 1st, ..58 rain, past 1 after. 
Full Moon 8th, ..39 min. past 5 morn. 
Last Quar. 15th,.. 4 min. past 4 morn. 
New Moon 23rd,.. 53 min. past 8 morn. 
First Quar. 30th,-. min. past 11 after. 



^Reference to Illustration. 



THEB.B is probably no conspiracy in 
the history of the sixteenth cen- 
tury which can be regarded as more re- 
markable than that of the " Holy Maid 
of Kent" and her numerous accomplices. 
Elizabeth Barton lived at the house 
of Thomas Cobbe, in the parish of Ald- 
ington, in Kent, and happening to be 
visited with sickness by which her brain 
became weakened, she had many epilep- 
tic seizures. In her trances she saw 
visions and uttered words and prophe- 
cies having connection with King Henry 
VIII. 's endeavour to divorce Queen 
Catherine. She confided these to her 
parish priest, Richard Masters, who 
made them known to Dr. Bockling, a 
canon of Canterbury, through whom 
they became widely known, and were 
everywhere proclaimed to he Divine 
revelations, and she obtained the de- 
scription of the " Holy Maid of Kent." 
Though she recovered her perfect health 
" by diet and physic, and by the course 
of nature, which expelled the matter, 
being the cause of her sickness," yet, 
"by the counsel and confederacy of Dr. 
Bockling and Richard Masters," she did 
"falsely practise, use, and show unto the 
people diverse and miraculous sundry 
alterations of her sensible parts of her 
body, craftily uttering in her said 
feigned and false trances divers and 
many virtuous and holy words tending 
to the rebuke of sin, and in reproving of 
such new opinions as then began to 
spring in this realm." By these arts she 
was made the instrument of stirring the 
people of England against the divorce 
of Catherine by Henry. The .chapel of 
Aldington became the centre of many 



"injurious is the gift that takes away freedom." 



pilgrimages, and the scene of many excited and 
tumultuous assemblies. Here she would be brought, 
and in an apparent state of trance went through the 
facial contortions she could not helpin her sickness, 
and spoke words professing to be inspired of God, 
while they were the coachings of her fellow-con- 
spirators. On one occasion more than 2,000 persons 
repaired to the chapel to witness her dissimulation. 
She afterwards became a nun in the priory of St. 
Sepulchre^nd continued in her pretended reception 
of revelation from God. By her cloaked hypocrisy, 
she was reputed amongst many people of the realm 
to be a very holy woman, inspired by God, when, in 
fact, she never had vision or revelation, as she sub- 
sequently op.n'y 
confessed herself. 
She professed to see 
letters written in 
characters of gold, 
sent to her by Mary 
Magdalene, which 
contained both re- 
velations and ex- 
hortations. When 
the king was at 
Calais, attending 
the Mass of the 
Blessed Sacrament, 
she professed to 
have seen the Sac- 
rament taken away 
from the priest by 
an angel, and ad- 
ministered unto 
iierself. Elizabeth 
affected to have 
communication 
with God on the 
subject of the di- 
vorce of Catherine 
—she asked " of Al- 
mighty God to know 
whether God was 
displeased with the 
King's Highnessfor 
proceeding in the 
said divorce and 
separation of the 
marriage between 
his Highness and 
the said Lady Cathe- 
rine." She professed 
to h ave hadre vealed 
to her inanswer 
that God was highly 
displeased with his 
Majesty, and in case 
he desisted not from 
his proceedings in 
" the said divorce 
and separation, but 
pursued the same 
and married again, 
that then within 
one month after 
such marriage he 
should no longer be 
king of this realm, 
and in the reputa- 
tion of Almighty 
God should not be 

a king one day, nor one hour— that he should die a 
villain's death." The revelation had further in- 
formed Elizabeth that there was a root with three 
branches, and till they were plucked up it should 
never be merry in England. The root was supposed 
to be the late Lord Cardinal, the first branch the 
king, the second the Duke of Norfolk, and the third 
the Duke of Suffolk. This insidious conspiracy 
against the king grew to such proportions that his 
Majesty's wrath was aroused. Elizabeth Barton and 
her confederates were relegated to the Star Cham- 
ber, where, before the King's Council, they confessed 
their hypocrisy and dissimulated sanctity, and trai- 
torous purposes and intents. They were adjudged 
to stand at St. Paul's Cross, where each of them 
should declare their subtle, crafty, and superstitious 
doings. This they did upon the following Sunday ; 
but for the treason they had committed, the matter 




was respited to the Parliament next following,where 
all of them were attainted by Act of Parliament, 
and were sentenced to be hanged, drawn, and 
quartered at Tyburn. The sentence was carried 
into effect on the 21st of April, 1533. Elizabeth 
Barton had previously given utterance to the fol- 
lowing words:—" Hither am I come to die, and I have 
not been the only cause of mine own death, which 
most justly I have deserved; but also I am the 
cause of the death of all these persons, which at this 
time here suffer; and yet, to say the truth, I am 
not so much to be blamed, considering that it was 
known unto these learned men that I was a poor 
wench without learning, and therefore they might 
have safely per- 
ceived that the 
things that were 
done by me could 
not proceed in no 
such sort ; but their 
capacities and learn- 
ing could right well 
judge from whence 
they proceeded, and 
that they were al- 
together feigned ; 
but because the 
things which I 
feigned were pro- 
fitable unto them, 
therefore they 
much praised me, 
and bare me in hand 
that it was the Holy 
Ghost and not I that 
did them ; and then 
I, being puffed up 
with their praises, 
fell into a certain 
pride and foolish 
phantasy with my- 
self, and thought I 
might feign what I 
would, which thing 
hath brought me to 
this case, and for 
the which now I cry 
God and the King's 
Highness most 
heartily mercy, and 
desire all you good 
people to pray to 
God to have mercy 
on me, and on all 
them that here suf- 
fer with me." 



CLOCK TOYVEK, LEICESTER 



LEICESTER. 

Few towns have 
such an interesting 
ancient history as 
the capital of Lei- 
cestershire, a con- 
spicuous object in 
which is illustrated 
on this page. The 
Roman history of 
the place is remark- 
able. It was founded, it is said, by the King Lear 
of Shakespeare; it formed one of the five Danish 
burghs or commonwealths. A Parliament was held 
there in the reign of Henry VI; and Richard III., 
defeated and killed at Bosworth, was buried in a 
Franciscan convent which then stood near St. Mar- 
tin's Church. At one time the town was fortified, 
and had a strong castle. The town is a very hand- 
some one. The great increase of Leicester in recent 
times is chiefly due to the hosiery trade. For two 
centuries this has been almost entirely concen- 
trated about Chesterfield and Market Harborough, 
Ashby-de-la-Zouche and Newark, Leicester being 
the centre of the woollen trade as Nottingham is of 
the silk, cotton, and merino. Hand-knitting was an 
important industry here in the latter part of the 
sixteenth century, and the stocking knitting-frame 
was introduced into Leicester soon afterwards. 



1887 MAY 31 days. 




QUEEN ELIZABETH'S LOVE-SCENE. 



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3rd Sunday after Easter. 

Death of Sarah Coleridge, 1852. 
Machiavelli born, 1469. 
Battle of Tewkesbury, 1471. 
Death of Napoleon I., 1821. 

Martyrdom of Archbishop O'Hurley 
' on St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, 1534. 
Royal College of Music opened, 1883. 



4th Sunday after Easter. 

Tichborne Trial began, 1871. 

Battle of Lodi, 1796. 

Assassination of Mr. Percival by Bell- 

ingham, 1812. 
Passage of the Douro, 1809. 

Old May Day. 

Discovery of Vaccination, 1796. 



Rogation Sunday. 

First Paper Mill in England, 1588. 
Death of Prince Talleyrand, 1838. 

Secession of Free Church of Scotland 
1843. 

Ascension Day.— Holy Thursday. 
Spanish Armada put back, 1588. 
Execution of Montrose, 1650. 



Sunday after Ascension. 

Rigi Mountain Railway opened, 1871. 
Birth of Queen Victoria, 1819. 

Battle of the Pass of Killicrankie,1689. 

Michael Barrett (Fenian) executed at 
the Old Bailey for the Clerkenwell 
Explosion. This was the last pub- 
lic execution in England, 1868. 

Death of Sir H. Davy, 1829. 



Whit Sunday. 

Whit Monday.-— Bank Holiday. 
Joan of Arc burnt at Rouen, 1431. 



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THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Full Moon 7th,.. 1 mill, past 2 after. 
Last Qttar. 14th, ..17 min. past 8 after. 
New Moon 22nd,.. 5 min. past 11 after. 
First Quar. 30th, .20 min. past 5 morn. 



IRcfcrcna to Illustration. 



THE late Mr. S. Hubert Burke says, in 
his entertaining " Historical Por- 
traits of the Tudor Dynasty," that the 
private lives of the Plantagenets furnish 
materials for the most romantic narra- 
tives, of which readers of history know 
but little. The love-affairs of the Tudor 
family never ran in a straight or smooth 
channel. Our illustration gives a love- 
scene of Queen Elizabeth's at Green- 
wich Palace. The Duke of Anjou, 
through his first messenger Sirnier, was 
a suitor for Elizabeth ; and the queen, 
after some refusals, consented to re- 
ceive Simier, provided he came without 
parade and kept secret the object of his 
mission. The messenger's bearing made 
a great impression upon her Majesty ; 
in fact, he became her favourite, and 
she never seemed so cheerful and so 
happy as when in his society. After the 
lapse of some time, and when the queen 
was pressed for an answer, she replied 
that she could not make up her mind to 
marry one whom she had never seen. 
Anjou thereupon travelled in disguise, 
and arrived at Greenwich Palace in Sep- 
tember, 1578. Elizabeth was enraptured 
with her new lover, who was introduced 
to her by Lady Leighton, and only a few 
days of private courtship, conducted in 
" the most delicate and loving manner," 
sufficed to render him happy with the 
assurances of a speedy union. Upon 
Anjou taking leave, the queen burst into 
tears and kissed the prince several times. 
When Anjou returned to London, there 
had been intrigues and cabals at work 
to frustrate the marriage, but it was on 
this visit that the incident of our illus- 
tration occurred. On the 22nd of .Novem- 
ber, 1581, the queen settled down for the 
winter at Greenwich Palace. She was 
taking her morning walk in the gallery 



"lies and gossip have a wretched offspring." 



with Anjou by her side, and Leicester and Walsing- 
hain a distance behind, when suddenly the French 
ambassador was introduced. After some prelimi- 
nary conversation, the queen addressed the French 
envoy in these words : — ° Write to your royal master 
that the duke (Anjou) will be my husband." With 
a sudden impulse she turned upon the prince, kissed 
him, took a ring from her finger and placed it on 
his hand. She then sent for the ladies and gentle- 
men of her household, and presented Anjou to them 
as their future master, the " husband whom she 
loved." Couriers were despatched to Paris with the 
news, Parliament was summoned, and all was to be 
finally settled in a few weeks. The queen, however, 
was only playing a deceptive game, and when this 
had gone so far, her ingenuity was taxed to set 
Anjou aside without insulting him. In public 
Elizabeth affected the deepest sorrow at Anjou's 
departure, whilst privately she danced for joy ; but 
Anjou was made 'acquainted with the deception 
being practised upon him. On some occasions 
Elizabeth assured her courtiers that her love for 
the French prince could never change, at another 
time that she could not marry a Catholic. One day, 
in a fit of passion, she swore she would not be 
Anjou's wife if it would make her empress of the 
universe. Anjou, on the other hand, professed a 
passionate and noble love for the Queen of England, 
and burst into tears. The fickle queen dried his 
tears. On a subsequent occasion she kissed him 
before the whole congregation in St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral, and whilst the clergy were engaged in Divine 
service. Later, on the anniversary of her corona- 
tion, she placed a ring on Anjou's finger, and from 
that time, Camden says, the prince was looked upon 
as her betrothed husband. On New Year's Day, 
after a tournament at which Anjou had exerted 
himself, the queen ran to him, kissed him repeatedly 
before the people, and subsequently led him by the 
hand to his bedchamber, that he might repose for 
awhile ; and on the next morning her Majesty, ac- 
companied by one of her ladies, visited him before 
he left his bed, and made inquiries as to " a good 
night's rest." Ultimately, however, the engage- 
ment ended like so many others. The Fates seemed 
to have conspired against any match for Golden 
Eliza, who continued to be content with the 
romantic title of the " Virgin Queen." 



QUEEN VICTORIA. 
(24) Her Majesty Queen Victoria, Queen of 
Great Britain and Ireland, and Empress of India, 
to-day completes her 68th year, and on the 20th of 
next month will complete the jubilee of her bene- 
ficent reign. Her age has been exceeded by six only 
of the Sovereigns of England, namely, Queen Eliza- 
beth, who attained the age of 69 years ; James II., 
who lived 68 years ; George II., 77 years ; George III., 
82 years : George IV., 68 years ; and William IV., 72 
years. Her Majesty succeeded to the Throne on the 
20th of June, 1837, on the death of her uncle, King 
William IV., and she will consequently complete 
the fiftieth year of her reign on that day. This 
length of reign has been exceeded by two only of 
the Monarchs of England— viz., Henry III. and 
George III., the former of whom reigned fifty-six 
vears, and the latter for the long period of nearly 
sixty years. An extraordinary Gazette was issued 
on the 20th of June, 1837, announcing the death of 
William IV., in the following terms :— 

" Windsor Castle, Tuesday, June 20th. 

" It has pleased Almighty God to release from his 
sufferings our Most Excellent and Gracious Sove- 
reign, King William IV. 

" His Majesty expired at twelve minutes past two 
o'clock this day." 

As it is a recognised maxim in England that " the 
King never dies," the time of the decease of King 
William IV. was also that of the accession to the 
Throne of Queen Alexandrina Victoria, or, as she 
was afterwards designated, Queen Victoria. The 



declaration made by the young Queen on entering 
upon the responsibilities of her high position shows 
the high estimate she had formed of the duties of 
the Sovereign of these realms, and her spirit of 
devotion to the welfare of the people ovor whom 
she was called to rule. " This awful responsibility," 
she said, " is imposed upon me so suddenly, and at 
so early a period of my life, that I should feel my- 
self utterly oppressed by the burden were I not 
sustained by the hope that Divine Providence, 
which has called me to this work, will give me 
strength for the performance of it, and that I shall 
find, in the purity of my intentions and in my zeal 
for the public welfare, that support and those re- 
sources which usually belong to a more mature age 
and to longer experience." Forty-nine years have 
gone by since these words were penned, yet who 
to-day can doubt either the purity of the inten- 
tions or the zeal for the public welfare, which, 
through a long and beneficent reign, have been dis- 
played by Her ^Majesty the Queen? "I place my 
firm reliance," wrote Her Majesty, "upon the 
wisdom of Parliament, and upon the loyalty and 
affection of my people." The English people are 
never likely to forget the one great private sor- 
row of Her Majesty's reign, which was likewise 
its greatest public calamity. Prince Albert was 
no common man, just as he was no common 
husband. He was the highest possible type at once 
of the perfect domestic character and the far-seeing 
intelligent statesman. The deep love with which 
his beautiful and tender nature had inspired the 
wife, was heightened by the lofty reverence the 
Sovereign was compelled to feel for his cultivated 
and penetrating intellect, coupled with the con- 
scientious and self-obliterating assiduity he 
brought to every task of fetate. By the premature 
death of the Prince Consort the Queen lost, at one 
blow, the closest friend and the most trusty coun- 
sellor. It was natural that the woman's nature 
should he utterly unstrung by so absolute and 
crushing a bereavement, nor could the anguish be 
dissembled because the grieving widow happened 
to be the occupant of a throne. All these feelings 
and circumstances the English people well under- 
stood ; and greatly as they regretted to be deprived 
of the constant presence of a Sovereign they loved 
and honoured so completely, they continued to 
make every allowance for a sentiment that, where- 
ever displayed or in whatever walk of life, does 
honour to human nature. Her Majesty, however, 
has recently emerged from her retirement, to the 
satisfaction of that human nature which craves for 
some visible sign of the existence of things it 
reverences and worships. No doubt the mere word 
monarchy has considerable power over the English 
people, for it represents the history, the grandeur, 
the order, the continuity of the past. But the 
champions of monarchy wish ever and again to see 
the Monarch. The Crown is yet a phrase to conjure 
with ; but it is the wearer of the Crown that reigns 
in the hearts of the English people. Nor is it any 
exaggeration to say that, of all the Sovereigns that 
have sat upon the EngLish Throne, none have been 
so uniformly popular and so universally beloved as 
Queen Victoria. Now the nation is celebrating the 
fiftieth anniversary of her accession. In half a 
century a M< narch has abundant opportunities of 
offending the sentiment, of coming into conflict 
with the interests of the nation ; and even an able, 
victorious, and popular King like Edward III. did 
not escape some eclipse of the favour in which he 
had been held by his subjects. But at no moment 
has the tie of confidence and affection between the 
Crown and the nation been overclouded during the 
present reign. As we have said, only a great per- 
sonal sorrow has darkened that long and otherwise 
happy era. The scrupulous observance by the 
Queen of her c> institutional obligations has never 
been interrupted. The Queen has never been for a 
party. She has always been for the State. What- 
ever may be her private and personal opinion as to 
the wisdom or folly of this or that public measure, 
the has never given expression to it ; and legisla- 
tion which, perhaps, the community now sees to 
have been hasty and unwise, has promptly received 
her sanction after being passed by the two Houses 
of Parliament. 



1887 J TJ N E 30 days. 




THE SACRIFICE OP VIRGINIA. 



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Prince Louis Napoleon killed, 1879. 

Burning of the Eastern Monarch at 

Spitbead, 1859. 
Poet Close born, 1831. 

Battle of Magenta, 1859. 



Trinity Sunday. 

Ionian Islands surrendered, 1864. 
First Reform Bill passed, 1832. 
Death of Mahomet, 632. 
Death of Charles Dickens, 1870. 
Crystal Palace opened, 1854. 
St. Barnabas. 



1st Sunday after Trinity. 

Earl Rivers beheaded, 1483. 

Battle of Marengo, 1800. 

The Mont Cenis Railway opened, 1868, 

Great Duke of Marlborough died, 1722, 

Battle of Naseby, 1645. 

Battle of Waterloo, 1815. 



Xlp>> 



2nd Sunday after Trinity. 

Queen's Accession, 1837.— Jubilee. 

Longest Day. 

Great Fire in Tooley Street, 1862. 

Keble College dedicated, 1870. 

MIDSUMMER DAY. 

24. Cattle Plague appeared in London 



3rd Sunday after Trinity. 

Emperor Maximilian shot, 1867. 

29. Freedom of the City of London con- 
ferred upon Prince Albert Victor— 
the first Prince of Wales presented 
with the Freedom in the lifetime of 
his father, 1885. 



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THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Full Moon 5th,.. 3S min. past 10 after. 

Last Quar. 13th, ..35 min. past 1 after. 

New Moon 21st,.. 53 min. past 10 morn. 

First Quar. 28th,,. 1 min. past 10 morn. 



SUcfrrcncc to Ellustration. 



APPIUS CLAUDIUS was the most in- 
fluential member of the Decemviri 
of Rome. The Decemviri was a famous 
body composed of ten patrician law- 
givers, who were deputed to draw up a 
code of laws for Rome upon the basis of 
information collected by a commission 
in Greece. A dispute had arisen between 
the Plebeians and the Patricians as to 
the constitution of the council of law- 
givers, but the latter had prevailed, and 
they were entrusted with the govern- 
ment of the State during the year they 
held office. A succeeding Decemviri, 
however, among the members of which 
was only one of the previous council — 
viz., Appius Claudius— conducted them- 
selves with marked tyranny. Every 
species of outrage, notably by the noto- 
rious Appius, was committed upon the 
Plebeians, and such a despotic altitude 
did the Decemviri assume that they re- 
fused to retire when the peiiod of their 
office had closed, and they defied the re- 
election of successors. It was in this 
state of public feeling that the life of 
the beauteous Virginia was sacrificed, 
ere her honour could be outraged by the 
brutal Appius Claudius. He had long 
cast envious eyes upon the maiden, who 
was the daughter of a Plebeian leader, 
and in order to obtain possession of her 
he induced Marcus Claudius, one of his 
clients to declare that she was his slave. 
A mock trial took place in the Forum 
before a large concourse of people. The 
judge was Appius Claudius, who, by his 
verdict, adjudged Virginia to the plain- 
tiff. Outraged at the result, the father 
rushed to the front, and plunging a 
knife into his daughter's heart, saved 
her from dishonour. This sacrifice of 



" LITTLE AND OFTEN MAKES A HEAP IN TIME." 



