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Full text of "Canadian grocer January-June 1896"

Library 

of the 

University of Toronto 



-i 







VOL. X 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 3, 1896. 



No. 1 





COLMANS MUSTARD 

HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 



ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 




TWO'GOLD'JMED^LS 
INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EXHIBITION LONDON 1S84 

0nly?ri^^edaLJondon.lS62, ^o^ OnlySilvterM«dal?aris.lX75 



Only JVVedal Dublin. 1S65. W grand qdl&ftfiMflosuM.RJZ&X 



HUNTLEY & PALMERS 

English Biscuits 

eP FOR EXCELLENCfi ^ 



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° ra ^f? S To HER MAJ ESTV *** ° 

KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 

READING and LONDON, ENGLAND 

Representative: MR. EDWARD VALPY, 49 Hudson Street, NEW YORK 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 






139 MEDALS AND HIGHEST AWARDS FROM THE WORLD'S EXHIBITIONS. 



Purveyors by special appointment 
to Her Majesty 

THE QUEEIS 

Empress of India. 




Purveyors by special appointment 
to H.R.H. the 

PRIDICE OF WALES 

K.G., K.T., K.P. 



MACONOCHIE 



131 Leadenhall Street 



LONDON, ENG. 



BROTHERS 



First Quality. 



Potted Meats and Fish Delicacies 




Fresh Herrings 
Kippered Herrings 
Bloaters and Bloater Paste 
Scotch Findon Haddocks 
Herrings in Shrimp Sauce 
Herrings a la Sardine 



All Herrings prepared by us are pre- 
served at Fraserburgh, Scotland, which is 
the largest fishing station in the world, 
and the quality of the Fraserburgh Her- 
rings is superior to all others. 




All particulars from agents : — 

SEETON & MITCHELL, Halifax, N.S. 

LIGHTBQUND, RALSTON k CO., Montreal 



Agents for British Columbia : 



& 



Vancouver and Victoria 









THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Standard Goods ^BesttoHancll e 



FRY'S 



Pure Concentrated 
Cocoa 

Pure Chocolate 

Vanilla and de Sante 
Chocolate 

Caracas Chocolate 



• • M, J f. J ■ -j • • • 




FRY'S 



Homeopathic Cocoa 

Diamond Chocolate 

Monogram Chocolate 

Gold Medal Sweet 
Chocolate 



THESE GOODS ARE SECOND TO NONE 



AFthlir P. TippGt & CO. Maritime Provinces, Ontario and Northwest. 



Thistle" 
Haddies 




ONLY THE BEST FISH ARE 
PACKED UNDER THIS BRAND 
AND EVERY CAN WARRANTED 



That's Why 



REPEAT ORDERS COME IN SO 
STEADILY 



^ TOWER'S 



Pure Lemon Syrup 

. . and . . 

Lime Juice Cordial 



AS LIGHT DRINKS FOR 
CHRISTMAS ARE UNSURPASSED 



They give Health, and Tone 
to the system. 




LAZENBY'S 

Solidified Table Jellies 

Are the best of their class on the market 
and are just splendid for dinner parties. 

. . . MANY FLAVORS . . . 



Arthur P. Tippet & Co. 



AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MANILLA and BLUE and WHITE DUPLEX 

Flour Sacks 



Regular sizes, 3^2 to 50 lbs. 
Special sizes made to order. 
Printed in any number of colors. 

Our patented method of undulating 
corrugation gives the sack an 
elasticity not attained in any other 
manner, while in quality the paper 
is absolutely without equal in 
its kind. 

Our larcre variety of cuts and 
special designs enables us 
to produce a sack most attractive 
in appearance. 



THE 



E. B. Eddy Co. 



LTD. 



Hull, Canada 



Agents: F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec; A. Powis, Hamilton; J. A. Hendry, Kingston; 
Schofield Bros., St. John ; J. Peters & Co., Halifax; Tees & Persse, Winnipeg; James 
Mitchell, Victoria ; Permanent agents not yet appointed for St. John's, Nfid., Sydney 
and Melbourne, Australia. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Grand Sultan 



COFFEE 



Ground or Whole. 



GRAND 
MOGUL 



Aunt Polly 



SELF-RISING 



V2 &. Ub. Air TightP kg*. 

EXCELS ALL OTHERS 



T. B. ESCOTT & CO. 



WHOLESALE GROCERS 



PANCAKE FLOUR 

2}4 lb. Packages. 

Best seller ever offered. 

LONDON, ONT. 




Blood Counts 



There is more "Imperial Cheese" 

sold than all other Potted Cheese in the 
world combined. 



Sample Pot Free on 
Application. 



PACKED ATTRACTIVELY IN WHITE OPAL JARS. 



A. F. MacLAREN & CO. 



Toronto 



When 
Write 

and we will 
give you 

Pointers 



How to increase your 
Tea Trade. 



you have caught on 



us 




ROSE & LAFLAMME 

MONTREAL, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



me St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co. 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL 

Laboratory of Inland Revenue, 
Office of Official Analyst, 

Montreal, April 8th, 1895. 

" I hereby certify that I have drawn, by my own hand, ten samples 
of the ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO.'S EXTRA STAND- 
ARD GRANULATED SUGAR, indiscriminately taken from ten lots 
of about 150 bbls. each, I have analysed same, and find them 
uniformly to contain : 

99i§§ to 100 per cent, of Pure Cane Sugar 

with no impurities whatever." 

(Signed) JOHN BAKER EDWARDS, Ph.D., D.C.L 

Prof, of Chemistry and Pub. Analyst, 

MONTREAL. 



™« BRANTFORD STONEWARE MFG. CO.,™ 

BRANTFORD, CANADA 

FOR . . . 

Rockingham, Yellow, Bristol and 
Salt-Glazed Stoneware 




Established 1849 



Incorporated 1894 



Manufacturers of Water Filters, Water Pitchers, Poultry Water 
Fonts, Jug=, Fruit Jars, Jam Jar 1 ;, Butter Pots, Cream Crocks, 
Churns. Pickle Jars, Flower Pot«. Ginger Beer Bottles, Ink and Fur- 
niture Cream Bottles, Oval and Round Baking Dishes, Pie Plat's, 
Stew Pots, Bowls, Tea and Coffee Pots, Bed Pans, Chambers, Cus- 
pidores, Spittoons, Stove and Fire Brick, etc., etc., and all kinds of 
Stoneware for Domestic and Chemical purposes. 

Price List and Terms on Application 



OTHER SPECIALTIES. 

NOUGAT 
RAHAT LAKUHM 
ALMOND ROCK 
EL MAHNA 



lf£» 



v<5r^J 




SPECIALTY CO., Toronto. 



BUTTER SCOTCH 

(The Celebrated Sweet for Children). 

WORKS «; LONDON.'jW.C, 



BU 



MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS. 

PARIS 

SYDNEY 

MELBOURNE 



A 



ROSE & LAFLAMME, Montreal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 









To Grocers 



The season is on for Marshall's popular Scotch Pickled Herrings. All 
principal wholesalers carry stock. The margin of profit to the dealer 
is good. He should not be without this leading brand. 



"CROWN" 



BRAND 



Marshall's Scotch Herrings 



FROM THE FAMED ABERDEEN FISHERIES 



In Kegs 
Firkins 
Half Barrels 
Barrels 



FULLS and 
MEDIUMS 

SOLE AGENTS : 



N. B. — Marshall & Co., Aberdeen, own their fishing fleet > 

pack only the Finest Selected Herring's. Every package 

guaranteed. Their Kippered. Fresh Herrings, Herrings in To- 
mato Sauce, etc., are very superior. 



WALTER R. WONHAM & SONS, 



3 I 5 and 3 I 6 Board of 
Trade Building, 



MONTREAL 






J£ »f» *f» «{* *f* A **• *f* *J* »T* *f"* *J* *J* *t* *t* *f* *J* *}* *J* *f» *{* *^* *f* *$* *t* *f* *t* *T* *f* *$* *T* 4* *T* *?* *T* '"f* *?* *T* *J* *T* *$* *T* Ji 



McLAREN'S 



is Honest Goods and just 

the Thing on Which to 

make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



Condensed Coffees 



If you have not handled " Reindeer " Brand 
Condensed Coffees, we should like you to give 
a sample order and try for yourself whether 
they are good or not. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



superb y 



YSONS 



a> 



EXTRA CHOICE 



NEW SEASON'S 



TO RETAIL AT 



50 CENTS 



Direct from country of growth and selected with a view 
to filling the demand for a delicately flavored, rich liquor- 
ing tea, at a moderate price. 

IN FULLEST CONFIDENCE we offer these lines, having 
exhaustively tested them. 

Ask for samples. It is a pleasure to show what real 
values we have. 

W. H. GILLARD & CO., whoi-i*. <.„*, Hamilton 

JOHN MOUAT, Northwest Representative, WINNIPEG. 



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FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS WHO BUY OUR GOODS 



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This journal has the largest circulation and the largest advertising 

patronage of any grocery paper in the world. We'prove it. 




Vol. X. (Published Weekly) 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 3, 1896 



(S2.00 per Year) No. I 



DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. 

An " ad " is an admirable trade winner. 

Murmuring and merchandise in the store 
are incompatible. 

Merchants who would succeed to-day 
must watch and pry. 

Stick-to-it-tiveness is a better quality than 
genius to wager upon. 

Merchants who refuse to give credit do 
not as a rule lose credit. 

To ensure its being read an advertisement 
must be bright and newsy. 

What use for a cash register has a mer- 
chant who does a credit trade ? 

Some match makers are not marriage 
makers, nor are all Eddy-fymg. 

Within the reach of every sane man are 
the elements essential to success in business. 

He who professes to sell his goods below 
cost is either lying or preparing to cheat his 
creditors. 

It is natural that the pedlar should push 
the merchant and the law officer aside : He 
is used to pushing — a cart. 

Opinions changed frequently denote in- 
stability ; advertisements changed frequent- 
ly denote practicability. 

Malice is a boomerang, for it injures the 
malicious infinitely more than it does those 
against whom it is levied. 

An association is an instrument for dis- 
sociating fog-yism, spleen, jealousy, and 
other evils from business men. 

A successful business man may have been 
your father, but it does not follow that you 
should religiously tread in his footsteps. 



Although they led him to Success they may 
lead you to Destruction. Times and 
methods have changed since your father 
was a merchant. 

A good resolution to make at this, the 
opening of the New Year, is never to be 
without your trade paper. 

A black sheep or a white sheep would the 
Creator have made you had he intended that 
you should follow where others led. 

Keenness in business men is much to be 
desired, but sharpness in manner toward 
customers is much to be deplored. 

Eschew those things which your business 
has not digested well during the past year, 
and feast on those which have proved nutri- 
tious. 

A thorn in the side to work much injury to 
trade, instead of a sword of protection there- 
to, appears to be the Customs tariff of the 
Uniied States. 

Unsoldered and caused to fall apart has 
the fire of jealousy many business men's as- 
sociations, while others it has prevented 
from being soldered. 

It has been intimated to me that Mr 
White, the new president of the Toronto 
Retail Grocers' Association, will make a 
" whi.e " chairman. 

A fallacious and fatal idea is it to fancy 
that people like to be "fooled" by mer- 
chants. They may be by circus men, but by 
business men never. 

Merchants are there, who, while they 
would not lie themselves, have no qualms of 
conscience about making their advertise- 
ments messengers of falsehoods. 

If when merchants for some unexplained 
reason lose customers they would go out 
and search d ligently for the cause thereof 
it would be poss.ble to keep others from 



straving through the same hole in the busi- 
ness fence. 

Some of the soap manufacturers in Sagi- 
naw, Mich., are wrapping their product in 
a wrapper, which has induced soap makers 
elsewhere to unwrap the vials of their wrath. 

As to whether the proposed United States 
tariff changes are in tne line of progress or 
of retrogression depends altogether upon the 
vantage ground from which they are viewed. 

As thick as leaves in Ambrosia were good 
resolutions on New Year's day, but as sparse 
as prairie grass after a fire will they be alter 
the whirlwind of temptation has stirred them 
up. 

Some of the trade papers are discussing 
the propriety of freezing canned goods. 
Freezing, it may be noted, has frozen out 
some of the packers of canned goods in 
Canada lately. 

Few business men would be eating leeks 
to-day had they partaken of a little reflection 
before they performed the act that subse- 
quently necessitated their swallowing Wales 
national emblem. 

He who is a member of an association is a 
spoke in the wheel of that association, and 
every time he absents himself from a meet- 
ing, by so much is the efficiency of the or- 
ganization impairea. 

The nearest approach to war which the 
United States is likely to be the scene of in 
this year of grace will be when President 
Cleveland and Congress cross swords over 
the amendments to the tariff. 

The store window is a mouth to the mer- 
chant through which he can sing the praises 
of his wares, and an eye to the public through 
which it can see the character of the goods 
heaped upon the shelves and counters inside. 



8 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



DRUMMERS IN ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE twenty-second annual general 
meeting of the Commercial Travelers' 
Association was held in the Audito- 
rium, Toronto, on Friday, the 27th ult., 
President R. H. Gray occupying the chair. 
The attendance was large. Mr. J. J. All- 
worth was elected recording secretary. 

The annual report and statement of the 
Board of Directors was read by Secretary 
Sargant. The report stated that the per- 
manent reserve fund now amounted to over 
$250,000. On November 30th the total 
membership amounted to 3,923, being an in- 
crease on last year of 159. The mortuiry 
payments during the year had amounted to 
$30,390. As there had been no fatal casual- 
ties during the year, the payments under the 
accident bonus bylaw were for minor claims 
only, and aggregated $1,671.50. The maxi- 
mum mortuary benefit for 1896 has been 
continued at $1,200. The premium to mem- 
bers is continued at the rate of $12 per an- 
num for a $5,oco policy. 

The cash abstract showed the receipts dur- 
ing the year to have been $63,065.02, of 
which $16,590.76 had been invested in de- 
bentures and a balance of $6,817.18 was in 
the Dominion Bank. There had been 
$32,061.50 paid in benefits and bonuses, and 
the remainder had gone for current ex- 
penses. 

The profit and loss account showed as 
follows: Receipts — Certificates, $39,318; 
interest,$8,778.n ; interest accrued, $144.90; 
rentals, $3,510; additional accident insur- 
ance, $2,049.25 ; total, $53,800.26. Dis- 
bursements — General expenses, $2,741.37 ; 
office expenses, $3,726.65; building expenses, 
$1,940.01 ; rent, $1,500 ; mortuary benefits, 
$30,390 ; accident bonuses, $1,671,50 ; furni- 
ture, $51.85. 

The president, in moving the adoption of 
the report, took an opportunity to deliver his 
annual address. He congratulated the as- 
sociation on the fact that its reserve fund had 
passed the desired quarter-million mark, 
notwithstanding the large mortuary claims 
of the past year. He animadverted upon the 
question of the additional accident policy of 
$5,000, and ventured th£ opinion that the 
Board had not received due credit from the 
membership in its efforts in regard thereto. . 

" I have heard," he continued, " remarks 
by some of our members that under our 
regulations a man has to die to win, and 
they would like something done for the liv- 
ing but unfortunate member who has become 
disabled and incapacitated from following 
his occupation. This is of course a reason- 
able thought, but, as you must all admit, you 
now get unusually good value for the small 
fee of $10, paid very generally by the mer- 
chant employer, and as no provision exists 
in our by-laws for the diversion of any part 
of the mortuary fund, and as by the advice 
of our actuary it would be most unwise to so 



divert it, if we could, there is nothing for it 
but to pay for such a scheme, if you wish one 
put in operation. At our last annual meet- 
ing a committee was appointed to inquire 
into this matter. Several meetings have 
been held during the year, and a crude plan 
of procedure has been laid out, which is in 
your hands. We cannot tell how it will 
work, nor can our actuary advise us, but we 
feel satisfied if a start is once mide by 500 
members, subscribing $5 each, that a com- 
mencement will be made which in the end 
will blossom out into proportions now un- 
dreamed of." 

He touched upon hotel sanitation, and the 
efforts that had been made to remedy exist- 
ing evils. He was sorry to say, however, 
that very little change for the better had 
taken place. " It is a very serious thing for 
you, gentlemen, who spend so much of your 
time in the small hotels of the country, that 
the sanitary condition of such places should 
be under Government surveillance," he add- 
ed. Before closing, the president put in a 
good word for the railways, and eulogized his 
fellow-officers. 

In the discussion which followed, Mr. Bed- 
lington pointed out that the sums paid out 
under the accident policies had been chiefly 
claims for bicycle accidents. He was of 
opinion that this class of accidents should in 
future be excluded from the provisions of 
the policies. He further expressed the 
opinion that it would be beneficial to the as- 
sociation were it to issue its own accident 
policies. 

Mr. Hugh Blain agreed with Mr. Bedling- 
ton in his last contention. 

The secretary's report was then adopted, 
and the financial statement was concurred 
in during the afternoon session. 

Mr. Joseph Taylor then presented, on be- 
half of the committee appointed at the last 
annual meeting to consider the question of 
the establishment of a " total disability 
fund," the report prepared on the subject. 
He read the rules which it was proposed 
should govern the fund, and which rendered 
it necessary for the recipient of the benefits 
to be obtained to ba entirely unable in any 
way to make his own living. It included 
total loss of sight, loss of both arms, and in- 
sanity. He urged very warmly that the fund 
should be extended so as to include cases of 
old age as well as of accident. 

Mr. C. H. Murdoch followed, and warmly 
supported the scheme and the suggestions 
made by Mr. Taylor. " We, as an associa- 
tion, have not one dollar to-day to give to 
you or to me or to any one of us in the case 
of any of us becoming incapacitated." 

Mr. E. S. Warne did not strongly oppose 
the scheme suggested by Messrs. Taylor and 
Murdoch, but he thought that it was neces- 
sary to have a fund raised and invested be- 
fore the paying of annuities to the totally 
disabled could be prudently begun. He 



therefore proposed that each member of the 
association should subscribe, first, $1 for 
each year be has been in the association, 
and then $5 for three years following. This 
he calculated would give a fund of $80,000, 
which at 4 per cent, would yield $3,200 per 
year, and this interest would give eight men 
$400 a year each. 

After further discussion a motion was 
adopted, thanking the committee for its 
labors, and asking it to further consider the 
question, and report again at the earliest 
moment possible. 

The scrutineers' report on the voting for 
the joint Boards of Directors for Toronto and 
Hamilton was submitted. It stated that 
1,168 ballots had been cast, of which 37 were 
not properly marked and were therefore ex- 
cluded. This left 1,131 correct ballots. .The 
following were reported as elected : 

For Toronto (18 candidates)— M. C. Ellis, 
Joseph Taylor, John Muldrew, J. H. De 
vaney, D. D. Braid, H. Gooderham, C. H 
Murdoch, E. E. Starr, Wm. Cauldwell. 

For Hamilton (10 candidates) — Wm 
Bremner, H. G. Wright, James Hooper, J 
H. Herring, Fred Johnston, W. G. Reid. 

After the adoption of a number of resolu 
tions, one of which was appointing Mr. A 
A. Allan as representative on the Industrial 
Exhibition Board, the meeting adjourned. 



SOAP FROM OLIVE KERNELS. 

This peculiar product is prepared in the 
consular district of Brindisi, Italy, says an 
English paper. The residue of the olive 
kernels is subjected to chemical process 
under the action of sulphuric acid, after all 
means of extraction by pressure have been 
exhausted. Of this substance it is stated 
that during 1894 the quantity produced 
amounted to about 1,200 tons, the medium 
market price for which ranged at about ,£18 
(say $90) per ton. This article, which is of 
little value as a lubricator, has an extensive 
sale for use in soap manufacture, and in 
years when the oil crop has been favorable 
considerable quantities have been exported 
tp America, Great Britain and Northern 
Europe. This oil is locally known as olio 
sulfureo, or sulphur oil, from the system of 
its extraction. The refuse left after the ex- 
traction of this oil is known as " sausa,"and 
it is used as fuel for steam boilers by millers, 
as being more economical than coal. 



RIO COFFEE PROSPECTS. 

The Rio News says : " The time is ap- 
proaching for the official estimates of the 
coming crops, and the general impression 
seems to be that everything eads.to expect 
the excellent outturn that has been pro- 
phesied. But November estimates are fre- 
quently very partial, and we confess to more 
confidence in those made after the turn of 
the year." 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CUT I 

this [ . . A Happy New Year 

OUT ) :o 

LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, 

Telephones 1258 and 447 Hillwattee Tea Agents, 

. . . HAMILTON, ONT. 

JAMES TURNER & CO. 

HAMILTON 



Keep a firm grip on your Tea trade 
Retain your Coffee trade 
Shut the fakirs out 



YOU CAN DO THIS BY 



Selling and pnshing RAM LAL'S TEA 
HandHng on,, ,hn MECCA COFFEE 



THESE GOODS CANNOT BE IMITATED ONCE INTRODUCED ALWAYS REPEATED 



TEAS 



We will offer during January exceptional 
values to clear out short lines. See our 
samples before buying. 

BALFOUR & CO. Who, S s r a oc e er S Hamilton, Ont. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



&ssrtgs$az 



n»aa%9*>@»@rt@»@g.'g3ffi^ 




WE WISH ALL OUR CUSTOMERS- 
AND FRIENDS 

A Happy and Prosperous New Year 



H. P. ECKARDT & CO. 



TORONTO 



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MARINE METAPHORS. 

THE sailor and his calling have fur- 
nished many of the descriptive words 
and phrases of every-day life, and the 
novelist and the preacher are continually 
going to Old Ocean for illustrations and 
other material, says Merchants' Revtew. 
The writer, therefore, will perhaps be ex- 
cused if he uses a few nautical metaphors to 
describe some of the dangers that threaten 
beginners in business who are starting out 
with small capital and less experience, and 
that threaten established dealers, too, when 
they have grown careless and over-confident. 

The newly-established business may ap- 
propriately be likened to a ship, the stock of 
merchandise to the cargo, the clerks to the 
crew, and the proprietor to the captain or 
skipper. 

The vessel, then, starts on her voyage to 
the port of Good Fortune, freighted with 
the entire wealth of her captain and owner, 
and with all his hopes and aspirations. The 
ship is barely out of sight of land when she 
encounters a severe gale, which sharply tests 
the seamanship of the commander and crew 
and the staunchness of the fabric which is 
bearing them from port to port. Ths vessel 
pitches and -rolls, straining her masts and 
seams, and it is imperative that sail should 
be taken in at once, though this may not be 
done without danger to the crew or loss of 
one or more of the sails. This may be ac- 
cepted as a not inapt description, in nautical 
language, of the condition of a young retail 
grocer and his business, after a few months' 
trading and when his capital has been re- 
duced by too easy credits, and the whole- 
saler begins to press for his just dues. If 
every hour of the day and night is filled with 
anxiety for the ship-captain while the crisis 
lasts, so also does the young dealer pass 
sleepless nights, and until he becomes hard- 
ened and willing to let the creditors " do the 
walking," spends a very anxious time during 
such spells of ill-fortune. 

If the ship, as we will call the business, is 
staunch and well-found, and the skipper or 
retailer is skilful, vigilant, persevering and 
sober, the craft usually manages to survive 



the mauling she receives, and finally makes 
her port all right, to the great profit of the 
dealer. 

But when a hurricane blows, out of a clear 
sky, just as some business panics come un- 
heralded, or almost so, the most experienced, 
vigilant and ingenious mariner is liable to 
be caught unready, and the vessel, or busi- 
ness, to founder with all on board, in the 
company of hundreds of other ill-fated craft. 

The pirate of marine life has his proto- 
type in the dead beat, the hated enemy of 
all grocers ; the reckless ship-captains who 
sail at full speed at night without warning 
signals, stand for the grocers who, without 
benefit to themselves but to the danger of 
others, rashly " cut " all the profit out of 
prices ; the knavish skippers who scuttle 
their vessels to get the insurance, are they 
not paralleled by the merchants who com- 
mit arson or swindle their creditors by means 
of Dogus bills of sale, " crooked " assign- 
ments, etc.? Is there any real difference in 
importance between a leak at sea and a leak 
in the store ? Are not manly courage, pru- 
dence, sagacity and energy needed to suc- 
cessfully conduct a business as well as to 
safely guide a fine vessel across the track- 
less ocean ? 

Th anks to the intelligence of young Ameri- 
cans, mutiny is a difficulty with which the 
average grocer is seldom bothered ; usually 
his little crew work hard during long hours 
and for wages not at all extravagant, and 
though the vessel may possibly be uuder- 
manned the work will, nevertheless, be well 
done. 

Now, if the crew are loyal and the ship is 
well-provisioned and tight, what is to hinder 
the voyage being prosperous, if no unusual 
tempests, otherwise panics, meet the vessel 
in her course ? Nothing, probably, unless 
the commander lacks the requisite qualities 
for a successful career or has not acquired 
the practical experience. Lack of experi- 
ence is the principal cause of the failure of 
the younger class of grocers, and this want 
can be supplied during a subordinate career, 
if the would-be employer will use his oppor- 
tunities. 



SPEARING SMELT. 

Smelt, writes our St. John, N.B , corres- 
pondent, are being speared on the north 
shore. One would think the fish too small, 
but a good mm will make $2 per d ay. A 
small shanty with no windows is built over 
the ice with a hole in the floor. A hole in 
the ice is cut the same size. Then a square 
piece of white cotton is sunk by weights 
attached to the corners and held in position 
by cords. The fish, as they pass over it, can 
be plainly seen, and the larger ones are 
speared. The spear is of s'.eel wire with a 
handle. There are two jaw shaped springs 
between which is the spear. Three or four 
fish will fit in at one time. The fishermen 
are taxed 50c. per spear. This method was 
first used by the Indians, and afterwards by 
the French. 



STORY OF A BUSHEL OF WHEAT. 

A milling trade organ publishes the follow- 
ing description of the manner in which a 
bushel of wheat is made to bear a variety of 
profits : 

1. The farmer lives on it -He raises it. 

2. The shipper lives on it— He ships it. 

3. The elevator man lives on it — He stores it. 

4. The Board of Trade man lives on it — He sells it . 

5. The miller lives on it— He mills it. 

6. The flour dealer lives on it — He sells it. 

7. The grocer lives on it — He sells it. 

8. The consumer lives on it — He eats it. 

They all buy and sell again at a profit ex- 
cept the last man, who pays all the profit the 
other seven have made. 

The only criticism we feel inclined to 
make on the above, remarks Merchants' Re- 
view, is in reference to the seventh item. By 
far too many grocers sell flour by the barrel 
at 25 cents to 50 cents profit, barely paying 
cost of handling, therefore it is too much to 
say " the grocer lives on it." 



The orange and lemon crop of Southern 
California this season is variously estimated 
from 9,000 to 1 1, 000 carloads of 300 boxes 
each. Last season the shipments from 
Riverside and immediate vicinity alone 
amounted to nearly 3,000 carloads, of which 
only about 70 carloads were lemons. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 11 



i Table 



Jellies 



EBENR. ROBERTS' 

Unequalled for Purity and Flavor 



ALL FLAVORS 

Quarts, Pints and Half-Pints 



| DAVIDSON & HAY, $£_* Toronto, Ont. | 

^iuiuuiiiiiuiuiikiumiuiiuiiiuiuiumiuiuiuiitiitiuiuuiiuiuiuiiuuuuuiuiuiiiiuiuiwuiuiiuiiuii 

r 

IT'S ALL BOSH 

This idea of buying your 
C. P. R 



GRAND TRUNK 
MICHIGAN CENTRAL 
RAILWAYS 



CEREAL GOODS 

all over the Province — your Rolled Oats one place, 
Cornmeal another place, and so on. We can put it all 

on ONE bill of lading. Do you want to save freight ? 



\ THE TILLSON COMPANY, Ltd. Ti.so n bur B , Ont. \ 



f It has a name . . . J 

i quality made it. — — ^ | 

J 

; 
_____ ; 

,. : Canadian Pacific Packing Co. j 

l viotoSTm. * LULU ISLAND, B.C. t 



i 
i 



" Flag- Ship " Brand Canned Salmon is kept at the high standard which has made 
it famous. The large and continuous demand shows that careful, buyers recognise this fact. 
Specify " FLAG-SHIP " BRAND in your next order for Salmon, then judge for yourself. 



ROBERT WARD & CO., Ltd. 

Sole Agents 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HALIFAX TRADE GOSSIP. 

AS IS usual during the week between 
Christmas and New Year's, trade is 
quiet in Halifax. In fact, dealers are 
enjoying the season as well as their custom- 
ers. The weather continues mild and open, 
and is more like April than December. 

The breadstuff markets have necessarily a 
holiday aspect, and yet, owing to the con- 
tinued mild weather, trade has kept up in a 
wonderful way, and there is still something 
doing. The out-ports are all open, which 
enables the coasters to get back and forth. 
As far as prices are concerned, there is no 
change. Stocks are small, but ample for 
present requirements. 

The flour trade during the year just clos- 
ing was better than the previous year. It is 
too soon to prognosticate for next year. 

The Refinery has put up granulated and 
yellow sugars a couple of fractions. This 
year has been one of the best for the Halifax 
refineries for some time. 

Green fruit dealers are doing quite a trade. 
They report the past season a very good 
one. 

All other lines remain quiet and un- 
changed. 

The Nappan dairy station has 400 cheese 
ready for shipment to England. 

F. H. Longley has been awarded the con- 
tract to supply the Victoria General Hospi- 
tal, and W. A. Maling the Insane Asylum, 



with meat for one year. Dillon Bros, have 
the contract to supply both with butter and 
groceries. 