Virginia still further excited the Plebeians, who 
triumphed in the deposition of the Decemviri, and re- 
established the old constitution. Applets Claudius 
died in prison by his own hand, or was strangled by 
order of the Tribunes, and Marcus Claudius was 
banished. 



RUGBY SCHOOL. 

The school buildings at Rugby form a very striking 
group, and although there may be architectural 
defects, yet their situ- 
ation and their memo- 
ries are great substi- 
tutes for elaborate 
and perfect design. 
The effect from the 
close, where huge 
elms cast their 
shadows over the 
greensward , and alter- 
nately mask or dis- 
close the various por- 
tions of the struc- 
tures, is one of no 
little beauty. There 
is not at Rugby either 
the park-like scenery 
of the playing-fields 
by the strong stream 
of the Thames, or the 
antique courts of 
Winchester. We have 
not the picturesque 
clustering of the 
buildings on the hill 
of Harrow, nor their 
wide outlook over a 
broad valley and the 
margin of a great me- 
tropolis. At Rugby all 
is of the present cen- 
tury as regards the 
buildings — all is of 
the quiet and homely 
Midlands as regards 
the scenery. There is, 
nevertheless, much 
quiet beauty among 
its shady lanes and 
its gently sloping pas- 
tures ; and the school 
is a standing memo- 
rial of what can be 
done by one strong 
man without the pres- 
tige of an ancient 
name or of a titled 
founder— without the 
genius loci of buildings 
three centuries old, or 
of a long line of dis- 
tinguished scholars. 
Rugby School num- 
bers among its old 
boys a goodly list of 
men distinguished in 
the battle-field, the 
law, the Church, and 
the State : Hodson, of 
Indian fame, Sir 




SCHOOL ENTRANCE, RUGBY. 



Ralph Abercrombie, and Field-Marshal Comber- 
mere; Cave, the originator of the Gentleman's 
Magazine; Walter Savage Landor and Dean Stan- 
ley; Macready the actor; Deans of Westminster, 
Durham, and Llandaff ; Lord Derby, Lord Selborne, 
M. Waddington, Sir Richard Temple, Sir Thomas 
Brassey, Sir R. A. Cross, &c. &c. 

The history of the town of Rugby is not remark- 
able. Before the days of the Norman Conquest we 
hear nothing of it. At that time it was a small 
village, which appears in Domesday Book under 
the name of Rocheberie, which is held by Dugdale 
to be derived from roche, a rock or stone quarry, 
and berie, a court or house of importance. At this 
period it belonged to Turchill of Warwick. There 
was a castle on a rising ground close to the town, 
which still bears the name of Castle Mount. Dug- 



dale is of opinion that this castle is one of those 
erected by King Stephen in order to maintain him- 
self against the Empress Maud, and that it was de- 
molished in the following reign. At any rate it 
makes no figure in history, and all traces of it have 
disappeared. The family to whom the manor bo- 
longed wrote their name as Rokeby, one of the 
forms under which the place i6 designated. The 
house of Rokeby became extinct in the male lino in 
the reign of Edward I. By Leland, in the time of 
Henry VIII., Rugby (so called for the first time) is 
only casually mentioned as a small market town; 
indeed, even in the 
clays of Lawrence 
Sheriffe, the founder 
of- the school, the 
number of its inhabit- 
ants would hardly 
have entitled it to the 
appellation of more 
than a village. 



MONT C^NIS. 

(15) Nearly twenty 
years ago one of the 
greatest triumphs of 
engineering skill was 
consummated by the 
opening of this rail- 
way through the Alps. 
Mont Ceius is a pass 
of the Cottian Alps, 
between Savoy and 
Piedmont, the highest 
point of which is 6,775 
feet above the level 
of the sea. The pass 
was used from the 
earliest times ; but 
the road was bad and 
dangerous. In 1810 an 
excellent road, begun 
by the orders of Bona- 
parte in 1803, was com- 
pleted at an expense 
of £300,COO. By this 
Napoleon III. sent his 
troops into Italy in 
his campaign against 
Austria in 1859. The 
most remarkable tun- 
nel in the world is 
that of Mont Cenis. 
It is fully 7£ miles 
long. It was con- 
structed as an experi- 
mental line at a cost 
of £8,000 per mile by 
Mr. Fell, upon a prin- 
ciple patented nearly 
fifty years before by 
Mr. Vignolles and Mr. 
Ericsson, and first 
tried ontheCromford 
and High Peak hue in 
England. The chief 
features of this plan 
are horizontal wheels, 
which, when the break 
rail, and thus enable 



is applied, grasp a central 
trains to traverse curves of 135 feet radius, and to 
ascend and descend with safety gradients of one in 
fifteen, and even one in twelve. From Lanslebourg, 
where the pass properly begins, the line climbed on 
the outer edge of Napoleon's road in six sweeping 
zigzags with a gradient of one in fifteen to one in 
twelve and a half to the top, a distance of six miles 
and a third, and a height of 2,240 feet. On the side 
of Italy it descended 5,211 feet to Susa, curling in 
its course like a serpent. The maximum speed here 
allowed was fifteen miles an hour, but with the 
central line brakes moderately applied, the train 
ran easily down the steep and circuitous incline. 
The carriages were on the American model, with en- 
trance behind and seats arranged in the omnibus 
fashion, and each had a guard and two breaks. 



1887- 



JULY 31 days. 




LORD WELLINGTON CROSSING THE BIDASSOA lilVER. 



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Princess Alice married, 1862. 
Death of Sir Robert Peel, 1850. 



4th Sunday after Trinity. 

Independence Day, U.S.A. 

Battle of Wagram, 1809. 

Old Midsummer Day.— Battle of 
Sedgemoor, 1685.— Mdme. Blanchard 
ascended in a balloon from Tivoli 
at night: the balloon being sur- 
rounded by fireworks caught fire, 
and she was precipitated to the 
grou nd and killed. 

5th Sunday after Trinity. 

Treaty of Villafranca, 1859. 

The Northumberland Street tragedy, 

1861. 
Voting by Ballot became law, 1872. 

Bastille destroyed, 1789. 

St. Sicithin's Day. 

Hegira, or Plight of Mahomet, 622. 



6th Sunday after Trinity. 

Trial of Robert Aslett, cashier to the 
Bank of England, for embezzlement 
and frauds; the loss to the Bank, 
£320,000; found not guilty on ac- 
count of the invalidity of the bills. 

Lord W. Russell beheaded, 1683. 
The Thames Embankment Gardens 

opened, 1871, 
Lord Kilw.irden murdered, 1803. 



7th Sunday after Trinity. 

Secret Treaty published, 1870. 

Baron L. Rothschild, the first Jew 
admitted to the House of Commons, 
1858. 

Maximilian Robespierre guillotined, 
1794. 

Spanish Armada sighted, 1588. 

Relief of Derry, 1689. 



8th Sunday after Trinity. 



Ext,. 


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THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Full Moon 5th, ..34 min. past 8 morn. 

Last Quar. 13th,.. 57 min. past 6 morn. 

New Moon 20th, ..50 min. past 8 after. 

First Quar. 27th, 30 min. past 2 after. 



Btfcrrnce to XHttstration. 



THE charming river Bidassoa, which 
forms part of the boundary between 
France and Spain, was the scene of one 
of the most memorable incidents of the 
Peninsular campaign. The river rises 
in Spain, and flowing south-west by 
north, enters the Bay of Biscay. At 
every bend in the river the road along 
its banks brings the traveller suddenly 
on some new and striking feature. The 
pleasing combination of wood and rock, 
overhanging the beautifully winding 
stream, contrasted with the barren gran- 
deur of the mountain summits which 
tower above them, present an infinitude 
of delightful prospects. The oak, the 
chestnut, and the walnut are the most 
conspicuous trees along the valley and 
the slopes of the inferior hills, whilst 
among the crevices of the rocks the 
evergreen box tree grows with surpris- 
ing luxuriance, and by its deep verdure 
relieves, while it contrasts in a very 
charming manner with the bright silver 
tints of the surrounding rocks clothed 
with lichens. Fuenterrabia is situate 
at the mouth of the river. It is a 
thoroughly old Spanish town, full of 
picturesque characters, fallen ramparts 
and grand houses, half-ruined, cele- 
brated by Milton in connection with 
"the dolorous rout" of Roncesvalles, 
which is forty miles distant. In former 
times it was a strong frontier fortress. 
It was here the Prince of Oonde was re- 
pulsed in 1638. The river widens below 
the bridge into a tidal rio or estuary. 
It was also on the island, at the mouth 
of the Bidassoa, that the Treaty of the 
Pyrenees was concluded in 1659. The 
episode represented in our illustration 
occurred in the year 1813, when, after 
the victory at Vittoria, the British army 
under Wellington drove the French 



"little children and headaches, great children and heartaches." 



across tht Pyrenees into their own country- It is I 
unnecessary here to enter into the origin of the 
Peninsular*War. That is told succinctly enough in 
Mr. H. R. Clinton's History (the Chantlos Classics). 
Suffice it to describe Wellington's feat at this his- 
torical embouchure in the teeth of the French array, 
a feat which has been fitly described as one of the 
most daring of military exploits. The French occu- 
pied the strongly fortified position on the dizzy 
heights of theimmense mountain group, the Rhune, 
the Commissari, and the Bayonette, on the right 
bank of the river ; the bridges were broken down, 
and every known ford was commanded by cannon, 
leaving Soult in security from an attack, save in the 
upper course of the river. The French line of en- 
trenchments had been strengthened on the most 
vulnerable points by abattis, or 
breastworks formed of felled 
trees, and the softer twigs being 
cut off, laid side by side 
with the branc' 
towards tli 
For the const 
tion of these 
fences the nur 
ous orchards 
in the dis- 
trict had 
b e e n cut 
down. Clin- 
ton says that 
Welling- 
ton's design 
was with 
his left and 
centre to 
storm the 
entrench- 
ments on 
these moun- 
tains which 
pointed to- 
wards the 
French cen- 
tre, and to 
separately 
assail Mau- 
cunis in Re- 
i lie's corps 
andTaupinls 
divisions in 
Clause l's 
corps with 
such speed 
that their 
reserves could not 
be brought into 
action in time. By 
this skilful combination 
the river road from Irun 
to Vera would be gained, 
and the fort of Fuenterrabia must 
necessarily fall into the hands 
of the allies. All the prepara- 
tions were made with secrecy. The Duke had 
ascertained -from some Basque fishermen the ex- 
istence of a ford close to the sea, nearly opposite 
Fuenterrabia, practicable only for three or four 
hours at neap tides, but at other times covered with 
sixteen feet of water. These fishermen fixed the 
marks for Wellington's purpose, and their move- 
ments in doing so were mistaken by Soult for their 
ordinary avocations. Wellington marched his 
columns unseen behind the hills on the left bank 
during the night of the 6th— 7th of October, and 
under the cover of a thunderstorm he placed guns 
and howitzers on the St. Marcial ridge. Several 
feints had been made to mislead Soult as to the real 
point of attack, and the French continued busy with 
their entrenchments. The tents were left in statu 
quo, no change was visible in the disposition of the 
allies till, on a rocket being sent up from the steeple 
of Fuenterrabia as the signal at seven o'clock on 
the morning of the 7th, the British troops were seen 
to emerge seven columns at once on a line of five 
miles, the lowest winding like serpents across the 
wet sands to the several points of passage. So un- 
expected was the movement that the passage was 
completed, and the allies' lines were drawn up on the 




INVERNESS CATHEDRAL. 



French side of the Bidassoa before a single French 
gun was flred. Soult was absent at Espelette; the 
sound of the heavy cannonade roused him to the 
point of real attack, and he hurried back to repulse 
it; hut before his arrival the encampments on the 
Bidassoa were lost. The first division, says the 
writer already referrer 1 to, drove back the enemy's 
right to the Croix des Bouquets heights ; these, the 
key of tho position, were won by a furious charge of 
the 9th Regiment. The entrenchment above Biriatu 
Was defended successfully in front, but its left was 
turned by Freyre's Spaniards, the Mandate moun- 
tain was carried, and now Koille's corps, thrown 
into disorder along its whole lino, fell hack by the 
royal road of Bayonne with the loss of 400 men and 
eight guns. The allies in this conflict lost 600 men, 
half of them Spaniards. Clau- 
sel's divisions were equally sur- 
prised in the second combat of 
Vera, while the boar's 
Rock, an isolated ridge, 
was simultaneously as- 
sailed at both ends 
when the rocket 
appeared, and, 
w hen the 
ridge was 
won, a con- 
centric 
movement 
was made 
upon the re- 
doubt on the 
higher range 
behind. The 
shouts of 
the combat- 
ants, the rat- 
tle of mus- 
ketry, and 
all the con- 
fusion of 
warlike 
struggle, re- 
echoed in 
the wooded 
hollows, and 
the white 
wreaths of 
smoke veil- 
ed as with 
mist the 
hills around. 
Very soon 
the riflemen 
issued from the 
forest recesses out 
upon the open 
slopes, and closed upon 
the redoubts : but the 
French rushed out, and 
with a rough sally scattered tliem. 
The invincible 52nd Regiment, 
however, were at that instant in 
full career, seeing which, the French turned and 
ran back in a mob to the redoubt. With them 
entered the gallant 52nd, the riflemen rallied, and in 
a few minutes the French, driven out, sought refuge 
in the second entrenchment. Oolborne next carried 
this ; but a heavy fire was carried on upon the crest 
of the Bayonette mountain, lasting five hours. At 
the expiration of this desperate struggle three 
ridges were carried— the Bayonette, Commissari, 
and Puerto de Vera. The great Rhune mountain 
was the next shelter for the French. Night fell 
with the Rhune still in Clausel's possession. In 
consequence, the possession of the line was deemed 
by Wellington insecure, so on the following day, the 
8th of October, he ordered a combined attack upon 
the left flank of the mountain, which was accessible, 
and upon the camp of Sarre. Fearing to be cut off, 
Clausel concentrated on the ridge behind Sarre, but 
leaving his right on the lesser Rhune, and two regi- 
ments on the Hermitage rock. The latter were afraid 
of being isolated, and they abandoned the position. 
Operations closed on the following day with a total 
loss to the French in the actions comprised in the 
passage of the Bidassoa of 1,400. The allies' loss was 
greater, viz., 1,600, half of whom were Spaniards. 



1887 A U G- U S T 31 days. 




A BLOODTHIRSTY ENCOUNTER. 



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Bank Holiday. 

Barrow Straits discovered by Parry, 
1819.— Royal assent given to the 
" Union " Bill, 1800. On January 1st, 
1801, in accordance with this great 
constitutional change, a new Im- 
perial standard (the Union Jack) 
was run up on the Tower of Lon- 
don, Edinburgh Castle, and Dublin 
Castle. 



9th Sunday after Trinity. 

Meeting of the First Reformed Par- 
liament, 1832. 

Elementary Education Bill intro- 
duced by Mr. W. E. Porster, passed 
1870. Amended Act passed in 1872. 

Stowmarket Explosion, 1871. 

Grouse Shooting begins. 

Eugene Aram executed at York, 1759. 



10th Sunday after Trinity. 

Execution of Ratcliffe for murdering 

a warder in Portland Prison, 1870. 
Ben Jonson died, 1637. 

Political Amnesty, Prance, 1869. 

Raleigh's last voyage, 1617. 

Blaise Pascal died, 1662. 



Eng. 



! «; 



11th Sunday after Trinity. 

Battle of Bos-worth Field, 1485. 

Treaty of Prague, 1866. 

St. Bartholomew). According to Sully, 
70,000 Huguenots or French Pro- 
testants, including women and 
children, were murdered through- 
out the kingdom. 

Landing of Julius Csesar, B.C. 55. 



12th Sunday after Trinity. 

Royal George sunk, 1782. 

King of Denmark at Iceland, 1874. 

Death of Bunyan, 1688. 



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TEE MOON'S CEANGES. 



Full Moon 3rd,.. 40 min. past 8 after. 

Last Quar. 11th,.. 37 min. past 11 after. 

New Moon 19th, ..30 min. past 5 morn. 

First Quar. 25th,.. 21 min. past 8 after. 



Reference to illustration. 



THERE is an old letter in manuscript, 
which is accounted one of the 
choicest treasures in the Queen's Library 
at Oxford, which sets forth an account, 
ex parte perhaps, but nevertheless what 
has been regarded as a generally fair 
statement regarding one of the bloodiest 
mortal combats which ever engaged a 
couple of English gentlemen in the his- 
tory of this country. It was the duel 
between Edward Sackvii.le, after- 
wards Earl of Dorset, and Lord Bruce, 
whic • took place betwixt Antwerp and 
Bergenopzoom in Zealand, and was the 
cause of some commotion at the time. 
Sir Richard Steele.in The Guardian of the 
period, gave a dissertation on duelling, 
and embodied the following documents, 
which led to the encounter above illus- 
trated :— (l) " To Sir Edward Sack- 
ville,— I, that am in France, hear how 
much you attribute to yourself in this 
trial, that I have given the world leave to 
ring your praises. If you call to memory, 
when I gave you my hand last, I told you 
I reserved the heart for a truer reconcilia- 
tion. Now be that noble gentleman my 
lord once spoke you, and come and do 
him right that could recite the trials 
you owe your birth and country, were I 
not confident your honour gives you the 
same courage to do me right that it did 
to do me wrong. Be master of your own 
weapons and time ; the place whereso- 
ever I will wait on you. By doing this 
you will shorten revenge, and clear the 
idle opinion the world hath of both our 
works.— Ed. Bruce." (2) "To Lord 
Bruce,— As it shall be always far from 
me to seek a quarrel, so will I always be 
ready to meet with any that desire to 
make a trial of my valour by so fair a 
course as you require. A witness whereof 
yourself shall be, who within a month 



"fools grow without watering." 



shall receive a strict account of time, place, and 
weapon, where you shall And me ready disposed to 
give you honourable satisfaction by him that shall 
conduct you thither. In the meantime, be as secret 
of the appointment as it seems you are desirous of 
it— Ed. Sackville." (3) " To Loud Bruce— I am 
ready at Tergoso, a town in Zealand, to give you 
that satisfaction your sword can render you, accom- 
panied by a worthy gentleman for my second, in 
degree a knight; and for your coming I will not 
limit you a peremptory day, but desire you to make 
a definite and speedy repair for your own honour 
and fear of prevention, until which time you shall 
tind me there.— Ed. Sackville... Tergoso, 10th Au- 
gust, 1613." (4) "To Sib E. Sackville,— I have 
received your letter by your man, and acknow- 
ledge vou have dealt nobly with me, and now I come 
with all possible speed, to meet you.— Ed. Bruce." 
The document at Oxford before alluded to is an 
elaborate one, and although from it the cause of 
the quarrel does not appear, yet it sufficiently war- 
rants the observation by Steele, that " the gallant 
behaviour of the combatants may serve to raise 
in our minds a yet higher detestation of that false 
honour which robs our country of men so fitted to 
adorn it." The gist of Sir Edward Sackville' s rela- 
tion of the fight we summarise :—" The enclosed 
contains the first citation (the challenge numbered 1 
given above) sent me from Paris by a Scotch gen- 
tleman, who delivered it tome in Derbyshire. After 
it follows my answer (No. 2), returned by the same 
bearer. The next is my accomplishment of my 
first promise (No. 3), which I sent by a servant of 
mine, by post from Rotterdam, as soon as I landed 
there, the receipt of which, 'joined with an acknow- 
ledgment of my two-pair carriage to the deceased 
lord,' is testified by the las* (No. 4), which ter- 
minates the business till we meet at Tergoso, in 
Zealand, where he, accompanied with one Mr. Craw- 
ford, an English gentleman, for his second, a sur- 
geon, and a man, arrived with all the speed he 
could. I addressed my second, Sir John Heidon, 
to let him understand that now all following 
should be done by consent, as concerning the terms 
whereon we shoufd fight, as also the place. To our 
seconds we gave power of our appointment, who 
agreed we should go to Antwerp, from thence to 
Borgenopzoom, where in the midway but a village 
divides the State's territory from the Arch-Duke's. 
And there was the destined stage, ' to the end that 
having ended, he that could might presently exempt 
himself from the justice of the country by retiring 
into" the dominion not offended.' It was further 
concluded, that in case any should fall or slip, that 
then the combat should cease, and he whose ill- 
fortune had so subjected him was to acknowledge 
his life to have been in the other's hands. Other 
preliminaries having been arranged. Lord Bruce, 
past expectation, told Sir John Heidon that he 
found himself so far behind-hand that a little of 
my blood would not serve his turn, and therefore 
he* was resolved to have me alone, because he knew 
that so worthy a gentleman, and my friend, could 
not endure to stand by and see him do that which 
he must to satisfy himself and his honour. Sir 
John Heidon replied that such intentions were 
bloody and butcherly, far unfitting so noble a per- 
sonage, who should desire to bleed for reputation, 
not for life, adding, he thought himself injured, 
having come so far, to be prohibited executing 
those honourable offices he came for. Lord Bruce 
answered by reiterating his former resolutions, 
whereupon Sir John, leaving him the sword he had 
selected, delivered me the other, with his deter- 
minations. We rode to the place of assignation, 
I being verily mad with anger that Lord Bruce 
should thirst after my life with a kind of assured- 
ness, seeing I had come so far, and needlessly, to 
give him leave to regain his lost reputation. I bade 
him alight, which with all willingness he quickly 
granted. There, in a meadow ankle-deep in water, 
at the least bidding farewell to our doublets, in our 
shirts we began to charge each other, having pre- 
viously commanded our surgeons to withdraw 
themselves a distance from us, conjuring them, 
besides, as they respected our favours or their own 
safety, not to stir, but suffer us to execute our 
pleasure. We being fully resolved (God forgive us) 
to despatch each other by what means we could, I 



made thrust at my enemy, but was short, and in 
drawing back my arm I received a great wound 
thereon, which 1 interpreted as a reward for my 
short shooting ; but in revenge I pressed into him, 
though I then missed him also, and then received 
a "wound in my right breast, which passed level 
through my body and almost to my back. And 
there we wrestled for the two greatest and dearest 
prizes we could ever expect trial for— honour and 
life ; in which struggling my hand, having but an 
ordinary glove on it, lost one of her servants, 
though the meanest, which hung by a skin, and to 
sight yet remaiueth as before, and I am put in 
hope one clay to recover the use of it again. But at 
last breathless, yet keeping our holds, there passed 
on both sides propositions of quitting each other's 
swords. But when amity was dead confidence could 
not live, and who should quit first was the ques- 
tion, which on neither part either would perform, 
and re-striving again afresh, with a kick and a 
wrench together, I freed my long-captivated weapon, 
which incontin'ently levying at his throat, being 
still master of his, I demanded if he would ask his 
life or yield his sword, both which, though in that 
imminent danger, he bravely refused to do. Myself 
being wounded and feeling loss of blood, having 
three conduits running on me, began to make me 
faint, and he courageously persisting not to accord 
to either of my propositions, remembrance of his 
former bloody desire and feeling of my present 
estate, I struck at his heart, but with his avoiding 
missed my aim, yet passed through the body, and 
drawing through my sword, re-passed it through 
again, through another place. He cried, ' Oh, I'm 
slain 1' seconding his speech with all the force he 
had to east me. But being too weak, after 1 had 
defended his assault, I easily became master of 
him, laying him on his back. Being upon him, I 
re-demanded if he would request his life, but it 
seems he prized it not at so dear a rate to be be- 
holden for it, bravely replying he scorned it. This 
answer of his was so noble and worthy that I pro- 
test I could not find in my heart to offer him any 
more violence, only keeping him down, till at length 
his surgeon, afar off, cried he would immediately 
die if his wounds were not stopped. At this I 
asked him if he desired his surgeon to come, which 
he did, and so being drawn away, I never offered to 
take his sword, accounting it inhuman to rob a 
dead man, for so I accounted him to be. This then 
ended, I retired to my surgeon, in whose arms, 
after I had remained awhile for want of blood, I 
lost my sight, and, as I then thought, my life also. 
But strong water and his diligence quickly re- 
covered me, when I escaped a great danger; for 
my lord's surgeon, when nobody dreamt of it, came 
full at me with his lord's sword, and had not mine 
with my sword interposed himself, I had been slain 
by those base hands, although my Lord Bruce wel- 
tering in his blood and past all expectation of life, 
conformable to all his former carriage, which was 
undoubtedly noble, cried out, 'Rascal, hold thy 
hand ! ' " Such is the narration, dated Louvain, Sep- 
tember 8th, 1613, In which the writer concludes :— 
" So may I prosper, as I have dealt sincerely with 
you in this relation, which I pray you, with the en- 
closed letter, deliver to my Lord Cliamberlstin." 
Lord Sackville was but in his twenty-third year at 
the time of the above encounter, and we learn from 
Lord Clarendon that this was not the only quarrel 
of the kind into which he was drawn through the 
excessive heat and fire of his temper. He was in 
great favour at Court, and at the creation of Charles, 
Prince of Wales (afterwards Charles I.), on the 4th 
November, 1616, he was made one of the Knights of 
the Bath to grace that solemnity. He was also one 
of the commanders of the forces sent in 1620 to 
arrest Frederick, King of Bohemia, at which time 
was fought the battle of Prague ; he succeeded 
Lord Herbert of Cherbourg as ambassador to the 
French king, and was afterwards called by King 
James I. to the Privy Council. He became a leading 
member of the House of Commons, and shone in 
the House of Peers. After the accession of Charles 
I. he was at the head of all national affairs con- 
ducive to the interest of the country. He was con- 
spicuous in the Rebellion, leading on the Royalist 
troops when they re-took the royal standard at 
Edgehill. 



1887 S E P T E M B E R 30 days. 




A TERI1IBLB SCENE AT A BRIDAL FETE. 



I 


Th 


2 


F 


3 


S 


4 


s 


5 


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6 


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7 


W 


8 


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9 


F 


IO 


S 


11 


s 


12 


M 


n 


Tu 


14 


W 


IS 


Th 


16 


F 


17 


S 


18 


s 


19 


M 


20 


Tu 


21 


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22 


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24 


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25 


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26 


M 


27 


Tu 


28 


W 


29 


Th 


30 


F 



Partridge Shooting begins. 

Sedan capitulated, 1870. 

Death of Oliver Cromwell, 1658. 



13th Sunday after Trinity. 

4. Plight of the Empress Eugenie, 

1870. 
Crown Prince marched on Paris, 1870. 

H.M.S. Captain foundered, 1870. 

Amy Robsart died, 1560. 

Gold discovered in California, 1849. 

Beyrout taken, 1840. 



14th Sunday after Trinity. 

Bunyan left Bedford Gaol, 1672. 

Battle of Tel-el-Kebir, 1882. 

Dante died, 1321. 

Liverpool and Manchester Railway 

opened, 1830. 
Moscow burnt, 1812. 
Covent Garden New Theatre built, 

1809. 

15th Sunday after Trinity. 

Battle of Poictiers, 1356. 

Covent Garden Theatre burnt down, 
180S. 

Duel between Castlereagh and Can- 
ning, 1809. 

Italian troops entered Rome, 1870. 

Battle of Assaye, 1803. 
Irish Rebellion, 1798. 



16th Sunday after Trinity. 

Connaught assigned as the " habita- 
tion of the Irish nation," 1653. 

Stockton and Darlington first rail- 
way opened, 1825. 

Strasburg capitulated, 1870. 

-MICHAELMAS DAY.— 

Spanish Armada defeated, 1588. 



Eno. 


Scot. 


3 <i 


3 !-* 


Bit 


6 39s 


6 58s 


16 


5 19r 


5 27r 


17 


6 35s 


6 54s 


18 


5 23r 


5 31r 


19 


6 30s 


6 48s 


20 


5 26r 


5 35r 


21 


6 26s 


6 43s 


1 


5 29r 


5 39r 


23 


6 21a 


6 37s 


24 


5 32r 


5 43r 


25 


6 16s 


6 32s 


26 


5 35r 


5 47r 


27 


6 12s 


6 26s 


28 


5 39r 


5 51r 


e 


6 7s 


6 21s 


1 


5 42r 


5 55r 


2 


6 3s 


6 15s 


3 


5 45r 


5 59r 


4 


5 53s 


6 lis 


5 


5 48r 


6 3r 


6 


5 53s 


6 6s 


) 


5 51r 


6 7r 


8 


5 49s 


6 0s 


9 


5 55r 


6 llr 


10 


5 44s 


5 55s 


11 


5 58r 


6 16r 


12 


5 40s 


5 49s 


13 j 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Full Moon 2nd, ..18 min. past 11 morn. 
Last guar. 10th,.. 3 niin. past 3 after. 
New Moon 17th,.. min. past 2 after. 
First Quar. 24th,.. 4 min. past 5 morn. 

^Reference to Illustration. 



IT was towards the latter end of the 
year 1809 that Napoleon's manner 
was observed to have changed to a very 
great degree towards the Ejiprbss 
Josephine. On their return, after the 
campaign, to France— Napoleon from 
SchOnbrunn, and Josephine from Stras- 
burg— the empress was alarmed at the 
circumstance of the private communi- 
cation between her room and the em- 
peror's having been shut up. An altera- 
tion in the features of Josephine, and a 
silent reserve on the part of the em- 
peror, also made it apparent that there 
was a change, and the explanation was 
arrived at on the 30th of November. 
Dinner had been served as usual; Jose- 
phine had a large hat tied under her 
chin, which hid her face in part, but she 
seemed to have been weeping, and still 
had some difficulty to restrain her tears. 
She was the picture of grief. Neither 
party spoke during dinner, nor touched 
anything but for form's sake. Having 
asked what time it was, Napoleon rose, 
and Josephine slowly followed him. 
Coffee was presented to him, and he 
made a sign to the attendants to retire. 
The chief of these (M. de Bausset) had 
hardly got out of the room when all of a 
sudden he heard violent cries uttered by 
the empress. Napoleon, appearing at the 
door, said eagerly, "Come in, Bausset, 
and close the door." The empress was 
stretched on the floor, venting the most 
piteous complaints, and saying, " No, I 
shall never survive it." At the desire 
of Napoleon, the attendants conveyed 
Josephine to her room. Napoleon re- 
tired to an ante-room, and in his ex- 
treme agitation and distress of mind 
told the cause of what had happened, 



BE TRULY WHAT THOU WOULDST BE THOUGHT TO BE. 



thus :— " The interest of France, and of my dynasty, 
has done a violence to ray heart. The divorce has 
become an imperious duty upon nie. I am so much 
the more hurt at the scene which Josephino has just 
exhibited, because three dayB ago she ought to have 
learnt from Hortense the melancholy obligation 
which compels me to separate from her. I am 
grieved to the heart for her. I thought she had 
more firmness, and was not prepared for this excess 
of her sorrow." Josephine at this time was six-and- 
forty, and she descended from the height to which 
she had been raised with calmness and dignity, and 
retired into private life, where she continued to 
retain the rank and magnificence of an Empress- 
Dowager. The " consideration " of the most advan- 
tageous matrimonial alliance for Napoleon was 
made by the Council soon after the divorce of 
Josephine was declared, and the Arch-Duchess 
Maria Louisa of Austria was the selected one. The 
necessarv consent having been obtained, the for- 
malities for the marriage ceremony were arranged. 
It was celebrated in the presence of "all that was 
most distinguished in Prance or nearly in Europe," 
and on the 27th of April the Emperor and Empress 
set out on a tour through the Northern Departments, 
to give the good city of Paris time to breathe. 
Dances, garlands of flowers, and triumphal arches 
welcomed them ail the way. On their return, in June, 
the rejoicings were renewed, and it is this period 
which leads us up to our illustration. The Austrian 
Ambassador, the Prince of Schwartzenburg, gave a 
ball in honour of the event at the Austrian Embassy. 
The ground floor of the ancient HSteldeMontesson, 
which he occupied in the RueChauss6ed'Antin,was 
not large enough to hold all the company invited. 
The Prince therefore had a superb ball-room con- 
structed of wood in the garden, with a gallery of 
the same material leading to it, the ceilings of 
which were covered with varnished paper, and 
ornamented with paintings. The floors were con- 
nected by planks of cross-timbers to the level 
of the rooms of the house, and an immense chande- 
lier was suspended from the ceiling of the ball- 
room. Candles were also used in the illumination 
of the walls of the gallery and ball-room. In the 
centre of the 
room was a 
box reserv- 
ed for the 
Imperial 
family. This 
faced the en- 
trance from 
the gallery, 
and there 
was a pri- 
vate door 
close to it 
for the use 
of the Em- 
peror and 
Empress. 
The fete 
commenced 
with danc- 
ing in the 
garden, 
which was 
splendidly 
illuminated: 
not so horri- 
bly, though, 
as it was de- 
stined to be 
during the 
festival. The 
dancing had 
continued 
about an 
hour, wben 
a current of 
air blew one 
of the cur- 
tains at the 
entrance to 
the wooden 
gallery a- 
cross the 
lighted can- 



dles, which had been fixed too near. In a moment 
the ceiling of the ball-room was in a blaze. The 
Emperor and Empress escaped with ease from the 
danger by the door which had been left behind their 
box. He made the carriages draw up, saw the 
Empress as far as the Place Louis XV. on her way 
to St. Cloud, and returned to assist in extinguishing 
the conflagration. The flames had made terrible pro- 
gress ; tho chandeliers suspended from the ccutre 
of the ball-room fell with a tremendous cra^h ; and 
in the hurry and fright, the crowd pressing towards 
the entrance stopped up the passage, and with this 
collected weight the floor gave way, and numberless 
victims were crushed to death, or enveloped in the 
flames which burst out on all sides. The noise and 
confusion in the garden was indescribable. Friends 
were frantically seeking friends, while the different 
members of a family were agonisingly calling to 
one another. In a very short time— a briefer period 
than it takes to recount the terrible story — the 
temple of gaiety and enchantment was no more. 
Nothing was left but blazing fragments and a 
melancholy stupor, when suddenly a young woman, 
handsome, elegantly dressed, and covered with 
diamonds, rushed forward from the smoking rafters, 
calling out for her children. The apparition vanished 
as soon as it was seen. It was the Princess of 
Schwartzenburg, who perished, while her young 
family were assembled in the garden, and out of 
reach of danger. Napoleon, by the directions he 
gave, saved sevenal lives ; but Prince Schwartzen- 
burg never recovered from tho effects of his loss. 




LINDORK'S ABBEY. 



LINDORE'S ABBEY, 

The ruins of Lindore's Abbey are situate at the 
north-east extremity of Newburgh, near the river 
Tay, on a gentle rise, in the middle of a rich and ex- 
tensive flat of clay land. The abbey was founded 
by David, the Earl of Huntingdon, in the year 1178, 
in memory of his taking Ptolemais in the Holy 
Land. It was bestowed upon the monks of St. Bene- 
dict, of the order of Tironensis, was dedicated to 
the Virgin Mary and St. Andrew the Apostle, and 

from grants 
bestowed 
upon it from 
time to time 
it came to 
be one of the 
most richly 
endowed 
monasteries 
in the king- 
dom. The 
founder of it 
died at Ge- 
conlay, and 
was buried 
at Soltray in 
theyearl219. 
KingRobert 
the Bruce 
claimed the 
Crown by 
his mother, 
daughter of 
this earl, in 
1218. St. Ber- 
nard was the 
founder of 
the order at 
T i r o n in 
France, and, 
in addition 
to the rules 
instituted 
by St. Bene- 
dict, added 
new regula- 
tions of his 
own, requir- 
ing the prac- 
tice of vari- 
ous indus- 
tries within 
the monas- 
tery. 



1887 O CTOBE R 31 days. 




EXTRAORDINARY CONTRETEMPS AT A ROYAL BALL. 



i|S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



Pheasant Shooting begins. 



M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



16 


S 


17 


M 


18 


Tu 


19 


W 


20 


Th 


21 


F 


22 


S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



30 

3i 



17th Sunday after Trinity. 

Nadar's great balloon, the largest 
ever made, when fully inflated con- 
tained 215,363 feet of gas ; the car, a 
cottage in wicker-work, raised 35 
soldiers at Paris. His first ascent, 
1863. 

Sir J. Burgoyne died, 1871. 
Owens College, Manchester, opened, 
1873. 



18th Sunday after Trinity. 

9. Jubilee of municipal corporations 
celebrated by a banquet in London, 
1S85. 

Old Michaelmas Day — Snowstorm in 
India, when many hundreds of ves- 
sels were cast away, a fleet of India- 
men greatly damaged, some ships 
lost.and 30,000 persons perished, 1737. 

14. Battle of Jena, 1806.— Execution of 
Mr. Orr, of Antrim, 1797. 



Bkg-. 



Scot. 



19th Sunday after Trinity, 

Siege of Sebastopol begun, 1854. 
Napoleon arrived at St. Helena, 1815. 
Dean Sw'ift died, 1745. 
Suicide of Henry, King of Hayti, 1811, 
Nelson killed at the battle of Tra- 
falgar, 1805. 
Edict of Nantes revoked, 1685. 



20th Sunday after Trinity. 

San Juan arbitration, 1872. 

Battle of Agincourt, 1415. 

Wreck of the Royal Charter in Red- 
wharf Bay, on the coast of Angle- 
sey ; 459 lives lost. 

SS. Simon and Jude. 

Reform Riots, 1831. 



21st Sunday after Trinity. 

All Hallows Eve. 



a | -3 


a S-3 

= a> (U 

=8 


floi 
2 &■> 


5 31s 


5 38s 


17 


6 8r 


6 26r 


18 


5 26s 


5 33s 


19 


6 llr 


6 30r 


20 


5 22s 


5 28s 


21 


6 15r 


6 34r 


22 


5 17s 


5 23s 


d 


6 18r 


6 38r 


24 


5 13s 


5 ISs 


25 


6 21r 


6 42r 


26 


5 8s 


5 13s 


27 


6 25r 


6 46r 


28 


5 4s 


5 8s 


3 


6 28r 


6 51r 


1 


5 0s 


5 3s 


2 


6 32r 


6 55r 


3 


4 56s 


4 58s 


4 


6 35r 


7 Or 


5 


4 52s 


4 53s 


6 


6 39r 


7 4r 


) 


4 48s 


4 48s 


8 


6 42r 


7 8r 


9 


4 44s 


4 44s 


10 


6 46r 


7 12r 


11 


4 40s 


4 39s 


12 


6 49r 


7 17r 


13 j 


4 36s 


4 35s 


14 | 


6 53r 


7 21r 


O 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Full Moon 2nd,.. 47 min. past 3 morn. 

Last Quar. 10th, ..57 min. past 4 morn. 

New Moon 16th, ..35 min. past 10 after. 

First Quar. 23rd, ..46 min. past 5 after. 

Full Moon 3lst,..31 min. past 9 after. 

Reference to Ellustratton. 