Auld Bros, and Geo. H. Toombs, of Char- 
lottetown, are shipping frozen smelts to 
Boston. 

Wm. McDonald, for years on the road for 
the tea house of M. T. Foster, has accepted 
the maritime agency of Rawley & Davies, 
London. 

An officious Inland Revenue official here 
has received a well-merited snub. Inspector 
Barrodale issued an order the other day for 
the benefit of Halifax merchants who have 
excise warehouses. The order insisted that 
all goods (liquors and tobaccos) must be 
placed in warehouse in such a manner as to 
call for two feet of clear space between each 
row of casks or boxes. This would necessi- 
tate double warehouse room. The depart- 
ment at Ottawa was communicated with, and 
on Monday Mr. Barrodale was called upon 
to revoke his order. 



THE ENGLISH WAY. 

There is a custom in England, as well as 
in many of the larger cities of Continental 
Europe, that could be followed with excel- 
lent results by the merchants and tradesmen 
of this country, says Journal of Commerce. 
When a person enters a shop in London, for 
instance, and selects an article he may de- 
sire, no matter whit it is, and inquires the 



price, a certain sum is stated. If the buyer 
happens to have an account at the establish- 
ment and instructs the salesman to charge 
his purchase to him, he is politely informed 
that the price of the article is two or three 
pence higher than the first named cost. 

This system is followed in all the better 
mercantile establishments in the United 
Kingdom. The credit price is invariably a 
few pennies higher than the same article 
would be sold for spot cash. The reason for 
this is very simple and entirely proper. 
When a person buys a thing for cash the 
transaction is closed and there is no further 
expense involved to either party. When a 
person buys for credit, the item must be at- 
tended to by a bookkeeper, the services of a 
paid collector are brought into requisition 
for the bill, and the running expenses of the 
establishment wherein the trade took place 
are thus increased. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. J. B. McRae, the popular represent- 
ative of the Snow Drift Co., Brantford, Ont., 
for the eastern section of Ontario and Mon- 
treal, has been laid up for some time with a 
severe attack of pneumonia. His friends will 
be glad to hear he is now improving very 
rapidly. 

Robert Maxwell, the well-known city tra- 
veler with Perkins, Ince & Co., has been a 
Benedict for twenty-five years. The other 
night he celebrated his " Silver Wedding" 
in becoming style, and a large number of 
friends were present to offer their con- 
gratulations. 



Do you wish 

THE 

Best 
Gelatine 

9 



A 






In the world 
To-day . . . 



^qpARKhlNp 

Eeua™E 



C.B_l<N_Oj Ci 

JONNSTOW 



THEN BUY 



SPARKLING CALVES FOOT 



Knox's 

SPARKLING CA 

Gelatine 

IT IS THE PUREST MADE 

MAKES 2 QUARTS JELLY 



It is the only Gelatine usc-d and endorsed by the 
LE \MN r O TEACHERS of COOKERY in Che United 

Received the only MEDAL at the WORLD'S FAIR 
for its 

Strength, Purity and Good Flavor. 

The New Granulated Package dissolves in two m 
ntcs; other brands take one hour. 



WE GVARANTEE EVERY PACKAGE 

SEND VS A TRIAL ORDER 



HAVE YOU TRIED 



Knox's 
Crystallized 
Fruit *j 
Gelatine • 



It is in dry powdeP form, already 
flavored, simply needs dissolving in 
boiling water and set aside to cool. 

MAKES ONE QUART DELICIOUS JELLY 

It is packed 3 dozen assorted 
flavors in a case. 

LET US SEND YOU A , 



SAMPLE ORDER ' 

It is a good Profit Maker. 



We sell all the KNOX GELATINES, 
for they are THE BEST. 



YOU SHOULD TRY 

Knox's 

Acidulated 

Gelatine 

Is in Powder form. Requires 
no lemons or other fruit. 

♦ ♦ 

ONLY ONE TEASPOONFUL 

of any extract you may desire. 

sugar, and water, makes 

two quarts Jelly. 

♦ ♦ 

The package for the 
busy housekeeper 



Ask your Wholesale Grocer 
for Knox Gelatines ; If he 
will not get them for you, 
write us and we will see 
that your order is filled. 



A. E. RICHARDS & CO. 



Agents for Canada 



CALEDONIA, ONT. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



An Extract 



WnCrC&S} it is our desire to handle 
only the very best lines of goods 
for the New Year, be it 

lyCSOlVCCl that in Flavoring Extracts 
we sell only the "Crown Brand' 
manufactured by Robert Greig & 
Co., Montreal, knowing, as we do, 
that this trade mark is an absolute 
guarantee of strength, purity and 
excellence, our experience proving, 
also, that once our customers have 
used these goods, they will have 
no other. 

Signed 



L. S. 



The Grocers of Canada 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



FULL RANGE. 



FANCY GROCERIES 



TABLE 
RAISINS 



London Layers Imperial Clusters 
Fancy Clusters London Layers 

2% » Cartoons. 

Dehesa Clusters Loose Muscatels 



All varieties California Evaporated Fruits 

Franco American Plum Pudding, pound tins 
Glace Lemon, Orange and Citron Peels 

Batger's Nonpareil and Compote Jellies 

New Nuts, Tarragona S. S. Almonds 

Valencia Shelled Almonds, Barcelona and 
Sicily Filberts, Grenoble Walnuts. 



Turner, Mackeand & Co. 



Winnipeg 



'95 



Was 
Our 

Banner 
Year 



Snowdrift 



THANK YOU GENTLEMEN 



t*5now Drift ft ■ 



■*~ Brantford. Ont.-^ 



You will 
Find us 
in the 
Front row 
During 



'96 



Effectual Sweepings 



Are only 
to be made 
by using 



The DAISY 
T 
ROSE 



MP- BROOriS 



The best value, retailing at 

20, 25 and 30 cents. 



Lots of 5 dozen assorted freight allowed. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS - Toronto and Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 




J. B. Ma CLEAN, 

President. 



HUGH C. MacLEAN. 

Scc.-Treas. 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

LIMITED 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

and 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 



TORONTO : 
MONTREAL ; 



26 Front St. W. 
146 St. James St. 



EUROPEAN BRANCH: 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

John Cameron. General Subscription Agent. 



MONTREAL BUSINESS MEN DID IT. 

THE defeat of the Government candi- 
date in Montreal Centre is the most 
significant rebuff this or any other 
Dominion Cabinet has received for many, 
years. The schnol question may have been 
a factor ; the tariff may have influenced some 
votes. 

But the great factor which contributed to 
the defeat of the Government was the revolt 
of the business men of the city against an 
unbusiness-like and senile Cabinet. 

The merchants of Montreal have been 
Conservative and are still Conservative, but 
the present Cabinet has proved so inimical 
to the business interests of Montreal in par- 
ticular, and to those of the country in gen- 
eral, that, from a sense of self-preservation, 
they were compelled to vote against the 
party with which they had hitherto been 
hand in glove. 

In every commercial centre in the Domin- 
ion there is a feeling of contempt of the 
most pronounced type against the present 
Cabinet. Men who are merchants by pro- 
fession, and Conservatives in political sym- 
pathy, are humiliated because of the poor 
Cabinet material that is both bringing the 
country into bad odor and dragging the 
party to destruction. And, like those who 
were never anything else, they are out of 
sympathy with the party. 

In Montreal, this peculiarity is probably 
more pronounced than in any other c:ty. 
And naturally so, for there, in its action to- 
wards the business men, the incapacity of 
the Cabinet has been revealed in its essence. 

For nearly three years the por — the most 
important in the country — has been wihout 
a collector. And all the satisfiCtion the 
business men of the city could get, through 
memorials sent by the Board of Trade, was 
that the position would be " filled as soon as 
possible." Representations by deputations 
headed by such men as Mr. Laporte, o 



Laporte, Martin & Cie., regarding measures 
for the better carrying out of the French 
Treaty, have been trea'ed with silent con- 
tempt, while letters regarding departmental 
matters have either been unanswered or only 
answered after an unre isonable time had 
elapsed. Then, among other things, there 
have been petty, annoying, and iniquitousCus- 
toms regulations to stir up the antipathy of 
the business men and transform them into 
enemies of the Administration. 

The fact of the matter is the Cabinet 
lacks the common sense of the business 
man, the keenness of the politician, and even 
the natural quality of self- preservation. 
And under such conditions it is only nat- 
ural that, from a sense of self-preservation, 
the business men of Montreal should desire 
to give it its quietus, or, at least, see it re- 
modelled on a more businesslike and com- 
mon-sense basis. That the Montreal mer- 
chants essayed to do this is evident from an 
analysis of the recent vote. 

Centre Ward is the business ward of the 
city. In this ward, in 1891, the Liberals 
polled 234 votes and the Conservatives 357. 
In last week's contest the figures were 449 
and 394 respectively. In other words, the 
Government's majority of 123 in 1891 was 
turned into a minority of 92 on the 24th ult. 
And the influence of the business men was 
not confined to the Centre Ward. But in 
the wards where they and their employes 
resided the same factors, adverse to the 
Government candidate, were at work. 

The Canadian Grocer is not concern- 
ed as to whether the Cabinet at Ottawa be 
composed of Liberals or Conservatives, but 
it is concerned a great deal as to whether 
that Cabinet be composed of statesmen, and 
men of experience and ability who have 
shown themselves capable of successfully 
managing their own business, instead of 
ward politicians of less than the average 
ability who have failed at everything they 
have undertaken, and have failed signally in 
the management of the departments over 
which they have presided. 

It is more than eighteen months since we 
became firmly convinced that the present 
Cabinet took no interest in the affairs of the 
busine-s men. We saw that the only way to 
bring them to a sense of the r duty was per- 
sistent action and the united efforts of the 
Boards of Trade. Week afer week since 
then we have hammered away at the sub- 
ject. We have brought up grievance after 
grievance. Our articles have been republish- 
ed in the daily and weekly newspapers all 
over Canada. There has thus been a con- 
tinuous fire. In consequence, the Govern- 
ment issued orders to the departments that 
in future no Government advertisemen s were 
to be inserted in this paper. 

We have done our best to arouse the 
business men. The result in Montreal shows 
that our efforts have been successful. The 



result in Jacques Cartier County, adjoining 
Montrea', in which there is a large business 
vote, is a further proof ; a Liberal replacing 
a Conservative in that constituency this 
week. 

The present conditions seem to be similar 
to what they were in the. Mackenzie Gov- 
ernment. The business men then asked Sir 
Richard Cartwright for a measure of pro- 
tection. That gentleman told them in effect 
that he was running the country, and advised 
them to go home and mind their business. 
He had a big head. So have most members 
of the present Government. What the busi- 
ness men would like to see is a Government 
composed of the best men from both parties 
— that Government would carry the country. 



THE CUSTOMS CONTROLLERSHIP. 

NOW that the appointment of Hon. J. 
F. Wood to the Controllership of 
Customs is no longer a question, 
Saturday's Canada Gazette having announced 
the fact, the business men of the country are 
asking why, in appointing a Controller, a 
practical business man has been overlooked 
and a man of briefs selected for the position. 

The reason is not far to seek. There are 
some men who do not know a harrow from 
a seed drill. The Cabinet is in a similar 
condition, the only difference being that it 
does not realize the fact that a man of busi- 
ness is one thing and a man of law or medi- 
cine another. 

It is no wonder the business men of the 
country are surprised at the absurdity of the 
Cabinet appointing a lawyer to the Control- 
lership of a purely business department, for 
they realize that were they to make the same 
indiscriminate appointments to the heads of 
their departments the sheriff would soon be 
in possession of their business. 

Col. Prior, who has been taken into the 
Cabinet and placed at the head of the In- 
land Revenue Department, is a practical and 
successful business man. He, or some other 
business man, should have been given the 
Controllership of Customs. And while the 
business men have not one word to say 
against Mr. Wood, they have a great deal 
to say against the Government for making 
him, instead of Col. Prior, Controller of 
Customs. 

The reason the Government advanced Mr. 
Wood to the Customs Department was un- 
doubtedly that he had greater influence with 
the Cabinet than Col. Prior, and Mr. Wood 
was no doubt equally willing to take the 
position, for the Customs. Department would 
affjrd him more opportuniiies for awarding 
his friends easy offices, and thereby, of 
course, increasing his power. This is, of 
course, the gauge that is used to ascertain 
a Cabinet Minster's ability. But it is none 
the less a reprehensible one, and one which 
the people of this country should frown 
down, and fortunately they are beginning to 
frown it down. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE RATE ON " DROP " LETTERS. 



A 



city. 



FEW days ago a man was arraigned 
before a Montreal magistrate and 
fined for delivering letters in that 



This is quite in accordance with the 
Postal Act of the country. Clause 34 of that 
Act declares that the " Postmaster-General 
shall have sale and exclusive privileges of 
conveying, receiving, collecting, sending 
and delivering letters within Canada." And 
the same clause further declares that any 
one "conveying, delivering," etc., letters 
unlawfully " shall for each and every letter 
so unlawfully conveyed or undertaken incur 
a penalty not exceeding $20." 

The same clause also cites certain condi- 
tions under which letters can be carried or 
delivered by private persons, viz. : letters by 
private friends ; letters sent by messenger 
on purposes concerning the private affairs 
of the sender or receiver ; commission writs; 
letters addressed to places out of Canada 
and sent by sea and by private vessel ; let- 
ters brought into Canada and immediately 
posted at the nearest post office. But it is 
specifically laid down that no person shall 
" collect any such excepted letters for the 
purpose of sending or conveying them. 

Briefly, then, while the law permits a firm 
sending its clerk out to deliver its private 
letters, it prohibits a firm from establishing 
itself as an agency for collecting, conveying 
or delivering letters. 

With the law itself The Canadian Gro- 
cer has no exception to take. It is per- 
fectly right thit the Postmaster General 
should monopolize the work of collecting 
and delivering letters. In fact we do not 
think we would look with disfavor upon a 
proposition for the Postal Department to 
monopolize the delivery of newspapers as 
well as letters. 

The only point where we take issue with 
the Postal Department is in regard to the 
manner in which it takes advantage of its 
power of monopoly to unnecessarily tax the 
business men of the country. 

We refer particularly to the postage on 
"drop" letters — letters for local delivery. 

When it is found necessary to increase the 
burdens of the people, it is usually the busi- 
ness men of the country that are selected to 
bear the heavy end. And the Dominion 
Government is not alone in this respect ; the 
Provincial Governments ae quite able to do 
this same thing. The recent business tax 
in Montreal demonstrates that. 

When, some six or seven years ago, the 
Postal Department undertook to raise more 
revenue, it was decided to increase the rate 
for the delivery of local letters by 100 per 
cent., and the registration rate by 150 per 
cent. There is no gainsaying that the bur- 
den of this fell largely upon the mercantile 
men. And the fact that since these in- 
creases were made the Boards of Trade in 
different parts of the Dominion have repeat- 



edly, though ineffectually, urged upon the 
Department the necessity of lightening 
these burdens still further exemplifies it. 

The reason assigned for increasing the 
rate on the drop letters was that the Depart- 
ment could not afford to deliver them for 
two cents, and for increasing the rate 1 50 per 
cent, on registered letters, grea'er efficiency 
was promised. As for any improvement that 
has been made, we fail to see where it has 
materialized. We know from the Postal 
Department's own report that in 1894 there 
were 222 cases of abstraction from, or total 
loss of, registered letters, against 149 the 
previous year — an increase of 73. 

True, the Postal Department does not 
pay its way. Last year the deficit was $707,- 
920, against $647,690 in 1893 and $663 375 
in 1892. 

But deficits are not, as a rule, turned into 
surpluses by an inordinate tax upon the 
revenue producers in a free country. And 
notwithstanding the commercial growth of 
the last ten years, there has been a diminu- 
tion in the number of registered letters, 
there being nearly a quarter-million less in 
1894 than in 1885, while just about the time 
the extra rate was put on, the number which 
passed through the mails was nearly half 
a million more than in 1894. Last year the 
registered letters carried through the mails 
averaged 60 per head of population, against 
64 in 1893. 

The sum and substance of the whole mat- 
ter is not that the Postal Department is in- 
sufficiently paid for the letters it carries : 
the cause of ihe trouble is that the Depart- 
ment is not run close enough to business 
principles. The Postmaster-General's re- 
port of last year shows that no less than 
4,925,500 letters were carried free, or about 
five out of every one hundred letters de- 
livered. Then thousands of dollars are an- 
nually lost through the abuse of the news- 
paper delivery system. Every year untold 
numbers of papers that are advertising 
fakes of the worst kind have free use of the 
mails in direct contradistinction of the regu- 
lations of the department. 

But where the greatest saving would be 
enailed would undoubtedly be in the run- 
ning expenses of the department. At present 
the expenditure is 88c. per head of popula- 
tion, against a revenue of 74c. per head. 
The franking or free delivery system should 
be done away with al ogether except in so 
far as it relates to mail matter purely be- 
longing to the Department. The other de- 
par ments in the governmental system 
should pay postage, and postage should be 
charged on letters particularly sent out by, 
or received by, members of Parliament. 
Then, there are those in the service of the 
Department whose heaviest work is the 
drawing of their salaries. They should be 
dispensed with. 

Put a practical business man with force of 
character at the head of the department, 



and we should soon have cheaper local and 
registered letter rates without in the slightest 
degree crippling the revenue. At any rate, 
when private individuals are willing to de- 
liver " drop" letters fifty per cent, below the 
rate now obtaining, the Department ought 
to be able to do so. If it cannot, it should 
surrender the monopoly it now enjoys, for it 
has no right to a monopoly that unneces- 
sarily burdens the business interests of the 
country. 

HOW TO SAVE ONE DOLLAR. 

There are hundreds of general merchants 
who are subscribers to The Canadian 
Grocer who should be subscribers to The 
Dry Goods Review as well. This latter 
paper contains as much valuable informa- 
tion as the former. Each number is pro- 
fusely illustrated, and contains valuable 
pom ers on new goods, bargains, window 
dressing, store management, etc. We club 
the two papers for Three Dollars a year. 
Please send in One Dollar while you have 
it in mind, and begin with the first issue of 
1896. Here is one firm's idea of The Re- 
view : 

The Dry Goods Review has jusi come to hand, but we 
have not had time to do more than glance through it, but 
that was sufficient to show that we can get many pointers 
from it. Yours truly, 

McCallum & Douglas, 

Innisfail, Alia. 



A LESSON IN POULTRY. 

Time and again has The Canadian 
Grocer urged prompt shipment of poultry. 
Had these suggestions be?n more generally 
acted upon better results would have been 
obtained during the holiday season than 
were experienced. 

During the early part of the past week 
poultry was scarcely to be had for love or 
money. As a result quotations went away 
up, but as there were not many shipments 
on the market few were benefited by the 
higher values. 

Close upon the advance in prices natur- 
ally came liberal supplies, and the concomi- 
tant of that was, of course, lower values. 
Tuesday night saw a drop of two cents per 
pound on the figures ruling in the morning. 
And Thursday saw a still weaker market. 



THE MONTREAL COLLECTORSHIP. 

The Government has at last filled the 
long vacant col ectorship of Montreal, Mr. 
R. S. White being appointed to the position 
on the last day of the old year. 

Had the office been filled three months 
ago Montreal Centre would not have gone 
aga nst the Government by the majority it 
did on the 24th ult. And had the appoint- 
ment been made s x months ago it is pos- 
sible that the constituency might have been 
saved to the Government. 

Mr. White has managed with credit the 
newspaper of which he is at the head, and it 
is quite reasonable to suppose that he will 
make an acceptable collector of Customs. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



T 



SUGAR MARKET OF 1895. 

HE sugar market of 1895 w 'l' stand 
out unique in the history of the 
trade. 



Paradoxical as it may seem, it was a year 
which witnessed low prices and high prices, 
big profits and small profits, great promises 
and great disappointments. 

When the year opened refiners' price for 
granulated, delivered in Toronto, was zH^- 
per pound. This was about equal to 4 22c. 
to-day, wi h the extra half-cent per pound 
duty. About the middle of January the 
price declined one-eighth, bringing the quot- 
* ation down to 3j£c, or about equal to 4.10c. 
to day. Three and a half cents per pound 
was the lowest point granulated sugar had 
touched in the history of the country. 

This price obtained till the middle of 
March, when it declined another eighth, 
again beating the record for lowness of quot- 
ation. And the end was not yet, for about 
the middle of the following month a further 
decline of one-sixteenth was recorded. 

On the first day of May there was a slight 
recovery, the refiners making sales at 3%c. 
And less than a week afterwards they were 
demanding and obtaining 4c. per pound, the 
duty in the meantime having been increased 
from 64c. per 100 pounds to $1.14 per 100 
pounds. As the increase in the duty was 
50c. per 100 pounds, it will be seen that the 
advance in price was one-eighth cent per 
pound more than the amount of the duty. 
But this was warranted to some extent at 
least by the condition of the outside markets. 
A few days later another eighth of a cent 
wes added to the price. 

The increase in the duty on sugar, it will 
be remembered, came as a surprise to the 
trade, and consequently the wholesale houses, 
as a rule, only held moderate stocks. There 
were exceptions, however, but these excep- 
tions had laid in good stocks, not because 
they expected a change in the duty, but be- 
cause they deemed the condition of the mar- 
ket warranted the;r anticipating their wants. 
Those who were thus fortunate, and even 
those who bought on the first advance after 
the increased duty was put on, made money. 
A profit of $3 per barrel was common. 

Anticipating further material advances, 
there was some heavy buying of sugar for a 
while. The fever was caught by those other 
than grocers : jam and preserve manufactur- 
ers and householders, all anticipated their 
wants to an unusual extent. And this fact 
aggravated the trouble that developed later 
in the season. 

The advances of May were well maintain- 
ed till toward the end of July, when prices 
declined a sixteenth, but a few weeks later 
4>£c. per pound was again the refiners' 
figure. Towards the end of August, how- 
ever, after a particularly heavy period of 
buying, the market again sagged. October 



saw the market stronger, with refiners' price 
at 4X to 4K c -> delivered in Toronto. The 
demand during October was light, but prices 
were fairly firm. The la'ter part of Novem- 
ber saw a little easier feeling, but the second 
week of December saw the development of a 
better feeling and an improvement in the de- 
mand. The end of the third week saw an 
advance of an eighth, and on the 30th, there 
was ano'.her gain of the same amount, mak- 
ing a total advance of a quarter cent per 
pound in less than a week. Refiners' prices 
to-day are 4>£ to 4 9-16C, delivered in 
Toronto net cash. 

Although a great deal of money was made 
by wholesalers, in May and June particu- 
larly, yet business during what is known as 
the purely sugar months was disappointing. 
The factors which induced this were, first, 
the heavy supplies left over from the specu- 
lative buying of May, and, secondly, the 
failure of the fruit crop, and the consequent 
haste of speculative holders to unload when 
they discovered that the market was going 
against them. 



AN ADVANCE IN SUGAR. 

REFINED sugar has been poin'ing to 
an advance for some time, and it will 
be no surprise to the trade generally 
that refiners in Montreal have marked up 
their prices %c. per lb. all round dur.ng the 
past week. 

About a fortnight ago they put up the price 
of low grade refined yellows %c. per lb., 
and it was then the general expectation that 
all grades up to granulated would follow suit. 

The refiners, however, concluded not to 
make any change, but since then circum- 
stances have forced them to alter their opin- 
ion. 

In the first place, the price of refined sugar 
in Montreal has all along been below the 
parity with New York prices. That market 
advanced a short time ago, and the rise in- 
duced an active enquiry. This, with the 
position of affairs in Cuba, and the general 
tendency of the raw market, set wholesale 
grocers, jobbers and buyers generally, think- 
ing whether it was not the time to buy. They 
concluded that it was, and the decision re- 
sulted in an active demand during the past 
eight or ten days at the refineries from buy- 
ers who wanted to get their orders placed 
before the advance. 

As only one of the refineries has been 
running on short time, and as stocks of 
refined in first hands were small, it is not 
surprising, considering outside conditions, 
that the advance of this v/eek was decided 
upon, all the more so as the demand still 
keeps up. In fact, still higher prices are 
looked for on Tuesday's basis at the re- 
fineries, which is as follows : Granulated, 
250 barrel lots, 4^c. ; smaller lots, 4>£c. ; 
yellows, y/z to 4c. 

In New York granulated is now quoted at 
4 13-16C, or an advance of ^c, and large 



sales of 96 crystals are reported from that 
market at 3-^c. 

Priva e cables from London were strong 
this week, and quoted beet at us. for Decern 
ber and January, f.o.b. 

The feeling is spreading more and more 
that the Cuba crop will be very short. As to 
the beet crop in Europe contradictory esti- 
mates are given. 

The London Grocer, one of the best 
authorities on the subject, has the following 
to say of the matter : 

" To prove the truth of our assertions, we 
here append statements compiled by the 
several enumerators under the all-embracing 
title of 'popular estimates,' of the conti- 
nental beet crops now being gathered, from 
which it will be seen that they differ to the ex- 
tent of not only tens of thousands, but 
hundreds of thousands of tons from each 
other, viz. : 

'- — Tons. 

First popular Second Third Fourth 
estimate. ditto. ditto. ditto. 

Germany 1,400,000 to 1,525,000 1,320,000 1,475,000 1,431,000 

Austria 775,000 to 825,000 740,000 800,000 716,000 

France 630,000 to 680,000 592,000 650,000 618,000 

Russia 600,000 to 640,000 590,000 630,000 593,000 

Belgium 220,000 to 245,000 207,000 225,000 210,000 

Holland 85,000 to 95,000 108,000 90,000 102,000 

Oth. countries 120,000 to 140,000 130,000 130,000 130,000 

Totals . . . .3,830,000 to 4,150,000 3,687,000 4,000,000 3,800,000 

" Then we come to consider the weight of 
the ' visible supplies,' as the cane and beet 
sugars are termed that are in stock, afloat or 
available at various places, and these, we 
are told, are found to be more or less unreli- 
able through certain mistakes having been 
detected in the totals representing the Cuban 
stocks, which, it appears, have been counted 
twice over, to the tune of about 270,000 
tons ; and, what is more, these 'mistakes' 
are openly acknowledged to be such by their 
authors. Amid so much that is confusing and 
hard to reconcile in the present framework 
of statistics as a whole, it is not surprising 
that the home trade, in their doubts as to 
which is the safest course to pursue, act with 
extra caution and reserve at this juncture of 
events, and prefer waiting for what bet- 
ter chances of operating the future may un- 
fold to them, rather than follow wherever 
speculators may choose to point." 



THE OUTLOOK FOR BUTTER. 

A fairly good quantity of butter has been 
going forward during the past few days, ac- 
cording to reports furnished by Toronto 
dealers, but the outlook is not considered 
roseate. 

The disturbing element is the English 
market. During the past month that mar- 
ket has declined something like 40s. per 112 
pounds. 

It will be remembered that, when the fact 
became known that the dry season had 
affected the output in Australia and that Den- 
mark would have a short supply, the price 
of butter advanced enormously. But this 
advance drew unusualy heavy supp'ies from 
Canadian and United States ports, with the 
result that prices were eventually broken, 
and the market is still in an unsatisfactory 
condition. 



18 THE CANADIAN GROCER 

DON'T BUY 
RIO COFFEE 



Until you get our prices, or you will miss one of the biggest snaps of '96. 
JUST TO HAND — A large consignment bought at most advantageous 
figures, and we are going to give the trade the benefit. 



IMPERIAL PLUMS 



In 25 -lb. boxes. 



Beautiful goods. In prime condition, 

We are heavy purchasers and offer bargain prices. 

A Word to the Wise is Sufficient. WRITE US. 



W. H. GILLARD & CO. !?!™«™ HAMILTON 



Package Goods 
Trade 



With us beats all 
previous years. Never 
had such a demand 
for fine goods before. 
All varieties selling 
with the most gratify- 
ing success. Can't we 
make you up an order 
out of the following 
choice assortment ? 

Desiccated Rolled Oats 

Desiccated Rolled Wheat 

Desiccated Rolled Barley 

Breakfast Hominy 

Prlc? List^ Buckwheat FlOUr (Self-Raising) 

^ IRELAND NATIONAL FOOD CO. Ltd. 

operating T*^j^c-*mi^ Toronto, Canada. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




i 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 
GROCERIES. 

INTEREST during the past week has 
been centred in the sugar market. On 
Friday last the refineries marked prices 
up an eighth, and on Tuesday the operation 
was repeated, making a total gain of one- 
fourth of a cent per pound. At the advance 
there has been some good buying for this 
time of the year. Outside sugar, the gro- 
cery market has been dull and featureless. 
All the travelers, with one or two exceptions, 
remained in town on Monday and Tuesday. 
The exceptions who went out did not, it is 
said, get enough business to allow even the 
amount of the invoices to equal their expen- 
ses. Yesterday (Thursday) saw, however, 
most of the travelers filing stationwards with 
their "grips." And a week or so will pro- 
bably see the wheels of commerce moving a 
little more briskly again. In the meantime 
the sample rooms present a deserted ap- 
pearance, for most of the staffs are in the 
warerooms assisting in taking stock. The 
only commodity outside sugar that is re- 
ceiving anything approaching attention is 
Ceylon tea, quite a lew transactions in which 
have been received during the week. 

CANNED GOODS. 