IT is often remarkable how "great 
events from little causes spring," and 
if that is the case with empires it is also 
the case in the smaller social circles of 
every-day life. But our illustration re- 
presents a contretemps of a more than 
usually extraordinary character, which 
occurred at a royal ball at St. James's 
Palace nearly a century ago, and which 
was the direct outcome of some indis- 
cretion at a regal dinner party. Perhaps 
it may be as well to premise the record 
of the occurrence by recalling an inci- 
dent when the firmness and decision of 
Pitt the younger's character was some- 
what remarkably displayed. It was in 
1788 when the mental malady of the king 
incapacitated him from performing the 
functions of royalty, and the kingdom 
was thereupon struck with great con- 
sternation. The first question brought 
up by this event was, in whom the office 
of regent was vested. The Prince of 
"Wales being connected with the party 
in opposition, it was contended by them 
that the regency of course devolved 
upon him ; whilst on the other hand 
Mr. t'itt supported the doctrine that it 
lay in the two remaining branches of 
the Legislature to fill up the office as 
taey should judge proper, admitting at 
the same time that no other person but 
the Prince could be thought of for the 
post. By adopting this principle ho had 
the good fortune to obtain the concur- 
rence as well of those who were attached 
to the popular part of the constitution 
as of the King's friends, whose object 
was to secure his return to power on the 
cessation of his malady, and he was en- 
abled to pass a Bill restricting the power 
of the regent. The mention of Pitt's 
name in the manner hereafter set forth 



"believe a boaster as you would a liae. 



was the cause of a duel and the occurrence at St. 
James's Palace, which, somewhat elaborated, forms 
one of Burke's aristocratic "anecdotes." In the 
year 1784, when the Duke of York was in his twenty- 
sixth year, Colonel Lennox was a guest at a dinner 
party given by the Prince of Wales. During the 
excitement of the evening the health of Mr. Pitt 
was given by Colonel Lennox. This led to an angry 
quarrel, whi'ch, however, was subsequently settled, 
for the time at least. But the next day a report 
was current that the Duke of York had spoken 
harshly and unfavourably at his club of the con- 
duct of Colonel Lennox, and had asserted that 
terms had been applied to him to which no gentle- 
man ought to submit. Colonel Lennox heard of 
these assertions and insinuations, and lost no time 
in demanding of the Duke of York, while on parade, 
what were the words to which he, Colonel Lennox, 
had submitted, and by whom they had been spoken. 
The Duke of York replied by the peremptory com- 
mand that the lieut.-colonel should return to his 
post. Parade over, the duke sent- for Colonel 
Lennox to the orderly-room, and, in the presence of 
all the other officers, said that he desired to receive 
no protection from his position as a prince or his 
station as a commanding officer. His Royal High- 
ness added : " When not on duty I wear a brown 
coat, and have none of the paraphernalia of rank. 
Neither the blood which is my boast, nor the posi- 
tion which I hold in the army, shall exempt me 
from any obligation which I may possibly owe as a 
private gentleman." After this declaration, Colonel 
Lennox sent a circular to the members of the club 
at which the Duke of York had said he heard the 
observations applied to Colonel Lennox. The cir- 
cular was sent to each individual member, desiring 
him " to let him know if he could recollect any ex- 
pression to have been used in his (Colonel Len- 
nox's) presence, which could bear the construction 
put upon it by his Royal Highness ; and in such 
case, to whom the expression was used." Colonel 
Lennox did not receive any affirmative answer, nor 
would the Duke of York offer any further explana- 
tion, whereupon Colonel Lennox thought it impera- 
tive that he should call upon his Royal Highness 
for the satisfaction due from one gentleman to 
another. The duke consented to the meeting, waiv- 
ing all personal distinctions, and with Lord Rawdon 
as his second, met Colonel Lennox, with Lord Win- 
chelsea as his "friend." The following is the ac- 
count by the two seconds of the meeting:— "In 
consequence of a dispute already known to the 
public, his Royal Highness the Duke of York, 
attended bv Lord Rawdon and the Lieut.-Colonel 
Lennox, accompanied by the Earl of Winchelsea, 
met at Wimbledon Common. The ground was 
measured at twelve paces, and both parties were to 
fire at a signal agreed upon. The signal being 
given, Lieut.-Colonel Lennox fired, and the ball 
grazed his Royal Highness's curl ; the Duke of 
York did not fire. Lieut.-Colonel Lennox observed 
that his Royal Highness had not fired. Lord Raw- 
don said it was not the duke's intention to fire ; his 
Royal Highness had come out upon Lieut.-Colonel 
Lennox's "desire to give him satisfaction, and had 
no animosity against him. Lieut.-Colonel Lennox 
pressed that the Duke of York should fire, which 
was declined, upon a repetition of the reason. Lord 
Winchelsea then went up to the Duke of York and 
expressed his hope that his Royal Highness could 
have no objection to say he considered Lieut.- 
Colonel Lennox as a man of honour and courage. 
His Royal Highness replied that he should say 
nothing- he had come out to give Lieut.-Colonel 
Lennox satisfaction, and did not mean to fire at 
him ; if Lieut.-Colonel Lennox was not satisfied he 
might fire again. Lieut.-Colonel Lennox said he 
could not possibly fire again at the duke, as his 
Royal Highness did not mean to fire at him. On this 
both parties left the ground. The seconds think it 
proper to add that both parties behaved with the 
most perfect coolness and intrepidity." This affair 
of honour was kept a great secret until it was over, 
and after the lapse of three days, Colonel Lennox's 
brother officers met on his requisition to deliberate 
on the following question, which he had sub- 
mitted :— " Whether he had behaved in the late dis- 
pute as became a gentleman and an officer 1 " On the 
: j ,0th of May the officers arrived at the following 



decision :— "It is the opinion of the officers of tlic 
Coldstream regiment that subsequent to the 15th of 
May, the day of the meeting at the orderly-room, 
Lieut.-Colonel Lennox has behaved with courage, 
but from the peculiar difficulty of the situation, not 
with judgment." Sir John Bernard Burke Bays this 
was the first instance of a prince of the blood in 
England being challenged by a subject. The case, 
however, occurred in Prance only a few years 
before, when the Prince do Conde fought an officer 
of his own regiment. The occurrence was over- 
looked by the king ; but the Prince of Wales could 
not restrain his feelings, and the illustration above 
exhibits one peculiar form in which he demonstrated 
his resentment. The following is a copy of the 
newspaper paragraph of the day, describing the 
occurrence :—" Colonel Lennox, to the surprise of 
every one, had appeared at the ball given at St. 
James's on the king's birthday (1789). The colonel 
stood up in the country dance with Lady Catherine 
Barnard. The prince, who danced with his sister, 
the Princess Royal, was so far down the set that the 
colonel and Lady Catherine were the next couple. 
The prince paused, looked at the colonel, took his 
partner's hand, and led her to the bottom of the 
dance. The Duke of Clarence followed his example, 
but the Duke of York made no distinction between 
the colonel and the other gentlemen of the party. 
When the colonel and his partner had danced down 
the set, the prince again took his sister's hand and 
led her to a seat. Observing this, the queen ap- 
proached, and said to the prince, ' You are heated, 
sir, and tired. I had better leave the apartment 
and put an end to the dance.' ' I am heated,' re- 
plied the prince, 'and tired, not with dancing, but 
with a portion of the company,' and emphatically 
added, ' I certainly never will countenance an in- 
sult offered to my family, however it may be re- 
garded by others.' The prince's natural gallantry 
next day offered the necessary apology to Lady 
Catherine Barnard in the expression of regret that 
he should have caused her a moment's embarrass- 
ment" Colonel Lennox succeeded to the Dukedom 
of Richmond in 1806, and died on the 28th of August, 
1819. 

INVERNESS. 

Inverness is the capital of the northern High- 
lands. Its situation on the river Ness, hard by the 
confluence of that stream with the sea at the foot 
of the hills, and on the margin of a fertile plain, has 
long rendered it a place of importance, strategically 
and commercially. In ancient days it was, perhaps, 
even more than Glasgow, the Ragusaof Caledonia, 
where merchant and mountaineer, shepherd and 
mariner, met together, bought, sold, bartered, and 
quarrelled. But though it is a very ancient place, 
there are few relics of antiquity in Inverness. An 
old castle, blown up by Charles Edward, has been 
rebuilt, and the terrace in front of the renewed 
edifice commands a fine view over the town, which 
possesses some architecturally interesting build- 
ings. Among these is the Town Hall, opened by 
the Duke of Edinburgh. It is a handsome building 
in the florid Decorated style prevalent in Scotland 
in the latter part of the fifteenth century. Inver- 
ness also is the seat of the episcopal see of Moray 
and Ross, and the cathedral of our illustration oc- 
cupies a site on the low ground on the left bank of 
the Ness. It is cruciform in plan, with two western 
towers ; but is not larger than many parish churches 
in England, and though pleasing in design, offers 
little special attraction. Beyond Inverness itself 
sereral other places near are attractive, notably 
the hill fort of Craig Phadwick, crowning a steep 
and isolated eminence, which rises more than 400 
feet above the plain ; the fatal Muir of Culloden, 
where was lost the last hope of the House of 
Stuart ; Loch Dochfour, situated in the plain of 
the delta, near to which are the traces of an en- 
campment said to be Roman ; Loch Ness, along the 
shores and among the glens of which are several 
mansions. The most interesting is TJrquhart Castle, 
which rises on a headland jutting into the water. 
It is a building of considerable antiquity, some parts 
going back to the fourteenth, and others to the 
twelfth century. Early in the former it was be- 
sieged by troops of Edward I. 



1887 N OVEMBE R 30 days. 




THE COUNTESS OF DERBY AND HUB VICTORIOUS GARRISON. 



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All Saints' Day. 

All Sends' Day. 

No. 1 of Notes and Queries published, 

1849. 

Memorable political panic in London. 
No Lord Mayor's Snow on the 9th, 
1830. 

22nd Sunday after Trinity. 

Sir Martin Frobisher mortally 
■wounded, 1594. 

Joseph Montgolfler made a silken bag 
(the first fire balloon) ascend with 
heated air, 1782. He and his brother 
Stephen safely ascended and de- 
scended by means of a fire balloon 
at Annonay, 5th June, 1783. 

11. Martinmas. — Assassination of the 
Earl of Desmond, 1583. 



02 p3 ! 



23rd Sunday after Trinity. 

Luddite riots in Nottingham and 

other places, 1811. 
Domesday Book completed, 1086. 

John Bright born, 1811. 

Queen Elizabeth's Day. 

Duke of "Wellington buried at St. 

Paul's, 1852. 
Nicholas Poussin died, 1665. 



24th Sunday after Trinity. 

Illness of the Prince of Wales, 1871. 

St. Cecilia. 

P. Warbeck hanged, 1499. 

Win. Duell executed for murder at 
Tyburn, but who came to life when 
about undergoing dissection at 
Surgeons' Hall 1740. 

Capitulation of liars, 1855. 



1st Sunday in Advent. 

Tlie Times first printed by steam, 1814. 
First Metropolitan School Board 

eleoted, 1870. 
St. Andrew's Day. 



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TEE MOON'S CEANGES. 



Last Quar. 8th,.. 2 min. past 5 after, 
New Moon 15th,.. 8 min. past 8 morn. 
First Quar. 22nd,.. 48 min. past 10 morn. 
Full Moon 30th,.. 20 min. past 3 after. 



IflUfrrcnce to Illustration. 



THE earlier half of the seventeenth 
century was remarkable for episodes 
innumerable, not only of historical, but 
of domestic interest, and the story of the 
siege of Lathom House, near Ormskirk, 
the seat of the Earl of Derby, is by no 
means one of the least exciting and 
romantic. It is of more than usual in- 
terest, because it was the tact and 
heroism of the Countess op Derby, 
the ever-memorable Charlotte de la 
Tremouille, that victoriously garri- 
soned the mansion in the absence of her 
lord at the Isle of Man. The hurried de- 
parture of Lord Derby for that island 
left him little time to get men and arms 
together to protect Lathom House from 
the Roundheads, but what he left in- 
complete was made up for by the sa- 
gacity and stratagem of the countess 
after his departure. The situation of 
the house has been thus described : — 
" Before the house to the south and 
south-west is a rising ground, so near it 
as to overlook the top of it, from which 
it falls so quick that nothing planted 
against it on those sides can track it 
further than the front wall ; and on the 
north and last sides there is another 
rising ground even to the edge of the 
moat, and then falls away so quick that 
you can scarce, at the distance of a car- 
bine shot, sea the house over that 
height, so that all batteries placed there 
are so far below it as to be of little ser- 
vice against it ; only let us observe by 
the way that the uncommon situation of 
it may be compared to the palm of a 
man's hand, flat in the middle and 
covered with a rising round about it, 
and so near to it that the enemy in a two 
years' siege were never able to raise a 



"better ask twice than lose your way once. 



battery against it, so as to make a breach in the 
wall practicable to enter the bouse by way of 
storm." The countess, at the period of which we 
write, lost no time in disciplining the men. At 
length the Parliamentarians arrived within a couple 
of miles, on March 28, 1(344. Sir Thomas Fairfax 
desired a conference with the countess, which 
was granted ; and he, with a number of his officers, 
informed her of his orders to reduce Lathom 
House to their obedience. It was intimated that 
she might be allowed to move in honour and with 
safety, and take with her the children, servants, &c, 
to the earl's house at Knowsley. The countess 
answered, that till she had obtained the consent 
of her husband and her sovereign, she could not 
give up that house without manifest disloyalty 
and breach of trust to both. She therefore de- 
sired a month's time, within which, if she ob- 
tained their consent, she would yield up the 
house. A clever ruse by Mr. flutter, afterwards 
Bishop Rutter, accomplished the delay sought for. 
A fortnight elapsed, and sir Thomas Fairfax de- 
manded a surrender. The countess's reply was 
that as she had not lost her regard for the Church 
of England, nor her allegiance to her Prince, nor 
her faith to her lord, she could not therefore as yet 
give up the house; that they must never hope to 
gain it till she had lost all these or her life in de- 
fence of them. The general had his eyes opened by 
this reply to the deception which had been played 
upon him ; but he was just now called away, and his 
command devolved upon Colonel Egerton, assisted 
by Colonel Rigby and Major Morgan. The former 
gave orders for drawing a line of circumvallation 
round the house, and the countess resolved to 
Interrupt the besiegers with a vigorous sally, which 
was so successful, that with the loss of only two 
men on their part, they killed about sixty of the 



besiegers and took about as many more prisoners. 
The Roundheads retired to a safer distance, com- 
pleting the line in about five weeks. They erected 
a strong battery, upon which they placed a mortar, 
and from which they fired shells and stones, to the 
consternation of the besieged. One of the shells 
exploded in the room where the countess and her 
children were dining, but they were unhurt. This 
was by no means the only escape enjoyed by the 
countess. The Roundheads, however, poured in such 
a pitiless storm of shot and shell, that despair almost 
took possession of the little garrison. A council of 
war was held, and a bold course determined upon — 
viz., to make a vigorous sally, and endeavour to des- 
troy the batteries. Next morning, after prayers, the 
countess led her gallant troop out of the gates, 
marching with them up to the very trenches. The 
encounter was a remarkable one. It lasted half an 
hour, when the Roundheads took to their heels, and 
the victors disabled the cannon, or rolled them into 
the moat. The mortar itself was taken to enrich 
the battlements of the mansion, and for use against 
its old friends. The Royalists returned to the 
citadel ; the Roundheads rallied, and numerous 
desperate encounters followed. When four months 
had elapsed, it was painfully evident to the inmates 
that unless help arrived they must inevitably sur- 
render. Their courage, however, was undaunted, 
and the countes8 somewhat astonished Colonel 
Rigby by her laconic reply to his demand of sur- 
render. She replied by the trumpeter who had 
brought the message, "Tell that insolent rebel 
Rigby, that if he presumes to send any other sum- 
mons, I will hang up the messenger at the gates." 
Help, however, was soon at hand. The earl, hearing 
of the distress of the countess, obtained Prince 
Rupert and his troops, who scattered the Round- 
heads, leaving the countess victorious. 




THE KEEP, CARDIFF. 



1887 D ECEMBE R 31 days. 




"WHO IS THE YOUNG MAX WHO TALKS SO LOUD?" 



IO 



Princess of Wales born, 1844." - ; 

St. Paul's Choir opened, 1697. . " 
Great bullion robbery in Lombard 
Street, London, 1864. 



2nd Sunday in Advent. 

Germans enter Orleans, 1870. 
Sir James Scarlett died, 1871. 
Algernon Sidney beheaded, 1683. 
Cuba discovered, 1492. 
Sierra Leone founded, 1786. 
Leopold, first King of the Belgians, 
died, 1865. 



3rd Sunday in Advent. 

Death of Richelieu, 1642. 

Fenian explosion at Clerkenwell 
Prison, 1870. 

Death of George Hudson, the " Rail- 
way King," 1871. 

Oliver Cromwell styled Lord Pro- 
tector, 1653. 
Gun-cotton invented, 1845. 



4th Sunday in Advent. 

The first- railway from Cape Town, 

about 58 miles long, opened, 1860. 
Napoleon proclaimed President, 1848. 

Shortest Day— Lord Beaconsfleld b., 
1804. 

St. James's Park first lighted with 

gas, 1821. 
Death of W. M. Thackeray, 1863. 



CHRISTMAS DAY. 

Bank Holiday. 

Joanna Southcote died, 1814. 

Innocents' Day. 

The Rt. Hon. "W. E. Gladstone born, 

1809. 
Order of Jesuits established, 1535. 

New Year's Eve. 



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THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Last Quar. 8th,.. 11 min. past 
New Moon 14th,.. 22 min. past 
First Quar. 22nd,.. 1 min. past 
Full Moon 30th, ..14 min. past 



3 morn. 
7 after. 

7 morn. 

8 morn. 



9&efcrtnce to Illustration. 



THE incident of the illustration was a 
remarkable one in the life of Vol- 
taire, to which he was indebted for his 
imprisonment in the Bastille, and his 
subsequent exile. He was born in 1694, 
was a weakly child, and in his infancy 
was abandoned to the care of his nurse. 
The Abbe Chateauneuf was his god- 
father and the child's first instructor. 
He was nurtured in the gaiety and dis- 
sipation of the time, and though his 
education did not comprehend the most 
noteworthy events in French history, he 
displayed a marked literary ability, 
which gave, in later life, his remarkable 
dramatic poems, &c, to the world. " I did 
not know," he says in one of his letters. 
" that Francis I. was taken prisoner at 
Paris, nor where Paris was ; the very 
land of my birth was unknown to me ; I 
knew neither the constitution nor the 
interests of my country— not a word of 
mathematics, not a word of sound philo- 
sophy. I learned Latin and nonsense." 
His father was a reputable notary, and 
had designs of bringing up his son in 
the same profession, but on this point 
they quarrelled, and though young Vol- 
taire did actually get matriculated, and 
acquired the right to plead, which he 
did, but not as a notary, his pleadings 
were destined to fill wider courts than 
those of Paris. His father died in 1722, 
relentlessly set against his son, who was 
flitting about in that gay world which 
presently became the infamous world 
of the Regency, where extraordinary 
sprightline and facility in verse had 
gained him welcome and patronage, 
lief ore his father's death he had suffered 
a period of imprisonment in the Bastille. 
It appears that in the autumn of 1715 
Louis XIV. died, and the Regent 



"the morning hour has gold in its mouth. 