The volume of business is still limited, and 
there is no change to note in prices. We 
quote: Tomatoes, 77 Yz to 85c; corn, 75 to 
85c; peas,90to95c. for ordinary; sifted, $1 05 
to $1.10; extra sifted, $1.50 to $1.55; 
peaches, $2.90 to $3 for 3's, $1.90 to $2 
for 2's ; raspberries, $1.40 to $2.00 ; straw- 
berries^. 80 to $2.4 5, according to brand and 
quality; blackberries, $1.90 to $2.20; cherries, 
$2.40 to $2.45 ; apples, 3's, 85 to 90c; 
gallons, $1.90 to 2.25; salmon, "Horseshoe," 
$1.35 to $1.40; "Maple Leaf," $1.35; "Lion," 
$1.35; Lowe Inlet, $1.27 to $1.30, in tall tins; 
cohoes,$i. 10 to $1.20; canned mackerel, $1.10 
to $1.20; lobsters, $1.80 to $2.10, for tall tins; 
flats, $2.35 to $2.65; half tins, $1.45 to $1.50; 
Canadian canned beef, i's, $1.40 to $1.50; 
2's, $2.40 to $2. 55; 6's, $7.75 to $8.25; 14's, 
$16 to $18. 

COFFEE. 

There has been a fair demand for green 
coffees, particularly Rios, although a fair 
quantity of Javas and Mochas have gone out 
on city account. We quote green in bags : 
Rio, 19 to 21c; Eas* Indian, 27 to 30c; 
South American, 21 to 23c; Santos, 19 to 
22^c; Java, 30 to 33c; Mocha, 33 to 35c; 
Maracaibo, 21 to 23c; Jamaica, 21 to 25c. 

SUGAR. 
The sugar market his been characterized 
by a great deal of strength during the past 
week. In sympathy with the firmer feeling 
outside, prices on Friday last were ad- 
vanced Y&c. per lb. by the Canadian refiners, 
and four days later (Tuesday) they repeated 
the dose, making the total gain Xc. per lb. 
Being stock-taking time, most of the local 
wholesalers are caught with light stocks. 
Considering the season, there has been a 
good deal of buying daring the past week 
or ten days, both of carload and small lots. 



The ruling idea for granulated is now 4/ic. 
per lb., although 4^ to 4^c. may be given 
as the range. For yellows the lowest idea 
appears to be about 3^c. 

SYRUPS. 
There is not much doing and stocks are 
light. We quote : Dark, 30 to 32c; medium, 
33 to 35 c - : bright, 40 to 42c. 
MOLASSES. 
The demand continues to be limited. A 
Halifax firm has been offering 3 carloads of 
West India molasses on the local market 
during the week, but no transactions are 
reported. We quote : New Orleans, bar- 
rels, 25 to 32c; half-barrels, 33^ to 35c; 
Barbadoes, barels, 31 to 35c. ; half-barrels, 
33 to 37C 

SPICES. 

Nutmegs are about is. easier, but the 
local market remains unchanged. Cream 
of tartar is 5s. 6d. dearer in the primary 
markets and the feeling is stronger locally 
in consequence. The spice trade con- 
tinues fair for the season. We quote : 
Pure black pepper, 10 to 12c. ; pure 
white, 18 to 25c; pure Jamaica ginger, 
231025c; cloves, 15 to 20c; pure mixed 
spice, 25 to 30c; cream of tartar, French, 25 
to 27c; ditto, best, 28 to 30c. per lb : all- 
spice, 14 to 18c. 

NUTS. 

There are no Brazilian nuts to be had on 
the street. Shipments of Bordeaux and 
Grenoble walnuts have been received 
during the week. Trade is quiet. We 
quote as follows: Brazil nuts, 14 to 15c; 
Sicily shelled almonds, 25 to 26c; Tar- 
ragona almonds, 14 to I4>£c.; peanuts, 10 to 
120 for roasted, and 7 to 10c. for 
green; cocoanuts, $4.50 to $5 per sack; 
Grenoble walnuts, 12 to 12XC. Marbot 
walnuts, 11 to 12c; Bordeaux walnuts, 9c. ; 
Sicily filberts, 8 to 10c, for sacks and 
10 1 4 to lie. for small lots ; pecans, 10 % 
to lie. 

TEAS. 

There have been some continued heavy 
purchases of Ceylon tea in the lower grades, 
and thete have been some transactions in 
fine grades of the same growth. Young 
Hysons are now in plentiful supply, and rela- 
tively are showing better value than Japan 
teas. China blacks are neglected. In Lon- 
don, England, a good demand is reported 
for fine liquoring Ceylon teas up to is., and 
Indian teas for a price. We quote ruling 
prices to retailers as follows : Young 
Hysons, 12 to 18c. for low grades, 24 
to 27c. for mediums, and 30 to 45c. for 
high grades ; China Congous, 14 to 18c. 
for mediums, and 25 to 55c. for high 
grades; Japans, 15 to 20c. for mediums, 
28 to 35c. for high grades ; Indians and 
Ceylons, 18 to 22c. for mediums, and 30 to 
65c. for high grades. 

DRIED FRUITS. 

Valencia raisins are quiet and unchanged. 
We quote: Off-stalk, 4^ to 4^c; fine off- 
stalk, 5 tos^c. ; selected, 6 too #c; layers, 
6^c. 

Nothing new has developed in currants 
either in regard to business or prices. We 
quote : Provincials, 3% to 4c. in bbls.; 



Fine Fihatras, in barrels, /[% to 4^c. ; ditto, 
half-barrels, 4X to 4|^c. ; ditto, half-cases, 
6,% to 5c; Casalinas, cases, 5 to $%c; Vos- 
tizzas, cases, 6 to 6%c. ; ditto, half-cases, 6%. 
to 6^c; ditto, extra fine, 6% to 7)4c.; ditto, 
half-cases, 7% to 7j4c; Panaretas, in cases, 
9c. 

Malaga raisins are quiet and nominally un- 
changed. We quote: London layers, $1.85 to 
$1.90; black baskets, $2.5010 $2.75; blue 
baskets, $2.90 to $3; choice clusters, $3.25; 
Dehesa clusters,|$3.75; Royal clusters, $4.25 
to $4.50; Royal Buckingham clusters, $4.25; 
Non-Plus-Ultra and Royal Windsor, $6. 

In Bosnia prunes the movement is insig- 
nificant. California prunes of the smaller 
sizes have been in bstter supply. We 
quote prunes : Bosnias, "Sphinx" brand, "A," 
70-75 to lb., 9c; "B," 80-85 to lb. 7^c, 
"U," 110-115 to lb., 6% to 6%"c; California 
prunes, 40-50, 10 to loyic. per lb. ; 50-60 to 
box, g'/ic. per lb.; 60-70 to box, 9; ; 70 80 to 
box, 8j£c. per lb.; French, 5 to 6c. 

California loose muscatels have been sold 
at about %c. below last week's quotation, 
but, it is claimed, prices were unnecessarily 
shaded. Some cheap California peaches 
have arrived on the market. They are show- 
ing good value, and several carloads have 
changed hands. We quote: Apricots, 13^ 
to 15c; peaches, ioj£ to I2j£c; pears, 10^ 
to I2yic. ; plums, 6^c. for unpitted, and 
I2^c, for pitted ; nectarines, 11 to 13c; 
loose muscatels, (,% to6^c. per lb. 

Sultana raisins are without change, busi- 
ness being quiet and prices steady at 5 to 

There is just an ordinary demand for figs. 
We quote : Elerr.e, 14 oz., 9 to io^c. ; 10 
lb., g l A to I2j£c; 12 lb., i2)4c; 28 lb., 15c. 

GREEN FRUIT. 

The demand for oranges, which was good 
during the holiday season, is now beginning 
to slacken off. Prices are lower. There is a 
good seasonable demand for lemons, the 
cheapness of this fruit having induced the 
demand. Malaga lemons have b'ien cl aned 



The Largest Sale. 

The Finest Flavored. 

The Best Friend of the 
Grocer. 

The Worst Enemy of the 
Pedlar. 

"SALADA" 

CEYLON TEA 



P. C. LARKIN & CO. 

25 Front St. East, 
and TORONTO 

318 St. Paul St., MONTREAL 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BesfforWashDay 






mm 




mm 



SrffiF 



Is not cheap 

Nor is it dear 



BdforEverjDay. 



A first-class soap is economical, 
experience proves it. 



You know it and can recommend SURPRISE to your customers 
to be worth what it costs. 



Branches — 

MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO: Wright & Copp, 51 Colborne St. 
WINNIPEG : E. W. Ashley. 



THE ST. GROIX SOAP MFG. GO. 



ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



out of the market. Business in cranberries 
has been rather better than usual the past 
few weeks, owing to the low price of poultry. 
We quote: Lemons — Messina, $3 to $4 per 
box ; Oranges — Choice, $4.50 ; fancy, $5 to 
$5 50; California navels, $4 to $4 75; Valen- 
cias, 420's, $4 75 to $5 ; Jumbo's, 420's, 
$6.50 to $7; ditto, 714's, $5.50 to $6.50; 
Mexicans, $5 to $5.50 per box. Ban- 
anas, $1.40 to $2; cocoanuts, $3.50 to 
$4 a sack; apples, $1.50 to $3 a barrel ; 
domestic grapes, in cases, 6s to 75c. ; 
Malaga grapes, $5 to $7 per keg ; pears, 
40 to 50c ; domestic onions, 60 to 65c. 
per bag ; Spanish onions, 50 to 65c. per 
small crate ; sweet potatoes, $3 to $3.25 
per bbl.; cranberries, $10 per t>bl., and $3.50 
per case; hickory nuts, $1.50 to $1.75 per 
bush. 

BUTTER, CHEESE, POULTRY, EGGS. 

Butter — The mild weather has induced 
more liberal receipts of butter, especially 
large rolls. A fair proportion of tub butter 
has also been coming forward, but the qual- 
ity in most instances was poor, in conse- 
quence of which dealers satisfied their te- 
quiremeuts with large rolls. We quote : 
Early summer dairy, store packed, 8 to 
12c. ; choice fresh packed, 15 to 16c. ; large 
rolls, fresh, 15 to i6j£c; dairy pound prints, 
16 to 18c. Fresh creamery — Tubs, 20 to 
2ic. ; do., pound prints, 21 to 22c. In 
creamery butter there is a plentiful supply 
coming forward, and stocks are accumulat- 
ing, and dealers are looking for higher 
prices. 

Cheese — The export demand continues 
to improve, there being more enquiry on 
this account. Dealers are anticipating an 
active trade after the holiday season is well 



over. We quote : Summer make, 9c; Sept. 
and Oct., o>£ to 10c. 

EGGS — Receipts continue liberal, and 
prices are easier, although there has been no 
special quotable change. We quote : Late 
gathered, 16 to I7^c. ; strictly new laid, 21 
to 22c; cold storage and held fresh, 14 to 
15c; pickled, 14 to I4^c. 

Poultry — The market during the past 
week has been the best of the season, but 
largely due to the want of supply. In this 
case, however, very few got any benefit, for 
when supplies became liberal, prices sagged. 
Turkeys were quoted as high as 11c. this 
week, but as we go to press prices are one to 
two cents per pound lower. We quote : 
Geese, 6 to 8c. per lb.; turkeys, 9 to 10c. per 
lb.; chickens, 25 to 50c. per pair ; ducks, 50 
to 80c. per pair. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — There is little or no demand. We 
quoteSi to $1.15 per bushel. 

Dried Apples — Are dull and easy at 4^ 
to 5c. 

Evaporated Apples — Offerings are 
more liberal, and prices fractionally lower at 
7 to 7%c. per lb. 

Potatoes— The market is even in a 
worse condition than before, carloads on 
track being quoted at 20c. per bush. 

Honey — Is quiet and unchanged. Strain- 
ed brings 8 to 10c. per lb.; while combs go 
at $1.50 to $2 per doz. 

PROVISIONS AND DRESSED HOGS! 

The Christmas demand being over, the 
provision market has assumed a quiet con- 
dition, and quotations are lower in many in- 



stances. With the advent of more favorable 
weather, the offerings of dressed hogs are 
more liberal, and packers are again bu^y. 
They are now paying $4. 50 for select weights, 
running from iio to 240 lbs For anyihing 
under these weights 25 to 50c. less is be : ng 
paid. 

Dry Salted Meats— Long clear bacon, 
6#c. for carload lots, and b% to b%z. for 
small lots ; backs, 7>£c. 

Smoked Meats — Breakfast bacon, 
10c; rolls, 7 to 7%c; hams, large, 22 lbs. 
and over, 9c; medium, 15 to 20 lbs., 10c. ; 
small hams, 10c; backs, 9 to 9 '4c. ; pic- 
nic hims, 7c; all meats out of pickle, ic. 
less thin above. 

Lard — Pure Canadian, tierces, 7 to 
7%c; tubs, y l 4 t0 8c. ; pails, 7^ to 8c. 

Barrel Pork — Canadian heavy mess, 
$13 50 ; Canadian short-cut, 14 to $14.50 ; 
clear shoulder mess, $12; shoulder mess, 
$11.50. 

FISH. 

Finnan haddies have been scarce, al- 
though some small lots have been arriving 
during the week. Oysters are firmer. Fish 
trade generally is quiet, as is usual at this 
season. We quote standards at $1.25, 
and selects $1.65. Fish are quoted as 
follows : Skinned and boned codfish, 6j4c; 
boneless fish, y/ z to 4c; haddock, 5 to 
6c. ; Labrador herring, $3.25 to $3 .50 per 
half barrel and $5.50 to $5.75 per barrel ; 
Newfoundland herring, $2.50 per half bar- 
rel, and $4.50 to $4.75 per barrel ; fresh 
water salt herring, $3 per barrel ; blue- 
back herring, 3c; pike, 6 to 7c. per lb.; 
flitched cod, 5c; finnan haddies, 6j£c; 
Digby herring, in bundles of 5 boxes, lie; 
ditto, lengthwise, 10c. ; large halibut, 12 to 
15c. ; Restigouche salmon, 20 to 25c; 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 



THE TORONTO 

COLD STORAGE WAREHOUSE 



All Information from W. H. LECKIE, Manager. 



THE TORONTO COLD STORAGE 
CO., LTD., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN TOMATO CHUTNEE 

For Soups, Gravies, Curries, Fish, Game, etc. 
Used foi lunch and breakfast as sandwiches. 
Highly recommended by H. R. H. Princess 
Louise and by the late Sir John A. Macdonald. 
For sale by leading wholesalers. 

Prepared by M. P. CARD, Guelph, Ont. 



Telephone No. 471. 



Established 1870. 



JOHN HAWLEY 

Provision and Commission Merchant 

Butter Lard Cheese 

Eggs Apples Etc. 

Raspberry Jam in I, "5 and 30 lb. Pkgs. 

88 Front Street East, Toronto 

WHITE & CO. 

TORONTO 

Are offering special bargains in the following 
Xmas lines, viz : 

Valencia Oranges Jamaica Oranges 

Messina Lemons 

Cape Cod and Jersey Cranberries 

Malaga Grapes Figs and Dates 
Nuts and Bananas Fish and Oysters 



P.S. — Consignments of Butter, Eggs, and 
Poultry solicited. 

Sea Food 

"GEM OF THE SEA." 

1 and 2 lb. Blocks. 

" FAVORITE." 

Pure Cod. 1 and 2 lb. Blocks. 

" SATISFACTION." 

Boneless, Fish. 25 and 40 lb. Boxes. 



Packed by 

LEONARD BROTHERS 

ST. JOHN, N.B. 

For sale by — — -^— ^— . 

Davidson & Hay, Toronto, Ont. 



Season's Greeting 



TO ALL OUR 



CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS 



CLEMES BROS., TORONTO 



British Columbia salmon, 13 to 14c; mack- 
erel, 20 to 25c; steak cod, 6^ to 7c: 
haddock, 5c; black bass, 9 to io}4 r - Fresh 
Lake Erie herring, $3 per 100 ; whitefish, 
8 to 9c; salmon trout, 7% to 8c; Lake Sup- 
erior whitefish, 8c. 

FLOUR AND FEED. 

Wheat — Deliveries have been light dur- 
ing the week. Quoted thus : White, 72c; 
red, 67c; goose, 53 to 54c. per bushel. 

Barley — There have only been a few odd 
loads coming forward and prices rule higher 
than a week ago, namely : 37^'° 44c- 

Flour — Is quiet ; cars of 85 per cent, 
patents sold high freights west at $315, 
90 per cent, patents at $3 west, and straight 
roller at $2.90 west. 

Breakfast Foods — Business is quiet, 
but an improvement is looked for shortly. 
We quote : Oatmeal, cornmeal and pot 
barley from 10 to 15c. lower ; Standard oat- 
meal and rolled oats, $3.10 to $3.20; rolled 
wheat, $2.10 in 100 lb. barrels; cornmeal, 
$2.75; SP 1 ' 1 P eas > $3- 2 5: P ot barley, $3.25. 
SALT. 

The market is active at unchanged 
prices. The fact that the packers have 
been busier during the past week or ten 
days has stimulated the demand for salt. 
We quote at Toronto : In carload lots, 
$1 per barrel, and 60c. per sack; in less 
than carload lots, $1.05 per barrel and 65c. 
per sack. At the wells we quote : F.O.B. 
barrels, 70c; sacks 50c. for points west of 
Toronto, and 45c. for Toronto and points east 
of Toronto. 
HIDES, SKINS, WOOL AND TALLOW. 

Hides — Quiet and unchanged. Dealers 
are paying 5, 4 and 3c. respectively for Nos. 
i, 2 and 3. Cured are nominal at 6>£c., 
trade being slow. 

Calfskins — Are still quoted at 6>£c. per 
lb. 

Sheepskins — Lambskins and shearlings 
are still quoted at 80c. 

Wool — Dull. We quote: Fleece combing, 
24c; rejections, 17 yi to i8^c. ; unwashed, 
13 }£ to I4>£c. 

PETROLEUM. 

The demand is fair and prices lower. 
We quote in 1 • to 10 bbl. lots, imperial 
gallon, Toronto : Canadian, 160; carbon 
safety, 18c. ; Canadian water white, 180; 
American water white, 21 ^c. ; Pratt's Astral, 
23c. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Sugar is %c. per lb. dearer than a week 
ago. 

Cream of tartar has again advanced in 
the primary markets. 

A shipment of fine Panyong Congous is to 
hand with Davidson & Hay. 

The Toronto Salt Works report that their 
December's business was the largest in the 



Graham, McLean & Co. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
77 Golborne St. TORONTO. 

We solicit consignments of Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Poul- 
try and all kinds of 

FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCE 

Send us a trial shipment. 

We handle a special line of kettle-rendered Lard. 

Cottam's Celebrated Biro 1 Seed 

Each package contains a 10c. cake 
of Patented Bird Bread. 



WILLIAM H. DUNN, - Agent 

394 St. Paul, MONTREAL. 



& Co, 



Wholesale Produce and 
Commission Merchants 



62 FRONT ST. EAST, - TORONTO. 



Correspondence Invited. 

Consignments Solicited. 

EGG CASES SUPPLIED 

Liberal advances made 
on consignments. 

Bankers : Canadian Bank of Commerce. 



W. N. LAZIER 



Box 341, VICTORIA, B.C. 



Agent for . . 



R emington machine go. 

Refrigerating and Ice Machines. 

Complete Plants Installed for all Purposes. 

Robb Engineering Co. Economic Boilers. 

High Speed and Corliss Engines. 

Complete Plants Erected. All work 

guaranteed. 

COWAN'S 
OCOAS 
OFFEES 
HOCOLATES 

and ICINGS 

are absolutely pure. 
All orders promptly attended to. 



THE COWAN CO., Ltd. 



470 King 8t. West, 

Toronto, Canada. 



Sugar Cured 



Hams, Shoulders, 
Bacon, all of Finest 
Selected Stock. 



I HAVE THE FINEST LARD. 
ALL 600DS GUARANTEED. 

T. R. F. CASE, Seaforth, Ont. 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



What We Manufacture 



McLauchlan's Sodas. McLauchlan's Fine Biscuits. 
McL. & S. Cough Drops in 5c. packages and bottles. 
McL. & S. Fruit Tablets in 5c. packages and bottles. 
McL. & S. Imperial Chocolates. 



JAS. M C LAUCHLAN & SONS, 



OWEN SOUND. 



hfstory of the firm. Their sales aggregated 
sixty-nine cars, the greater proportion of 
which were Windsor salt. 

Smith & Keighley are closing out their 
Scotch salted herrings in 281b. drums at 
low prices. 

Davidson & Hay are offering an extra 
sifted Young Hyson, just arrived. 

A shipment of Hallowee dates arrived 
this week for Perkins, Ince & Co. 

Davidson & Hay have in stock a very 
bright pure sugar syrup in half barrels. 

Warren Bros. & Boomer have in stock a 
line of new season's Bordeaux walnuts in 
i io-lb. sacks. 

Ebenezer Roberts' table jellies, in al) 
flavors, are in stock with Davidson & Hay. 

Gunn, Flavelle & Co. report a continued 
increase in the demand for " Maple Leaf" 
lard and smoked meats. 

In syrups and molasses Lucas Steele & 
Bristol are offering some special values. 
Their travelers have samples. 

George Stanway & Co., brokers, Toronto, 
have removed to first floor over their late 
office, No. 46 Front street east. 

Another carload of such scarce goods as 
shelled walnuts and Grenoble walnuts came 
to hand this week for Clemes Bros. 

Dawson & Co. have a carload of Valencia 
oranges close at hand. They are also in 
receipt of 100 cases of finnan haddies. 

Mc William & Everist are in receipt of a 
carload each of Washington navels, Valen- 
cias, and Jamaica oranges, and a car of 
Jersey cranberries. 

" In teas to retail at 25c. we never had 
such all-round values," say Lucas, Steele & 
Bristol. " Our blacks are particularly choice 
also in the half-dollar lines." 

W. H. Gillard & Co. are large holders of 
Imperial plums, in 25 lb. boxes, in excellent 
condition, and merchants desiring a snap in 
this line should drop them a card. 

The travelers of the Snow Drift Co. will 
start on the road Monday, Januaiy 6, to wait 



upon their much-esteemed friends through- 
out the year 1896. Thankful for the con- 
fidence of the past year, which has been the 
most successful in their history, they again 
ask the favors of the trade, which will have 
careful and prompt attention. 

Half-barrels of Ai mackerel ; also kitts, 
are to hand with Lucas, Steele & Bristol. 
Thev also have some choice British Colum- 
bia salmon to offer in half- barrels. 

The enormous advertising the " Salada " 
Ceylon Tea Co. are doing is attracting a 
great deal of attention. P. C. Larkin & Co. 
say : " In advertising be sure you have the 
right article first, then don't spare printers' 
ink." 

W. H. Gillard & Co. have some excep- 
tional values in high-grade Young Hysons. 
The firm state they were particularly fortu- 
nate in getting in right, and that merchants 
desiring bargains should communicate with 
them. 

A large consignment of Rio coffee has just 
been delivered to W. H. Gillard & Co., and 
having bought at an advantageous point of 
the market, the figures they are asking are 
low, considering the now advanced prices 
asked by first holders. 

Clemes Bros, are in receipt of two cars of 
nivel oranges, one car of bananas, one car 
of Valencia oranges and one car of choice 
evaporated peaches. The last named is 
direct from the Coast, and the fruit is in 
bags. 

Warren Bros. & Boomer report that they 
hive Arguimbau's off stalk Valencia raisins, 
which they are offering at bargain prices; 
also half-cases of choice Patras currants and 
extra choice Vostizzas in cases and Pana- 
retas in half-cases. 

W. H. Gillard & Co. report that during 
1895 their sales of standard black tea? have 
reached larger proportions than even they 
anticipated, being 50 per cent, in advance of 
former years. This should be a fair indica- 
tion of their value, and the abo\e firm state 
they are at all times pleased to furnish 
samples for comparison with other blends. 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 2, 1896. 

GROCERIES. 

THE most notable feature this week has 
been the strength of the sugar market, 
refiners having advanced their prices 
on Tuesday %c. per lb. all round. This 
advance has, to a certain extent, been antici- 
pated in these columns, and such traders 
who took advantage of the tip and placed 
their orders are better off by }{c. per lb. 
At this writing the refineries are experiencing 
an active demand for both prompt and 
future delivery, but are not disposed to 
operate ahead. The volume of trade in other 
lines has been of a seasonable character, 
and values generally have a firm tendency, 
especially so in the case of dried fruits. 
SUGAR. 
The demand that refiners have exper- 
ienced from jobbers for refined sugar for 
future account has continued and has led 
the latter to advance their price j^c. per lb. 
all round. Jobbers have not, at this writing, 
fixed their prices here, as the refiners only 
put up prices on Tuesday morning. They are 
certain to ask a proportionate advance, how- 
ever, especially as the retailers by their de- 
sire to place orders tor future delivery seem 
to be fully awake to the stronger tone of the 
market. We quote prices nominal for job- 
bing lots, but refiners are getting 6,Y% to 
4>£c. for granulated, and 3^ to 4c. for yel- 
lows. 

SYRUPS. 

There is no change in syrups, which have 
only been moderately enquired for. Prices 
are unchanged at ifi to i%c, as to grade. 

MOLASSES. 

A moderate jobbing trade is passing in 
Barbadoes and Porto Rico goods. We 
quote : Barbadoes, 36 to 37c, and Port 
Rico, 34 to 35c. 

RICE. 

The rice market continues quiet and un- 
changed. 

SPICES. 

There is not much doing in spices, and 
though primary markets report weakness in 
some cases, values in a jobbing way are 
steady and unchanged. We quote : Pure 
black pepper, 10 to 12c; pure white, 18 to 
25c; pure Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c; cloves, 



WE ARE 

PAYING 
GAStt 

FOR 



D H' E A V E§ 



W. B. BAYLEY & CO. 

EXPORT BROKERS 
42 FRONT ST. E. TOTOIltO 



Start the New Year Right 




by buying 

"GLOBE and BEAVER' 



BRAND 



Crushed Coffee 



(X. T. R.) 

Tins, 25 and 50 lbs. 

This is the best value in Coffee on the market for 

the money. Price only 22c. per lb. 

Every pound guaranteed or Coffee returned. 
Others have bought it and increased their Coffee 
trade, why not you ? Send for sample. 



Look Out for "KOLONA" 

KOLONA will be a revelation. 



THE 



Eby, Blai/n Company 



LTD. 



WHOLESALE IMPORTING AND MANUFACTURING GROCERS 

TORONTO - - ONTARIO 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 to 20c; pure mixed spice, 25 to 30c; 
cream of tartar, French, 25 to 27c; ditto, 
best, 28 to 30c. per lb. 

COFFEE. 
There is no change in the coffee market, a 
fair jobbing demand being noted by the local 
roasters. We quote green in bags : Mara- 
caibo, 20 to 2 1 c; Rio, 19 to 20c; Java, 28c; 
Jamaica, 20 to 21c, and Mocha, 32c. The 
easier feeling in New York noted last week 
has not influenced this market as yet. 

TEAS. 

Very little change is to note in the tea 
market, there being little or nothing doing in 
a large way between houses, and only a 
moderate distributing trade on local account. 
For round lots of Japans, we hear of 15^ to 
i8j^c as a range, while a fair enquiry is 
noted for Moyune Young Hysons and Cey- 
lons, ranging all the way from 25 to 30c. 
We quote Japans : Low grades, 14c. ; 
medium, 15 to 18c; fine, 20 to 22c, and 
choice, 25 to 32c. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

The Valencia raisin market has not pre- 
sented any notable activity, and no large 
business is noted, while the movement in a 
jobbing way is quiet. Layers and selected 
have been the fruit most asked for the small 
hand to-mouth demand experienced dur- 
ing the week We quote : Ordinary off- 
stalk, 4X t0 4'A C - > fine off - stalk > 4^ t0 5 c -5 
selected, S l A to 5^c, and layers, b% to 
6^c. 

There have been further receipts of Cali- 
fornia raisins, but jobbers are still lightly 
supplied and values are firm, in fact, full 
values are easily obtained. We quote 
3-crown rather firmer in consequence at 1% 
to 6c, and 4-crown stiff at 7c. 

Table (ruits are quiet. We quote Mala- 
gas as follows: Extra loose muscatels, $1.40; 
Imperial London layers, $1.75; Imperial 
cabinets, $1.90 ; Connoisseur clusters, $2.20; 
extra dessert clusters, $3 ; Royal Bucking- 
ham clusters, $350. 

Sultanas have been moving for actual 
wants to a fair extent. Prices are firm at 6 
to 6^c, as to grade. 

The currant market contiuues firm but 
quiet, and prices are unchanged. We quote: 
3^c. in barrels, 4 to 4#c in half-barrels, and 
4>£ to 4^c. in half-cases. 

The prune market is firm and prices 
strongly held. Supplies of French are be- 
coming exhausted, and values are held 
strong in consequence, as stocks could not 
be replaced except at an advance. We 
quote: Bosnia prunes, 6 to 6^c; French 
ordinary, S^c; do. plums, 10 to 14c, and 
California prunes, 9c. 

There has been a moderate enquiry for 
figs at 9 to 10c. for ordinary and 14 to 17c 
for fancy, as to box, etc. 

Dates are held firm, old moving at 4/^c., 
and new stock at 4^ to 5c, as to grade. 

NUTS. 

There has been a fair, seasonable trade in 
nuts. Almonds are firmer, if anything. We 
quote : Grenoble walnuts, 12 to 13c; filberts, 
lYz to 8c; Tarragona almonds, ii>£ to 
i2}4c.; pecans, 9 to 14c, and shelled wal- 
nuts, 27 to 30c. 

CANNED GOODS. 

There is no change in the situation of the 
canned goods market. We quote: Lobsters, 
tails, $8 per case; flats, $9 to $9.50 ; 
sardines, ordinary brands, $7 to $8.50; 
best brands, $9 50 to $10.50 ; salmon, $1.25 
to $1.30 per doz.; tomatoes, 75 to 80c; 



peaches, $2 to $2.25; corn, 85 to 90c; mar- 
rowfat peas, 95c to $1; strawberries, $2 to 
$2.25; raspberries, $1.75 to S2; greengages, 
$1.75 to $2; blue plums or damsons, $1.50 
to $1.75; pineapples, $2 to $2.25 and 3-lb. 
apples, 80 to 85c 

WINES AND SPIRITS. 

Wines and liquors continue quiet and 
unchanged, with no special feature to report. 
GREEN FRUIT. 

There has been a good active holiday 
jobbing trade in green fruit, oranges, lemons, 
in fact all kinds of fruit, selling well on 
local account, with a bare market at the close 
of the week. 

Oranges— All kinds of oranges here 
ruled active and firm, and fresh receipts of 
Messina, Jamaica and Valencia oranges, 
which arrived, showing fine condition, were 
a very short time on the market. We quote: 
Jamaica, $9 to $10 per barrel ; Valencia, $5 
to $5.50 per box, and Messina, $3. 

Lemons — Have shown a somewhat softer 
tone, but prices do not show much change 
despite the sales at Boston and New York 
last week. We quote: $275 to $3. so per 
box. 

Grapes — There has been a fair demand 
for grapes, Malaga stock moving well at $5 
to $6.50 per keg as to grade. 

Cranberries— Continue active and firm 
at $10 to $10.50 per bbl. for Nova Scotian 
and $8 to $12 for Cape Cod. 

Apples — The apple market is about as 
last quoted. Green fruit are quiet, but there 
is a fair enquiry for evaporated and dried 
stock. We quote: Whole fruit, $2 to $5 per 
bbl. as to quality; dried, 4 to 4>£c, and 
evaporated, 5>£ to 6>£c. per lb. 

Spanish Onions— Quiet and unchanged 
at 25 to 40c per crate. 

FISH. 

There has been little doing in fish during 
the past week. We quote : Fresh haddock 
and cod at 2H an d 4 c -5 pickled No. 1 Labra- 
dor herrings at $5.25, No. 1 N.S. at $4.50, 
and ordinary grades $3 to $4 per bbl.; No. 
2 Labrador salmon, $13 per bbl.; B. C. sal- 
mon $11 • No. 1 lake trout, $4.25 to $4 50 
per keg ; No. 1 green cod at $4.50 to $4.75 ; 
No. 2 at $3 to $3.10 ; No. 2 mackerel at 
$17.50 ; No. 1 pickled sardines at $4 50 per 
bbl. Dried and boneless cod, $4.25 to 
$4.50 per 100 lbs. for dried ; sA to 6c 
per lb. for boneless ; 5c per lb. for boneless 
haddock; 3^c per lb. for fish, and 11c. per 
lb. for shredded. Smoked haddies, b]/z to 
7c per lb., kippered herrings at $1.40 to 
$1.50 per box, Yarmouth and bay bloaters 
at 90c per box, and smoked herrings at 8 to 
ioc per lb. 

DRESSED HOGS AND PROVISIONS. 

The provision market has developed a 
weaker tone since our last. This is due to 
the continued slow demand, the liberal re- 
ceipts of hogs, and the low prices ruling in 
the west. Recent sales of thort cut clear 
have been made at $13, and mess at $13.50. 
In lard and smoked meats there were no 
changes. We quote : Canadian short cut, 
clear, $13; Canadian short cut, mess, $13.50; 
hams, city cured, per lb., 9 to ioc; lard, 
Canadian, in pails, %% to Stfc; bacon, per 
lb., 9 to ioc; lard, com. refined, per lb., 6% 
to 6^c 

Continued mild weather has demoralized 
the trade in hogs. Prices are easier at $4.50 
to $4.60 in car lot?, and $4.75 to $5 per 100 
lbs. in a jobbing way. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 
EGGS— There has been a demand for 
small lots of eggs. We quote : Boiling 



stock, 18 to 20c; Montreal limed, 14 to 15c; 
western limed, 13^ to 14c, and held fresh, 
13 }£ to 14c per dozen. 

Beans — In beans business continues 
quiet and prices rule steady. We quote : 
Car lots of choice hand-picked at $1 to $1.05, 
and small quantities at $1.10 to $1.20. 

Potatoes — The demand for potatoes was 
slow, and the market rules quiet, choice 
Early Rose being quoted at 40 to 45c per 
bag. 

Poultry — There was no improvement in 
the poultry market on account of the con- 
tinued mild weather. The offerings of 
stock in poor condition were large, and sales 
of such were at 3 to 5c per lb. for turkeys ; 
4 to 5c for chickens, and 4c for geese. 
Choice fresh killed turkeys sold at 7 to 7}4c. ; 
chickens, 6 to 6>^c; ducks, 7 to 7^., and 
geese, 5 to 5'/ic. per lb. 

FLOUR, MEAL, AND FEED. 

There has been a weaker feeling in the 
flour market for Ontario grades, and prices 
are quoted 10 to 20c per barrel lower all 
round. The demand is slow, and the mar- 
ket on the whole is dull. We quote : Winter 
wheat, $3.60 to $3.80 ; spring wheat, patents, 
$3 75 to $3.85; straight roller, $3.30 to $3 40; 
straight roller, bags, $1.60 to $1.65 ; extra, 
bags, $1.40 to $1.45 ; Manitoba strong 
bakers', $3 40 to $3.65. 

In oatmeal the feeling is steady, but sales 
are slow. We quote : Standard, bbls., $3 
to $3.10; granulated, bbls., $3 to $3.15; 
rolled oats, bbls., $3 to $3.15. 

The demand for feed is slow and values 
are unchanged. We quote : Bran, $14 to 
$15; shorts, $15 to $16; mouillie, $19 to $20. 

CHEESE AND BUTTER. 

The close of last week brought more ex- 
port enquiry for finest fall cheese. Holders 
were not urgent sellers, but several lots were 
put through at a range of 9 to 9,!^. This is a 
modification of the views expressed at the 
beginning of the month. It remains to be 
seen whe;her sellers will submit to further 
shading, or whether, once business is set in 
motion, .they will not endeavor to secure a 
fraction more than current rates. 

Local enquiry for fine, late-made creamery 
butter is fair, at a range of 19^ to 20c, but 
it is the only outlet offering at the moment. 
In dairy stock, trading is hard to discover, 
but a nominal range of 14 to 1 5c is given on 
finest late-made creamery. Unless the ship- 
pers come into the market, of which there is 
no indication at present, little improvement 
on current prices is possible. 

HAY. 

The market is quiet and unchanged at 
$13 for No. 1 and $12 to $12.50 for No. 2. 



Pease Meal-—. 
Glasgow Brose Meal 

The lightest and best food for 
those troubled with dyspepsia. 
The only genuine article manu- 
factured in Canada — by 

JAMES WILSON 

MONKLAND MILLS, FERGUS 

Manufacturer also of the celebrated Brands of 

Rolled, Standard and Granulated OATMEAL 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



TRADE 



BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH 



Ready for the table in 10 minutes. 

No Soaking. No Boiling. No Odor. 



Selling 
Agents: 



MARK 

( J. Harley Brown, London ; R. Thomson, Hamilton Chambers, 17 St. John St. , Montreal ; J . E. Huxley, 
"| Winnipeg ; W. M. P. McLaughlin, St. John, N.B.; Wm. Brewster, Palmer House, Toronto, Selling Agent. 

J. W. BEARDSLEY'S SONS, New York, U.S.A. 



NORTHERN 
ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Established 1836. OF LONDON. 



Capital and Funds, $36,465,000. 
Revenue, $5,545,000. 

Dominion Deposit, $200,000. 



Canadian Branch Office, 1724 Notre Dame St., Montreal. 



ROBERT W. TYRE - Manager. 

Q. E. MOBERLEY, Inspector. 

Dawson & O- 

FRUIT 

PRODUCE 

and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

32 West Market Street 

TORONTO. 



Consignments 
Solicited 



George McWilliam. Frank Everist. 

TELEPHONE 645. 

MCWILLIAM & EVERIST 

GENERAL.. FRUIT 

Commission Merchants 



25 and 27 Church street, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Consignments of FRUIT and PRODUCE SOLI- 
CITED. Ample Storage. 

All orders will receive our best attention. 



FOR 



SMOKED MEATS 

LONG CLEARS 
MESS PORK 
SHORT CUT PORK 
PURE LARD 
COMPOUND LARD 

Write for Prices. Send your ORDERS by mail. 
Careful Attention. Prompt Shipment. 



F. W. FEARMAN 



HAMILTON 



ASHES. 

Ashes continue steady at $370 for first 
pots, $3.50 for seconds, and pearls, $4.65. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

Sugar refiners have advanced their prices 
#c. per lb. all round. 

A. P. Tippet & Co. note the arrival and 
distribution of several carloads of California 
raisins. 

Only one sugar refinery is running now, 
and not yet on full time. Stocks accordingly 
are light. 

Laporte, Martin & Cie. call attention to 
their full assortment of fine dried fruit, also 
their fruit syrups in fancy bottles. 



NEW BRUNSWICK MARKETS. 

Office of The Canadian Grocer. 
St. John, N.B., Jan. 2, 1896. 

THE Christmas Number of The Can- 
adian Grocer was much appreciated 
by the trade here. One feature has 
had particular interest to the grocery trade 
in the columns of The Grocer lately. 
That is tea. And the articles which have 
appeared from time to time receive more 
than passing notice from the reader. This 
has been a quiet week. The chief matter of 
interest has been the strengthening in the 
sugar market. The weather is very warm, 
there being but little frost during the week. 
There is no snow at all. It is a great draw- 
back to lumbermen in the woods. 

Salt — Price keeps low. There is little 
demand at this season, and the larger part 
of that arriving is being put in store. A 
small quantity is expected to arrive by 
steamer from Liverpool this week. We 
quote : Coarse, 50 to 55c; fine factory-filled, 
95c. to $1.10 ; s-lb. bags, $3.25 per bbl.; 
10-lb. bags, $3 per bbl.; 20-lb. boxes, 20c. ; 
10-lb. boxes, 12c; cartoons, $1.90 to $2 per 
doz. ; dairy, bulk, $2.80 per bbl.; cheese, 
bulk, $2.70 per bbl. 

Oil — Movement is much lighter, and 
there is nothing new. Prices remain un- 
changed. In returning barrels dealers 
would find it to their advantage to see they 
are in good order, particularly that all hoops 
are on. We quote: Best American, 23XC; 
best Canadian, 2 1 Xc; prime, 19c. No charge 
for barrels. 

Canned Goods — There is no stir. The 
past season has not seen as large a business 
as formerly, dealers finding they can buy 
about as low in the spring as fall. Stocks in 
the hands of the wholesalers here are fair, 
strawberries being, however, very scarce. 



IF YOU WANT . . 

to get the highest market prices for your 
Butter, Eggs, Poultry, and general pro- 
duce, send your consignments to 

H. F. PRICE 02 8 F t?e U e n t dlng 

MON TREAL 

Reference: Empire Tobacco Co., or 

Merchants Bank of Halifax. 



Bird Seed 



IF YOU WANT 

Your customers to have the cleanest, best and most 
nutritious Bird Seed- in the market sell them only 
BROCK'S 




NICHOLSON & BROCK 



TORONTO 



W* RYAN 

PORK PACKER, 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

AND COMMISSION MERCHANT 

70--7Z Front St. East, Toronto 

Liberal Advances 

made on Consignments. 

Egg Cases Supplied. 



S.K, 




(ONIMlSSlON wiERCHAKf 

Wholesale Dealer in . . . 

Oysters, Finnan Haddies, Fresh and 
Frozen Fish, Oranges, Lemons, Al- 
meria Grapes, Cranberries and Dates 

76 COLBORNE ST., 

TORONTO, ONT. 



Wishing you 
the Compliments 
of the Season 



D.Gunn,Flavelle&Co. 

Pork Packers and . . Tni-nntn 
Commission Merchants I 01011 10 



F 



INEST 

RESH 

RUITS 



Hugh Walker & Son 



Importers and 

Wholesale Dealers. 



Guelph, Ont. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Oysters in Baltimore are quoted rather 
higher. The tone of the market here is firm. 
We quote as follows; Corn, 85 to 90:.; 
peas, 90 to 95c; tomatoes, 90 to 95c; corned 
beet, 2-lb. tins, $2.60 to $2.75 ; i-lb. tins, 
$1.50 to $i.6c; oysters, 2's, $2 to $2 25 ; i's, 
$1.60 to $1.65; peaches, 3's,$2.8i; to $2.90; 2's, 
$1.90 to $2; lobsters, $1.75 to $2; haddies, 
$1.40; salmon, $135 to $1.50; flat, J1.75; 
clams, $15.50 for 4 doz. ; chowder, $3 for 2 
doz. ; scallops, $5. so for 4 doz. ; Digby chick- 
ens, $i ; pineapples, $2.35 ; kippered herring, 
$1.10; American peaches, $2.40. 

Green Fruit — The holiday trade has 
been good. The mild weather has aided in 
the shipping of goods. Cranberries are 
high, which keeps down demand. West 
India oranges, owing to the number of bad 
now among them, have to be repacked, and 
are higher. There are also a good many 
small ones. Valencias are coming in in good 
order and are low. Apples are good value, 
and prices held firm. Stocks are light. We 
quote : Lemons, $4 to $4.50; West India 
oranges, $7 to $8 per bbl.; Malaga grapes, 
$5 to $6.50 ; Valencia oranges, $4 to $5 ; 
Pippins and winter fruit, $1.50 to $2.50 ; na- 
tive cranberries, $8 per bbl.; Cape Cod do., 
$12 per bbl. 

Dried Fruit — Theie is a quieter feel- 
ing now that the Christmas season is over. 
California prunes are here, both in boxes and 
bags. The price is, however, higher than 
for the French, which also have an advan- 
tage in duty when imported direct. London 
layers are rather easier, though late advices 
from California show rather an advance. 
In loose muscatels, while prices are easy, 
there is quite a range in quality, and all 3 cr. 
goods are not alike. The demand for 
cleaned currants has 'been particularly en- 
couraging. There is also a better feeling 
in apples, and quite a number are mov- 
ing. In dried apples the market is dull, and, 
as stated last week, Nova Scotia could 
likely be bought at 4c. The quantity of 
new French prunes here is very light. 
We quote: New Valencias, 5 to 6c; new figs, 
10 to 12c. ; new 4-crown Cal. L. M. raisins, 6 to 
7c; new 3-crown Cal. L.M. raisins,sX t0 6c; 
keg prunes, 4c; boxes, 4% to 6c; new Cal. 
L. L. raisins, $1.50 to $175; new currants, 
bbls., t,% to 4c; half-cases, 4 to 4}4c; new 
evaporated apples, 7 to 7'Ac; dried apples, 
5 to 6c; dates, 4% to 5c; California evapo- 
rated peaches, 12 to 13c; do. apricots, 12 to 
14c; do. pears, 12 to 13c; clean currants, bulk 

5 to 6%c.;i-\b. cartoons, 7 toj'Ac; Canadian 
onions, $2 to $2,215 P er bbi.; cocoanuts, $4 to 
$4.50 per 100; citron, 15 to 16c ; orange, 13 
to 14c; lemon, 12 to 13c; Valencia layers, 

6 to 6^c. 

Dairy Produce — Movement during the 
week has been light. There is a dull feeling 
in butter. Stocks of medium grade are large, 
while for best there is a good business. 
Prices keep low. Creamery, both tubs and 
prints, is below last year's prices. In eggs 
there is slow sale, though fresh laid are 
being held at good figures. Case eggs are 
not much wanted. Cheese, though there 
are not large stocks, and but little through 
the country, does not gain strength, and de- 
mand is not large. We quote: Cheese, Z l / Z 
to 9c; butter, 17 to 18c; eggs, 17 to 19c; 
fresh creamery prints, 23 to 24c, tubs, 21 
to 22c. 

MOLASSES— Some Barbadoes which ar- 
rived by last steamer is not desirable stock. 
The stoi k of £ood quality here is light, but 
prices keep low. There are but few small 
package-, ihe principal thing being New 
Orleans, which, giving good satisfaction, 
finds steady demand. This is the first sea- 



son it has been imported here. The trade 
are well satisfied with it. The demand for 
syrup continues good. We quote : Bar- 
badoes, 30 to 33c; St. Croix, 30 to 32c; 
Porto Rico,34 to 36c; syrup,35 to 38c; Trini- 
dad, 32 to 33&; New Orleans, bbls., 35 to 
36c. 

Sugar — There is but a fair movement at 
firm prices. We quote : Granulated, 4% 
to 4%Q. ; yellow, y/ z to 3X C -; Pans lump, 
5% to <;^c ; powdered, s,% to ;j£c. 

Fish — The mild weather has much dis- 
appointed the trade, as it has prevented any 
movement in frozen fish, for which at this 
season there is always good demand. Two 
small cargoes have been in for some days, 
but, on account of warm weather, have not 
been able to unload. In dry, demand is 
good. Pickled are quiet, while smoked are 
still dull at the low prices. Hake, in which 
a good business is done with Cuba, is very 
dull. No doubt the war there affects busi- 
ness. There are fair stocks held here of 
extra dry fish. There is steady demand for 
boneless, and in bloaters and finnan had- 
dies a good trade is being done. There 
is quite a range in shad. We quote : 
Medium cod, $325 to $350; large, 
$3.65 to $3.75; small, $2.25 to $2.50; 
pollock, $1.50; bay herring, $1.25 to $1.30; 
Grand Manan, $1.30 to $1.40; ripplings, $1.65 
to $1.70; wolves, $1.90 to $2; Quoddy River, 
$2.75 to $3 ; smoked, 5 to 6c. ; shad, hall- 
bbl., pickled, $450 to $5; Canso, $s;halfs, 
$2.75; Shelburne, $2.75 to $3 per bbl. 

Provisions— There is light movement, 
and values remain low, with beef market 
rather low again this week. Smoked, though 
so low, finds but little sale. There is fair 
movement in lard. We quote: Domestic 
mess pork, $14 to $14.50; American, $13.50 
to $14 ; clear pork, $15 to $15.50; beef, 
$13 to $14; pure lard, 8^ to 9c; com- 
pound lard, 8c; rolls, 8c; hams, 10^ to 
12c. 

Flour Feed and Meal —There is fair 
movement, but, like all other lines at this 
season, there is nothing large. Then the 
weak state of the market works against large 
business. Ontario flour is, it anything, 
rather lower. Manitoba shows no change. 
In cornmeal the demand has dropped off, 
though price is quoted rather easier. Oat- 
meal and oats show no change. Hay is 
still firm, and shows strength. Very few 
Island oats are offering. We quote : Man 
itoba, $4.25 to $4.50 ; best Ontario, $3.95 to 
$4.00; medium, $3.85 to $3.90; oatmeal, J>3 50 
to $3 60 ; cornmeal, $2.30 to $2.35 ; hand- 
picked beans, $1.20 to $125 ; prime, $1.10 
to $1.15; split peas, $370; pot barley, 
$4.10 to $4.25; hay, $12 to $12.50 ; oats, 34 
to 36c; middlings, $19 to $20 on track ; 
bran, $18.; buckwheat meal, domestic, $1.25 
to $1.30 ; western, $1.75 to $2. 



ST. JOHN NOTES. 

Since Nov. ist, the creameries of P. E. I. 
have made 30,000 pounds of butter. 

Among the receipts here this week by rail 
were five cars raw cotton, and three cars 
broom corn. 

Horton Township, N.S., exported this 
year 200,000 bushels of apples ; last year it 
was about 300,000. 

At Sackville this season, upwards of 4,000 
bushels of Nova S:otia apples were landed 
for there and surrounding towns. 

St. John as a winter port has developed a 
new feature, this week upward of 100 cars 



E. T. STURDEE 

Mercantile Broker, 
Manufacturers' Agent, 

ST. JOHN, N.B. Etc > Etc - 

Wholesale trade only. 

Cleaver's Toilet Soaps. 
Bensdorp's Royal Dutch Cocoa. 
Pyle's Pearline. 

C, & E. MACMICHAEL, 

40 Dock St., St. John, N.B. 

FPPS'S COCOA 

* ^ 1-4 lb. Packets. 14 lb. Boxes 

secured in tin. 

Special Agent for the Dominion 

C. E. COLSON - MONTREAL 

IT WILL 

"Draw Trade" 

If you will sell the " Celebrated" cai 

GOLDEN 
FINNAN 




You will "Draw Trade" to your store and 
" Increase" your " Profits." 
Only the "best" fish are packed in the cans labelled 
"Golden Finnan Ha(U> 



NORTttRUP G-GO. 

Age'r' St. John, N.B. 

FISH* 

WITHOUT A BONE. 



Ordinary Boneless Fish have some 
bones in them, but we now put up pure 
Codfish in 3-pound boxes 

WITHOUT A BONE. 

This is the best Fish packed in Can- 
ada, and very much superior to Fib- 
red or Shredded Fish. . . . 



JOHN SEALY - St. John, N.B. 



<* 






v JOHN.P.MOTT&C° 



^ 



ASK FOR 



MOTT'S 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



Always Seasonable 



-*- 



Always Salable 




DALLEY'S 

ROYAL 
HYGIENIC 
SELF-RISING FLOUR 



Tea 



Graham 

. . and . . 

Buckwheat Flour 



Pancake 



Order a case at once ; one trial will convince 
you of the superiority of this flour. 



Manufactured by 



Neat and attractive package and extra fine quality combine to make it 
a most valuable addition to your stock. For sale at all wholesale houses. 

THE F. F. DALLEY CO., Ltd., Hamilton, Canada. 



Only the best fruit, thoroughly cleaned 
and picked, is used in making 



CLARK'S 

ENGLISH MINCE MEAT 



An Article fit for a 
King's Table. 

Every package guaranteed to be as 
represented. 




t 



FINE QUALITY 



In 7, 14 and 28 lb. pails. Write for 
quotations. 



W. CLARK 



MONTREAL 



T. A. LYTLE & CO. 



TORONTO 




iSSSxii 




FOR PURITY 



and cleanliness in packing 
the canned goods sold by 
the 



U 



KENT 



99 



I 



Canning and Pickling Co. of 
Chatham, Ontario, are abso- 
lutely without any superior. §) 



y^wjs^^i 



» 



We cant say 



1: 

:» 

• 
m 

!• 
:• 
• 

» 

\i 
: 

; WMWBWaMWWawwMM ^ MMMMMMMMMM ^ 




How many families throughout Canada are 
using our goods, but we are sure that those 
who are using them are amply satisfied with 
them. The goods are strictly pure and 
cannot fail to give satisfaction even to the 
most exacting consumer. 



TRADE MARK. 



DELHI CANNING CO. 



DELHI, ONT. 



3 

3 



s 

3 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



of American goods coming here for ship- 
ment, One day last week 137 manifests 
were entered at the Customs. This is the 
largest number ever entered here in one day. 

St. John is to have a new wholesale drug 
house. The name is Canada Drug Co., 
Ltd.; capital, $100,000, of which $50,000 is 
paid up. The incorporators are : Wm. H. 
Murray, Samuel Hayward, James Kennedy, 
Charles T. Nevins and James W. Russel. 
These names represent some of our r/chest 
men. 

C. & E. Macmichael have received some 
of the MacLaren Imperial cheese in the new 
jars. These jars are much handsomer than 
the ones before used. It is not necessary 
that the cheese should be any better. 

While steamers bring coal here from Glas- 
gow, Halifax is shipping coal to Liverpool. 
Similar conditions obtain in regard to lum- 
ber. A schooner is here unloading hard- 
wood, from New York, to which port we are 
always sending lumber. 

The regular line steamers are receiving all 
the freight here they can carry. There is 
one thing : if they are short of general cargo 
they can always get lumber. 

The new pulp mill at Mill Cove, on the 
Miramichi, is to be first-class in every par- 
ticular. It will use about eighty cords of 
wood a day. 

From Mount Stewart, P. E. I., 60,000 
bushels of pota'oes and 20,000 bushels of 
oats were shipped this fall. 

In connection with the article on the bark 
business of this province, which was in the 
Christmas number, it might be added that 
another reason why the trade is quiet is be- 
cause manufacturers are moving from 
Massachusetts to New York and Pen- 
sylvania, where bark can be obtained, while 
in the former it could not. One shipper is 
sending forward some ten cars per day, hav- 
ing in hand some 10,000 cords. 

Yarmouth County, N.S., did a large busi- 
ness in berries during the past season, ship- 
ping some 16,000 bushels of blueberries, 
valued at $32,000; also 4,000 bushels of straw- 
berries and other small fruit to the value of 
$18,000. 

A NEW INDUSTRY. 

Mr. W. Munn, writes the Newfoundland 
correspondent of The Montreal Gazette, has 
been actively engaged this year in the manu- 
facture of refined cod liver oil, and has suc- 
ceeded in producing a splendid article, 
which competes successfully with the Nor- 
wegian oil. He employs the freezing 
process, which separates the steanne, 
and produces an article rich in medi- 
cinal properties, and much more pala- 
table than the ordinary o 1. Mr. Munn has 
rented large premises in St. John's, with the 
view of carrying on the business on an ex- 
tended scale next year. Naturally, our oil is 
richer and finer than that of Norway, and, 
when manufactured on the improved plan, it 
will surpass the Norwegian article. 



HOW IT WAS WORKED. 

A DELEGATION of young men had 
been shown into the reception room 
of their employer's residence, and 
when his wife entered, all arose awkwardly 
and seemed ill at ease. 

" We are employed at your husband's 
office," explained one of them at length. 

" Indeed," she said, in some surprise. " I 
am very glad to see you ; but to what am I 
indebted for this call ? " 

" Well," said the spokesman, plucking up 
a little courage, " we've been getting off at 
three o'clock Saturdays during the summer, 
and now we want to make it twelve or one 
o'clock if we can." 

" The ball grounds are quite a distance 
away," put in one of the delegation. 

" And we have to start early to get to the 
races," said another. 

" Really, you must excuse me," said the 
mistress of the house, courteously but firmly, 
" I never interfere with my husband's busi- 
ness affairs." 

" Oh, we don't want you to," protested two 
or three together. 

" You see," said the spokesman, getjing 
down to business again, " it's just this way : 
we want you to be kind and nice and pleas- 
ant to him for a few days, and then we'll go 
to him and ask him to — " 

" Gentlemen !" she exclaimed haughtily. 

"Might ask him to take you to the ball 
game," said one of the young men, noticing 
her manner. 

" Or the races," added another. 

" There is an inference, gentlemen — " she 
began, but the spokesman interrupted. 

" Oh, I know all about it," he said ; " I'm 
married myself. Things go wrong in the 
house, and you're tired and cross at break- 
fast. Then we suffer at the office. You stay 
up late to chaperon your daughter to a ball, 
and we have more trouble at the office. 
You're a bit cross three mornings in succes- 
sion, for one reason or another, and we have 
a — a— terrible time at the office." 

" I was discharged from an office once 
because my wife was cross the same morning 
that my boss was," exclaimed one young 
man. " I suppose our wives would have 
chatted pleasantly if they had met, but there 
was an explosion when we met. He was ugly 
about something, and I fired and he fired 
back. That's the way it goes now ; and if 
you'd make it a point to be particularly 
agreeable and pleasant to him for — say, four 
days—" 

" Yes, four days will do nicely," broke in 
the spokesman. "Then we'll go to him and 
everything will be all right. The fourth day 
you give him the best breakfast you can — 
everything that he likes best — and we'll get 
what we want in three minutes. Talk about 
a woman having no influence in business ! 



Why, the humor she's in has more effect than 
a bank failure or a boom in trade. 

She thought she ought to be angry, but 
instead, she laughed, agreed to the proposi- 
tion, and four days later, when they waited 
on the head of the firm, he made the closing 
hour twelve o'clock, and said that never in 
the history of the firm had things run as 
satisfactorily as they had during the last 
four days. — Texas Siftings. 



DISPLAY YOUR GOODS. 

DISPLAY is a silent but very effective 
salesman — never absent for meals or 
on account of sickness, remarks The 
American Grocer. It adds nothing to salary 
account, very little to general expenses. Give 
display plenty of space and it will beat any 
other sales agent in the store. Recently the 
representative of a large manufacturer, upon 
entering a prominent retail store, noted a 
very fine display of their goods on the floor. 
He requested that it be removed and the 
goods exhibited upon the counters, in impos- 
ing array. This was done, and soon a cus- 
tomer, walking about, examined them with 
interest and ordered forty dollars' worth of 
preserves, of which there was a prominent 
display. Probably the customer did not 
have the goods purchased in mind until the 
eye was arrested, desire created and grati- 
fied. 

We never found a grocery with too much 
floor area. The more that goods are spread 
out and displayed the more interest will be 
aroused with consumers to investigate and 
the quicker will be the demand. Piling 
goods several rows deep on shelves is not 
calculated to increase interest therein. 

It is well in making a display to remem- 
ber the Earl of Chesterfield's motto : 
" Whatever is worth doing at all is worth 
doing well." Let not a slight expense deter 
one from making an artistic display. If the 
establishment has no one possessed of a 
taste for arranging goods, then hire an ex- 
pert, or elso go and study displays that are 
effective, of which there are many. 

No dry goods store or bric-a-brac shop 
has as varied an assortment of goods as the 
grocer, whose wares are of exquisite colors 
and lend themselves to decoration in a won- 
derful way. They are particularly adapted 
to giving the store a bright, cheerful holiday 
aspect that catches the eye of the passers by 
and sets them to advertising in a way which 
money cannot buy. 