D'Orleans reigned in his stead. There soon ap- 
peared some pungent lines, entitled Les j'ai vu, 
in which the writer recounted a number of evil 
things which he had seen in the State— a thousand 
prisons crowded with brave citizens and faithful 
subjects, the people groaning under rigorous bond- 
age, the magistrates harassing every town with 
ruinous and unrighteous edicts. The last line ran 
that all these ills the writer had seen, though he was 
but twenty years of age. At this timo Voltaire was 
twenty-two, but being known as a versifier of a 
pungent turn, the production was "put down to 
him," and though actually he had no hand in the 
offence, he was laid up in the Bastille. He employed 
his time in confinement by the preparation of what 
he designed to be the great epic of France, and in 
finishing his tragedy, JEdive, which was represented 
in the course of the following year. For half a 
dozen succeeding years he was occupied with the 
composition of new plays and the completion of the 
Hcvriade, and at the same time he led a life of tur- 
moil and confusion in the gay society with which 
he was surrounded, and in which we have the inci- 
dent of our illustration. It is thus recorded by Mr. 
John Morley :—" Industrious as he was, and eager 
as he was for rural delights and laborious solitude, 
Voltaire was still pre-eminently social. His letters 
disclose in him, who really possessed all arts, the 
art of onewho knewhowto be graciously respectful 
to the social superiors who took him for a com- 
panion, without forgetting what was due to his own 
respect for himself. ' We are all princes or poets,' 
he exclaimed jubilantly on the occasion of one of 
those nights and suppers of the gods. Such gay- 
hearted freedom was not always well taken, and in 
time Voltaire's eyes were opened to the terms on 
which he really stood. ' Who is the young man who 
talks so loud?' called out some Chevalier Rohan at 
one of these sprightly gatherings at the house of 
the Duke of Sully. ' My lord,' the young man replied 
promptly, 'he is one who does not carry about a 
great name, but wins respect for the name he has.' 
A few days afterwards the high-spirited patrician 
magnanimously took an opportunity of having a 
caning inflicted by the hands of his lackeys on the 
poet who had thrown away his lesson upon him. 
Voltaire, who had at all events that substitute for 
true physical courage which springs up in an in- 
tensely irritable and susceptive temperament, forth- 
with applied himself to practice with the small 
sword. He did his best to sting his enemy to fight, 
but the Chevalier either feared the swordsman, or 
else despised an antagonist of the middle class ; and 
by the influence of the Rohan family, the poet once 
more found himself in the Bastille, then the house 
of correction, at the disposal and for the use of the 
nobles, the court, and the clergy. Here for six 
months Voltaire, then only representing a very 
humble and unknown quantity in men's minds, 
chafed and fretted." His freedom from the prison 
walls, however, was only; subject to a sentence of 
banishment, and he exiled himself in England, 
making only one of the company of distinguished 
men who made the invigorating pilgrimage during 
the two generations which elapsed between the death 
of Louis XIV. and the outbreak of the Revolution. 
He arrived in England in 1726, and found himself in 
a land where intercourse was familiar between 
ministers and the brilliant literary group of " Queen 
Anne men," and where they were rewarded with 
lucrative posts in the administration of the country. 
Voltaire was amazed at all this. He had the entrance 
to the best society; he knew Bolingbroke, Pope, 
Con greve, Newton, Locke, Prior, Gay, Addison, and 
others, and his soul was fired with energetic hatred 
towards the black clouds of prejudice, of mean self- 
love, of sinister preference of class or order, of 
indolence, obstinacy, wanton fancy, and all the other 
unhappy leanings of human nature, and vexed and 
fatal conjunctures of circumstance which interpose 
between humanity and the benefieent sunbeams of 
its own intelligence, the central light of the universe. 
"Hence again," says Morley, " by a sufficiently visi- 
ble chain of thought, his marked dis-esteem for far- 
sounding names of brutal- conquerors, and his cold 
regard for those outward, and material circum- 
stances in the state of nations, which strike the 
sense, - but do not touch the inward reason. 'Not 
long ago,' he-writes, once 'a distinguished company 



were discussing the trite and frivolous question, 
who was the greatest man— Cassar, Alexander, 
Tamerlane, or Cromwell. Somebody suggested 
that it was undoubtedly Isaac Newton. This per- 
son was right; for if true greatness consists in 
having received from Heaven a powerful under- 
standing, and in using it to enlighten oneself and 
all others, then such an one as Newton, who is 
hardly to be met with once in ten centuries, is in 
truth a great man. It is to him who masters our 
minds by the force of truth, not to those who en- 
slave men by violence— it is to him who understands 
the universe, not to those who disfigure it, that we 
owe our reverence. ' " Here a story of Voltaire may 
be mentioned in this connection. It was a pecu- 
liarity of Congreve to affect a dislike to the fame 
brought him as a litterateur, which he considered 
somewhat in the light of a disparagement of his 
claims as a person of quality. He intimated to 
Voltaire that it was only as this last that he desired 
his friends should regard him ; whereupon Voltaire 
remarked that had lie been nothing more than the 
elegant gentleman he considered himself, M. do 
Voltaire would have scarcely thought it worth 
while to solicit the honour of his acquaintance. 
The English influences during "Voltaire's exile re- 
vealed to him the importance of the mixture of 
ranks and classes in common pursuits, and he records 
with admiration instances of the younger sons of 
peers of the realm following trade— "Whoever 
arrives in Paris from the depths of a remote pro- 
vince with money to spend and a name in etc or ille, 
can talk about a 'man like me, a man of quality,' 
and hold a merchant in sovereign contempt. The 
merchant, again, so constantly hears his business 
spoken of with disdain, that he is fool enough to 
blush for it ; yet I am not sure which is the more 
useful to a State : a thickly be-powdered lord, who 
knows exactly what time the king rises, and what 
time he goes to bed, and gives himself mighty airs 
of greatness while he plays the part of a slave in a 
minister's ante-room ; or the merchant who enriches 
his country, gives orders from his country house at 
Surat or Cairo, and contributes to the happiness of 
the globe." When Voltaire landed in England, in 
the middle of May, 1726, he was in his thirty-third 
year — that earlier climacteric, says the writer 
already quoted, when the men with vision first feel 
conscious of a past, and reflectively mark its shadow. 
It is then that they either press forward eagerly 
with new impulses in the way of their high calling, 
knowing the limitations of circumstance and hour, 
or else, fainting, draw back their hand from the 
plough, and ignobly leave to another, or to none, 
the accomplishment of the work. Voltaire did not 
draw back. He returned to France in 1728, his two 
years' residence in England having been fruitful of 
much new knowledge and ideas. He had studied 
the speculations of Bolingbroke, Collins, Tindal, 
Wollaston, and others ; he had dived deeply into the 
philosophies of Newton and Locke ; he had acquired 
such an astonishing mastery over the language that 
he read Hudibras, Shakespeare, Milton, and Dryden. 
He had plunged into the field of theology, and mas- 
tered the famous deistical controversy, of which 
the seed had been sown in the first half of the 
seventeenth century by Lord Herbert of Cher- 
bury, the correspondent of Descartes, and the 
earliest of the English metaphysical thinkers. Sub- 
sequently in Paris he indulged in speculation, with 
such marked success that it was estimated that his 
income was £7,000 per annum. His literary labours 
ran up to about ninety volumes, but he did not 
acquire much pecuniary return for them. He wrote 
everything, and was, in fact, a universal genius, and 
he was terribly envenomed in the fierce polemics on 
his adversaries. From 1750 to 1758 Voltaire led a 
somewhat unsettled life. In the latter year he 
established himself along with his niece at Ferney, 
in Switzerland, and he died in his 84th year on a 
re-visit to Paris, where he was received with an 
enthusiasm that knew no bounds. A notice of 
Voltaire without a dissertation on his religious 
beliefs and sentiments, may by some be compared 
to the play of Hamlet minus the Prince of Denmark ; 
but it will serve the purpose here to conclude by an 
expression of regret for the ignorance which has 
created the prevalent belief that Voltaire was an 
-atheist. 



"proverbs are the daughters of daily experience." 



THE ROYAL JUBILEE. 



It was given to Egbert of "Wessex to unite the hept- 
archy of England into one kingdom. This was in 
827. Dating from this period, and including Egbert, 
England has seen fifty-eight monarchs on the 
throne. 

Only four out of this long list have had reigns 
extending into what is understood as the jubilee 
year, the four being Henry III., Edward III., 
George III., and "Victoria. 

On the 20th of June, 1S86, Queen Victoria en- 
tered upon the fiftieth year of her reign, but the 
full term of the jubilee will not, of course, be com- 
pleted until the 20th of June, 1887. Henry III. 
reigned in all fifty-six years, 1216—1272 ; Edward III. 
died soon after completing the jubilee term ; while 
George III. outlived his jubilee ten years, and had 
therefore the longest reign of which our history 
affords an example. 

The third George was seventy-one years old when 
the advent of his jubilee was celebrated, so that he 
may be said to have reached his majority when he 
came to the throne. The other two began their 
reigns in their boyhood— Henry III. in his tenth 
year, and Edward III. in his sixteenth. Her present 
Majesty was eighteen at the time of her accession. 

The jubilee year of Henry III. gave rise to no 
p iblic rejoicings, and Henry, owing to his oppres- 
sive exactions, was not then in favour enough to 
make any celebration other than a mockery had any 
attempt been made to do honour to the event. 
Edward III., however, saw a very hearty celebra- 
tion of two jubilees— one on attaining the fiftieth 
year of his life as well as that which marked the 
fiftieth year of his reign. It is recorded of him (in 
Barnes's History) that in 1376, being the fiftieth 
year of his reign, he " kept a second jubilee in com- 
memoration thereof, and gave pardons, immuni- 
ties, and graces, and showed many notable acts of 
bounty and goodness to his people, as in the first 
jubilee." 

The year was a memorable one in many other re- 
spects. It was that in which the Black Prince 
died. It witnessed the discomfiture of John of 
Gaunt. A few months before the king had lavished 
his wealth upon Alice Perers ; she was now ban- 
ished from the Court. 

Edward had summoned numerous Parliaments 
during his reign, and it happened that the Parlia- 
ment of the year of his jubilee began the work of 
reform, so that when Richard II. succeeded to the 
throne he faced a resolute body of commoners, who 
had courageously put forward, for the first time, a 
Speaker, and who claimed the right of appointment 
to all State offices; 

George III. was not well enough to take any per- 
sonal part in the festivities that marked the fiftieth 
year of his reign, and soon after the malady pro- 
nounced itself which necessitated a Regency. His 
Consort, however, took an active part in all jubilee 
arrangements made by the royal household. 

The celebration was general on the 25th of Octo- 
ber, 1809, all over the country, Scotland vying with 
England in the heartiness with which it com- 
memorated an event of so much interest in our 
annals ; and Ireland was not in any sense behind in 
demonstrative loyalty. 

The gaol-doors of the country were thrown open 
that all small debtors might go free, the creditors 
either foregoing their claims or receiving their 
own from subscription lists instituted for the pur- 
pose. The king headed one of these lists with four 
thousand pounds. The merchants of London gave 
two thousand, and the Corporation a thousand. 

A proclamation was issued pardoning uncondi- 
tionally all deserters from the fleet, leaving it 
optional with them to return to duty or seek other 
pursuits. All deserters fr<>m the land forces, who 
surrendered within two months from the 25th of 
October, were also pardoned. Extra allowances of 
rations and leisure were given both to soldiers and 
sailors. There were some fifty thousand prisoners 
of war in England at the time, and they were given 
the privilege of returning to their own countries if 



so minded. Very many of them elected to remain, 
and became part of the body politic, leaving de- 
scendants, who to-day " be all good Englishmen." 

It is related of a benevolent citizen of Ports- 
mouth, that on the day of the celebration he gave 
threepence each to nearly seven thousand French 
prisoners confined in vessels in the harbour, and 
that he gave sixpence each to about two hundred 
Danish prisoners in the same port, accompanying 
the gift in the latter case with a printed card, 
setting forth that the donation was intended not 
merely in honour of the jubilee, but in recognition 
of the humanity shown by Marshal Mortier to the 
British sick and wounded after the battle of Tala- 
vera. 

Generally throughout these islands much was 
done by public and private effort to mark the year 
of jubilee by relieving distress ; and here and there 
a permanent memorial was raised, such as the em- 
battled tower on the summit of Moel Famma, This 
tower, by the way, has been a ruin since 1882, in 
which year it gave way during a gale. 

The jubilee year itself was a notable one. It was 
that of the battle of Corunna and the death of Sir 
John Moore. It witnessed the ill-fated Walcheren 
expedition, and the duel between Canning and 
Castlereagh. It was the year in which Pall Mall 
was first lighted up with gas ; and the sporting as 
well as the scientific world have reasons for recalling 
it, for wasn't it that in which Captain Barclay began 
and finished his wonderful walk of a thousand miles 
in a thousand consecutive hours ? It was the year 
also of the starting of the Quarterly Review. 



CARDIFF. 



The rapid and extensive strides in modern de- 
velopment have served to annihilate almost 
all the ancient relics of the antiquity of Cardiff. 
Among those that do remain is the castle keep, 
shown in the November page. Cardiff Castle itself 
has been largely restored and remodelled. It stands 
near to the river at the north-west angle of the 
town, and guarding the bridge where was formerly 
the only access to the town from the west. Some 
suburbs have of late years sprung up on the right 
bank of the Taff; but all, or nearly all, the older 
parts are upon the left bank. The old town, of 
which the walls and gates remained so late as the 
last century, extends south of the castle near the 
river-bank ; but the extraordinary transformation 
of the place of late years has been remarkable, and 
it has been largely due to the Bute family. The 
castle is still a family residence, owing to which 
there is less of genuine antiquity remaining than a 
distant view of the building might seem at first to 
indicate. A castle has occupied the site from a very 
early date. There was a stronghold here of the 
British princes long before the Norman Conquest, 
and perhaps the mound which rises on the northern 
side of the castle courtyard once supported the 
principal tower of their residence. Soon after that 
event the Normans occupied the site and built a 
castle. This, however, has been affected by later 
changes, and the keep, which still remains on the 
above-named mound, is of Perpendicular architec- 
ture. Formerly the castle court was divided in two 
by a wall which ran from the gatehouse tower to 
the keep, and in one of these parts stood the Shire 
Hall. Both this and the wall have been swept away, 
so that the whole of the spacious court can now be 
seen at a glance. These frequent alterations make 
it difficult to trace the history of the various parts. 
Little or nothing, however, now remains above 
ground of the Norman castle. This was chiefly 
famous as the prison of the ill-fated Robert Court- 
hose, Duke of Normandy, eldest son of "William the 
Conqueror, for here, when his wars and wanderings 
were abruptly ended, the " man who forgot and for- 
gave too much" spent the last twenty-eight years 
of his long life. His death occurred in 1134. 



"PRACTISE NOT YOUB ART, AND 'TWILL SOON DEPART." 



THE GREAT SEAL OF ENGLAND. 



The mere holding of the Great Seal of England 
entitles the fortunate custodian to some £12,000 a 
year, to immense patronage in Church and State, to 
he Speaker in the House of Lords, a Privy Coun- 
cillor, and the head of all judicial authority in the 
kingdom, to be designated Lord High Chancellor of 
Great Britain, and keeper of the royal conscience, 
and to rank (next to the Royal Family) the second 
subject in the realm. It is very difficult, if not im- 
possible, to say when England first had a Great Seal. 
Seals were not much used by our Anglo-Saxon 
ancestors, but came largely into fashion during the 
Norman reigns. The gilt roses, or marks of Edward 
the Confessor and other Saxon kings, can scarcely 
be called seals, and partook more of the character 
of signatures of an illiterate age ; but a grand and 
perfect seal of William the Conqueror exists, having 
the monarch crowned and throned on the one side, 
and mounted on horseback on the other— attitudes 
which have been invariably observed to the present 
day. One remarkable circumstance connected with 
the Great Seal is its progressive growth in size as 
time advanced. Originally, 800 years since, not 
larger than the top of an ordinary modern teacup, 
it has been gradually enlarged from age to age, till 
it offers now the size and appearance of a muffin, 
and requires to be enclosed in a tin box for pro- 
tection. Indeed, so cumbrous and unwieldy had the 
Great Seal become, that some three or four years 
since an Act of Parliament passed— containing very 
extraordinary provisions— directing that all the 
minor, and many even of the more important docu- 
ments passing under it, should for the future be 
authenticated by a paper wafer, of moderate size, 
which should be gummed on the instrument, and be 
deemed and taken to be the Great Seal itself. 

The Great Seal has only three times been lost— 
twice temporarily and once permanently. James II., 
on leaving the kinerdom on his abdication, threw 
the seal into the Thames, whence, however, it was 
next morning fished up and brought to Whitehall. 
Lord Eldon buried it in his garden in Queen Square 
during one night when his house caught fire, as he 
thought in the confusion it might be stolen. "And," 
writes the Chancellor in his diary, " when the fire 
was extinguished I quite forgot in the morning 
where I had buried it, and while the carriage waited 
to take me to Court, my lady and I and all the house- 
hold were digging with pieces of stick till we 
luckily found it." Lord Thurlow, who always kept 
it during the night in his bedroom, had it actually 
carried off by burglars, from whom it was never 
recovered. A Privy Council was called the next 
day, a new seal was made, and during the remainder 
of his continuance in office, Lord Thurlow invari- 
ably deposited it at night under his pillow. 

Down to 1818 the Great Seal itself was made of 
copper; since then silver has been the metal em- 
ployed. It is in two halves, something like 
two very thick bright tin saucepan-lids fitting 
closely together, their inner surfaces deeply sculp- 
tured with the royal devices intended to he formed 
on the wax when squeezed between them. Instru- 
ments having a limited duration are sealed with 
yellow wax. Others, supposed to exist in per- 
petuity, such as patents of peerage, &c, are exem- 
plified under green wax ; and in the case of some 
letters patent, likely to be exposed to a great deal 
of knocking about or journeying from place to 
place, such as were the assize commissions, the wax 
seal was stamped after being ingeniously enclosed 
in cream-coloured leather. 



ENGLAND IN 1550. 



An examination of the different entries contained 
in the Machyn diary sheds a strong light upon 
matters connected with the reign of Mary which 
ordinary historians omit. Take, for instance, the 
criminal statistics with which Machyn furnishes us. 
We look in vain for those particular offences of 



fraud and cunning which the subtleties of the nine- 
teenth century have made us familiar with, but in 
their stead we read of hostility to the mechanism of 
religion, of low cheating, of cruelty to men and 
animals, and, of course, of those sins against the 
flesh which ever follow in the wake of ill-disciplined 
human nature. 

From the well-furnished army of Machyn let us 
select a few of his arrows to take aim at the manners 
and corruptions of his age. Here we find a younc 
fellow tied to a post " hard by the Standard in Cliep, ' 
with a collar of iron round his neck, and soundly 
whipped by two men "for pretending visions." 

The Church offers its next victim. We read how 
one " Cheken, a parson of St. Nicholas, Coldharbour, 
did ride in a cart round about London, for he sold 
his wife to a butcher," a piece of traffic which is 
still, on some parts of the Continent, believed to 
flourish in England. 

This was how a butcher who had exposed diseased 
meat for sale was punished. He was forced to ride 
about London, "his face towards the horse's tail, 
with half a lamb before and another behind, and 
veal and calf borne before him upon a pole, raw." 
There are several entries recording this punishment. 

Men who sold stinking fish were put in the pillory 
with the stinking fish round their neck. One very 
nineteenth-century summer trick we see was in 
vogue in those more innocent days. The first day 
of July there were a man and a woman in the pillory 
in Cheapside; the man sold pots of strawberries, 
" the which the pot was not half full but filled with 
fern." Thus even in minor matters history repeats 
itself. 



THE ORIGIN OF BICYCLES. 



The first pedomotive machine was that designed 
—though never, so far as we know, constructed— 
by the Marquis of Worcester, an exceedingly able 
scientist of Charles II. 's time. Of the details and of 
the plan of this invention all traces have been lost. . 
In the Universal Magazine for August, 1769, we 
find a long description of a chaise to go without 
horses. Considerable attention must have been de- 
voted to the matter at that time, for the editor of 
the magazine, in introducing the subject, says: 
' ' The conversation of the public being greatly taken 
up with a machine to move without horses, we are 
persuaded the preceding plate, with the following 
introduction, will be not a little agreeable to our 
readers." The machine described was the invention 
of John Vevers, "Master of the Boarding School at 
Rygate in Surry," who, so far as can be ascertained, 
was the maker of the very first velocipede the world 
ever saw. In the illustration we see a gentleman 
lolling back in what resembles a small " Victoria." 
Behind him, and with an exceedingly meagre pair 
of legs projecting from a box, is a footman, who is 
supposed to be propelling the machine, which is 
steered by the three-cornered-hatted occupant of 
the vehicle. The rage for the new kind of carriage 
did not evidently die out at once, for in 1774 we 
notice in the Universal Magazine that, " On Monday 
evening, about seven o'clock, a machine for going 
without horses, invented by Mr. Boone, of cheap- 
side, on a new construction, went through the 
Strand. It consists of a wooden chair, placed upon 
iron supports, and which is pushed forward with 
great velocity by the quick working of the man's 
feet upon some iron springs placed immediately 
behind it. It is so contrived as to be turned at 
pleasure and with ease, and goes at amazing speed." 
The December issue has an account of another velo- 
cipede "capable of travelling with ease six miles 
an hour, and, by a particular exertion of the foot- 
man, might travel nine or ten miles an hour on a 
good road, and would even go up a considerable hill. 
But this carriage is in general only calculated for 
the exercise of gentlemen in parks or gardens, for 
which it answers extremely well." 



STAMPS, TAXES, LICENCES, EXCISE DUTIES, Ac. 



BILL STAMPS. 

£ s. a. 

Not exceeding 5 .. o l 

l°J but not J g - ° J. 

^ :^ exceeding j g ;; » « 

^ V.75.J V.100 -.10 

And every additional £100, or frac- 
tion of £100— Is. 