BUSINESS CHANCES 

IN A CITY OF 10,000 — A PORK STORE- WELL 
I fitted up for the business; will dispose with or with- 
out fixtures; going out of the retail trade. Apply office 
of this paper. (3) 

*0 nOD W1LL PURCHASE A HALF IN- 
^O jUUv lerest in a well established manufac- 
turing business; centrally located; an article handled 
by all grocers ; purchaser to act as salesman. Address 
Box 3 Ghockk. (t-f) 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 



Chain- 

Lishtni no 



is quick — perhaps 
quicker than the sale of 
Crystal Baking Powder 
will be — but not much. 
It is the fastest selling 
package of Baking Pow- 
der you ever handled. 




Each lamp glass contains 
i lb. net of 



GOOD 



BAKING 
POWDER 



Put up i doz. in case. 

We guarantee safe deliv- 
ery to any point in the 
WORLD with our new 
system of packing. 



PATENT APPLIED FOR. 



PURE COLD M FG.CO 



Write us. 

See our travel- 
lers. 



31 §r33 FRONT ST. EAST. 
TORONTO. 



THE MIND RULES THE WORLD. 

THE number of inventions that are being 
announced, and the numerous patents 
that are being issued daily, should be 
a lesson to old as well as young to be on the 
alert, on the move with eyes always open 
and ears ever receptive to catch an idea 
that, by saving time or by easily and ade- 
quately supplying the wants of man, may be- 
come an article of value to the world, says 
New Ideas. Edison, the greatest name in 
practical electricity, whose inventions have 
made him or will make him one of the 
wealthiest and most widely known men in 
the world, says : " Never look at the clock 
while at work." He has often sat in his 
darkened laboratory while working on one of 
his brain creations, probably the phono- 
graph or kinetoscope, while his whole mental 
being, that wonderful something to which 
the body is but a shell, was so absorbed, so 
concentrated on the one subject, that he was 
utterly oblivious to the passing of time, and 
after many hours of such application he has 
come back again to the world, as it were, 
and found that he had been sitting from 
early morning until far into the night with- 
out having gone outside his door. As it has 
been with the father of the kinetoscope, so it 
has been with other great inventors. Every- 



thing must give way to the mind. Mind rules 
the world, and he who through sheer lazi- 
ness or carelessness gradually loses the 
power to concentrate his mind, must not ex- 
pect to retain a forward position in the pro- 
cession of life, but must resign himself to one 
of those levels which separates man from 
the machine. So many persons who have 
work to perform go about it in a slip-shod, 
half-hearted way, more like a horse or an 
automaton, than a human being; conscious 
of the fact that they have to put in their time 
doing something, say from eight o'clock in 
the morning until six o'clock at night, they 
measure work done not by results, but by 
ticks of the clock. No matter how humble 
a man's occupation be ; no matter how much 
drudgery he be subjected to, no matter how 
much there be of a tiresome sameness in his 
work, still if he keeps his mental machinery 
well oiled and always in wotking trim there 
is ever a chance for him to strike upon an 
idea, simple at first, but which upon ma- 
terialization and application may prove a 
boon to his fellow-men, and also may yield 
a fortune to himself. It is true there are 
some inventions that have been stumbled 
upon by mere chance, but the great majority 
have been made by those who have had 
their brains in woiking order, and who have 
not permitted themselves to become walled 



in from the world of progress by allowing 
their brains to become deadened from care- 
lessness and non-application. 



SUPPORT MR. WEISMILLER. 

Commercial travelers who have been up 
in Huron County say that there is every 
probability that D. Weismiiler, the Conser- 
vative Candidate, will be returned to the 
House of Commons in the election to be 
held there shortly. 

It is to be hoped he will be successful. 
He will take his place in a Parliament that 
is decidedly weak in business representa- 
tives. 

From what we all saw of him at the con- 
ference of merchants and manufacturers 
held in Hamilton a few years ago, he will 
undoubtedly be a valuable acquisition to the 
House. 

It is to be hoped that the business men 
of West Huron will cast aside politics and 
use their best efforts to elect Mr. Weis- 
miller. 

He has been an occasional contributor to 
these columns, and his views on questions 
affecting the trade — the retail trade e s peci- 
ally — have always been sound, and conse- 
quently have been well received by business 
men in every part of Canada, who wi.l be 
delighted to know of his probable success. 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Pinna ye hear the Slogan? 

If you drink Whisky, drink 



JOHN DEWAR'S SCOTCH 



HONORS AWARDED 



Purveyors by Royal Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Under competition the only Scotch drawn at the Bars of the 
largest Caterers in the World, viz. : Spiers & Pond, Ltd. Diploma 
of Honor and Gold Medal, Edinburgh, 1890 (Highest Award). 



Better Whisky cannot be had 



Edinburgh 

Antwerp 
Anglo-Danish . 

Cookery 

Brussels 

London 

Melbourne 

Food (London) . 

Sportsman 

Paris 

Dunedin ... . 
Military 



MEDALS 



890 



Edinburgh '890 

London '890 

Jamaica m 1891 

Food 1891 

Tasmania 1892 

Dublin 1892 

Brussels 1893 

Chicago 1S93 

Fisheries '■ ... 1893 

Manchester 1893 

Brewers' Show, Manchester. 1894 



National Trades and Industrial Exhibition, 1894, etc., etc. 



S. Sc H. HARRIS'S HOUSEHOLD REQUISITES. 



llARRIS^ 

BRITISH 

Polishing 
Paste. 

3rass, Copper, Tin, PcwterMetat 7 
\ Plate, C oach Classes s Windovis II 

V»*i-»« /*/■ Us, '_ Rut fh.AHttU mte 



-S7MA«sru- 



Ebonite Blacking 

( WATERPROOF.) 

FOR BOOTS AND SHOES. 



Does not 

Injure the 
Leather 




Requires 
No. . 
Brushing 



SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



Trade Mark. 

. . ASK FOE IT . . 

MANUFACTORY : LONDON. 



[Ianthoscute; 



(BROWN LEATHER^ 
RESTORER, 

For Cleaning and PrricnrlBf 

BROWN BOOTS AND SHOES 

And all kinds of Russet 
Leather. 



ENGLAND. 



"~™ Sit 



MARINE INSURANCE 

The Mannheim Insurance Company 

Grant Open Policies to Wholesale Gro- 
cers and Importers at specially favor- 
able rates. 



Further particulars obtainable by applying 
to Local Agent, or to 

JAMES J. RILEY & SONS 

Managers for Canada Montreal 



Notice 



TO THE WHOLESALE 
TRADE ONLY . . . 
Ynii ran ftnv plug tobaccos duty paid. 

1 UU KjO.11 L>UJ Sweet Navy Chewing, all sizes, 
25c. to 35c. per lb. Bright Honey Chewing, all sizes, 33c. 
to 43c. per lb. All kinds of Cut Tobaccos, 20c. to 55c. per 
lb., put up in any kind of package or style required. 

CIGARETTES 

All kinds of Cigarettes from $2.50 per 1,000 
to $10 per 1,000. 

CIGARS 

All kinds of Cigars from $13.50 per r, 000 to 
$100 per i,ooo. 

Write for samples and prices. Correspondence solicited. 
See price current. 



J. M. FORTIER 

MANUFACTURER 

st. Maurice street /flontreal 



JAPAN TEAS 



6* 



New 
Season's 



♦_»» 



FROM 13^ CTS. UP. 

Best value in Canada to-day. See our travellers or write for samples. 



J. F. RAMSAY & CO. 



WHOLESALE TEA IMPORTERS 



14 and 16 Mincing Lane 



Toronto. 




BOISSELIER'S 



One Tablet makes an excellent Cup of Cocoa. 




A perfectly pure 
compressed . 
Cocoa . . 
Extract 



In boxes 

ff jy of one dozen 

20-cent tubes, each 

tube containing 18 

tablets 



ALL LEADING GROCERS KEEP IT. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 



WHEN PURITY 
COUNTS . . . 

You will be forced to buy our goods. 

They have an unbroken record in all manner of tests and 
trials for purity and strength. The quality is unexcelled. 
Order a sample case at once. 




Lumsden Bros., Hamilton, Canada 



EWIMG. HEBRON 1 CO. 

Have Tons 

OF GARRAWAYS 

Recleaned and double sifted. Samples 
and quotations sent on enquiry. 

Trade Mills - - 



WE MAKE 



FOAJVL 
YEAST 

The Foam Yeast Co., Ltd. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



Pure, clean, fresh, and always per- 
fectly reliable. 



Canned 
Goods 



Full lines now in stock, in- 
cluding Aylmer "Canada First " 
and Miller's "Little Chief" 
brands of canned vegetables and 
meats. 



JOHN SLOAN & 00. 



45 Front St. East 

TORONTO 



I IN 

tPin 



STORE 



Rio Coffee 



Very choice selection. 



LAKE HERRINGS 

special TROUT and 

quotations for 
quantities. WHITEFISH 



Warren Bros. & Boomer \ 

W WHOLESALE GROCERS W 

• 35 and 37 Front St. East, Toronto. m 





If you sell our soaps and they sell at K 

sight a 

Write for prices. 3l 



P. M. LAWRASON 

London, Ont. 



NOW IN STORE 



Excelsior Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 

Perfecto Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 
London Layers. Black Baskets. 

A full and complete stock of Christmas Fruits. 



T. KINNEAR & GO. 

49 Front St. E., TORONTO. 



Sugars- 

^ AND 



S 



cr-ulH* 

Send for samples and quotations. 

Perkins, Ince & Go. 



TORONTO. 



J. W. Lang & Co. 

Have in stock . . . 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Extra." 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Fine." 

Curtice Bros.' " Monroe Brand " 

Strawberries. 
Shredded Codfish, " pkges." 

Very fine. 

J. W. Lang & Co. 

59, 61 and 63 Front ITt -._,_. ^,4-^ 
Street Fast J. Ol Oil LO. 

We have just received a 
quantity of 

Blue Basket 
Raisins 



too late for Xmas trade. Will 
sell at a very low price. 



SMITH & KEIGHLEY 

9 Front St, E, TORONTO. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TREATMENT OF DRUMMERS. 

A CHICAGO firm writes a contem- 
porary as follows regarding treat- 
ment which should be accorded 
traveling salesmen : 

A WORD FOR THE SALESMEN. 
English buyers have a very systematic 
method of treating with salesmen who call 
upon them with a view to selling a bill of 
goods. They set apart a certain portion of 
the day or the week to the reception of the 
traveling man, when he can show his 
samples and make his little speech. To 
further expedite matters, these buyers, as a 
rule, ask their visitors if they are carrying 
any new goods, and if so they look over the 
samples of such, and buy or not, as suits 
them. Should it happen that the drummer 
has nothing novel, the buyer refers to a 
memorandum kept for the purpose to ascer- 
tain whether a replenishment of the stock is 
necessary, and, if needed, orders it at once 
without keeping his visitor waiting for a de- 
cision, as is so often done in this country. 
Then, again, our English friends allow out 
of town salesmen to call on them outside of 
the hours fixed for those who ran conveni- 
ently abide by the rule. When the buyer is 
busily engaged he will immediately inform 
his caller of the fact, and appoint a meeting 
that will cause no inconvenience to himself 
or loss of money or time to the drummer. 
Best of all, the buyer is always very punc- 
tilious in keeping such engagements, and 
unless something unforeseen occurs, will 
never disappoint the salesman or keep him 
waiting. Doubtless there are many buyers 
in this country who are equally as punctual 
and methodical, but, from the number of 
letters sent us by road men, complaining of 
ill-treatment at the hands of the persons in 
question, we cannot help but feel that there 
is plenty of room for improvement in this 
respect. 

SUGGESTIONS TO CRANKY BUYERS. 
Cranky buyers, as a rule, are men of very 
little experience outside their own office and 
have no road experience whatever. This 
class of buyers do not consider the time of a 
salesman worth anything, while it is equally 
as valuable in proportion as theirs. 

Buyers who are courteous, considering a 
salesman's time worth something, and accord 
him a hearing, let it be ever so short, will 
seven times out of ten buy goods cheaper 
and better than if they allowed the salesman 
to hang around for hours, and sometimes 
days, before affording him a hearing or a 
chance to see him in regard to his goods. 

If a salesman has a job or inside deal of 
any kind he will never offer it to the cranky 
buyer or to the one who kept him hanging 
around for hours. The price of goods to 
such buyers generally advances according 
to the time the salesman has been waiting 
for an audience. These are facts, but many 
buyers don't know it. 
It is just as easy for a buyer to tell a sales- 



man at 8.30 Monday morning, after an inter- 
view of five minutes, that he does not wish 
any of his goods, as it is to say the same 
thing Thursday or Friday of the same week. 

By so doing he affords the salesman an 
opportunity to make two or three other 
towns, and perhaps sell many bills, thus 
earning his salary and at the same time 
making money for the house he represents. 
POLITENESS. 

Politeness is one of the cheapest com- 
modities in the world, and the buyer who 
dispenses it with a lavish hand is always 
sure to make friends among salesmen who 
are willing to aid him in every possible way. 
He will also be serving the best interests of 
his employer, who, as our correspondent 
points out, is always benefitted by dealing 
properly with the commercial traveler. The 
latter is but human and should not be looked 
upon as an interloper in any sense of the 
word, " Live and let live" should be the 
motto of all, as each is dependent on the 
other. Without making mutual concessions 
both will be sure to lose golden opportuni- 
ties that can never be recalled. 



KOOTENAY PETROLEUM DEPOSITS. 

ONE of the various resources of East 
Kootenay waiting for development, 
says a correspondent of a contem- 
porary in that district, is the petroleum 
found in the Flathead Valley in the south- 
eastern portion of this district. This is a 
section of country but little known, and 
which is separated from the remainder of the 
district by a high range of mountains. The 
natural outlet of the valley is down the Flat- 
head River into Montana, and the nearest 
railroad is the Great Northern. Some years 
ago attention was called to the section 
through the finding of crude oil in the pos- 
session of some Stony Indians, who an- 
nually hunted in this valley, and they were 
induced to show some miners were they ob- 
tained the oil, which they (the Indians) were 
in the habit of using as a medicine for 
complaints of all kinds. The surface in- 
dications are good, and two different quali- 
ties of oil have been obtained. On Kish- 
neena Creek, a short distance north of 
the international boundary line, a black oil, 
similar to the Pennsylvania and Ohio oils, is 
found. But, on Sage Creek, some eight 
miles north, there is found an oil that is 
nearly pure, of a light yellow color, which 
will burn in a lamp as it comes from the 
ground. Close by, there is natural gas es- 
caping from the bedrock, which burns free- 
ly on ignition. Some of this oil sent to the 
Geological Museum at Ottawa, caused con- 
siderable excitement and comment, and was 
pronounced a fraud on account of its purity. 
Dr. Selwyn, the head of the Department, 
made a special trip to the valley, and was 
surprised to find the oil genuine, and also 
that this oil was found in the Cambrian for- 



mation, which was something unknown, as 
all the oil fields hitherto discovered have 
been in the Trenton limestone. Directly 
due east of Sage Creek, and on the eastern 
slope of the main ridge of the Rocky Moun- 
tains, in Alberta Territory, there are plenty of 
surface indications of crude oil. And the find- 
ing of these indications over such a large 
area, and in the same formation, would go to 
show that there is a large oil field awaiting 
capital to develop it. 



TRADE CHAT. 

1BRICKLES, 760 Queen street east, 
Toronto, has disposed, by auction, of 
• his entire stock of fruits, candies, etc., 
as well as fittings, including show cases, 
glass jars, etc. 

Mr. J. C. Stockwell, Danville, Que., has 
sold by auction his dry goods, etc., and will 
only keep drugs and groceries. 

Retail grocers of Newcastle, Pa., have 
organized an association to protect them- 
selves from non-paying debtors, and any 
person who trusts a blacklisted person will 
be fined $10. 

The warehouse of the pottery works of 
Mr. F. S. Glass, of Pottersburg, near Lon- 
don, was totally destroyed by fire Saturday 
morning. The contents were also ruined. 
The building was valued at from $12,000 to 
to $13,000, and the stock at from $8,000 to 
$9,000. The building and contents were 
partially insured. 

A number of the members of the Wood- 
stock Fishing Club visited the preserve this 
week, and report that the trout in the breed- 
ing ponds are thriving. 

Max. Wolfe, at London, has been fined 
$20 for an infringement of the Transient 
Traders' Act, he having opened up in the 
Forest City for the purpose of doing a fur 
trade during the holiday season. 

In some parts of Ontario ploughing was 
in progress during Christmas week, which is 
most unusual. 

The Department of Customs has refused 
the application of the proprietors of the 
Silver Creek trout ponds, Toronto, for free 
admission of speckled trout ova from the 
United States. 

Mr. J. Dunfee reports that the demand 
for groceries, confectionery and fruits during 
the Christmas holidays at his store was 
about double what it was last year. They 
had to work late every night getting goods 
ready for the following day. — Guide, Port 
Hope. 

The cheese buyers of Western Ontario 
have decided that in future all cheese will be 
purchased on the following condition as to 
weight : "That all cheese shall weigh at the 
time of delivery at the railway station or 
other point of delivery up beam at half a 
pound per box more than the weight marked 
on the box, and that no fractions of a pound 
shall be tnajksd oq the box." 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



WE WANT YOU 



"D 



"^ 



To keep us in mind for 1896. We will 
try not to let you forget us. It will pay 
you to watch our space each week. Goods 
well bought are half sold. We are con- 
stantly advertising "snaps." Thanking you 
for your patronage of the past year. 



LAPORTE, MARTIN & CIE. 



MONTREAL 



Manufacturers by appointment to Her Majesty the Queen, 
H.R.H. The Prince of Wales and the Army and Navy. 




150 

Years' 

Record 




Liquid SJ» Blacking 

Black and White Cream fcr Patent Leather. 

Russet Cream 

For Brown Boots, Saddlery, Etc. 



MARTIN & ROBERTSON, 
Victoria and Vancouver, 

for British Columbia 



DAY & MARTIN ltd. Lond ^ v a e ^ 001 

E. T. STURDEE, St. John, N.B., for Maritime Provinces. CHAS. GYDE, Montreal, for Ontario and Quebec. 

TEES & FERSSE, Winnipeg, for Manitoba and North-West Territory, 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



.X5X 



You will find that 
these packets are the 
most attractive you 
have ever seen and that 
their contents make the 
most delicious TEA 
you have ever tasted — 

TAKE 
THEM 

ON 

and they will make a 

TRADE 
FOR 
YOU!! 



<r \£X 



tfppteton '4 Sndia &■ *€ej//on Tea4 

' THE "TAPIR" BRAND. 

SOLD IN LEAD PACKETS 




Agents 



(MONTREAL— FRANK MAOOR & Co., 16, St. John Street. 
(TORONTO— THOMPSON & THOMPSON, 18, Front Street East. 



PUREST & BEST 



Windsor Fine Salt 



In Barrels, 20olb. Sacks and 50ID. Sacks is shipped in car lots 

to all parts of Canada. The Salt is the 
finest made and the best for general farm 
use. Our barrels are machinery made and 
one end carries a neat paper label. The 
sacks are made of superior bleached Jute, 
and will stand more handling than the 
ordinary salt sacks. A glance at the cut 
will convince you that the appearance of 
our barrels and sacks is a great help in 
selling the salt. Write us or our agents 
for prices or samples. 

The WINDSOR SALT WORKS, WINDSOR, ONT. 




THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 



THE /9/JE Of /ND//JN WO CE^LOM TE/? fiND THE. ECL/PSE OF C////VS? TErf 

1894 >884-. , l87 4, 

1864 




THE AREA l» EACH CIRCLE R t PRE.5 LHTS THE QUANTITV OF TEA CONSUME.0 IN CREAT BRITAIN IN THE YEAR NAMED 



/?£PRes£/vTs /no/si/y Tsrt. I I ft£P./?E.sEnrs CsYLo/t /sa. 



/?£P/?£S£/vrj C/j//v# 7s /r 



From One Million Pounds in 1883 



To 



94,000,000 



Pounds in 
.... 1895 



is indeed a remarkable export record. Ceylon, little Ceylon, 
has done this. British grown teas, made by machinery, are 
driving the hand-rolled teas of China out of every desirable 
market. 



Be Wise in Time 




Send to your wholesale dealer for 
a package of 



CEYLON TEA 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



JAPAN TEA PLANTATIONS. 

THE tea production of Japan, writes Y. 
Obayashi, of Tokyo, in American Gro- 
cer, amounts to 62,836,892 pounds, 
and this tea is grown on plantations scat- 
tered within the limit of 31 deg. 20 min. to 
41 deg. 30 min. N. lat., namely, from Chiran 
of Kagoshima to Matsumaye of Hokkaido 
Though young buds can be plucked from the 
tea tree in the cold region as far as Hok- 
kaido, yet it is an evidence of unnatural 
growth. The true limit of mercantile tree 
production may probably be 36 deg. 30 min. 
(the upper part of Ibaraki prefecture). In 
the upper region, or above 36 deg. 30 min., 
there are very few plantations, which only 
supply the local consumption and produce 
2,047,486 pounds, or 3 per cent, of the en- 
tire production of Japan tea. In the middle 
part of the island there are three or four 
tea districts, of which the Uji region is the 
widest and most famous. Next to Uji is the 
Shidzuoka district, and next to that is the 
Sayama tract. In the Uji region there are 
Kyoto, Shiza, Nara and Miye, prefectures of 
large production. In the southern part there 
are found in abundant profusion wild tea 
bushes among the hills or forests. For those 
who would be more conversant in regard to 
the Japan tea districts I have grouped the 
tea districts according to latitude, as shown 
in the following table : 

Production, Per 

Plantations— lbs. cent. 

Above 36 d. 30 m. N. lat 1,047,486 3.2 

Above 35 d. 20 m. N. lat 5. 6 77>25° 9.3 

Above 34 d. o m. N. lat 4'.529.'53 '6.0 

Above 33 d. o m. N. lat 8,084,387 128 

Above 31 d. 20 m. N. lat 5,498,616 8.7 

According to this classification the Sayama 
tea belongs to the second group, and in the 
third there are Shidzuoka and Uji. 

It is well known that the crop of tea per 
acre is very heavy, though the climate is 
colder than the regions of China or India. 
Every farmer knows how to cultivate tea 
with the aid of manure, but does not know 
how to get the best results without the man- 
ure. Every tea man knows that the tea 
leaves picked from the manured trees are 
rich in aroma and taste, but does not know 
how to produce fine tea from unmanured 
plantations. From a single acre there is 
sometimes obtained a crop of 2,083 pounds. 
The yield of the May and summer crops fre- 
quently amounts to 1,000 pounds in Shid- 
zuoka, Uji, Miye, Sayama, etc. But as to 
the average it is lar below, as shown in the 

following table : 

Pounds 

Tea Acreage, per acre. 

1 11,650 175 

2 28.110 202 

i .'.'.'.'.'...... 76.436 542 

4 21,953 368 

5 11,300 487 

Average 4'7 

I cannot but feel very sorry that your 
countrymen serve only inferior variety and 
cannot use the finest tea of Tapan such 
as Japanese gentlemen consume. The 
Amer.can Consul at Amoy, about 1892, said 
that among Formosa Oolongs there is found 
tea of very hgh value, and also in Japan, 
where a pound of Gyokuro costing above 
$10 may be bought in the large cities of the 
empiie. 



The "GENUINE" 



Is a Chimney full of quality 

See our Registered Trade 

Mark on each one. 






Full Leadj 
Flint-Wrapped 
and Labelled 



Do not buy any so-called 
Flint Chimney, but insist 
o'n having the GENUINE 



GOWANS, KENT & CO., Toronto 



no s v c a otia FIBRED CODFISH 



REPRESENTS the highest achievement in 
the art of curing and preparing Codfish ready 
for cooking. 

NOTHING is used in this product but the 
finest of shore Codfish especially cured and 
dried for it. 



EVERY particle of skin and bone being re- 
moved and the water evaporated, there is 
absolutely no waste. The contents of each 
package, therefore, is worth to the house- 
keeper about three times its weight in Cod- 
fish as ordinarily sold. 



THE disagreeable odor usually considered 
to be a necessary evil to be endured while 
cooking Codfish will be found to be entirely 
lacking in this. 

PARKER, EAKINS & CO. SsrtMsAa YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 



PUT UP in half-pound cartons, 3 doz. car- 
tons to the case, and sold by the wholesale 
and retail grocers throughout Canada. 




Free . . . 

a handsome Glass 
Jar with . . . 

Tutti Frutti 



Get one from your whole- 
saler. Send postal to us 
for elegant signs to deco- 
rate your window. 



ADAMS & SONS CO. 

11 & 13 Jar vis Street, Toronto 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



3? 



PllilKTDI'S POWDERED PERFUMED LYE 

" BELL BRAND ",m i-lb. tins. 

Dillon & Co.'s Baking Soda 

" BELL BRAND " in I-lb. packages. 
Ask your wholesale grocer for them. 



Champion Fire and 
Burglar-Proof Safes . . 

Made with Solid Welded An- 
gle Iron Frame, Iron Inside 
Doors; 1,000,000 Changes 
Combination Lock. Twelve 
years trial have proven them 
the Best. Fifteen sizes in 
stock. Write for our Price 
List. 

S.S. KIMBALL 
577 Craig St., Montreal, P.Q. 



STOP 

SELLING 

STARCH 

to your customers when they waut Tapioca. 
The majority of so-called Pearl Tapiocas con- 
tain as much potato starch as Tapioca. They 
all take a worrying long time to cook. In- 
stantaneous Tapioca cooks in fifteen minutes, 
and makes 




Delightfully 

Dainty 

Dishes 



for the sick, nourishing and non-irritating 
food for children, and scores of desserts for 
the busy housewife. Have it on hand the 
next time she calls. It makes customers and 
pleases everybody. 

HOWE, McIISTYRE CO. 

Sole Agents MONTREAL 



A GOOD RESOLUTION 




ITCHKLOTH 



W— 

Vl ■ Silver, Brass, Nickel, Copper, Bicycles, 

etc. Retails at ISC. Send small 
sample order. 
Sole Agency for Canada 

TEMPLE BUILDING, 113a, MONTREAL 



New York Fancy Brand. Have a good light. Use 



i^^^T 



/BURNINGS 




OIL 

,. .IN THE-./ 1 



« 



NO |jj,o I 



Samuel Rogers & Go. Toronto. 



Every Oil known to trade and industry— wholesale. 



Brown & Polsons 

Corn Flour 



DISTINGUISHED FOR 
PURITY, STRENGTH, 
AND FLAVOUR. 

Excellent for CHILDREN and INVALIDS, prepared with MILK. 
Makes DAINTY DISHES for Breakfast, Dinner, and Supper. 



NO PACKET GENUINE WITHOUT 
THESE SIGNATURES— 



<MuA//}7&W2 (^W(&t 



For sale by all the leading grocers Write for samples and quotations. 

Sole Agent for Canada, JNO. A. ROBERTSON, Board of Trade Building, Montreal. 

The Gulf of Georgia Cannery 



MALCOLM & WINDSOR, Ltd 



Sole Proprietors, and Agents for 



if 



Ice Castle Brand" Canned Salmon 

All salmon packed under the " Ice Castle Brand " are 
guaranteed to be the celebrated Sockeye. 



FACTORY, Stcveston, B.C. 



OFFICE, Vancouver, B.C. 



Batty's 



Nabob Pickles 



AND 



Nabob Sauce 

Are unquestionably the finest and most enjoyable 
in the world. Have been awarded 



ALL WHOLESALERS 
HAVE THEM. 



Canadian Agents 

J. A. Gordon & Co., 



EIGHT PRIZE MEDALS 



flontreal 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS.COMPROMISES 

JOHN BURKE, general merchant, 
Thornton, has assigned to H. C. 
Boomer, of Toronto. 

Samuel Dickson, general merchant, Innis- 
fail, has assigned. 

Geo. Lambert, general merchant, Bed- 
ford, Que., has assigned. 

R. Racicot, general merchant, Windsor 
Mills, Que., has assigned. 

Jos. Schaffer, jr., general merchant, Paris, 
has assigned to R. C. Teggart. 

A. Paxton & Co., produce, Toronto, have 
assigned to Henry Barber & Co. 

C. C. Chauvin, grocer and butcher, Wind- 
sor, has assigned to Robert Pinchin. 

C. A. Chouillou, importer of wines, etc., 
Montreal, is offering to compromise. 

A. B. Valiquette, grocer, Montreal, has 
compromised at 6oc. on the dollar (cash). 

The affairs of Hunt, Barnes & Co., fish 
and oysters, Montreal, are being investiga- 
ted. 

Wm. Hutcheson, grocer, 60 Gerrard 
street east, Toronto, has assigned to E. R. 
C. Clarkson. 

F. H. Martelock, grocer, etc., Ottawa, 
has left the city and the sheriff is in posses- 
sion of his store. 

J. O. Fournelle, leather and shoes, St. 
Jerome, Que., has compromised at 60c. on 
the dollar (cash). 

R. K. Jost, boots and shoes, Charlotte- 
town, P.E.I., is offering to compromise at 
50c. on the dollar. 

A meeting of the creditors of Remi Raci- 
cot, general merchant, Windsor Mills, Que., 
is to be held Jan. 4. 

A settlement at the rate of 80c. on the 
dollar is being carried through in the matter 
of Thos. Mailhot, Stanfold, Que. 