DAYS OF GRACE. 

Bills of Exchange or Promissory 
Notes payable at any time after 
date have three days of grace al- 
lowed ; thus, a bill dated Jan. 1 at 
two months' date is not due till 
March 4 ; but by a recent Act no 
days of grace are allowed on Bills 
drawn at sight, or on demand ; 
such must, therefore, be paid on 
presentation. 



RECEIPTS. 

Receipt for the payment of 
£2 or upwards Id. 

Persons receiving the money to 

pay the duty. 
Penalty for giving a receipt, liable 
to duty, not duly stamped— £10. 

The person giving the receipt 
shall, before the instrument be 
delivered out of his hands, ob- 
literate the stamp by writing his 
Name or Initials, together icitli the 
true date of his so writing, in such 
a manner as to show clearly and 
distinctly that such stamp has 
been used. 

Letters acknowledging the safe 
arrival of Bills of Exchange, &c, 
and other securities for money, 
are no longer exempt from the 
Stamp Act, but must have a 
Stamp affixed. 

Penalty for refusing to give a 
duly stamped receipt in any case 
where receipt is liable to duty— 
£10. 

CHEQUES AND CERTIFICATES. 

Bankers' Cheques Id. 

Scrip Certificates for shares 
in any Company, not trans- 
ferable by Deed Id. 



FEES PAYABLE UNDER THE 
PATENT ACT. 

On application for pro- 

visional protection •. l 
On filing complete speci- 
fication 3 

On certificate of renewal 

(before end of 4 years 

from date of patent). . 50 

Ditto (before the end of 

8 years from date of 

patent) 100 

Or the following annual 
fees may be substi- 
tuted for the fees of 
£50 and £100:— 
Before the expiration 
of 4th year from date 

of patent 10 

5th year 10 

6th „ 10 

7th „ 10 

8th „ 15 

- 9th „ 15 

10th „ 20 

11th „ 20 

12th „ 20 

13th „ ... 20 



NEW 



s. 


d. 
























































































LICENCES AND EXCISE DUTIES. 

£ s. d. 
Appraisers & House Agts 2 

Armorial Bearings l i o 

,, „ on a Carriage 2 2 
Arms, grant of , stamp dty. 10 
Auctioneers, AnL Licence 10 
Bankers' Annual Licence, 

United Kingdom 30 

Beer and Wine Retailers 4 
„ not to be consumed 

on the premises 3 

Beer drunk on premises 3 10 
„ not drunk on the 

premises l 5 

Brewers' Licences : — 
Brewer of Beer for sale 10 

Duty per 36 gallons o 6 3 

Carriages, Annual Licence 
(Great Britain).— For 
every carriage with 
four wheels, weighing 

four cwt 2 2 

With two wheels : or 
four wheels, if weigh- 
ing less than four cwt. 15 
For every Hackney 

Carriage 15 

In respect of carriages 
used for the first time 
on and after Oct. 1, in 
any year :— 
For every carriage, not 
being a Hackney Car- 
riage, with four or 
more wheels, and 
weighing 4 cwt. and 

upwards 110 

For every carriage being 
a Hackney Carriage or 
with fewer than four 
wheels, or having four 
or more wheels, shall 
weigh less than 4 cwt. 7 fi 
Dogs, any kind, Gt. Brit. 7 6 
., (Ireland) one dog.. 2 6 
Game Licences : - If taken 
out after 31st July 
and before 1st Novem- 
ber, to expire on 31st 

July following 3 

After 31st July, expire 

31st October 2 

After 1st November, ex- 
pire 31St July 2 

Occasional Game Li- 
cence for any period 

of fourteen days l o 

Gamekeepers, Gt. Britain 2 
Game Dealer's Licence ..200 
Gun (Licence to carry) . . 10 
Hawkers, Gt. Britain :— 
Travelling with a 

horse or an ass 4 

If more than one horse, 

or ass, each 4 

Marriage Licence, Special, 

England and Ireland 5 

,, By Superin- 
tendent Registrar • • 10 
Medicine (Patent) Dealers, 

Gt. Brit., ann. Licence 5 
Passenger Vessels, on 
board which liquors 
and tobacco are sold : 
„ „ one year ..500 

„ „ one day ..100 

Pawnbrokers 7 10 

Plate :— To sell 2 oz. of 
Gold, or 30 oz. of 
Silver, and upwards ■ . 5 15 
To sell less than above 2 6 
Plate— Dty.on Gold per oz. 17 
„ „ Silver ,, 16 

Publican's (United Kingdom) li- 
cence to sell spirits, beer, and 
wine to be consumed on the 



premises :-If rated under £10, 
£410s.; £15, £6; £20, £8 ; £25, 
£11; £30, £14; £40, £17; £50, 
£20 ; £100, £25 ; and £5 for each 
additional £100, with a maxi- 
mum of £60. 
Servants— Annual Licence 
for every Male Ser- 
vant in Great Britain 15 

Retailers of Sweets 15 

Tobacco &Snuff, dealers in 5 3 
Wine Retailers :— To be 

consumed on premises 3 10 
,, Off Licences 2 10 



AGREEMENTS, &c 

Agreement, or Memorandum 
of Agreement, under hand only, 
of the value of £5 or more, when 
not otherwise charged— 6d. Ditto, 
to let a furnished house for less 
than a year, the rent being above 
£25— 2s. 6d. Agreement for a Lease 
not exceeding 35 years, the same as 
on a lease. An Agreement should 
be stamped within 14 days of date. 
The penalty for stamping after 
that period is £10. 
Affidavits and Declarations, 2s. 6d. 
apprentice indentures. 

Without premium 2s. 6d. 

With prem., for every £5 5s. od. 

Articles of Clerkship to Solicitor 

in England or Ireland . . £80 

„ For Lancashire, Durham, or 

Scotch superior courts — £60 

Scotch inferior courts .. 2s. 6d. 



GOVERNMENT INSURANCE AND 
ANNUITIES. 

The lives of the persons of either 
sex between the ages of 14 and 65 
may be insured for. not less than 
£5 nor more than £100: or if the 
amount does not exceed £5, not 
under the age of 8 years. The 
Postmaster-General is also em- 
powered to grant Immediate or 
Deferred Annuities for any 
amount not less than £1 or more 
than £100 to any person not under 
the age of 5 years. 

The following examples show 
various ways in which Insurances 
may be effected :— The life of a 
Male or Female between 21 and 
22 years of age may be insured for 
£10, by an annual payment 
throughout life of 4s. 4d. (id. a 
week); or by an annual payment 
to the age of 60 of 4s. 8d. ; or by a 
single payment of £4 4s. ; or a 
person between 21 and 22 years of 
age having, say, £9 deposited in 
the Post Office Savings Bank, the 
interest on which is 4s. 6d. a year, 
can direct that 4s. 4d. of this 
amount of interest be applied to 
the payment of premiums on a 
Life Policy for £10; he can thus 
maintain his Life Insurance with- 
out decreasing his capital of £9. 

A sum of money may be insured 
on the attainment of the age of 
60 years, or sooner in the event of 
death, by the payment of a single 
or animal premium, and a sum of 
money may be insured at the 
expiration of in, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, or 
40 years, or sooner in the event 
of death, by the payment of a 
single premium according to the 
age of the insured person. ■ 



LAW SITTINGS, ECLIPSES, AND MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



THE CIVIL LIST. 



Her Majesty— £ £ 

rrivy Purse .... 60/300 

Salaries of House- 
hold 131,260 

Expenses of House- 
hold 172,500 

Royal Bounty,&c. 13,200 . 

Unappropriated .. 8,040-385,000 

Tensions (.limited to 
£1,200 per annum).... 22,620 

407,629 



ANNUITIES TO THE ROYAL 
FAMILY. 

Prince of Wales 40,000 

Princess of Wales 10,000 

Crown Princess of Prussia 8,000 

Duke of Edinburgh 25,000 

Priucess Christian of 

Schleswig-Holstcin 6,000 

Princess Louise (Mar- 
chioness of Lome) 6,000 

Duke of Oonnaught 25,000 

Duchess of Albany 6,000 

Duchess of Cambridge .. 6,000 

Duchess of Mecklenburg ' ' 

Strelitz , 3,000 

Duke of Cambridge 12,000 

Duchess of Teck 5,000 

Princess Beatrice (Prin- 
cess Henry of Battenberg) 6,000 



SPECIAL WEICHTS & MEASURES. 

A Fodder of Lead is 

194 cwt., or 2184 lbs. 

A Firkin of Butter .. 56 lbs. 

A Stone of Butcher's 

Meat (London) 8 lbs. 

A Stone of Horse- 
man's Weight — 14 lbs. ' ■ 

A Stone of Iron Shot 14 lbs. 

A Stone of Glass 5 lbs. 

A Seam of Glass, 24 st. 

of 5 lbs., or 120 lbs. 

A Faggot of Steel .. 120 lbs. 

Pig Ballast 56 lbs. 

Cask of Bristles 10 cwt. 

A Bale of Feathers 

about l cwt. 

A Pocket of Hops . . 14. to 2 cwt. 

A Bag of Hops, nearly 24, cwt. 

A Hogshead of To- 
bacco 12 to 18 cwt. 

A Sack of Potatoes . . 168 lbs. 

A Sack of Coals . . 224 lbs. 

A Sack of Flour .... 280 lbs. 

A Dicker of Hides . . 10 skins. 

A Dicker of Gloves . . 10 dozen. 

A Last of Hides 20 dickers 

A Last of Feathers 17 cwt. 

A Last of Gunpowder 24 barrels. 

A Roll of Vellum, 5 

doz. or 60 skins. 

COMMERCIAL NUMBERS. 

12 Articles 1 Dozen. 

13 Ditto l Long Dozen. 

12 Dozen 1 Gross. 

20 Articles 1 Score. 

5 Score 1 Com. Hundred. 

6 Score 1 Great Hundred. 

80 Deal s 1 Quarter. 

4 Quarters 1 Hundred. 

24 Sheets Paper.. 1 Quire. 

20 Ditto 1 Ditto outsides. 

25 Ditto 1 Printer's Ditto 

20 Quires 1 Ream. 

21J Ditto 1 Printer's Ditto 

2 Reams 1 Bundle. 

10 Ditto 1 Bale. 



BANK HOLIDAYS, 1887. 

Easter Monday April 11 

Whit Monday May 30 

First Monday in August Aug. 1 
Monday Doc. 26 



LAW SITTINGS, 1887. 

Begin. End. 

HilarySittingsJan.il .. Apr. 6 
Easter do. . . Apr. 19 . . May 27 
Trinity do. ..June 7 .. Aug. 12 
Michaelmas do. Oct. 24 .. Dec. 21 



UNIVERSITY TERMS, 

1887. 

OXFORD. 

Begin. End. 

Hilary Jan. 14 .. Apr. 2 

Easter Apr. 23 .. May 27 

Trinity May 20 .. July 11 

Michaelmas .. Oct. 10 .. Dec. 17 

CAMBRIDGE. 

Lent Jan. 8 .. Mar. 27 

Easter Apr. 18 .. June 24 

Michaelmas .. Oct. 1 .. Dec. 19 



MINISTERIAL SALARIES. 

Prime Minister and Foreign £ 

Secretary 5,000 

First Lord of the; Treasury 5,000 

Chancof the Exchequer •• 5,000 

Home Secretary 5,000 

Indian Secretary 5,000 

Colonial Secretary 5,000 

Secretary of War 5,000 

Lord Chancellor of Eng- 
land 10,000 

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 20,000 
First Lord of the Admi- 
ralty 4,500 

Lord President of the 

Council 2,000 

Vice-President of the Coun- 
cil of Education 2,000 

President of the Board of 

Trade 2,0C0 

Lord Privy Seal 2,000 

President of Local Govern- 
ment Board 2,000 

Chancellor of the Duchy of 

Lancaster 2,000 

First Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Works 2,000 

Postmaster-General 2,500 

Lord Steward of the House- 
hold 2.0S0 

Lord Chamberlain 2,000 



ECLIPSES IN 1887. 

There will he two Eclipses of 
the Sun in 1887, viz. :— 

Feb. ?2— 23.— An Annular Eclipse 
of the Sun, invisible at Greenwich. 

Aug. 19.— A Total Eclipse of the 
Sun, partly visible at Greenwich. 



REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS, &C. 

In England an infant should be 
registered within six weeks after 
its Birth. No fee is payable; but 
after 42 days, a fee of 7s. Od. is 
chargeable. 

Notice must bo given of Deaths 
to the District Registrar. Let this 
be done early, as a certificate must 
be obtained to give to the minister 
who performs the funeral service. 

In Scotland a Birth must be 
registered within 21 days. A Mar- 
riage must be registered within 
three days. A Death must be' 
registered within eight days. 



INTEREST TABLE. 

Without giving an elaborate 
series of tabulated figures to as- 
certain the interest due on any 
given sum, at 24. 3, 5, or any other 
rate per cent., any person may cal- 
culate for himself the amount of 
interest by a very simple process. 
The amount of interest upon one 
pound for every month at 5 per 
cent, is one penny. Having ascer- 
tained what any given sum 
amounts to at 5 per cent., other 
rates may be calculated by adding 
to, or dividing it, thus: g months. 
5percent.for£80wouldbe£2 6 
25 per cent., which is one- 
half 1 

3 per cent, is six-tenths ..140 
34, per cent, is seven-tenths 1 $ 

4 per cent, is four-fifths ..112 
If the interest should be more 

than 5 per cent., then the extra 
rate of interest must be added. 
Thus for 6J per cent, add one- 
fourth; for 74 per cent, add one- 
halt 

TABLE TO CALCULATE WACeIT 
AND OTHER PAYMENTS. 



Yr. 


Pr. Mnth. 
~£~i.~d. 


Per Week- 


Pr. Day 


£ 


£ s. d. 


s. d. 


1 


18 


4 


03 


2 


3 4 


91 


1J 


3 


5 


1 if 


2 


4 


6 8 


1 6J 


24 


5 


8 4 


1 11 


3i 


6 


10 


2 3| 


4 


7 


11 8 


2 84 


44 
5| 


8 


13 4 


3 Of 


9 


15 


3 5£ 


6 


10 


16 8 


3 10 


64 


11 


18 4 


4 2| 


7| 


12 


10 


4 71 


8 


13 


1 1 8 


4 ll| 


84. 


14 


1 3 4 


5 4J 


94 


15 


15 


5 9 


10 


10 


10 8 


6 13 


104 


17 


18 4 


6 6J 


111 


1-8 


1 10 


6 103 


113 


19 


1 11 8 


7 3i 


1 0J 


20 


1 13 4 


7 8 


1 14 


3(1 


2 10 


11 6 


1 7a 


40 


3 6 8 


15 44, 


2 24 


50 


4 3 4 


19 2 


2 9 


61) 


5 


1 3 Oi 


3 3J 


70 


5 16 8 


1 6 10* 


3 10 


80 


6 13 4 


1 10 81 


4 44 


90 


7 10 


1 14 74 

1 18 5| 


4 114 


100 


8 6 8 


5 5f 



If the Wages be Guineas instead 
of Pounds, for each Guinea add 
Id. to each month, or Jd. to each 
Week. 



POST-OFFICE INFORMATION. 



RATES OF POSTACE. 

To and from all parts of the Uni- 
ted Kingdom, for prepaid letters: 

Not exceeding 1 oz Id, 

Excdg. loz. but not excdg.2oz. l£d. 

„ 2 oz. „ 4 oz. 2d. 

„ 4 oz. „ 6 oz. 2.Jd. 

„ 6 oz. „ 8 oz. 3d. 

„ 8 oz. „ 10 oz. 3)d. 

„ 10 oz. „ 12 oz. id. 

and so on at the rate of id. for 
every additional two ounces. A 
letter posted unpaid will be 
charged on delivery with double 
postage, and a letter posted in- 
sufficientlyprepaidwill be charged 
with double the deficiency.— An 
Inland Letter must not exceed 1 
foot 6 inches in length, 9 inches 
in width, or 6 inches in depth, un- 
less it be sent to or from a Govern- 
ment Office. 

REGISTRATION. 

By the prepayment of a fee of 
twopence, any letter, newspaper,or 
book-packet may be registered to 
any place in the United Kingdom 
or British Colonies. The Post- 
Office will not undertake the safe 
transmission of valuable enclo- 
sures in unregistered letters ; and 
unregistered letters found to con- 
tain coin will, on delivery, be 
charged with a registration fee of 
8d. If a registered article be lost 
the Post-Otflce is liable to the ex- 
tent of £2. 

REGISTERED LETTER ENVELOPES 

Are sold at all Post-Offlcos, and 
by rural messengers, according to 
size, from 2±d. to 3d. each. 

POSTACE ON INLAND REGISTERED 
NEWSPAPERS. 

Prepaid Rates. — For each Regis- 
tered Newspaper, whether posted 
singly or in a packet— One Half- 
penny ; but a packet containing 
two or more Registered News- 
papers is not chargeable with a 
higher rate of postage than would 
be chargeable on a Book- Packet of 
the same weight, viz., One Half- 
penny for every 2 oz., or fraction 

Of 2 OZ. 

Unpaid Bates. — A Newspaper 
posted unpaid, or a packet of News- 
pipers posted either unpaid or in- 
sufficiently paid, will be treated as 
an unpaid, or insufficiently paid, 
Book- Packet of the same weight. 

The postage must be prepaid 
either by an adhesive stamp, or by 
the use of a stamped wrapper. 
Every Newspaper or packet of 
Newspapers must be posted either 
without a cover or in a cover open 
at both ends. If this rule be 
infringed, the Newspaper or 
packet will be treated as a letter. 

No Newspaper, whether posted 
singly or in a packet, may contain 
any enclosure except the supple- 
ment or supplements belonging to 
it. If it contain any other, it will 
be charged as a letter. 

No packet of Newspapers may 
exceed 14 lbs. in weight, or two 
feet in length by one foot in width 
or depth. 



INLAND PARCEL POST. 

For an Inland Postal Parcel, the 
rate of postage, to be prepaid in 
ordinary postage stamps, will be- 
Not exceeding in weight 1 lb., 3d. ; 
and for every additional lb. up to 
the maximum of 11 lbs., l£d. 

Maximum length 3 feet 6 inches ; 
maximum length and girth com- 
bined, 6 feet. 

A Parcel Post Service has been 
established between the United 
Kingdom and the countries of 
the Continent of Europe and 
the British Colonies and Foreign 
Possessions generally. For rates 
and other conditions, see the 
"Post Office Guide, published 
quarterly. 

Insurance and Compensation. 

The Postmaster- General will, 
subject to rules, give compensa- 
tion for loss and damage of inland 
parcels as follows : — 

(I.) Where no fee except postage 
is paid, the Postmaster-General 
will give compensation to an 
amount not exceeding £l. (II.) 
Where, in addition to the postage, 
an insurance fee of Id. is piid. 
the Postmaster-General will give 
compensation to an amount not 
exceeding £5. (III.) Where, in 
addition to the postage, an in- 
surance fee of 2d. is paid, the 
Postmaster - General will give 
compensation to an amount not 
exceeding £10. In no case will 
a larger amount of compensation 
than £10 be paid. 

INLAND BOOK POST. 

The Book Post rate is One Half- 
penny for every 2 oz.or fraction of 
2oz. A Book-Packet may contain 
not only books, pa per, or other sub- 
stance in ordinary use for writing 
or printing, whether plain or 
written or printed upon (to the ex- 
clusion of any written letter or 
communication of the nature of a 
letter), photographs, when not on 
glass, and anything usually apper- 
taining to such articles in the way 
of binding and mounting, or neces- 
sary for their safe transmission by 
post, but also Circular swoon these 
are wholly or in great part printed, 
engraved, or lithographed. 

Any Book-Packet which may be 
found to contain a letter or com- 
munication of the nature of a 
letter, not being a circular-letter, 
or any enclosure sealed or in any 
way closed against inspection, or 
any other enclosure not allowed 
by the regulations, will be treated 
as a letter, and charged with 
double the deficiency of the Letter 
postage. 

Every Book-Packet must be 
posted either without a cover or in 
a cover open at both ends, and in 
such a manner as to admit of the 
contents being easily withdrawn 
for examination ; otherwise it will 
be treated as a letter. 