A meeting of the creditors of Milburn & 
Co., grocers and crockery merchants, of 
Stratford, will be held in Assignee Tew's 
office on January 7. 

R. Fisher, of Hagersville, has assigned to 
Richard Tew. Toronto houses are interest- 
ed in the estate. The liabilities are esti- 
mated at from $8,000 to $9,000. 

At a meeting of the creditors of Cross 
Bros., of Drayton, general merchants, held 
in Assignee W. A. Campbell's office, the 
statement showed that the liabilities are 
$6900 and the assets $6,100, made up of 
$1,200 equity on the farm, $2,900 stock, and 
$2,000 book debts. The stock will be sold 
to-day. The firm did not make an assign- 
ment, but the stock is being sold for the 
benefit of the creditors. 

CHANGES. 

Geo. R. Brown, hotel, Belleville, has sold 
out to Geo. E. Cox. 

Paul Campbell has retired from the firm 
of John Macdonald & Co., Toronto, and 



Duncan M. and A. N. Macdonald have been 
admitted. 

J. A. Taylor, grocer, Hensall, has sold out 
to J. W. Broderick. 

W. N. May'is commencing business in 
Port Stanley as a grocer. 

A new grocery store, has been started in 
Montreal by G. T. Vincent. 

Epstein, Tormey & Co., general mer- 
chants, Trail Creek, B.C., are selling out. 

A. F. Baile has been registered proprietor 
of the produce firm of Campbell & Bade, 
Montreal. 

Mary Therien has been registered pro- 
prietress of the general store of T. Rogers & 
Co., St. Agapit, Que. 

R. Gagnon & Co. is the name of a new 
firm of general merchants which have opened 
up in Tring Station, Que. 

Fred. B. Smith, grocer, 99 Queen street 
west, Toronto (W. M. Milligan's old stand), 
has closed up and is going out of business. 
SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The stock of T. Jiuy, grocer, Montreal, 
has been sold at 54c. on the dollar. 

The assets of L. Weinstein & Co., general 
merchants, St. Jovite, Que., are to be sold. 

The stock of A. Laferte, general merchant, 
St. Bonavtnture, Que., has been sold at 50c. 
on the dollar. 

The stock of Ed. Julien, boot and shoe 
manufacturer, Hedleyville, Que., has been 
sold at 7oXc on the dollar. 
PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

R. H. Staples, general merchant, Carman, 
Man., has admitted Mr. Carthew ; style, 
Staples & Carthew. 

Lyman, Sons & Co., wholesale druggists, 

Montreal, have dissolved. Henry Miles has 

retired, and business will be carried on by 

remaining partners under the old firm name. 

FIRES. 

Huston & Co., general merchants, Glen- 
coe, have been burned out. 

W. R. Armson, general merchant, Wye- 
bridge, Ont., has been burned out. 
DEATHS. 

W. A. Turiff, general merchant, Alameda, 
N.W.T., is dead. 

T. R. Marsh, general merchant, Niverville, 
N.W.T., is dead. 



THE CUBAN SUGAR CROP. 

Special correspondence of Willett & Gray, 
writing upon Cuban crop prospects, says : 
" Regarding the total amount of our crop, in 
view of the general situation, and after a 
careful examination of all the data at hand, 
I have come to the conclusion that 500,000 
tons seems at present to be the most con- 
servative probable out turn to our crop of 
1895 96. At the same time there is but little 
doubt that due to all the present evils the 
crop will be a late one." 



DO YOU WANT A LEAD PENCIL ? 

If you do, send to M. Masuret & Co., 
London, Ont, and no doubt they w,U send 
you one thit will last a year. We have no 
au hori'y to ask you to write for one, but as 
we want our readers to get all that is gong, 
we assume the responsibility. If you write, 
put the blame on us The pencil in q lestion 
is about a foot long, half an inch thick, with 
a brass ring on one end. 



A NEW INDUSTRY. 

Mr. W. Munn, writes the Newfoundland 
correspondent of The Montreal Gazette, has 
been actively engaged th s year in the manu- 
facture of refined cod liver oil, and has suc- 
ceeded in producing a splendid article, 
which competes successfu'ly with the Nor- 
wegian oil. He employs the freezing 
process, which separates the stearine, 
and produces an article rich in medi- 
cinal properties, and much more pala- 
table than the ordinary o 1. Mr. Munn has 
rented large premises in St. John's, with the 
view of carrying on the business on an ex- 
tended scale next year. Naturally, our oil is 
richer and finer than that of Norway, and, 
when manufactured on the improved plan.it 
will surpass the Norwegian article. 



TEA EXPORTS FROM SHANGHAI. 

The exports of tea from Shanghai and 
Yangtsze ports for season of 1895 9° t0 No- 
vember 30th were as follows : 

U.S. and Great 

Canada. Britain. Total. 

Black lbs. 7.458,078 14,438,310 21,896,388 

Green 19,124,050 5,146,320 24,270,370 

Total 26,582,128 19,584,630 46,166,758 

Last year 23,509,528 19,885,225 43.394.753 

AND HERE'S OUR HAND. 

The reason some merchants do not keep their store 
windows clean is probably because they are ashamed of 
the contents of their windows and desire to keep a veil 
overthem. — Canadian Grocer. 

Shake on this, brother. Some of these 
fellows are justified in feeling ashamed. — 
Grocery World. 

T here are no Customs Duties 

That we cannot pay for you here and then 
have your goods distributed — repacked if 
required — to any part of Canada. 
Write for particulars. 

BLAIKLOCK BROTHERS, MONTREAL 



"SILICO" 

THE UP-TO-DATE 
CLEANING SOAP. 

Cleans quickly and . . . 

DOES NOT SCRATCH 

Try a Three-Dozen Case for $2.26. 
For Sale by Grocers and Druggists. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 



mini 






I 



Hot Mince Pie 

"Just like mother used to make" — RICH, 
WHOLESOME, PURE, can be had by 

using Wethey's Condensed Mince Meat. 

TO BE HAD FROM ALL WHOLESALERS. 

J. H. WETHEY, n an uf a c t »rer St. Catharines 



iniiiiiiiiniii 



CAUSES OF FAILURE 

In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. 

As long as there are failures, subjects that furnish 
information how to prevent them will always be 
timely. We have published, in pamphlet form, 
three admirable papers on the above topic, in which 
Over-Stocking, Expense, Capital, Credit, Dis- 
counts, Buying, etc., etc., are ably discussed. We 
will mail the whole three essays ~ j- < 

to any address on receipt of Zj CCfllS 

HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto 



Onion Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

OF PORTLAND, MAINE 



Only Company whose Policy Contracts 
are governed by the statutes of the . . . 

niaiHe NONFORFEITURE LAW 



WALTER I. JOSEPH, Manager 



Room 2, 162 St. James Street, Montreal 




B* 






is our business. Naturally, we 
wish to increase it by having 
your trade. The fact that our 
business is rapidly increasing 
will show you that we must be 
giving our customers satisfac- 
tion. We can do the same for 
you. When you need anything 
in salt, either write or call on 
US. 



The Toronto Salt Works 

128 Adelaide Street East 

TORONTO 

City Agents for the "Windsor" Salt Works. 

ftr^@tt^y?affir^ @i v^>@»^^ 



THE 



Sydenham Glass Co. of Wallaceburg 

Limited 




WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Prescription Ware 

Flasks and Liquor Bottles 
Celebrated Beaver 

Fruit Jars, Jelly Jars 



PRIVATE MOULDS A SPECIALTY 



OILS 
OVALS 
SALADS 
SAUCE 



BOTTLES 



PICKLES 
PANELS 
BEER and 
MINERAL 



We make bottles of extra weight to order. We invite inquiry 
relative to lettered ware and bottles from private moulds 
Prompt attention to orders and inquiries. 
Mention this journal. 

Toronto Representative : G. A. McCANN. 208 Dundas St. 
Tees & Persse, Winnipeg, Martin & Robertson, Vancouver and Victoria, 

Agents for Manitoba and Northwest Territories. Agents for British Columbia . 



Fine Fruit Tablets 



ENGLISH FORMULA 
TABLETS 

Have been our specialty 
and have been a success. 
Packed in elegant Flint 
Glass Jars, large glass 
stopper, the finest pack- 
age in the Dominion. 
Also in round jars, similar 
to English, but made two 
inches shorter to fit the 
ordinary shelf. A large 
variety. List of flavors 
and prices on application. 




G. J. HAMILTON 
& SONS 

PICTOU, N.S. 




40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Southwell's Jams are I1 1. 
Southwell's Jellies are I1 1. 
Southwell's Marmalades are A 1. 




You cannot do better than start the year 
1 896 with a full line of 

SOUTHWELL'S 

Price List on Application. 

FRANK MAGOR & CO., 16 St. John Street, MONTREAL 




Toronto, Jan. 2, 1896. 

This list is corrected every Thursday. The 
prices are solicited for publication, and are 
for such qualitits and quantities as are usually 
ordered by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt pay are 
generally obtainable at lower prices. 

All quotations in this department are under 
the direct control of the Editor, and arc not 
paid for or doctored by any manufacturing 01 
jo tilling house unless given under their name, 
the right being reserved to exclude such firms 
as do not furnish reliable information. 
BAKING POWDER, 

Snow Drift — 

Vi lb. tins, 4 doz. in case per doz. $0 75 

V? " 3 " " 

1 " 2 " " 2 00 

3 " 1 " " 6 50 

5 " V* " " WOO 

10 lb. boxes per lb. 16 

301b. pails " 16 

Dominion— 

Vi lb. tins, 4 doz. in case per doz. 1 00 

>Z " 3 " " 175 

1 " 2 " " 3 00 

10 lb. boxes ......'. .per lb. 20 

30 1b. pails " 20 

pure gold. per doz 
lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

|i lb. cans, doz. in 

case 16 00 

|2'/ 2 lb. cans, 1 and 2 

I doz. incase 10 50 

1 16 oz. cans, 1, 2 and 4 

I doz. in case 4 60 

1 12 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 60 

TtYk^JS oz. cans, 2 and 4 

^1 doz. ii case 2 40 

'6 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 1 80 

4 oz cans. 4 and 6 doz. in case 1 25 

10 1. in can ° ^ 

Cook's Friend— ,.„ 

Size 1, in 2 and 4 doz. boxes 8 2 40 

" 10, in 4 doz. boxes 2 10 

"2, in 6 " *° 




" 12, in 6 doz. boxes 7C 

" 3, in 4 " 45 

Pound tins. 3 doz. in case 3 00 

oz. tins, 3 doz. in case 2 40 

oz. tins, 4 " 1 10 

Jib. tins, % doz. in case 14 00 

<:, t. MARTF.lt & SON. 

Barton's Baking Powder— per doz. 

1 Hi. scaler jars, 2 doz. in case $ 2 25 

1 ' i lb. jelly jars, 2 doz. in case 2 25 

2 " " 125 

2 lb. fancy enamelled tins, 2 doz 2 75 

1 lb. tins, 2 doz. in case 2 00 

'4 lb. " 3 " " 1 2r 

% lb. " 4 " " 75 

Gold Medal— per lb 

Vi !b. paper package, 10 lb. in box 12 

% lb. .... 12 

lib. ' .... 12 

W. H. GILLARD & CO., PROPRIETORS. 

Diamond— 

Vi lb. tins, 4 oz. cases 67V4 

V2 lb. tins, 3 doz. cases 1 17 

1 lb. tins, 2 doz. cases 1 98 

LUM8DEN BROS. 

Boston Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins. . . $1 25 

.Standard Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins.. 1 50 

Jersey Cream B'kg Powder, '/i-lhs... 75 

Vi-lbs.. 125 

1-lbs. . 2 25 

BLACKING. 

DAY & MARTIN'S BLACKING. 

Paste. (Boxes of 3 doz. each, per gross. 

No. 1 size (4 gross to a case) 8 2 40 

No. 2 size 3 " " 3 30 

No. 3 size 3 " " 5 00 

No. 4 size 2 " " 6 85 

No. 5 size 2 " " 9 00 

Emboa'd974 " " 6 00 

Liquid. per doz. 

Pints, A (6 doz, per bbl) 8330 

% " B 9 " " 2 25 

V, " C15 " " 1 25 

Russet Paste. (3 doz. in box) per gross. 

No. 1. In tins 8 3 75 

"2. " 5 65 

"3. " 7 85 

Russet Cream. (1 gross cases) per doz. 
No. 1. In bottles $ 80 



No. 1. 
" 2. 
" 3. 



Polishing Paste. 
(3 doz. in box) per gross. 

In bottles 83 75 

5 65 

7 85 

Polishing Cream. 

(1 gross cases) per doz. 

In bottles 80 80 

1 35 

2 25 



No. 1. 

" 2. 

" 3. 

In Metal Tubes 190 

Ivorine. per doz. 
Small. In patent stoppered bottles, 

sponge attached $0 80 

No. 1. " 135 

" 2. " per gross. 25 00 

p. o. French blacking. per gross 

Vi No. 4 84 00 

Vi No. 6 4 50 

Vi N0.8 7 25 

Vi No. 10 8 25 

P. G. FRENCH DRESSING. per doz. 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box $2 00 

No. 4, 1 or 2 doz. in box 1 25 

per gross. 

CROWN PARISIAN DRESSING 9 00 

BLACK LEAD. 

Reckitt s Black Lead, per box 81 15 

Each box contains either 1 gross, 1 
oz., Vi gro, 2 oz., or Vi gro. 4 oz. 

per gross. 

Silver Star Stove Paste 89 00 

Dixon's Carburet of Iron Stove 

Polish, 70c doz 7 20 

BLUE. 

KEEN'S OXFORD. per lb. 

1 lb. packets $0 17 

Vi lb. " 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 12-lb. box 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 5 box lots 16 

CORN BROOMS 

(mas. boeckh & sons, per doz. 
Carpet Brooms— net. 

" Imperial,'' extra fine, 8, 4 strings. . 83 65 
" 7, 4 strings. . 3 45 

" " 6, 3 strings 3 25 



tine. No. 8, 4 strings. . 

7, 4 strings.. 

" " 6, 3 strings.. 

"Standard," select, 8, 4 strings.. 

'Standard," select 7, 4 strings. . 

" 6. 3 strings. . 

" 5, 3 strings. . 

CANNED GOODS. 



3 30 
3 10 
290 
290 
2 75 
2 60 
2 40 



per doz. 
.-() 86 so 95 



Apples, 3s $085 80 95 

'• gallons 200 225 

Blackberries, 2 1 75 2 00 

Blueberries, 2 90 1 10 

Beans, 2 75 95 

Corn, 2's 75 95 

Cherries, red pitted, 2 s 2 00 2 25 

Peas, 2's 90 95 

" Sifted select 1 05 110 

" Kxtra sifted 145 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 1 65 1 75 

" 3's 2 40 

Pineapple, 2 s 1 75 2 40 

3's 2 40 2 50 

Peaches, 2's 1 90 2 20 

3's 2 65 3 00 

Plums, Green Gages, 2 ,-. 1 85 2 00 

" Lombard 160 175 

" Damson Blue 160 175 

Pumpkins, 3's 85 90 

gallons 2 10 2 25 

Raspberries, 2's 1 40 2 00 

Strawberries, choice, 2's 1 90 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 1 15 

Tomatoes, 3's 080 095 

Lobster, tails 1 75 2 25 

Hats 2 30 2 60 

Mackerel 110 120 

Salmon, Sockeye, tails 135 140 

flats 1 55 1 75 

Cohoes 1 15 1 20 

Sardines, Albert, Vi's tins 13 

Vi's tins .... 20 21 
" Sportsmen, Vi's genu- 
ine French high grade, key 

opener 12' 

Sardines, key opener, '//a 10 

" Exq. fine Fr'ch, k.o.p. Vis 11 11 

Vis 10V4 11 

& 18'/ 2 19 

Sardines, other brands 9% 11 16 17 

P. 4 0., Vi's tins .... 23 25 

<> " S'l " .... » 6 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



41 



; 

t 
t 

; 
? 



i 
; 
? 

i 



There is always 

a "best" in everything. 

This time it is starch — Edwardsburg Starch. Any- 
thing we didn't know about making starch when we 
commenced business in 1858, we have since learned, 
and as we manufacture from nothing but purest 
selected corn we feel justified in calling our prepara- 
tions " the best." 



Edwardsburg Starch Co, 



Cardinal, Ont. 



Sardines, Amer., %,& 

%'e 



. . 04% 09 

%'s " .... 09 11 
Mustard, % size, cases 

50 tins, per 100 10 00 11 00 

MARSHALL & CO., SCOTLAND. 

Fresh Herring, 1-lb 1 10 

Kippered Herring, 1-lb 1 65 

Herrings in Tomato Sauce 1 70 

Herrings in Shrimp Sauce — 2 00 

Herrings in Anchovy Sauce . . 2 00 

Herrings a la Sardine 2 40 

Preserved Bloaters 1 85 

Real Findon Haddock 1 85 

CANNED MEATS. 
(CANADIAN.) 
Comp Corn Beef, 1-lb. cans 
" " " 2 



1 15 
1 90 
1 90 



1 90 
1 90 



4 
6 
14 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 

Soups and Boull. 2 
" 6 



Minced Callops 

Lunch Tongue 

English Brawn 
Camb Sausage 

Soups, assorted 



$1 40 .$1 50 
2 40 2 55 



7 75 
16 00 



2 60 

3 40 



2 75 




8 25 
18 00 
2 60 

2 65 

3 50 
6 00 
2 80 
2 50 

4 00 

1 50 

2 25 
1 80 
< 50 



Acme 
Sliced 
Beef. 

No, 1 tins, 
key, 2 doz., 
perdoz. 32.50. 

Beardsley's 
Boneless per 
Herring, doz 

2 doz.... 14 



Codfish. 

Beardsley's Shredded, 2 doz. pkgs 




CHEWING GUM. 

adams & sons co. per box 

Tutti Frutti, 36 5c bars $1 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 23 5c packages . . 75 
Pepsin Tutti Frutti, in glass-covered 

boxes, 23 5c packages 80 

Horehound Tutti Frutti, glass tops, 36 

5c packages 1 20 

Cash Register, 3905c bars and pkgs . . 15 00 
Tutti Frutti Show Case, 180 5c bars 

and packages 6 50 

Glass Jar with Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 

115 5c packages 3 75 

Tutti Frutti Girl Sign Box, 160 5c 

bars and packages 6 00 

Tutti Frutti Cash Box, 160 5c bars 

and packages 6 00 

Variety Gum (new), 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Orange Blossom, 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Flirtation Gum, 150 lc pieces 65 

Monte Cristo, 180 lc pieces 1 30 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c bars 1 20 

Sappota, 150 ?c pieces 90 

Orange Sappota, 160 lc pieces 75 

Black Jack, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Rose, 115 lc pieces 75 

Magic Trick, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Spruce Chico, 200 lc pieces 1 00 

CHOCOLATES & COCOAS. 

cadbuby's. per doz. 

Cocoa essence, 3 oz. packages $1 65 

per lb, 
Mexican chocolate, % and % lb. pkgs. 40 

Rock Chocolate, loose 37% 

1-lb. tins 40 

Cocoa Nibs, 1Mb. tins 40 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO.'S. 

Chocolate— per lb. 

French, y 4 's— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Caraccas, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 35 

Premium, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Sante, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 22 

Sticks, gross boxes, each 1 00 

Cocoa — 

Homeopathic, %'s, 8 and 14 lbs. . 30 

Pearl " " " 25 

London Pearl, 12 and 18 " '.'. 22 

Rock " " " " .. 30 

Bulk, in boxes 18 

per doz. 

Royal Cocoa Essence, packages 1 40 

Cocoa — EPPS'. per lb. 

Case of 112 lbs. each 35 

Smaller quantities 37% 



FRVS. 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents.) 

Chocolate — per lb. 

Caraccas, %'s, 6-lb. boxes 42 

Vanilla, %'s 42 

"Gold Medal " Sweet, 6 lb. bxs. . 29 

Pure, unsweetened, %'s, 6 lb. bxs. 42 

Fry's "Diamond," %'s, 61b. bxs. 24 

Fry's " Monogram," %'s, 6 lb. bxs. 24 
Cocoa — per doz 

Concentrated, %'s, 1 doz. in box. . 2 40 

%'s, " 

libs. " 

Homeopathic, %'s, 14 lb. boxes . . 33 

" % lbs. 12 lb. boxes. 33 

JOHN P. MOTT & CO.'S. 
(R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott'sBroma per lb. 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homeopathic Cocoa (%'s) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa (in tins) 45 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate 28 

Mott s Caraccas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate 22 

Mott's French-Can Chocolate 18 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Chocolate . . 27 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 35 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 05 

Vanilla Sticks, per gross 90 

Mott's Confectionery Chocolate. 21 43 

Mott's Sweet Chocolate Liquors. 19 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Hygienic Cocoa, % lb. tins, per doz. . $3 75 

Cocoa Essence, % lb. tins, per doz. . 2 25 

Soluble Cocoa, No. 1 bulk, per lb 20 

Diamond Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb. cake, per lb 22% 

Royal Navy Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb. cake, per lb 30 

Mexican Vanilla Chocolate, 12 lb. 

boxes, % lb. cake, per lb 35 

WALTER BAKER & CO.'S 

Chocolate — 

Premium No. 1, boxes, 12 lbs. each. . 42 

Baker's Vanilla in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 50 

Caraccas Sweet, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. 37 
Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 boxes 

in case, per box, net • 4 20 

German Sweet Chocolate — 

Grocers' Style, in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 25 

Grocers' Style, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. . 25 

Eight cakes to the lb., in bxs, 6 lbs. e. 25 

Soluble Chocolate — 

tn canisters, 1 lb., 4 lb. and 10 lb. . . . 50 

Breakfast Cocoa— 

nbxs, nd 12 lbs. each, % lb., tins. 49 



COFFEE. 

Green. 

per lb. 

Mocha 28 30 

Old Government Java 30 33 

Rio 20 21 1 /. 

Plantation Ceylon 29 31 

Porto Rico 24 28 

Guatemala 24 26 

Jamaica 21 22 

Maracaibo 21 23 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO.'S 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey " 30 

Laguaya " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 28 30 

Santos 25 27 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum $0 02 #0 03 

Blue Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstorte 03 03% 

Borax 10 12 

Camphor 80 85 

Carbolic Acid 25 50 

Castor Oil, 1 oz. bottle, p. gross 4 20 

2 ' .... 6 00 

3 .... 8 40 

4 " " " .... 10 00 

'/ 2 pint " " .... 12 00 

Olive Oil, % pts., 2 doz. to case, 

per case 1 25 

" pints, 2 doz. to case, 

per case 2 50 

Epsom Salts 02 02% 

Extract Logwood, bulk 13 14 

boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 13 

Glycerine, per lb 17 18 

Hellebore 16 17 

Iodine 5 50 6 00 

Insect Powder 26 30 

Saltpetre 08'/ 2 09 

Soda, Bicarb, per keg 2 75 2 90 

Sal Soda 1 00 1 25 

Madder 12'/ 2 .... 

EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold, No. 8, per doz. ... $0 75 
" 1, 1% oz.... 1 25 

" " 2, 2oz 1 75 

3. 3oz 2 00 



RECKIITS Blue and Black Lead 



[ALWAYS CIVE YOUR 
(CUSTOMERS SATISFACTION. 



42 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUY IlPTON S 



AWARDED THE HIGHEST H0N0R5AI THE r»)FAIR I 
5UP^IE0 UNDER SPECIAL ROYAL WARRANT TO . 





possess that most delicate 
flavor and exquisite aroma 
peculiar to tl 
growths of Ceylon ami 
India. - . . 

They are put up in i 

pound ami half-pound a : r- 
tight package*, and retail- 
ed at 30, t0. and BOC per 

pound. Reason! why yon 
should sell LiptOO'e Teas: 
Becau e sveryhodj Hkes 
them. Tiny have the lar- 
gest sale in the world. 
They will increase your 
trade. Vein rati buy from the 
following wholesale agents : 

Do., Montreal 
H II. Brennan ■>» Co., - Ottawa 
W. G. Or»lg .* Co., ■ Kingston 
Balfour & Co., - - Hamilton 
A. M. Smith* Co., - London 
T, Kenny & Co., - • - Sarnia 



('hint Offices: City Road, London, England. 

United States Offiees : SO Front St., New York. 



TEA PLANTER 

CEYLON 



THE BRITISH GROWN TEA 



. . . TETLEY'S 



Tea is admirable — In flavor 
it is perfect, and it is so 
pure. 



Tetley' 



s 



Tea. . . 



London, Eng., 5, 6 and 7 Fenchurch St. 
Montreal, Headquarters for Canada, 14 Lemoine St. 
Toronto, 128 Richmond St. West. 
Manitoba, Northwest Territories and British 
Columbia, The Hudson's Bay Co. 



Tetley's Teas 



are not mere bulk of leaves, but 

•STRENGTH, PURITY 

AND FRAGRANCE. 




who cater to a coun- 
try trade must keep 



Salt 



to suit their custom- 
ers. 

A MEDIUM GRAIN SALT 

is what farmers re- 
quire. We sell it. 



The Canada 
Salt Association 



CLINTON, ONT. 



BROOMS . . . 



R 
O 
O 
M 
3 



OUR BRANDS : 



Imperial Gold Medal Victoria 

Bamboo Carpet Standard Leader 

A variety of sizes in each line. Give us a trial order. 

Freight allowed to Ontario points in 5 doz. lots. 



CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers. TORONTO, ONT. 



CONFIDENCE 

in the merits of the goods you sell is an important element of success. 




JOHNSTON'S 



FkUlD BEEP 




can always be sold with the most absolute guarantee that it is the best beef s 
preparation. We will back you up in this statement to the fullest extent. 

THE JOHNSTON FL01D BEEF CO. 



MONTREAL. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



43 



To Our Customers 



Another year has closed, and although we are 
rushed with orders as we never were before, we 
just want to use this space in The Canadian 
Grocer to return our sincere thanks to our nuiner- 
from ocean to ocean ous customers for their past support. We will try 

and merit your favor in the future even more than in the past, by giving you good goods and fair dealing. 
We wish it were possible to shake hands with you and tell you all we feel ought to be said ; but as this 
is impossible you will be kind enough to " take the will for the deed," and believe we are sincere when 
we say we are grateful for your past trade and are greedy enough to look for more in the future. We 
wish you, one and all, a big booming trade in 1896. 

Yours very truly, 



HENRY O. FORTIER 
CHARLES J. PETER 



} The Toronto Biscuit & Confectionery Co. 




Crown Brand ( Qreig & Co.)— 

1 oz. London gross 6 00 

'2 "Anchor.... " 12 00 

1 '• Flat Crown " 10 80 
2 18 00 

2 " Square .... " 21 00 
2%" Round .... " 24 00 

4 oz. Glass Stopper doz. 3 50 

8 ' 7 00 

Parisian Essence gross 21 00 

Ketchup, Fluted Bottles . . . .gross 12 00 

Screw Top " 21 00 

S. &L. "High Grade" 

per doz 3 50 

Pepper Sauce, per gross 15 00 

FLUID BEEF. 

JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL. 

Fluid Beef— No. 1, 2 oz. tins $ 3 00 

No. 2, 4 oz. tins 5 00 

No. 3, 8 oz. tins 8 75 

No. 4, lib. tins 14 25 

No. 5, 21b. tins 27 00 

Staminal— 2 oz. bottles 3 00 

4oz. " 6 00 

8oz. " 9 00 

16 oz. " 12 75 

Fluid Beef Cordial— 20 oz. bottles. ... 15 00 

Milk Granules, in cases, 4 doz 6 00 

Milk Granules with Cereals, in cases, 

4 doz 5 r 

FRUITS. 

FOREIGN. 

per lb. 

Currants— Provincials, bbls . . 04 04% 

% bbls . . 04% 04% 

Filiatras, bbls 04% 04% 

% bbls . . 04% 04% 

Patras, bbls 04% 05 

" %bbls 04% 05% 

" cases 05% 

Vostizzas, cases 05% 07% 

Panarete, cases 08 08% 

Dates, Persian, boxes 04% 05% 

Figs— Eleme, 14 oz 09 10% 

" 101b 09% 12% 

" 181b 13 15 

" 281b 16 18 

" taps 03% 04 

Prunes— Bosnia, cases 05% 07 

Bordeaux 04% 06% 

Raisins— Valencia, off stalk.. 04% 04% 

Fine, off stalk 05 05% 

Selected 06 06 a 

Layers 06% 

Sultanas 05% 08 

Cal. Loose Musca- 
tels 50 lb. boxes . . 05% 06% 
" Malaga— per oox. 

London Layers 2 00 2 20 

Black Baskets 2 75 3 20 

Blue Baskets 3 25 3 50 

Choice Clusters 3 25 3 50 

Dehesa Clusters 4 25 4 50 

Royal Clusters 5 00 5 25 

" Buckingham Clusters 4 50 

Non Plus Ultra Clusters .... 6 50 

Royal Windsor Clusters 6 50 

Lemons— Mussina, boxes 3 50 4 00 

Malagas, half chest.. 5 00 6 00 

boxes 2 50 3 00 

Oranges— Jamaica, fncy in bxs 5 00 5 50 
Jamaica, choice, boxes 4 75 5 00 
Cal. Navels, in boxes. . 4 25 5 00 

" Mexican, in boxes 5 50 6 00 

" Jamaica, in bbls 9 00 9 50 

DOMESTIC. 

Apples, dried, per lb 04 05 

" evaporated 07 07% 

FOOD. 

per brl. 

Split Peas $3 50 

Pot Barley 3 75 

Pearl Barley, XXX 6 50 

ROBINSON'S BARLEY AND GROATS. 

per doz. 