A Packet posted wholly unpaid 
will be charged with double the 
Book Postage ; and if posted par- 
tially prepaid, with double the de- 
ficiency.— No Book-Packet may ex- 
ceeds lbs. in weight, or one foot six 
inches in length, nine inches in 
wi dth, and six in depth. 



POST-OFFICE ORDERS. 

Money Orders are granted in the 
United Kingdom, as follows :— 
For sums not exceeding - £l,2d. 

„ „ exc. £l&not exc. £2, 3d. 

£2 „ „ £4,4d. 

it .. ., £4 „ ,. £7,5d. 

h ., „ £7 „ „ £10, 6d. 

POSTAL ORDERS. 

Postal Orders are now issued at 
any Money Order Office in the Uni- 
ted Kingdom, and at Malta, Gibral- 
tar, and Constantinople. Terms : 
Is. . . Id. 3s. 6d. Id. I 10s. . . id. 
is. 6d. Id. 4s. .. id. | 10s. 6d. Id. 
2s. .. id. 4s. 6d, Id. 15s. .. lid, 
2s. 6d. Id. 5s. .. Id. 20s. .. ljd. 
3s. .. Id. 7s. 6d. Id, I 
Postal Orders are not payable out- 
side of the United Kingdom, ex- 
cept at Malta, Gibraltar, and Con- 
stantinople. 

MONEY ORDERS PAYABLE ABROAD. 

Foreign Orders are issued at the 
following rates :— 

If payable in Belgium, Denmark, 
Danish West Indies, Dutch East 
India Possessions, Egypt, France, 
German Empire,Austria-Hungary, 
Holland, Italy, Japan, Norway, 
Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, 
and United States, or the British 
Possessions and Colonies: — On 
sums not exceeding 

£2 .... 0s. M. I £7 .... is. 6d. 

£5 .... Is. CM. I £10 .... 2s. Od. 

POST-OFFICE SAVINCS BANK. 

Deposits of one shi 1 ling upwards 
wil I be received from anydepositor 
at the Post-Office Savings Banks, 
provided the deposits made in any 
year ending the 31st December do 
not exceed 30(., and provided the 
total amount does not exceed 1501. 
exclusive of interest. When prin- 
cipal and interestamount together 
to £200, all interest will cease. 

"TAKE CARE OF THE PENCE." 

At every Post-Office in the United 
Kingdom forms can be obtained, 
free of charge, on which twelve 
penny postage stamps can be fixed, 
and when the form has been thus 
filled up with twelve penny stamps 
it will be received at any Post- 
Office Savings Bank as a Savings 
Bank deposit for one shilling. 

STOCKS CAN BE BOUCHT 

At any Post-Office Savings Bank. 
Any depositor who wishes can in- 
vest £10, or any larger sum up to 
£100, in Government Stock at the 
current price of the day. On each 
£10 of Stock interest at the rate of 
3s. every six months is paid to the 
investor, free of all charge. The 
same facilities are afforded for 
selling out stock. The commission 
for purchase or sale of Stocks is 
for any amount not exceeding £25, 
9d. ; and 6tf. for each £25 after. 

POSTAL TELEGRAMS. 

Charge throughout the United 
Kingdom, 6d. for twelve words; 
names and addresses of sender and 
receiver included. Usually, how- 
ever, there is no necessity to tele- 
graph sender's address. Each ad- 
ditional word, $d. Numbers in 
addresses counted as one word. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



77 



ITALIAN WAREHOUSE, 

ESTABLISHED 1835. 



BffiUttCS. 



Port, Sherry, 

Claret, Hock, 

Champagne, 

Moselle, 

Burgundy, 

Madeira, 

Marsala, 

Sauterne, 

Chablis. 



Max Gregor's 
Hungarian. 

Carlo witz. 

Somlau, 
(Edenburg. 



Hidalgo's 
Natural. 

Manzanilla, 

Palma, and 

Fino. 



pqttetirs. 

Curacao, 

Chartreuse, 

Maraschino, 

Benedictine, 

Kummel, 

Cherry Brandy. 

Angostura, 

Orange and 

Tonic Bitters. 

C babbie & Co.'s 

Ginger Wines 

& Cordials. 



Duncan 
Flockhart &Co.'s 
Aerated Waters 



B, & M, M£UVIN, 

^familu <|>rocers, 

Ifea, Wine, ^ Spirib /VtapGJpanbs, 

17, 19, & 21 CASTLE STREET, 

FORFAR, 

Opposite Municipal Buildings. 



TEAS 

Carefully selected from first crop Teas of 
the best gardens in India, China, and Ceylon, 
and judiciously blended in our own establish- 
ment. 



COFFEES 

FRESH GROUND DAILY. 



LAZBNBY'S 

PiCHLES AHB SAUCES, 

Ham Tongue and Chicken Sausages in Tins. 

Potted Chicken and Ham, Ham and Tongue. 

Anchovy, Bloater, and Shrimp Paste. 

Sardines in Tomatoes. 

Sardines with Butter. 

Sardines (Boneless). 

Boneless Anchovies in Oil. 



Bombay Ducks, French Truffles, &c. 
Calf-foot Jelly, Salad Oil. 

Moir's Soups in Tins and Bottles. 

Kidney, Ox Tail, Mulligatauny, 

Julienne, Mock Turtle, Brown, 

Chicken, and Hare. 

Finest Vostizza Currants, Sultana & Valencia 

Baisins cleaned on the premises by the 

Bristol Patent Fruit Cleaner. 



Spirits. 
WHISKY. 

Our Famous 
Old Islay Blend 

is Perfection. 



BRANDY. 

Hennessey's 

Martell, 

Courvoisiers, and 

Otard. 



RUM. 



Finest Old 

Jamaica. 



GIN. 

Fockink, 

Loopuyt, 
Old Tom. 



MALT LIQUORS 

Bass & Allsopp's 

Pale Ale. 

Melvin's 

& Younger's 

Edinburgh Ale. 

Barclay, Perkins, 

& Co.'s Imperial 

Porter. 

Raggett's 

Nourishing Stout 

and Golden Hop 

Pale Ale. 

Pilsener Lager 
Beei\ 

American 
Champagne Cider 



Note the Address— 17, 19, k 21, CASTLE STREET, FORFAR, 



7§ ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WILUAM fULURWH, 

Boot and Shoemaker, 

Has in Stock a great and varied assortment of first-class BOOTS, SHOES, and 

SLIPPERS, at Prices to suit all Classes. 

Football, Running, Bicycling, Cricket, and Tennis Shoes, always on hand. 

ALL SORTS OF BOOTS & SHOES MADE TO MEASURE ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 

Note the Address — 

30 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

Repairing done on the Premises. 

ROBERT M C NAB, 

<m JFaiI©P, t (Zlsfehiep, T and \ latetep, ^ 

HAS ALWAYS IN STOCK 

A Fine Selection of all the Newest and Most Fashionable TWEED SUITINGS and 
TROUSERINGS, DIAGONAL WORSTEDS, SERGES, and OVERCOATINGS. 



Having a staff of First-class Workmen, MOURNINGS, or very pressing Orders, are 
executed promptly and efficiently. 

M)\ the fewest fashions in lats, (f^aps, t$i?s, hearts, $hirts, and 

dollars, .&<?. $ic. 

Boys' Ready-made SUITS, TOP COATS, and REEFERS, superior quality, 

very cheap. 



150 EAST HTGH STREET, FORFAR 



PETRIE'S 

2 BACKWYND (adjoining Castle St.), FORFAR. 

BREAKFASTS, DINNERS. 
3fca, GoPFee, |Hoh Pies, and all Je<mpzvar\zz Relfrcsbmcnbs. 

Families supplied with Superior GINGER BEER. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 79 






85 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR, 



A GENT for KEA Y BROTHERS, General Dyers, PERTH. 



LANGLANDS & MILNE, 



agfifeieps, ? JWHSBfireiis, 

$&EIXHANG£RS, i&>6., 

1 West High Street, Forfar. 



REPAIRS CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO IN TOWN & COUNTRY. 



LARGE STOCK of IRONMONGERY FURNISHINGS ALWAYS ON HAND, 

ESTIMATES GIVEN FOR ALL KINDS OF WORK. 



Mind your Feet. 

ALL KINDS OF READY-MADE BOOtTaND SHOES NOW IN STOCK. 



BOOTS and SHOES.— Home and Hand-made to Measure. COMFORT Guaranteed- 
REPAIRS NEATLY & PROMPTLY DONE. 



40 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 






8o ADVERTISEMENTS. 



LOW & Co.s 

CELEBRATED 

-r I LOAF BREAD I ^S: 

SHOULD BE USED IN EVERY HOUSEHOLD. 



Superior Pastry and Choice Cakes, 

Fancy Goods. Plain and Ornamented. 

FORFAR BAKERY, CASTLE STREET, 



LOW & CO.'S 

) Strong, 



•ungent, | 0TJB 1f3j? JL gj Flavoury, 

Pure, | 3i. SSri J^ 



AT 



2s and 2s 8d per Lb., 

SHOULD IBE TEIED B~y ALL. 



GOLD MEDAL HAMS 

ARE PERFECTION. 



FORFAR BRANCHES ;- 

15 East High St., 106 West High St 

AND 

FORFAR BAKERY BUILDINGS, CASTLE ST. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 8 1 



i <k nbdnhe 

SLATEES, 

116 EAST HIGH STREET, 

And 2 CHARLES STREET, 

FORFAR. 
PR0|7E880R 0p /AU8JG #N0 DINGING, 

YEWBANK, WHITEHILLS, FORFAR. 



ffi»i"$aie Jjcssons aivcn, etr)d Ifpiverte Classes 
etFretrjcica lay appoii)irr)cr)t. 

STRING Bfl^BS supped to G0NSERTS » flSSE/WBMES, 
Pianoforte & Violin for Coating Parties. 



Published every Friday morning. Guaranteed Gratis 

Circulation, 3000. 

The BEST Advertising Medium in Forfar. 



OLIVER M'PHERSON, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR, 
76 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



82 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Registered Telegraphic Address "WHYTE," FORFAR. 

DAVID WHYTE, 

FOEFAE. 



House -11 MARKET PLACE ; Office— THE CROSS. 

Stores-LOWER MARKET PLACE, and at LAMOND SQUARE. 



Has always for Sale, 

Best Ei*(jlisl\ and Scotch €oals 3 

ON MOST REASONABLE TERMS. 

ALSO, 

BEST HAND-THRESHED WHEAT STRAW, from Belgium and France, 

BR A IS' and OATS of the l>est Feeding Qualities., and as Cheap 

as any one else. 

ALSO, 

HAY FROM PERTHSHIRE AHG THE CARSE 

OF STIRLING- 

ETC. ETC. 



ADVERTISEMENTS- 83 



HENDRY & WARDEN'S 

Ser^epal BpapePY 




83 Bast High Street, Forfar. 



BEDSTEADS AND BEDD1N6. 

PRPETS AND MN0liEU/V\S, 



TAIliiRING DEPARTMENT 



INSPECTION INVITED— BEST GOODS AT LOWEST PRICES. 



THE NEW SHOE SHOP. 



MISS SMITH 

Has always on hand a large and carefully selected Stock of BOOTS and SHOES 

of the best quality. 

The Best Selling House Slipper :— The Original "A" (Best quality), "Household 1 ' 
Felt Slipper, which can only be got at the NEW SHOE SHOP. 



Ladies Fancy DRESS SLIPPERS* in Great Variety. 

REPAIRS AND SPECIAL ORDERS TO MEASURE RECEIVE PROMPT 

ATTENTION. 

93 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



84 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JAM£S MARSHALL 

Invites all those who wish to buy Genuine DRAPERY 
GOODS at Moderate Prices to call at No. HO West 
High Street, Forfar. 



JAMES MARSHALL, 

DRAPER, CLOTHIER, & HATTER, 110 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

MEN'S, YOUTHS', & BOYS' in great variety, 

GOOD QUALITY AND CHEAP. 

ALSO, 

Shirts, Bpaweps, ¥ies", feipfs, Fp§f$s, 

and IBpaees. 



INSPECTION CORDIALLY INVITED. 



WM. A. GIBSON, 

25 DUNDEE LOAN, FORFAR. 

C. THOM & SON, 

5 nf^T^nRC^AUBKWAY, FORFAR. 



-*> * ■»♦■* < ■ 



Billposting and Delivering promptly executed in Toum or Country. 
Circulars Addressed. Messages, Nicjlpb or ID ay, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 85 



" Gives a Story of all Round the World," — yohn Bright. 




Daily, One Halfpenny, 

^SJlONTAINS Latest Telegraphic News, freshest 
«P Local and District Intelligence, Cream of the 
London and Scotch Newspaper Press, Ladies' 
Column by Lady Editor, Athletic and Sporting 
News, Literary Extracts, &c, making the 
TELEGRAPH one of the most Popular Daily 
Papers published, and a splendid Advertising 
Medium. 



LARGEST CIRCULATION 

OF ANY HALFPENNY DAILY PAPER IN SCOTLAND, 

OUT OF GLASGOW OR EDINBURGH. 



SOLD BY ALL NEWS-AGENTS IN TOWN 
AND COUNTRY. 



Forfar Branch Office— 10^ WEST HIGH STREET. 

J 



S6 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Famous SCOTCH WHISKY 

At 16/6 per Gallon, and 2/10 per Bottle. 



TEA, TEA, TEA. 

We have at present the best value in Teas we have ever offered to 

the Public, 

At 2s 8d and 2s per Pound. 

Finest SELECTED HAMS, 

8d per Lb,, in Wholes and Halves. 

NOTHING FINER TO BE GOT FOR MORE MONEY. 



We have always in Stock a Fresh Lot of 

Feeding Stuffs for Poultry, Pigeons, «fcc, 

At very Lowest Prices. Special Quotations for Large Quantities. 

BASS' & ALLSOPP'S PALE ALE, 

2/3 per Dozen Pints. 



GERMAN li«6ER BEER PRPE GQNBI^QN, 

2s 3d per Dozen Pints. 

33 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



^7 



• 




WtXAIAH »I€ 

Ollothier, |)atta, & <§htrt Jftaker, 

Begs respectfully to thank his Patrons for past favours, and to intimate that his Stock 
"Sit all times is replete with the Newest and Best Goods in the Market, at the lowest 
possible price. GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS made to Measure in First-Class 
Style, Perfect Fit, and Best Workmanship. 



Overcoatings 

Coatings 

Suitings 

Trouserings 

Vestings 

Ladies' Cloths 

Shirtings 


Flannels 
Plaidings, &c. 
Lambswool Under- 
clothing 
Merino Underclothing 
Shirts and Fronts 
Collars and Cuffs 


Scarfs and Bows 
Hats and Gloves 
Caps and Bonnets 
Umbrellas and 

Braces 
Waterproof Coats, 

&c. 



92 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



ANDREW SHEPHERD, 

amilg §xah & §kmit §akr Sc fettMiotwr. 



PPPWBE. CHRISTENING. * SUPPER GW'ES. 

DISHES COVERED TO ORDER. 
SUPPLIED ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 

temperance §Ufo*ahment0* 



22 k 24 WEST HIGH STREET, Forfar. 



88 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



m® 14 



m 



•m, 



HAS always in Stock a Large and Varied Assortment of BOOTS and SHOES, 
suitable for the Season, at Reasonable Prices, made of good material and work- 
manship, that he can recommend to his Customers and the public generally. 

LADIES' BOOTS from 4s 6d to 12s 6d ; 

GENTS' BOOTS from 18s 6d to 14s 6d. 

A large lot of Boys' and Girls' Boots to hand, suitable for the season. Boots and 
Shoes of every description made to measure of best material and workmanship. 



Observe the Address— D. TARBAT, 13 East High Street, Forfar. 
WOOL MATTRESSES, 16/6 to 22s. 



CD 



«e 



in 

w 

< 



FAMILY MOURNING, 



Special attention is given to this Department, A large 
variety of Goods always kept in Stock. Having a numerous staff 
of Dressmakers, Mantlemakers, and Milliners, Orders for urgent 
FAMILY MOURNING can be made up on the Premises on Shortest 
Notice. 

SCALE OE CHARGES VERY MODERATE. 



WILLIAM WARDEN, 

Drapery, Millinery, Mantlemaking, Dressmaking, and 
Tailoring Establishment, 

23 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



M 
o 
d 

Hi 

K 
Q 

CO 



SEWING MACHINES at Special Prices. 



FOR THE BEST VALUE IN 

TEA-BREAD, SHORTBREAD, & CAKES, 
Confections, Jams & Jellies, Jfruit Mints, 

COSAQUES, HONEY, TEA, & FORFAR BRIDIES, 

TRY 



35 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



8 9 



DAVID IRONS, 
Hardware and Seed Merchant, 

14 EAST HIGH STREET, 

Has always on hand a general Assortment of House Furnishing Ironmongery, Table 
Cutlery, N.S. and TC.P, Spoons and Forks, Registered and Kinnaird Grates, Ranges 
(close and open fire). Paraffin Heating and Cooking Stoves, Mangles, Wringing 
Machines, Fenders, Fire Irons. Blacksmiths', Joiners', and Bootmakers' Furnishings. 



Agricultural Implements, and all General Farm Requisites. Spades, Shovels, 
Forks, Graips, Sacks, Ropes. Twines, &c. 



OILS— Burning", Harness, and Machinery- 



Benedict* anb <pilvevzmitt). 
WATCH & CLOCKMAKER, 



1® 



*>-', 



•o 



ht 



>MM 



f 



Always on hand 

A Good Selection of the Best Makes of GOLD and SILVER ENGLISH LEVER and 
Foreign WATCHES and JEWELLERY of every description. 



ELECTRO-PLATED GOODS IN GREAT VARIETY 



REPAIRS of all kinds in Town and Country Promptly and Carefully attended to. 

REPAIRS AND WINDINGS CONTRACTED FOR ANNUALLY. 



OPTICAL GOODS KEPT IN STOCK. 
Curling Stones in Stock, or got to Order. 



9 u 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 





*%gi 43) III ■ &) 

BOOTS & SHOES. 



ALL WHO REALLY WANT GOOD VALUE SHOULD TRY 



SOOTS, SHOES, AND f 



SLIPPERS 






© 



^fHTVl & /t^\ I b OO ts , SHOES, AND 

<gMJ ^J) ; SLIPPERS 



They are of First-Glass Workmanship, and manufactured from the best materials. 
Universal Satisfaction Guaranteed to All. 



REPAIRS, Special attention is given to this Department — the best materials 
used, and the lowest prices charged. Boots Re-Gussetted. 

CUSTQMEE WORK.— As HOOD is a practical tradesman in all the branches of 
the Boot and Shoe Trade, and employs none but the best of Workmen, he can with 
confidence recommend his own make — Pegged, Rivetted, and Sewed. 



Address-HOOD'S, 96 OASTLE ST., FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



9* 



IllSIES 1 



I 



A^Splendid Stock of SHOW & FANCY VARIETIES for Competition, 

from 3s to 12.S per dozen. 

ROSES, Finest Hybrid Perpetual, 8s to 12s per dozen. 
Do., Tea-Scented, 12s to 18s per dozen. 



Large Stock of BEDDING PLANTS, FRUIT, & VEGETABLES, in Season, 

Ai LOAVEST PRICKS. 



i#ii stilts® 

Sheriff Park, Glamis Road, Forfar. 



■fti 



4511 ■©' 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



GAME DEALER AID FRUITERER. 

66 EAST HIGH STREET, 



BUY YOUR 

GLASS, CHINA, EARTHENWARE, AND FURNITURE 
AT CHEAP WAREHOUSE, 

45 and 47 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

LARGE SELECTION ALWAYS ON HAND, 



92 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



P. A. TOSH, 

CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

SALES CONDUCTED. ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY 

ATTENDED TO- 



DAVID IASTEETON 



H Plak md Oraam€fttaJ PIast«f«f . j*- 

All kinds of TILE WORK, CEMENT WORK, 
CONCRETE FLOORS, &c. 