Patent Barley, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

Groats, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 
Cut Nails— From Toronto— 

50 to 60 dy basis 2 50 

40 dy 2 55 

Ody 2 60 



20 16 and 12 dy 2 65 

10 dy 2 70 

8and9dy 2 75 

6 and 7 dy 2 90 

5 dy 3 10 

4 dy A P 3 10 

3 dy A P 3 50 

4dyCP 300 

3 dy C P 4 10 

Horse Nails— 

Canadian, dis. 55 per cent. 
Horse Shoes— 

From Toronto, per keg 3 60 

Screws— Wood— 

Flat-head iron, 80 p. c. dis. 
Round-head iron, 75 p. c. dis. 
Flat-head brass, 77% p. c. dis. 
Round-head brass, 72% p. c. dis. 
Window Glass. [To find out what break 
any required size of pane comes under, 
add its length and breadth together. 
Thus in a 7x9 pane the length and breadth 
come to 16 inches, which shows it to be a 
first-break glass, i.e. not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in. and under) 1 15 

2nd " (20 to 40 inches) 130 

3rd " (50 to 60 inches 2 90 

4th " (51 to 60 inches 3 20 

5th " (61 to 70 inches) 3 50 

Rope— 

ManiUa 09% 09% 

Sisal 07 07% 

Per box 6 00 12 00 

Shot— 

Canadian, dis, 17% per cent. 

Hinges— 

Heavy T and strap 04% 05 

Screw, hook and strap .... 03% 04 

White Lead— Pure Association guarantee, 
ground in oil. per lb. 

25 lb. irons 04% 

No. 1 04% 

No. 2 04% 

No. 3 04 

Turpentine— 

Selected packages, per gal. 39 41 

Linseed Oil— 

Raw, per gal 58 

Boiled, " 61 

Glue— 

Common per lb 07% 08 

INDURATED FIBRE WARE. 

THE E. B. EDDY CO. 

% pail, 6 qt $3 35 

Star Standard, 12 qt 3 80 

Milk, 14 qt 4 75 

Round-bottomed fire pail, 14 qt 4 75 

Tubs, No. 1 13 30 

" 2 11 40 

" 3 9 50 

Fibre Butter Tubs (30 lbs) 3 80 

Nests of 3 2 85 

Keelers No. 4 8 00 

" 5 7 00 

" 6 6 00 

" 7 5 00 

Milk Pans 2 65 

Wash Basins, Hat bottoms 2 65 

" " round bottoms 2 50 

Handy Dish 2 25 

Water Closet Tanks 17 00 

Dish Pan, No. 1 7 60 

2 6 20 

Barrel Covers and Trays 4 75 

Railroad or Factory Pails 4 75 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

SOUTHWELL'S GOODS. 

per doz. 

Orange Marmalade 1 60 

Clear Jelly Marmalade 2 00 

Strawberry W. F. Jam 2 30 

Raspberry " " 2 20 

Apricot " " 2 00 

Blackcurrant " 2 00 

Other Jams " " 1 55 1 90 

Red Currant Jelly 3 10 

(All the above in 1 lb. clear glass pots. 

KNOX'S GELATINE. 

Sparkling calves foot 1 20 

Crystalized Fruit, flavored 1 65 

Acidulated 1 50 

(Sold by all wholesale grocers.) 



LICORICE. 

YOUNG & SMYLIE'S LIST. 

5-lb. boxes, wood or paper, per lb $0 40 

Fancy boxes (36 or 50 sticks) per box . . 1 25 

"Ringed ' 5 lb. boxes, per lb 40 

"Acme" Pellets, 5 lb. cans, per can. . 2 00 
"Acme" Pellets, fancy boxes (40) 

per box 1 50 

Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers, 5 lb. 

cans, per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb. glass jars 1 75 

5 lb. cans 1 50 

"Purity " Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 

" 100 sticks 73 

Dulce, large cent sticks, 100 in box ... 75 

MINCE MEAT. 

Wethey's Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

COLMAN'S OR KEEK'S. 

Square Tins— per lb 

D. S. F., 1 lb. tins $0 40 

% lb. tins 42 

% lb. tins 45 

Round Tins— 

F. D., % lb. tins 25 

% lb. tins 27% 

" 4 lb. jars, per jar 75 

1 lb. " " 25 

" 4 lb. tins, decorated, p. t. 80 

FRENCH MUSTARD. 

Crown Brand— (Greig & Co.) 

Pony size, per gross 9 00 

Small Med. " 7 80 

Medium " 10 80 

Large " 12 00 

Spoon " 18 00 

Mug " 16 20 

Tumbler " 12 00 

Cream Jug " 21 00 

RICE, ETC 

Rice— per lb. per lb. 

Standard "B" 03% 03% 

Patna 04% 

Japan 05 

Imperial Seeta 05% 

Extra Burmah 03% 04 

Java Extra 06% 06% 

Genuine Carolina 09% 10 

Grand Duke 06% 06% 

Sago 03% 05 

Tapioca 03% 05% 

Goathead (finest imported) 06% 

STARCH. 

EDWARDSBURG STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches — 

No. 1 White or Blue, cartoons 05% 

Canada Laundry 04% 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. draw-lid boxes 

and fancy packages 07 

.Silver Gloss, 6-lb. tin c 'iinisters. . 07 
Edwardsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. 

chromo package 07 

Silver Gloss, large crystal." 06% 

No. 1 White, bbls and kegs 04% 

Benson's Enamel, per box 3 00 

Culinary Starch— 

W. T. Benson & Co.'s Prepared 

Corn 07% 

Canada Pure Corn 06% 

Rice Starch— 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White, 1-lb. 

cartoons 09 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White or 

Blue, 4-lb. lumps 07% 

THE BRANTFORD STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches- 
Canada Laundry, boxes of 40 lbs. . 04% 
Finest Quality White Laundry— 

3 lb. cartoons, cases 36 lbs 05% 

Bbls., 175 lbs 04% 

Kegs, lOOlbs 04% 

Lily White Gloss- 
Kegs, extralargecrystals,1001bs. 06% 
1 lb. fancy cartoons, cases 36 lbs. 07 
6 lb. draw-lid boxes, 8 in crate 

48 bs 07 

6 lb. solid enamelled cannis- 

ters, 8 in crate 48 lba 07 

Brantford Gloss— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases 36 lbs. 07% 
Brantford Cold Water Rice Starch— 

1 lb. fancy boxes. cases281ba 09 

Canadian Electric Starch— 
40 packages in case 3 00 



Culinary Starch- 
Challenge Prepared Corn — 

1 lb. pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 06% 

No. 1 Pure Prepared Corn — 

1 lb. pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 07% 

KINGSFORD'S OSWEGO STARCH. 




f 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. pkgs., 08% 
SILVER J 6-lb. boxes, sliding covers 

GLOSS ^ (12-lb. boxes each crate. 08% 

PURE 12-lb. boxes 07% 

OSWEGO i 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. 

CORN STARCH. ] packages 07% 

For puddings, custards, etc. 
ONTARIO i 38-lb. to 45-lb. boxes, 

STARCH I 6 bundles 06% 

STARCH IN » Silver Gloss n 07'4 

BARRELS f Pure , 06% 

Brown & Polson's Cornflour. 

1-lb packages n m 

40-lb bcxss " gj 

SUGAR. 

Granulated n 04 £ P n1uv 

Paris Lump. bbls. and iw-ib. % M/z 

boxes Q5^/ 

" in501b. boxes ".'." 05% 

Extra Ground, bbls. Icing. ... 05% 05% 

Powdered, bbls 05 05% 

Extra bright refined 375 3 85 

Bright Yellow 3 40 03% 

Medium Yellow 330 03% 

DarkYellow „ 03% 03<| 

Raw Demerara 03% 03% 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 
8YHUP8. per gallon. 

__ . bbls. %bbls. 

5** 30 33 

Med ' l > m 033 038 

B r, f ht ;; '. "tV °38 43 

Kedpath s Honey 40 

2 gal. pails. l'io 1 15 

3 gal. pails. 1 45 1 50 
SOAP. 

Babbitt's " 1776 " Soap Powder .... $3 50 




1 S ox f*°» 50 ° 

5 Box Lot 4 go 

Freight prepaid on 5 box lots. 

P. M. LAWRASON'S SOAPS. 

Wonderful, 100 bars ."$4 0) 1 

Supreme, 100 bars 3 gn 

Our Own Electric, 100 bars ."." 2 00 

Sunflower, 100 bars '.'. 2 00 

BRANTFORD SOAP WORKS CO. 



r\w\u3 



Ivory Bar— per box. 
3 lbs. and 2 6-16 lbs. , 60 bars in box $3 30 
13% oz. and 1 lb., 60 bars in box. . 3 30 
12 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 4 00 



44 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



1896 MOTTO 

flAKE HONEY 



SELLING 



BY 



BRANTFORD STARCH 



10 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 3 80 

Twin cake, 11 % oz., 100 cakes in 

box 3 85 

All wrapped with lithographed wrapper, 
printed with finest alkali proof ink. Quota- 
tions of lower grades of all kinds of soap 
furnished on application. 

GUELPH SOAP CO. 

Pure, 60 bars, 12 oz., per box $3 00 

Silver Star, 100 bars, 12 oz., per box. . 4 00 

Royal City, 3-lb. bar, per lb 05 

Peerless, 2'/ a -lb. bar 04% 

Genuine Electric, 72 bars, per box — 2 50 

TEAS. 

BLACK. 
Congou— per lb. per lb. 

Half Chests Kaisow, Mou- 

ing, Paking 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darieeliugs 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 18 25 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

CHINA OREENS. 

Gunpowder— 

Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

\oung Hyson- 
Cases, sifted, extra firsts. 42 50 
CaBes, small leaf, firsts . . 35 40 
Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

Half ChestB, seconds .... 017 19 

" thirds 15 17 

11 M common 13 14 

PINO 8UEYS. 

Young Hyson— 

Half Chests, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32. 

" seconds .... 16 19 
JAPAN. 
Half Chests- 
Finest May pickings 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 13'/ 2 15 

Nagasaki, % chests Pekoe 16 22 

" Oolong... 14 15 

'• " Gunpowder 16 19 

" Sif tings.... 07% 11 



"SALADA" CEYLON. 

per lb. 

Green label, retailed at 30c 22 

Blue " " 40c 30 

Red " " 50c 36 

Gold " " 60c 44 

Terms, 30 days net. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

British . Consols, 4s ; Twin Gold 

Bar, 8's 59 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8's 57 

Laurel, 3's 49 

Brier, 7 s 47 

Index, 7's 44 

Honeysuckle, 8's 56 

Napoleon, 8's 50 

Victoria, 12's 47 

Brunette, 12's 44 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 48 

" in 401b. boxes 48 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T. & B., 

3's 60 

Lily, 7's 47 

Diamond Solace, 12's 50 

Myrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb. tins 70 

Vi-lb. plug, 6-lb. boxes 70 

oz. plug. 5-lb. boxes .' 70 

CANADIAN TOBACCO CO., MONTREAL. 

Cut Tobaccos— 

Theo, 1-6, 5 lb. box 20 

Comfort, 1-6. 5 lb. box 22 

Champion, 1-10, 5 lb. box 38 

I. O. F., 1-10. 5 lb. box 28'/, 

Sohmer, 1-10, 5 lb. box 32% 

Imperial Cigarette Tobacco, 1-10, 

51b. box 40 

Quesnel Tobacco, all sizes 60 

Crown Cut Plug Mixture, % lb. tin 50 
1 lb. tin 47 

Cigarettes — 

per 1,000 

Sonadora Havana 10 00 

Royal Turkish Egyptian 10 00 

Creme de la Creme 7 50 

Marquise cigarettes, Canadian .... 7 00 
Imperial " " 3 50 

Plug tobaccos (sweet chewing)--- 

Navy, in caddies 35 

Navy, plug mark 33 35 

Honey, boxes and caddies .... 43 
Spun roll chewing, boxes 55 

Plug smoking (with or without tags) — 

. per lb. 

Black Crown smoking, in 

caddies 35 

Crown Rouge smoking 38 

Leaf tobacco, in bales. ... 08 20 

Cigars- 
La Sonadora Reina Vic- 
toria Flor Fina, 1-20 $85 00 



La Sonadora Reina Bou- 
quet, 1-10 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 

Victoria Extra, 1-20 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 

Victoria Special, 1-20 50 00 

Honey moon, Regalia Com- 

rue il Fait. 1-40 55 00 

El Caza Culebras, 1-40 55 00 

La Fayette Reina Vic- 
toria, 1-20 32 50 

Noisy Hoys, BlueLine, 1-20 .... 25 00 

Princess of Wales, Prin- 
cess, 1-10 25 00 

Ditto, low grades 13 50 20 00 

Cigars. 

S. DAVIS SONS, MONTREAL: 

Sizes. Per M. 

Madre E Hijo, Lord Lansdovme $60 00 

" Panetelas 60 00 

" Bouquet 60 00 

- Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow 85 00 

" Reina Victoria .... 80 00 

" Pins 55 00 

El Padre, Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Victoria Especial.. 50 00 

Conchas de Regalia 50 00 

" Bouquet 55 00 

Pins 50 00 

Longfellow 80 00 

Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo, Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas 30 00 

" Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes— All Tobacco- 
Cable 7 00 

El Padre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORK8, MON- 
TREAL. 

Cigarettes— Per M. 

Athlete «7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 25 

B. C. No. 1 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 75 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

Cut Tobaccos— per lb. 

Puritan, lOths, 5-lb. boxes 70 

Old Chum, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes 75 

Old Virginia, 1-10 lb. pkg., 10-lb. 

boxes 62 

Gold Block, 9ths, 5-lb. boxeB. ... 73 

Cigarette Tobacco— 

B. C. N. 1, 1-10, 5-lb. boxes 83 

Puritan, 1-10 5-lb. boxes 83 

Athlete, per lb 1 15 



Plug Tobaccos— 

Old Chum, plug, 4s, Solace, 16 lbs. 
8s, " 16 
R. & R. 13% 
R. U% 



O. V. 
O. V. 

o.v. 

Derby 
Derby 
Athlete 



chew 7s, R. & 

" 7b, Solace, 14 

" 8s, R. & R. 16 

" 8s, Solace, 15 
plug 8s, Twist, 

" 3b, Solace, 

" Is. " 

" 12b, 

" 7s, 

" 5s. Twist 



16 

" l /a 
17 

17% 
17 

9 



68 
68 
068 
58 
58 
58 
58 
058 
58 
55% 
51 
51 
74 



WOODENWARE. 

per doz. 

Pails, 2 hoop, clear, No. 1 9160 

" 3 165 

" 2 2 1 40 

" 3 2 lii 

" " " painted" 2 1 

Tubs, No. 9 

1 750 

2 6 50 

3 5 50 

Washboards, Globe 190 200 

Water Witch 1 40 

Single Crescent 1 85 

Double " .... 2 75 

Jubilee 2 25 

" Globe Improved 2 00 

Quick and Easy .... 180 

World 1 75 

" Rattler 1 30 

THE E. B. EDDY CO. 

Washboards, Planet 1 60 

" Waverly 1 50 

XX 140 

X 125 

Electric Duplex 2 25 

" Special Globe 

Mops and Handles, combined 1 25 

Butter Tubs 160 3 60 

Butter Bowls, crates assort d 3 60 

Matches- 
Steamship (10 gross in case). 
Single case and under 5 

cases 3 10 

5 cases, freight allowed 3 10 

Per Case. 
Matches — 5-Case Lots, Single Case 

Parlor $1 70 $1 75 

Red Parlor 1 70 1 75 

Telephone 3 10 3 30 

Telegraph 3 30 3 50 

Safety 400 420 

French 3 00 3 10 

Favorite 2 25 2 35 

Flamers 2 20 2 40 



Licorice Goods 



SOME OF OUR 
LEADERS ARE : 






ACfflE 

Licorice 



SlICKblCORICE 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



Pnre Calabria "Y&S" Licorice 

Acme Licorice Pellets 
Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers 
Licorice Lozenges 
"Parity" Penny Licorice 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



I 



For 



i 



25 cents 

We will mail you a valuable ♦ 
little book on 



BUYING 
SELLING AND 
HANDLING OF TEA 

This is a complete and use- 
ful work, which every grocer 
should have in his possession. 



♦ The MacLean Publishing Co. ♦ 

I 26 Front St. West, Toronto. I 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »»»»»t ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CAHE& SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT., 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Bteel 
Hoops, sank in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly (all oft. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE; 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



THE 

Oakville Basket Co., 

MANUFACTUBBRB OF 




i, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets. 
I, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
1, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For tale by all Wooden ware Dealer* 



Oakville. Ont. 



English 
Malt 

Six GOLD Medals YII^ EGAB 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

. . OPART'S SPECIALTIES . . 

- HIGH CLASS - - GREAT NOVELTY - - GOOD PROFIT - 

ODART'S PICKLE - and - ODART'S SAUCE 

ODART & CO.. PARIS, FRANCE, AND LONDON, ENC. 




£3S 

7W+ 



CLUBBING RATES 



The Dry Goods Review and 
The Canadian Grocer 



TELLS what to buy and how to sell it ; gives a 
regular course of Window Dressing, Store 
Management, Advertising; describes all new 
goods, etc. What more do you want? One Pointer 
from a single copy should net you at least Two 
Dollars. Twelve copies, or one year, should net you 
Twenty-four Dollars. This is a fact, and the reason 
we have subscribers 



$3.00 



Send tor Samples. 



THE DRY GOODS REVIEW 

TORONTO .... .... MONTREAL 




N.B — The old Standard Brand of HORSESHOE 
Canned Salmon still takes the lead, and aftords the 
greatest satisfaction to both dealer and consumer, and 
for uniform excellence in quality and weight has no 
equal 

EVERY CAN WARRANTED. 

We are also packers of the well and favorably known 
orands of BEAVER, COLUMBIA and TIGER, all 
guaranteed prime Red fish. 

ALL LIVE GROCERS KEEP THEM. 



J. H. TODD & SON, 

Victoria, B.C., Owners. 

AGENTS— Geo. Stanway, Toronto, 

Agent for Ontario, 
" W. S. Goodhugh & Co,, Montreal. 

" Tees & Persse Winnipeg. 



Walter BaKBF& Co. Liitefl, 

The Largest Manufacturers of 

PURE, HICH CRADE 

CocoasandChocolates 

on this continent, have received 

HIGHEST AWARDS 

from the great 

INDUSTRIALandFOOD 

EXPOSITIONS 

In Euro pe and A merica. 

fl A TTfp T/~h ~\T • In view of the many 
\s*£*- U -M.J.XJJM • imitationsof the labels 
and wrappers on our goods, consumers should 
make sure that our place of manufacture, 
namely, Dorchester, Mass., is printed 
on each package. 




SOLD BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 



WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 
DORCHESTER, MASS. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 





* What a trial will do. 



*5 




It will transform incredulity into enthusiasm. It 
will turn cautious samplers into liberal buyers. 
Hundreds of dealers who "shied" at B.F.P. 
Cough Drops before they knew them, are 
now the most enthusiastic patrons we have. 
Perhaps you are one of the few who have not 
yet made a trial? Better drop us a line now 
while you think of it. 



TORONTO 
BISCUIT & 
CONFECTIONERY 
CO. - - - TORONTO 



B.F.P. Cough Drops 



LEA AND PERRINS' 



Observe 

that the 

SIGNATURE 



coe^a, c&Z&r 



Is now printed 
• in blue Ink 



Sold Wholesale by the Proprietors, Worcester; 

Crosse & Blackwell, Limited, London; 

and Export Oilmen generally. 



RETAIL EVERYWHERE. 



Of* every Bottle of the 

ORIGINAL . . . 
WORCESTERSHIRE 



) 



OUTSIDE WRAPPER 

SAUCE, 



AGENTS— J. M. Douglas & Co., and Urquhart & Co. Montreal 



CHARLES F. CLARK, EDW. P. RANDOLPH 

President. Treasures. 

ESTABLISHED 1849. 

THE BRADSTREET 

flEROlNTILE /IQENCT 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY, 

Executive Offices, PROPRIETORS. 

NOS. 279, 281 AND 283 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Qfflcci in (Ke principal dtia of the United Statu 
Canada, the Kuropean Continent, Auitratia and 
in London, Bngland. 
The Bradstreet Company is the oldest and, 
financially, the strongest organization of its 
kind— working in one interest and under one 
management— with wider ramifications, with 
more capital invested in the business, and it 
expends more money every year for the collec- 
tion and dissemination of information than any 
similar institution in the world. 

36 Front St. East and 

TORONTO OFFICES j$ W^JJingtOn St . East. 

TH08. O. IRVING. Superintendent. 



GOX'S GELATINE 



Always 

Trustworthy. 



E8TABLI8HED 1726. 



Agents for Canada : 

C. E. COLSON, Montreal. 

D. MASSON & CO., Montreal. 
ARTHUR P. TIPPET & CO . 

Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Montreal 



gDWARD STILL 

Assignee, Accountant, Auditor, etc. 



1 Toronto Street, 



TORONTO. 



Commercial Accounts and those of Estates. Munici- 
palities, etc., thoroughly audited and investigated. 
Charters obtained for Joint Stock Companies. 
Parties in difficulties can procure prompt settlements 
with creditors, on easy terms, without publicity. 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

The Original and only Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery. 



John Oakey & Sons, limited, 

Manufacturers of Emery, Black Lead, Emery and 
Glass Cloths and Papers, etc 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Representative in Canada : 
JOHN FORHAN. 650 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



VOL. X 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 1 0, 1896. 



No. 2 



I COLMAN'S I 
I flUSTARD I 






BEST ON EARTH 3 



^ 0HE lr ESTy %r o 



*" 



vv>* 




•*fr 



HUNTLEY & PALMERS 

ENGLISH BISCUITS 

The Largest Biscuit Manufacturers in the World 

Address, Huntley & Palmers, READING, \ riini Aim 
or 162 Fenchurch St., LONDON, E.c. J lNULANU 

Representative, MR. EDWARD VALPY, 49 HUDSON ST. NEW YORK 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



139 MEDALS AND HIGHEST AWARDS FROM THE WORLD'S EXHIBITIONS. 



Purveyors by special appointment 
to Her Majesty 

THE QUEEIS 

Empress of India. 




Purveyors by special appointment 
to H.R.H. the 

PRINCE OF WALES 

K.G., K.T., K.P. 



MACONOOIIE 





^^^2 


Rfv!§ 


SB 




wr i 


'- y M V 




?.v-/ft 




Kfe „-..- 




''bk^S 




tjUjjiEi 







BROTHERS 



131 Leadenhall Street, London, England 




Manufacturers of First Quality 

Potted Meats 
Fish Delicacies 
Jelly Squares 
Pickles 
Sauces 



Vinegars 

• • • • iutv* 



The Best 



The World Produces 



All particulars from agents : — 

SEETON & MITCHELL, Halifax, US. 

LIGHTBDUND, RALSTON & CO., Montreal 



Agents for British Columbia : 



& 



Vancouver and Victoria 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Standard Goods ^BesttoHandl e 



FRY'S 



Pure Concentrated 
Cocoa 

Pure Chocolate 

Vanilla and de Sante 
Chocolate 

Caracas Chocolate 



USE 




FRY'S 



Homeopathic Cocoa 

Diamond Chocolate 

Monogram Chocolate 

Gold Medal Sweet 
Chocolate 



THESE GOODS ARE SECOND TO NONE 



Arthur P. TippGt & CO. Maritime Provinces, Ontario and Northwest. 



FOR 



P URITY 



vkortafe 



FOR 



S TRENGTH 



TRADE MARK 



Made 



This brand is always reliable. Highest test 98,*°% pure. 

BT* The UNITED ALKALI CO., Ltd., Liverpool. 



"New Process" Soda, finest on the market. 



"LAZENBY'S 



J J MULLIGATAWNY and other soup squares, 
CURRY POWDER and SOLIDIFIED 
JELLY are the goods to use this cold weather. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 

A. P. TIPPET & CO. 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 

F. H. TIPPET & CO. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MANILLA and BLUE and WHITE DUPLEX 

Flour Sacks 

Regular sizes, 3^ to 50 lbs. 
Special sizes made to order. 
Printed in any number of colors. 

Our patented method of undulating 
corrugation gives the sack an 
elasticity not attained in any other 
manner, while in quality the paper 
is absolutely without equal in 
its kind. 

Our large variety of cuts and 
special designs enables us 
to produce a sack most attractive 
in appearance. 



THE 



E. B. Eddy Co. 



LTD. 



Hull, Canada 



Agents: F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec; A. Powis, Hamilton; J. A. Hendry, Kingston; 
Schofield Bros., St. John ; J. Peters & Co., Halifax; Tees & Persse, Winnipeg; James 
Mitchell, Victoria ; Permanent agents not yet appointed for St. John's, Nfid., Sydney 
and Melbourne, Australia. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Grand Mogul Tea 



Black or Mixed 

30c, 40c, 50c, 60c 



No competition with pedlars or department stores. No doubt as to quality and 
uniformity. Large profit, sure sale, certain satisfaction. We make no boasts. 
Quality tells. Sales doubling every three months. This is the assurance mer- 
chants like. Our latest method of advertising for 1896 will be shown you by our 
salesmen. 



P.S.-Have you tried GRAND SULTAN 
COFFEE, 12 and 25 lb. tins, 
whole or ground. Retails 30c, 
35c, 40c Best value ever 
offered 



T. B. ESCOTT & CO. 



Sole Agents 



CANADA and UNITED STATES 



AT THE CLUBS 



IN THE HOMES 



Wherever you find a taste for delicacies, there you'll rind fond friends of 

MacLarcn's Imperial Cheese 

Pronounced " perfection." The Highest Award by the epicurean 
taste of judges at the World's Fair, in competition with the cheese 
makers from every country. 

All Grocers SELL IMPERIAL CHEESE in White Opal Pots. 



When 
Write 

and we will 
give you 

Pointers 



How to increase your 
Tea Trade. 



you have caught on 



us 




ROSE & LAFLAMME 

MONTREAL, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



me St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Laboratory of Inland Revenue, 
Office of Official Analyst, 

Montreal, April 8th, 1895. 

" I hereby certify that I have drawn, by my own hand, ten samples 
of the ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO.'S EXTRA STAND- 
ARD granulated SUGAR, indiscriminately taken from ten lots 
of about 150 bbls. each, I have analysed same, and find them 
uniformly to contain : 

99iol to 100 per cent, of Pure Cane Sugar 

with no impurities whatever." 

(Signed) JOHN BAKER EDWARDS, Ph.D., D.C.L 

Prof, of Chemistry and Pub. Analyst, 

MONTREAL. 



Do You Sell Crockery ? 

Then we want your business. We manufacture all kinds of Yellow, and Bristol 
Glazed goods, also Rockingham Ware, which we guarantee fully equal to any on 
the market, either of home or foreign production. Catalogues, prices or travelers' 
attendance, if you drop us a card. 



Brantford Stoneware iWfg. Co. ua. - Brantford. 



OTHER SPECIALTIES. 

NOUGAT 
RAHAT LAKUHM 
ALMOND ROCK 
EL MAHNA 



&*5£$SH 




BUTTER SCOTCH 

^^ (The Celebrated Sweet for Children). Jk 



MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS. 

PARIS 

SYDNEY 

MELBOURNE 



CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., Toronto. P|% <%*!¥&?»***** .J£ i{ ROSE 4 LAFLAME, Montreal. 

WORKS f LONDON, W,C, 



THE CANADIAN GROCTZP 



5 



cC*s* "W* *■* *■? *■* *W* '»* *•* «' *s* "4* *■* «* *s* "■* "i? *■!* *S* *«* *■* "a" r m' *s* *• "¥* "4* *•' *•* "J* »* *s* "4* "w" #* # *•* *•* *•* "s* •* *t* V. 






To Grocers 



The season is on for Marshall's popular Scotch Pickled Herrings. All 
principal wholesalers carry stock. The margin of profit to the dealer 
is good. He should not be without this leading" brand. 



"CROWN 



55 



BRAND 



Marshall's Scotch Herrings 



FROM THE FAMED ABERDEEN FISHERIES 



In Kegs 
Firkins 
Half Barrels 
Barrels 



FULLS and 
MEDIUMS 

SOLE AGENTS 



N. B. — Marshall & Co., Aberdeen, own their fishing fleet ; 

pack only the Finest Selected Herrings. Every package 

guaranteed. Their Kippered. Fresh Herrings, Herrings in To- 
mato Sauce, etc., are very superior. 



WALTER R. WONHAM & SONS, 



3 I 5 and 3 I 6 Board of 
Trade Building, 



MONTREAL 






j£«X» *t» A »X* <M* A ««» A J&* «£» A A A A A A A A A A A *J. A A «A> *f. A *f* A »J» A »}• A A A •A. A A A A A }\ 



McLAREN'S 



is Honest Goods and just 

the Thing on Which to 

make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



64 



Just for the fun of it 



99 



is NOT what we advertise for. 



There is pleasure and profit in handling 

"REINDEER BRAND" Condensed Goods. 

( MILK, COFFEES, COCOA, AND EVAPORATED CREAM. ) 

EVERY WHOLESALE GROCER HAS THEM IN STOCK 

Try them ! They sell ! 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Teas 

That 

Tickle ~ 

The 

Throat 

Tremendously 



TRY THEM 



THE 400 SELECT 
DALU-KOLA CONGOU 
IMPERIAL CONGOU 
RUSSIAN CONGOU 



Everybody wants the best. Why not try them ? 