20 CANM0R£ STREET, FORFAR, 

/^ K<9£/ WANT FASHIONABLE AND EASY-FITTING 
HATS, YOU SHOULD TRY 



W® 14¥Il§@Ip 



OF THE 



FORFAR OPERATIVE HAT STORE, 

As he is the only Hatter in Town. Every description of Hat made to order. Hats 
Dressed and Altered to the present Fashion. Hats Trimmed for Mourning. 

Splendid Selection of Caps, Ties, &c, 97^ EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



ALEX, DALGETY, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRAPER, CLOTHIER, & OUTFITTER, 

55 & 57 East High Street, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



93 



Broken Plates 

Repaired, Teeth 

added, old or bad 

fitting sets 

remodelled and 

made as good as 

new. 



BEST ARTIFICIAL TEETH, 



AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 




Opposite the Auld 
Kirk Steeple. 

At Home every day. 



33 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



f. ill 




( g vT s> v( g ) / T iV T s Tf T^vT 5 ? & FT ft H^H^'FaT 5 ? . 

For Best Value in GENTS' and BOYS' CLOTHING, Visit 

Mann's ^fof^xng J^ott^e. 

o 

GENTS' SUITS, 45s to 90s. GENTS' TROUSERS, 13s 6d to 21s. 
YOUTHS' AND GENTS' READY-MADE TROUSERS. 5s to 9s. 
OVERCOATS, 15s 6d to 30s. BOYS' READY-MADE S, a Specialty. 



HP78 in S^TIN. PELT, apd 7WErZI3, of bhe Ripest gudlihy, 
CAPS, ALL STYLES AND SIZES. 

fjainler & gtearatar, 

DESIRES respectfully to call attention to his New Stock of PAPER-HANGINGS 
and GENERAL DECORATIONS, suitable for Rooms, Lobbies, and Stair- 
cases. Pattern Books and Decorative Designs sent to any address. All Orders will 
receive Prompt Attention. 



21 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS. 



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* ALEX. TODD, 

10 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR 

(ABOVE POST OFFICE). 



A GOOD SELECTION of TWEEDS, COATINGS, OVERCOATINGS, and 
LADIES' JACKETINGS to Choose from. 



Parties bringing their own Cloth can have it made up in the Latest Fashions. 



-:o:- 



MOURNINGS PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO 



TEEMS STRICTLY MODERATE. 



WM. ROSS, 

Wlgnlmk & JhiwIjj torn & Want §f^I;mL 



Splendid Stock of Old Brandies, Wines and Whisky. 

— o — 
Our Blend of Old Matured HIGHLAND WHISKY is Perfection, 

Ifbree Y ears ©1^' Blepded updsr Excise Supsrtfisiop, ah %s 5d pet? 

Gallon, 2s 1Qd Per Bobble. 

Old BRANDY, 10 Years old, 5s per Bottle. 

Large Stock of WINE at Moderate Prices. 



12 East High Street, Forfar. 

%* Goods delivered Free per own Van in Town or Country. 



9^ ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JAMES EWEN, 

Woob <fe §oaC l&erc£ant, 

IN soliciting a continuance of the support which he has received 
during the past forty-five years, begs to intimate that- he can always 
supply, 

At Current Prices, in any Quantity, 

Best English k Scotch Household Coals, 

English & Balqufyatstoft Nuts, 
SPLINT, STEAM, & SMALL COALS. 



SALT, WHITING, &c. 

FIREWOOD cut to LENGTHS. 



Special Prices for TRUCK LOADS or Large Quantities 

of any of the above. 

&xUxb pnnnptb attcnkb to. 



DEPOT AND OFFICES:- 

OLD RAILWAY STATION, VICTORIA STREET, 

AND 

FOHFAH SAW MILL. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 97 



e ^forfctr gfrexatb, 




PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY MORNING. 



Only Newspaper Published in Forfar. 

Large and Increasing Circulation. 

Best Medium for Local Advertisements. 

Publishers— CHRISTIE & IICOLSOI, 

PRINTERS, 6ASTLE STREET, fORFAR. 

D. P, THORNTON, 

BOOT & ©MOEIMJ^KEIR, 

84 West High Street, 

HAS always on hand a First-class Assortment of BOOTS AND SHOES, from 
the best Manufacturers in the trade, at very Moderate Prices. 

I would call special attention to my Stock of BOYS' & GIRLS' BOOTS, 
which for durability and price cannot be surpassed. 



^Boots & ?5f)oei5 of all imt&s made to Measure. 

Repairs of all kinds executed on the shortest notice. 



Note the Address— 84 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



9 8 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WMzWMwm^mmmmm^ 






0- 



JAMES W. ROBERTSON 



52 & 54 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



Large Stock of PAPfcfiHANCHNGS, 

To be Cleared out at Cost Price to make room for NEW STOCK. 



Sold in Bottles, at 40I, 6d, and 1/ each. 

B£ST FURNITURE POLISH, 

Sold in Bottles, at 4d, 6d, and 1/ each. 

PAINT, all Shades, sold in Tins, 6d each. 



Estimates Furnished for Painting & Glazing. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



99 



SPECIALTY IN PHOTOGRAPHS OF EXTRAORDINARY VALUE. 



Wffi 




w 

IMPERIAL SIZE, in Beautiful Alhambra Gilt Frame, of Superior Quality, 

Size, 20 by 16 inches, 

WITH CRIMSON FLOCK & GOLD CUT MOUNT, 

ALSO, 

6 CABINET CARDS, OR 12 MEDALLION, C.D.V., 

With Gold Gilt Edges, and all of the highest finish, 

FOR THE SUM OF 12S 6(1. 

CHAS. MITCHELL, Photographer. 

FORFAR, East High Street. 

KIRRIEMUIR, Station Brae. 

FALKIRK, the Garrison Studio. 



N.B.— In order to assist in producing the most Superior Work, intending Sitters 
are requested to come early in the day, when the light is good. 

TEETH SPECIALIST- 



Best Artificial Teeth 

Inserted on Shortest 

Notice, at most 
Moderate Charges. 



PR, FRENCH, 

33 EAST HIGH STREET, 

FORFAR. 

At Home every day. 



TEETH 

Most carefully extracted ; 

also, painless extractions 

under Gas, <kc, dkc. 



PERSONAL ATTENDANCE AND GREAT SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

IN ALL CASES. 



BERLIN WOOL REPOSITORY, 

20J WEST HIGH STREET. 



Miss J. FERG USON. 

BERLIN, FLEECY, FINGERING, MERINO, AND FINE KNITTING WOOLS. 

STAMPED GOODS for Crewel Work, Embroidery, Bead, & Wool Needle-Work. 
BABY-LINEN & UNDERCLOTHING. 

LADIES' WORK of all kinds Finished and Tastefully Made up. 



IOC 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 





% 






HOUSE and STEAM COAL MERCHANT, 

33? Victoria Street, tfoffkt. 



Every Description of COAL kept in Stock, and delivered to 
any part of the Town or Country. 



WAGGON LOADS sent to any STATION. 



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MELODEONS 

MELO DE ONS 
MELODEONS 



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Bookseller & Stationer, 

73 BAST HIGH ST., FORFAR, 

Keeps the best and most varied selection of 
MELODEONS in town. Best Quality, Strong 
and Durable. Personally Selected. 

Prices from 4/6 to 20/. 
MELODEONS & CONCERTINAS REPAIRED. 



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missTthom, 

130 EAST HIGH STREET, 

^JMJAS always in Stock a very choice selection of MILLINERY, 
]§|||f in all the Leading Styles. Also, all the NOVELTIES in 
LACE and Fancy Goods for evening wear. 



INSPECTION INVITED. 



130 EAST HIGH STREET, Forfar. 

JAMES SHEPHERD, JIM, 

CHINA MERCHANT, 124 WEST HIGH STREET, 

Has always on hand a large assortment of Staffordshire China and 
Earthenware. Table Crystal, from the Best English and Foreign 
Makers. Note the Address : — 

JAMES SHEPHERD, Junr,, 124 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



WILLIAM MOFFAT, 

SLATER, 

3 NEW ROAD, FORFAR. 

o 

ROOF LIGHTS, CHIMNEY CANS, CEMENT (best London). Large Stock always 

on hand, fresh. 

ORDERS IN TOWN & COUNTRY PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO, 
i 



102 ADVERTISEMENTS. 




i ». m%Tk 




•» 



I 

96 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR, 



AND 



GOURDON, BY MONTROSE, 

IMPORTER OF 

P®i?eigH and Eijgfistj Bpuil, 

ICE MERCHANT, <&c. 



THE Largest Buyer of any Inland Town in the North of Scotland. 
These few Seasons' Autumn and Winter Trade amounts to about 
300 Tons in weight. Established 1870. 



c-^^G*flgw£-^- -» 



FISH CURING PREMISES 

For Herrings, Haddocks, Smoked and Fresh Fish, Beach 
Dried Cod in season, at 

GOURDON (Established there 1879). 



Finest Quality COD LIVER OIL, warranted, retailed at 
2s per quart bottle, its equal rare to get at any price. 



Wholesale and Retail Fruit Depot, 

18 CASTLE ST, FORFAR, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 103 



BRITISH AND IRISH 

pate <Sla$s Insurance Compng, 



Insures all kinds of Glass. 



REPLACEMENTS MADE PROMPTLY, and no Re-Insurance Premium until end of year. 



70 CASTLE ST, FORFAR, Agent 

W. E. REID, Monikie Manse, Carnoustie, Manager. 

00&& in #Cegcmt ^Hndro&s 

FOR PRIZES & PRESENTATION, 



;- £j "» *b < « 



Magazines and Newspapers Supplied. 

i 




# ^l#'^ 



/;z #// Stvles a?id to any Pattern. 



W. SHEPHERD, 



Index to Advertisements. 



Page. 

Anderson & Co., Drapers 

feeing 2nd page of Cover. 

Bell, Mrs, Draper 79 

Boyle, J. S. , Fruit Merchant, etc. ... 102 
British and Irish Plate Glass 

Insurance Company 103 

Butch art, D. , Grocer 86 

Dalgety, Alex., Draper, etc 92 

Davidson, J., Hatter 92 

Dick, W., Clothier, etc 87 

Evening Telegraph 85 

Ewen, James, Wood Merchant, etc... 96 
Ferguson, Miss, Berlin Wool Reposi- 
tory 99 

Forfar Dispatch 81 

Forfar Herald 97 

French, Dr, Dentist 93-99 

Fullerton , W. , Shoemaker 78 

Gibson, W. A., Clothier, etc 84 

Gray, R. , China Merchant, etc 91 

Guthrie, G. , Game Dealer, etc 91 

Hendry & Warden, Drapers, etc 83 

Hood, D., Shoemaker 90 

Irons, D. , Ironmonger 89 

Langlands & Milne, Plumbers 79 

Low & Co. , Grocers, etc 80 

Mann, J. , Clothier, etc 93 

Marshall, J. , Draper, etc 84 

Masterton, D. Plasterer 92 

Meek, A. , Shoemaker 94 

Melvin, B. & M., Grocers tj 



Page. 

Mitchell, C. , Photographer 99 

Moffat, W. Slater 101 

M'Dougall, J., Shoemaker 79 

M ' Nab, R. , Clothier, etc 78 

Neill, J. , Music Teacher 81 

Paterson, Sons, & Co facing 53 

Petrie, Thomas 78 

Robertson, J. W. , Painter 98 

Rodger, D., Painter 93 

Ross, Wm., Grocer 95 

Saddler , J. , Confectioner 88 

Sharp, W. W. , Coal Merchant, etc... 100 

Shepherd, A., Baker 87 

Shepherd, A. & C. , Slaters 81 

Shepherd, Jas. , Jr., China Merchant 101 

Shepherd, W. , Printer, etc 60-103 

Simpson, John, Gardener 91 

Smith , Miss , Shoemaker 83 

Spalding, A. , Clothier — facing title page 

Steele, John & Co facing 52 

Strachan, John, Watchmaker 89 

Tarbat, D., Shoemaker 88 

Thom, Miss, Milliner 101 

Thom, C. & Son, Billposters 84 

Thomson, W. H., Bookseller, etc. ... 100 

Thornton, D. P., Shoemaker 97 

Todd, Alex., Tailor, etc 95 

Tosh, P. A., Auctioneer, etc 92-103 

Warden , W. , Draper, etc 88 

Whyte, D. , Potato Merchant, etc. ... 82 



A D VER TI SEMEN TS ON CO J EP. 



Dunn, R. & J., Boot Merchants Page 4 

Martin, James, Grocer 3 

Thom & Barclay, Drapers, etc = 2 



Bright, pure, and interesting reading for Sunday, 
with beautiful Illustrations, will be found in each Part of 

The Quiver, Monthly, /«•« ea. 

The NOVEMBER PART forms the First Part of the New Volume for 1887. 

*** Ask your Bookseller for a Prospectus of the New Volume. 




{From The Quiver.) 
" The Quiver is one of the very best of magazines." — Record. 
" The Quiver is unsurpassed as a magazine of religious, moral, and general 

utility." — The Queen. 
" Best of all the magazines devoted to Sunday reading." — Saturday Review. 
" It is through the beneficent influence of The Quiver that many a home in old 
England is to-day happy and prosperous." — Stockport Advertiser. 
Cassell & Company, Limited, London ; and of all Booksellers and at the Bookstalls. 



Cassell & Company's Complete Catalogue sent post free on application. 



"The stories in Cassell's Family Magazine are good, the 
pictures are clever, the selection of subjects is strikingly varied; 
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usually attractive." — The Times. 

V Order the DECEMBER PART of 



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price 7d., forming the First Part of the New Volume for 1887. 



? 




{From Cassell's Family Magazine.) 



LettS' S Diaries for 1887 are now ready at all 
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m 



NOTICE.— In each Monthly Part of 

The Magazine of ART 

there will in future be given a Photogravure, 
Steel Engraving, or Etching as a Frontispiece. 




From " The Magazine of Art." 



THE 
NOVEMBER PART, 

PRICE 

One Shilling, 

Forms the First 
Part of the New 
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"The exquisite beauty 
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"The Magazine of 
Art is the only Art 
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keeps pace with the 
moving current of 
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In Monthly Volumes, Is. each; or cloth, Us. each. 

Cassell's Red Library. 



Rome and the Early 

Christians. 
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Lyndsay. 
Poe's Works, Selected. 
Old Mortality. 
The Hour and the Man. 
Handy Andy. 
The Scarlet Letter. 
The Pickwick Papers. 

(Two Vols.), 
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The Old Curiosity Shop, 

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The Talisman. 

Washington Xrving's 

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Selected Essays. 
Harry Lorrequer. 
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plush Papers. 
&c. &c. &c. 



YULE TIDE, Cassells 
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price One Shilling, contains 
a Magnificent PICTURE 

in COLOURS, "Three 
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New Illustrated Boohs for Young People, 



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In Letters Of Flame. A Story of the Waldenses. 

By C. L. MATEAUX. 2s. 6d. 
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E. Wynne. 2s. 6d. 



^°THE QUEEN'S JUBILEE. 

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With numerous 
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QUEEN VICTORIA (at the time of her Accession). 
(From " The Life and Times of Queen Victoria") 



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Cassell & Company, Limited, Ludgate Hill, London. 



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ggr A J*iew MigSi-Class Magazine lor Ladies 

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lustrated Magazine of Fashion and Society. 

Monthly, price One Shilling. 

Illustrated with Original Coloured Plates and high-class Wood Engravings, 

and covering the entire range of subjects in which Ladies take an interest, 

EMBRACING— 
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Abroad. 
At Home with Ladies of Society. 
Pastimes and Amusements. 
Artistic Occupations for Ladies. 
The World of Music. 



Ladies' Work in the World of Edu- 
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and Medicine. 

Floral Decorations for the Table. 

Domestic Pursuits. 

Short Stories. 

<&c. &c. &c. 

* Full Prospectuses at all Booksellers, or post free from 

Cassell & Company, Limited, Ludgate Hill, London. 







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"A happy idea judiciously carried 
out,'" says The Times, is 'Cities of the 
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New Edition in Monthly Parts, at 7d., of 

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With about 600 Illustrations. 

Cassell & Company, Limited, London. 



Books for Holiday Heading. 

Kidnapped. By R. L. Stevenson. 5 s. , King Solomon's Mines. By R. Haggard. «. 

The Phantom City. By W. Westall. 5s. | Treasure Island. By R. L. Stevenson. 5s. 

Cassell & Company, Limited, London; and of all Booksellers and at the Bookstalls. 



New Serial Work. 

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In Weekly Volumes, price 3d. each. 

CasselVs National Library. 

Edited by Prof. HENET MOELET. 

VOL. Some of the Volumes now ready, price 3d. each ; or cloth, 6d. each, 

i. Warren Hastings Lord Macaulay. 

2. My Ten Years' Imprisonment Silvio Pellico. 

3. The Rivals, The School for Scandal Sheridan. 

4. The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. 

5. The Complete Angler Isaac Walton. 

6. Childe Harold Lord Byron. 

7. The Man of Feeling Mackenzie. 

8. Sermons on the Card Bishop i atimer. 

9. Lives of Alexander the Great and Caesar Plutarch. 

10. The Castle of Otranto Horace walpole. 

11. Voyages and Travels Sir John Maundeville. 

12. She Stoops to Conquer, and the Good-Matured Man .. Oliver Goldsmith. 

13. The Lady of the Lake Sir Walter Scott. 

14. Table Talk Martin Luther. 

15. The Wisdom of the Ancients, and New Atlantis .. Francis Bacon. 

16. Francis Bacon lord Macaulay. 

17. Lives of the English Poets Dr. Johnson. 

18. Thoughts on the Present Discontents Edmund Burke. 

19. The Battle of the Books, and other Short Pieces . . Jonathan Swift. 

20. Poems George Crabbe. 

21. Egypt and Scythia Herodotus. 

22. Hamlet Shakespeare. 

23. Voyagers' Tales Hakluyt's Collection. 

24. Nature and Art Mrs. Inchbald. 

25. Lives of Alcibiades and Coriolanus, «&c. Plutarch. 

26 & 27. Life and Adventures of Baron Trenck. 12 Vols.) 

28. Essays .. .. Abraham Cowley. 

29. Sir Roger de Coverley and the Spectator's Club . . Steele & Addison. 

30. Voyages and Travels . . Marco Polo. 

31. The Merchant of Venice .. Shakespeare. 

32. Religio Medici Sir Thomas Browne. 

33. The Diary of Samuel Pepys (1660— 1661.) 

34. Earlier Poems Milton. 

35. The North- West Passage Hakluyt's Collection. 

36. Sorrows of Werter Goethe. 

37. Lives of the English Poets (Series II.) Dr. Johnson. 

38. Nathan the Wise 11 Lessing. 

39. Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners John Bunyan. 

40. Macbeth Shakespeare. 

" The several opposition libraries, the issue of which Messrs. Cassell's spirited enterprise 
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Number 157 {price id.) of 

CasselVs Saturday Journal 

Forms the FIRST NUMBER of an entirely NEW VOLUME. 

Attractive as CasselVs Saturday Journal undoubtedly has been 
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In order to inaugurate the New Volume worthily in all respects, the Publishers 
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But it is in the intrinsic attractions of the Journal itself that the readers will 
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The amount and quality of the literature given, the high-class and yet 
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the brilliantly written Short Stories, and the. variety of its matter — furnishing 
attractive reading for old and young — these, and a hundred other characteristics 
of permanent and never-failing interest, will be found conspicuously present in 
No. 157, being tha First Number of the New Volume. 

%* Also published in Monthly Parts, (id. 

— '_.__,_ — _-,_-._■_■—_ - — - - - - a — ' - -. — — — — y y y» T ».yy - »y*y» w » »'t *-»t^ 



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53^ 



ENTIRELY NEW and REVISED EDITION, 
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CasselVs History of England, 

Reset in New Type, with about 2,000 ILLUSTRATIONS, a large number of 
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V With PART 1 is issued a Large PRESENTATION PLATE, suitable 
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of the celebrated Picture by Seymour Lucas, A.R.A., " The Armada 
is in Sight." 




landing of the Romans on the coast of kent. {From " Cassell's History of England."') 

" The most interesting, instructive, and entertaining history of our country 
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PROPERTY 

of 
c ORFAR PUS! . 




LIBRAR 



PROPERTY 
of 

FORFAR PUBLIC 
LIBRARY