Teas 

That 

The 

Trade 

Try 

To Imitate 



WE ARE RIGHT IN IT ON TEAS 



W.H. GILLARD dc CO. "SK™ HAMILTON, ONT. 

JOHN MOUAT Northwest Representative WINNIPEG 



Look At This 



One of the leading jobbers in Toronto stated that 
the reason our goods took the lead, was that there 
was something about the flavor that made them 
so popular, and that we made our goods so attract- 
ive that his customers would not accept substitutes. 




START IN RIGHT 

Here is a bright New Year to you, 
so grace your store with bright, 
up-to-date goods which sell, and 
give you a smart profit. 



W. BOULTER & SONS 

Packers of the Peerless " Lion " Brand Canned Goods. 



Our Demand Novelty is the talk of the trade; every- 
body wants one. We never mislead in anything we state. 
This PROVES it. Grocers, ask your wholesaler for the 
quantity you require for your customers who buy our goods. 



This journal has the largest circulation and the largest advertising 

patronage of any grocery paper in the world. We prove it. 




Vol. X. (Published Weekly) 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 10, 1896 



($2.00 per Year) No. 2 



DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. 

An adder, but without a sting, is he who 
adds up accounts in an office. 

The trade paper is a teacher to the clerk, 
a guide to the buyer, and a help-meet to the 
seller. 

"C" stands for .Ceylon, a very good tea 
that is knocking Old Harry out of a tea call- 
ed Chinee. 

Everything else may be shoved into a 
corner, but for ability there is always room 
in the world. 

A regrettable fact is it that merchants who 
live beyond their incomes sometimes live 
beyond their time. 

Food for consolation is the thought that 
failures of last year can be made the founda- 
tion of success this year. 

Dr. Jameson, of South Africa fame, is 
evidently a bore, but still, the Boers have 
nothing in common with him. 

Men without opinions will not develop 
enough energy to keep themselves warm, 
much more set the world on fire. 

Progressive ideas that have been con- 
ceived with the New Year should be brought 
forth before they become addled. 

Merchants who are the freest in giving 
credit are usually the ones who most quickly 
bring discredit upon themselves. 

People who are always hunting for bar- 
gains sometimes get more than they bargain 
for— dissatisfaction instead of satisfaction. 



goods, and yet when prices are low we are 
as pesky as an old maid who has just made 
her ninty-ninth and ineffectual attempt to 
entrap a man. 

Clerks should not flirt with a business 
which is incompatible with them. Select a 
business that is compatible and then marry 
it. 

Thought is the germ from which business 
men spring. Consequently, if thought be 
absent the merchant proper cannot be pre- 
sent. 

He who does not know at least the rudi- 
ments of the art of advertising can scarcely 
be said to have mastered the details of his 
business. 

The voice is not the goods nor the goods 
the voice, but the selling of the goods often 
depends upon the tone, if not the quality, of 
the voice. 

Failures in life are due, not so much to 
over-competiiion as to the fact that men 
essay to be what nature never intended they 
should be. 

Ho* can a Cabinet that requires to be 
" schooled " in common sense be expected 
to deal intelligently with the Manitoba 
school question ? 

No footprints in the sands of time will he 
leave who finds time hanging so heavily on 
his hands that he wastes golden moments in 
trying to kill it. 

If ten per cent, of what has been lost to the 
country through bad roads could be collect- 
ed, we could construct roads good enough for 
the most fastidious. 



Judging from the tone of the exchanges % three fires last vear Toronto lost $2,- 

from there, people who have gone into min- 49°.°°°- Let us hope that the only fire that 

ing in British Columbia have not got into a wil1 visit the " Queen City " in this year of 

hole. grace will be the fire of business enthusiasm. 



Most of us are full of contradistinctions : 
we are always prospecting for low priced 



He who declares cash down shall be his 
business motto will need to keep up a great 



deal of courage if the motto is not to be like 
a clock with no tick. 

An advertisement in a bright paper reflects 
the common sense of the advertiser, but an 
advertisement on a mirror reflects the lack 
of sense of the advertiser. 

A trade contemporary talks about " The 
Coming Department Store." I thought the 
department store was here. What most 
merchants are interested in is the going de- 
partment stores. 

The Retail Grocers' Association of Jack- 
son, Mich., is to hold a social, and it has de- 
cided to invite the retail grocers and their 
ladies, the clerks and their ladies and the 
wholesale grocers and their ladies. It is not 
three of a kind, but it is a winning trium- 
virate all the same. 

I suppose the retail grocers of Chicago 
take butchers into their association in order 
that they may have a competent expert car- 
ver to disjoint departmental stores and di- 
vide the trade proportionately among the 
legitimate merchants of the " Windy City." 

A Chicago paper has magnified into form- 
idable warships, that could blow United 
States cities sky high, Canada's three little 
fishery protection steamers with their crew 
of half a dozen men that ply the upper lakes. 
If there is as much exaggeration regarding 
what the United States would do to Canada 
in the event of war, small indeed must be the 
injury tnat our neighbors can do this or any 
other country. 

A Toronto news company is adding a line 
of package tea to its wares. The tea is 
named " Jungle," and a good many mer- 
chants will no doubt hope that the firm will 
get tangled up in it. But the firm in ques- 
tion, knowing that tea and news are com- 
panions at the breakfast table if not in the 
bed, no doubt anticipate the two will pull 
along together very nicely. We shall see. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A BUSINESS-LIKE VIEW. 

HOWmuch more imagination influences 
some men than facts do is illustrated 
by a couple of resolutions, one in each 
branch of Congress, looking to an interna- 
tional conference of American nations to 
protect each other from European aggres- 
sion. All South America buys of us only 
about $33,000,000 worth of merchandise in 
a year, while the British colonies alone buy 
more than double that ; and the entire 
British Empire was our customer in 1894 to 
the enormous extent of $520,000,000, or 
about an even ten million dollars a 
week. Commercially speaking, South 
America is worth nothing to us in com- 
parison with British markets. Of course, 
if our national safety and our free institu- 
tions, and our liberty of conscience were at 
stake, we ought cheerfully to repeat the 
formula of Patrick Henry and demand lib- 
erty or death, regardless of business. That 
our liberties are in no respect endangered 
we shall not take the trouble of arguing ; if 
any one is dull enough to need argument on 
that head he is too dull to be reached by 
argument. No entangling alliances with 
foreign nations would be so dangerous to us 
as alliances with countries subject to politi- 
cal revolutions every two or three years, 
and most of them heavily indebted to 
Europeans who will some time or other 
insist on benig paid. This country has 
never undertaken to guarantee the de- 
fence of any South American state; it has 
indeed distinctly refused to, and it has 
limited its interference with their concerns 
to the extent of its own interests. Three of 
the South American states declined four 
years ago our reciprocity overtures ; be- 
tween Chili and Peru 15 years ago we in- 
terfered just enough to make Chili dislike us, 
and not enough to win the affection of Peru; 
most of these states are military dictator- 
ships, and their markets are markets for 
manufactured goods which the gentlemen 
now in control of the House of Representa- 
tive believe we cannot produce in competi- 
tion with Europe ; hence their desire for 
higher duties.— N.Y. Journal of Commerce. 



THE WESTERN RANCHES. 

F. S. Stimson, manager of the North-west 
Cattle Co., High River, N.W.T., is in Mon- 
treal. Chatting to a Herald reporter, Mr. 
Stimson said that the cattle shipments 
from the ranches were never better than th.s 
year. Over 20,000 head were shipped from 
the combined ranches this season, meaning 
an exchange of cash to the extent of $750,000. 
During the past summer over 10,000 young 
cattle were bought in Ontario for the purpose 
of feeding in the ranches, and for shipment 
in a few years. The ranch controlled by his 
company extends over 7,000 acres now, 
while a contract for 18,000 acres additional 
was recently made with the Government. 



The great trouble was that the Government 
charged too much for land that could be and 
would be utilized for stock raising, and 
which was no use for anything else. The 
new purchase of his company was at the rate 
of $1.25 per acre. At $1 an acre the land 
will be well sold, in fact, it would pay to take 
50 cents an acre, so long as thrifty settlers 
were attracted. 



CANNED GOODS IN THE STATES. 

WITH the end of the year it is not 
to be expected that the consuming 
trade would show much interest in 
canned goods, and the reports fiom all pro- 
ducing and distributing centres of dull trade 
is only what might be expected at this 
season. When the present season opened 
there was not a large carry-over in any line, 
with the exception of tomatoes and corn, 
but the exceptionally low prices quoted on 
these caused an enlargement of the consum- 
ing outlet, and as the 1895 pack of nearly 
everything was short stocks in all hands 
were moderate. Packers and commission 
men have, it is said, already disposed of the 
bulk of the current season's pack of nearly 
all descriptions of fruits and vegetables, and 
there seems to be no accumulation of any- 
thing in first hands, with the possible excep- 
tion of corn. Stocks of all kinds have 
filtered out slowly through jobbing channels, 
but at no time has the movement been of 
sufficient importance to warrant more than 
passing notice. Very little speculative in- 
terest in any line has been apparent since 
early in the season, and then there was no 
great show of interest on the part of those 
who sought to make investments. 

Prices throughout the year have been low, 
but toward the close there have been mark- 
ed evidences of improvement in everything 
on the list. In this connection a statement 
showing the opening, highest and lowest 
prices of the year in comparison with pre- 
sent quotations will be interesting, and we 
draw upon the statistics of prices just issued 
by Messrs. Thos. J. Meehan & Co., of Balti- 
more, for the following statement of ihe ex- 
treme fluctuations in prices of goods packed 
in Baltimore. The differences noted in these 
figures are about the same as in other sec- 
tions. The following figures represent Balti- 
more prices, to which freight must be added 
to find the equivalent in New York. 

Open- High- Low- Pres- 

ing. est. est. ent. 

3-lb std Y. peaches $i 25 $1 40 $1 10 Ji 20 

lib std \V. peaches 1 20 1 35 1 10 1 15 

3-lb 2d Y. peaches ... 1 10 1 10 90 90 

;-lb 2d W. peaches 1 05 1 05 85 85 

Gal. apples 1 75 2 20 1 50 1 50 

3-lb std Bart pears 90 1 00 85 85 

3-lb std tomatoes 67 % 70 55 62 J£ 

Gal. tomatoes 1 80 2 10 1 65 2 00 

2-lb 2d pineapples 70 75 57% 75 

2-lb ex std E. & C 1 10. 1 10 1 00 1 10 

2-lb 2d marrow peas . . . f>2% 70 60 70 

2-lb std marrow peas 85 90 75 80 

2-lb 2d E. J. peas fi, 70 62^ 70 

2-lb std E. J. pdas 90 100 80 80 

2-lb std corn 47H <>5 42J-2 47% 

2-lb skd corn 55 55 40 40 

— N. Y. Journal of Commerce. 



THE DIFFERENCE WAS MARKED. 

I passed two grocery stores the other Jay 
which illustrated very pertinently the differ- 
ence between the different degrees of pro- 
gressiveness possessed by two grocers, re- 
marks a writer in Grocery World. These 
stores were almost adjoining, there being 
but a few stores between. Both of them 
had a good display of fruit and produce 
about the door. There was no difference in 
the display. One was about as good as the 
other. But one display was papered all 
over with neat signs, telling the price of the 
goods, and sometimes with just a word of 
praise or description. Every basket or box 
had a sign on, and the lettering was so large 
that it could easily be read across the street. 
The whole display had a strictly live, hustl- 
ing, up-to-date appearance. The other dis- 
play hadn't a single sign on. As I stated, 
the produce itself was just as good as the 
other man's, but it presented an entirely 
different appearance. That grocer missed a 
splendid advertising opportunity. 



AN AD. HAS MANY LIVES. 

The value of an advertisement, says the 
Music Trade Review, no matter how old, if 
once it has been committed to type, is very 
peculiarly shown in the experience of Fr ink 
Howe, son of the late historian. For many 
years the historian was a resident of Cincin- 
nati, engaged in the publishing business. He 
was at that time a very liberal advertiser in 
the newspapers of the State, and received a 
very large mail. Thirty years have passed 
since then, and yet occasionally, to this day, 
letters addressed to Henry Howe, at his Cin- 
cinnati street and number, are received by 
his son in New York, and after having 
been forwarded from Cincinnati. In one of 
these letters the writer explained that he had 
just come across an old paper containing an 
advertisement of a book in which he was in- 
terested, and wrote at a venture to see if a 
copy could be secured. The newspaper had 
been packed away in some corner and had, 
after long disuse, found an interested eye. 
This and other instances of the kind show 
that it is impossible to tell how and when an 
advertiser will get returns. It is made 
equally apparent that the good offices of an 
advertisement in a newspaper are never 
ended till the paper is destroyed. 



CEYLON'S TEA-SEED IMPORTS. 

The Ceylon Observer says tha\ from sta- 
tistics supplied by the Collector of Customs, 
it appears that over half a million pounds 
weight of tea seed was imported into Ceylon 
during the two years 1893 an ^ 1894, viz., 
324,cco lbs. in 1893, valued at 129,000 
rupees, and 207,000 lbs. in 1894, a value of 
200,000 rupees. The amount for 1895 will 
be considerably less. Up to September 19 
last tea-;eed to the value of 36,000 rupees 
only had been imported into Ceylon from the 
several ports of India. 



Cheap and Nice. 

MOORPAK APRICOTS 

CHOICE APRICOTS 

FANCY DRIED PEACHES 

PRIME DRIED PEACHES 
SILVER PRUNES, (Whole) Santa Clara 
SILVER PRUNES, (Pitted) 

OSTRICH PRUNES, Extra Lartre 

OSTRICH PRUNES, Medium 
ITALIAN EVAPORATED CHERRIES 

Fine Selection EVAPORATED APPLES 



James Turner & Co., Hamilton 



TEAS 



We will offer during January exceptional 
values to clear out short lines. See our 
samples before buying. 

BALFOUR & CO. Who, S&™ Hamilton, Ont, 



THE REAL AND THE UNREAL 
BUSINESS PAPER. 

By Nath'l C. Fowler, Jr., Doctor of Publicity, New York. 

Imitation is the order of the day. 

Imitators are everywhere. 

The real and the unreal live side by side. 

The good and the bad are neighbors. 

There are trade papers which are trade 
papers. 

There are trade papers which trade on the 
trade, and have nothing to trade with. 

The profitable trade paper is very profit- 
able. 

First-class trade papers make money. 

All first-class men are successful. 

All honest men succeed. 

Dishonest men try to, and sometimes do. 

There are papers masquerading under 
the names of legitimate publications which 
are nothing more nor less than advertise- 
ments bound together in pamphlet form. 

There are so-called trade papers which 
have no circulation, and which cannot get 
any circulation. 

There are trade papers run by men who 
know nothing about the trnde they repre- 
sent. 

The popular impression that all trade 
papers are successful, has thrown upon the 
market numerous illegitimate publications 
which attempt to float on the water which 
has passed, and to sail by the wind of 
others. 

A trade paper can be three-quarters ad- 
vertising, and yet be a good trade paper. 

A trade paper can be half clippings, and 
yet be a real trade paper. 

The trade paper which is all sample 
copies is illegitimate — it has no right of exis- 
tence. 

The trade paper which is all clippings is 
not a real publication. 

The trade paper which is all advertising 
cannot be classed in the first-class. 

The trade paper which is a trade paper, 
is the paper which contains part advertising, 
part original matter, part clippings, and is of 



interest and benefit to its readers, and such 
a trade paper is obliged to have circulation. 

The trade paper which contains nothing 
but puffs is not worthy of publication. 

The trade paper which has all of its read- 
ing columns for sale, and which sells nearly 
all of its reading matter space, is worthless 
as an advertising medium. 

The trade paper has a perfect right to 
print a paid notice. Every publication, ex- 
cepting a few of the magazines, do that. 

The trade paper can legitimately speak 
well of its advertisers — it oughi to do that — 
the advertisers expect it. 

The trade paper which speaks illy of those 
who do not advertise in its columns is a 
trade paper which has no standing, and 
which is worth little. 

There are trade papers in the country 
which are nothing more or less than black- 
mailing sheets, which the Government ought 
not to transmit through the mails, and wh:ch 
are a detriment to the trade they represent, 
and to the honesty of the craft. 

The legitimate trade paper, the trade 
paper of character, and the trade paper 
which pays the advertiser, is the trade paper 
which carries a large amount of advertising, 
for such advertising is as valuable to the 
reader as the reading columns themselves, 
for these pages of advertisements present 
pictures of progress, and tell buyers what the 
to buy as well as where to buy. 

The legitimate trade paper contains a 
reasonable amount of reading matter, part 
of it original and part of it copied. 

The legitimate trade paper balances its 
advertising with its reading matter, and its 
reading matter with its advertising. 

It prints legitimate reading notices. 

It speaks well of its advertisers, but it is 
not a paper of puffs— it is a paper of news 
and comment, simply the right combination 
of all that which makes up a first-class pub- 
lication. 

Beware of the trade paper which has a 
different rate for every advertiser. 

Look out for the trade paper which does 
not stand on its own dignuy aDd say to the 



advertiser, " My space is merchandise. If 
you want it, you must buy it as you buy your 
clothes or your shoes." 

Look out for the trade paper which has a 
" Seeing-it's-you " concession for everybody. 

Look out for the trade paper which puffs 
everybody indiscriminately. 

The trade paper can be known by the 
quality of its representatives. 

First-class advertising men work for first- 
class papers. 

Second-class advertising men work for 
second-class papers. 

The representative of the legitimate trade 
paper is a gentleman — a man worthy of your 
confidence — when he calls he is entitled to 
your consideration, and should be given an 
audience. 

It is your business to discourage the ille- 
gitimate trade paper. 

It is your business to encourage, with your 
money and your interest, the trade paper of 
character, for such a paper is as much a part 
of your business, and is as necessary to your 
business, as your desks and your counters. 



UNIQUE WAY OF TAKING STOCK. 

Mr. John Mouat, of Winnipeg, sends us the 
following : Apropos your seasonable article 
on " Stock-taking " in THE GROCER of 20th 
ult., reminds me of how an old shop keeper 
in a country town in Scotland took his stock 
and struck his balance. When the time 
came he started off thus : 

" Noo lads, steek the door, and let's get 
oor stock-takin' ower before onybody comes 
in to bother us.'' 

With a business-like air he began looking 
up the first row of shelving wkh the remark: 
" Weel, there's as muckle stock there as 
pay McDonald & Co.," eyeing each row of 
shelves in succession. " And there's as 
muckle there as will square Fraser & Co., 
and as muckle there as will stand for Cam- 
eron & Co., and they twa or three shelves 
there will cover the few wee accounts due and 
a' the rest's my ain. Noo, boys, come up and 
hae your supper wi' me." 

If some of our merchants would even take 
their stock in this offhand way, it would be 
much better than none at all. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 11 



i Table 



i Jellies 



EBENR. ROBERTS' 

Unequalled for Purity and Flavor ^ 



ALL FLAVORS 
Quarts, Pints and Half-Pints. 



I DAVIDSON & HAY, Sis E Toronto, Ont. | 
IF YOU WILL LET US 

We will sell you a Flour you will be delighted with. 
This is the season 

. . Buckwheat Flour 

in is asked for. 

IT IS QUALITY WE ADVERTISE 

| THE T1LLS0N COMPANY, Ltd. tLL* o«. { 



j We could write a book 

i about Salmon and Salmon Packing, but if we did you might not have 

time to read it. Our knowledge takes form in our goods. The best 
4 evidence of our ability to pack a first-class article is the article itself — 

} Flag-Ship Salmon. Have you got it ? 



4 
4 

i 



Robert wakd* co.. u. j Canadian Pacific Packing Co. 

Sole Agents ♦ 

victoria, b.c. LULU ISLAND, B.C. 



i 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRADE CHAT. 

WILLIAM THOMAS HODGENS, 
oil merchant, of London, Ont., was 
united in marriage the other day to 
Miss Ida Gwendolyn 0>ven, youngest 
daughter of Mr. L. Wade Owen, of the same 
city. 

R. H. Smith, the well-known aparian, St. 
Thomas, has bought the grocery business at 
125 Ross street, that place, lately carried on 
by Mr. McA. Anderson. 

A general store at Brookholm, a suburb 
of Owen Sound, owned by Chas. Lethbridge, 
was destroyed by fire on the 3rd mst. Loss 
about $2,000 ; stock insured for $900. 

Messrs. Halstead & Scott, bankers, have 
closed their bank in Wingham. Mr. Smith, 
their former agent, intends carrying on the 
banking business on his own responsibility. 

James Proctor, one of the most popular 
auctioneers in the county of Perth, died in 
Stratford Thursday morning. He was born 
in Sault Ste. Marie, and was 43 years of 
age. He had lived in Stratford for 25 years. 

Wheat is going east via the Canadian 
Pacific on an average of 140 cars a day. The 
interior elevators are being relieved and the 
Fort William elevators contain nearly 3,000,- 
000 bushels. 

A press despatch from Chatham on Jan. 
3, says : The city is full of park, farmers 
from all over this district bringing it in in 



immense loads. More than 2,000 carcases 
were delivered to-day. The price is $4.35, 
with an upward tendency. 

The British -Boaid of Trade returns for 
December show an increase in imports of 
^3,900.000 and an increase in exports of 
,£1,680,000 during that month, as compared 
with December, 1894. 

Mr. J. Brodie, proprietor of the Mapleton 
cheese factory, has his creamery still in 
operation, and is making over a thousand 
pounds of butter a week. It has been all 
contracted for, by a London firm, at 20c. per 
pound. — St. Thomas Times. 

The City Travelers' Association of To- 
ronto have elected the following officers : 
R. M. Corrie, president ; W. F. Daniels, G. 
B. Curran, vice-presidents ; R. W. Cherry, 
secretary ; James Mortimer, treasurer; J. F. 
Smythe, chaplain; T. Holman, marshal. 

The exports from Winnipeg during the 
past month showed a wonderful increase 
over the same month in 1894. The figures 
are : 1894, $98,376 ; 1895, $628,989. The 
exportation of wheat to Duluth was the 
cause of the increase. Wheat, fish and furs, 
are the chief exparts from Canada. — Free 
Press, Winnipeg. 

Olive culture in California seems to be 
making great strides. It is reported that 
over 800,000 trees have been planted this 
year and that it is expected that at least a 



million more will be set out next year. The 
total area in olive orchards in California is 
stated to be 21,000 acres. Last year's crop 
was valued at $160,000. 

Mr. John P. Macdonald, one of Stratford's 
most prominent bu-iness men, is dead, aged 
68. Deceased setiled in Stratford in 1876. 
For years he was the senior member of a 
big milling firm. In 1892 he became man- 
ager of the North American Mill Building 
Co., but he had to retire two years later on 
account of ill-health. Mr. Macdonald had 
served several times as an alderimn, and 
had also occupied the position of president 
of the Board of Trade. 



CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS. 

The following shows the clearings for the 
cities in Canada for the past two years : 

1894. 1895. 

Montreal 8546,600,000 $583,160,000 

Toronto 279.270.739 308,636,054 

Halifax 58,778,698 60978,524 

Winnipeg 50,540,647 55.873,630 

Hamilton 34.3°7.8s6 34.361,139 

$969,497.94° $1,043,009,347 

The grocer who does not handle B. F. P. 
cough drops misses miking a good profit out 
of an easily sold article. 

The Toronto Biscuit and Confectionery 
Co. say there has been a tremendous run on 
B. F. P. cough drops lately. 



A Little Thought 



£■ 



A -LITTLE ACTION. It won't be hard for you to have an article of e very-day 
use for sale that will catch and hold to your store everyone that uses it once. 
It's Clean — it's perfectly pure — it's Strong. There are three kinds of 
Gelatines we make. These Gelatines are in crystallized and powder form. They 
dissolve in a few minutes — other Gelatines take an hour. 



Knox's 
Sparkling 
Calves Foot 
6elatine 

Makes 2 quarts 
of Jelly. 



f 

t 

t 
t 

X 

♦ 
♦ 

t 



Knox's 
Crystallized 
Fruit 
Gelatine 

Makes 1 quart 
delicious Jelly. 



Knox's 

Acidulated 

Gelatine 

Makes 2 quarts 
of Jelly. 



A. E. Richards <£ Co., "sasu Caledonia, Ont. 

Agents for KNOX'S EGG PRESERVER 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



Robert Greig & Co. 



456 St. Paul St. 



MONTREAL 



ROWNTREE'S 



Elect Cocoa 



UNRIVALLED FOR PURITY 
AND STRENGTH. . . . 



I LB. MAKES 120 GUPS 



For Druggists and 
Confectioners 



M. A. CRAVEN & SON 

YORK - ENGLAND 

Fruit Drops 
Lozenges 

Cachous, etc. 



Of Finest 
Qualities. 



MCKAY'S 



KOLA-CAFE 



The Finest Liquid Coffee 
on the market. 



PUT UP IN 12 OZ. BOTTLE8 




CARR & CO.'S 

ENGLISH BISCUITS 



Are exported to all parts of the world. 



Established 1831. 

The original manufacturers of 
Fancy Biscuits by Machinery. 

Appointed Biscuit Manufactur- 
ers to H. M. the Queen by special 
warrant, dated May 8th, 1841. 

CARR & CO. Ltd 

CARLISLE, ENGLAND. 



Agents for Canada 



Robert Greig & Co. 



456 St. Paul St. 
I MONTREAL 




CROWN BRAND EXTRACTS 

For Strength and Purity are unexcelled. 

ROBERT GREIG & CO. 



456 St. Paul Street 



REGISTERED 



A FULL LINE OF FRENCH 
CANNED GOODS IN STOCK 



, f , 4 MONTREAL 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



FULL RANGE. 



FANCY GROCERIES 



TABLE 
RAISINS 



London Layers Imperial Clusters 
Fancy Clusters London Layers 

■*% " Cartoons. 

Dehesa Clusters Loose Muscatels 



All varieties California Evaporated Fruits 

Franco American Plum Pudding, pound tins 
Glace Lemon, Orange and Citron Peels 

Batger's Nonpareil and Compote Jellies 

New Nuts, Tarragona S. S. Almonds 

Valencia Shelled Almonds, Barcelona and 
Sicily Filberts, Grenoble Walnuts. 



Turner, Maekeand & Co. - - 

Always Uniform 

THOROUGHLY TESTED IN EVERY WAY 

SNOW DRIFT BAKING POWDER 

No one ever complains if you sell them this perfectly pure 
Baking Powder. ........ 



Winnipeg 



SnowOrif 



The Snow Drift Co. 



Brantford 



vSnow Drift C» 

"$""" Brantford. Ont.^ 



Effectual Sweepings 



Are only 
to be made 
by using 



The DAISY 

THISTLE 
ROSE 



BROOflS 



The best value, retailing at 

20, 25 and 30 cents. 



Lots of 5 dozen assorted freight allowed. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS - Toronto and Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 




J. B. Ma CLEAN, 

President. 



HUGH C. MacLEAN, 

Sec.-Treas. 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

LIMITED 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

and 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

TORONTO : 26 Front St. W. 

MONTREAL: - - 146 St. James St. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH: 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
" R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

John Cameron. General Subscription Agent. 



THE PROPOSED MERCHANTS' 
CONVENTION. 

IT is to be hoped that the different busi- 
ness men's associations throughout the 
country will second the efforts of the Re- 
tail Grocers' Association of London to hold 
a convention some time during the summer 
months. 

The business men of this country are 
badly in need of affinity. No community of 
merchants needs it more. 

What local associations the Country can 
boast of are,;as a ru'e, but poor sickly things, 
owing to the chronic apathy which afflicts 
their members. And while two associa- 
tions will occasionally correspond upon some 
question of interest to both, yet, as a rule, 
the one does not half the time know whether 
the other is dead or alive. 

The immediate result of the proposed con- 
vention may not be the creation of a provin- 
cial association. But immediate results 
would be obtained in the formation of 
acquaintanceships, the interchange of ideas 
regarding the actual management of busi- 
ness, and the interchange of ideas as to the 
best methods to be adopted to remedy the 
evils in trade, particularly those which de- 
pend on action from within and not from 
without. 

While each business man of the country 
remains wrapped up in himself, or each of 
the few associations there are make no com- 
mon cause with the others, their interests will 
continue to be subservient to other interests, 
united, but incomparably less important. 

The greatest evils that menace trade to-day 
are created by factors within and not with- 
out. Legislation cannot remove them. But 
merchants themselves can if they will sink 
petty jealousies and act in unison. 

Let the convention be held if no organic 
union results therefiom. Sympathies will 
be excited and united at any rate. The more 
tangible union will come by-and-bye ; and 



the oftener there is a fraternization the 
sooner will the desideratum be obtained. 

As things exist to-day the merchants of 
the country are, like the sons of Noah, try- 
ing to build a tower into which they can 
enter for safety from floods present and 
floods prospective, but their structure makes 
no heidway because of the confusion which 
comes of disunion and mistrust. 



GLEAM OF HOPE IN POTATOES. 

WHILE the potato market continues 
in the same dull and unsatisfactory 
condition, there are not wanting 
those who see daylight ahead. And they 
are basing their expectations on their ex- 
perience with the market eleven years ago. 

In the spring of 1885 the conditions were 
even worse than they are to-day. In May 
of that year farmers were selling their pota- 
toes to shippers at ten cents per bushel, and 
were glad to get it. The crop the preceding 
year had been, like it was last year, enor- 
mous. Producers could not find a market 
for a large proportion of their tubers, and 
consequently farmers' cellars became over- 
filled. With the outlook so unsatisfactory, 
farmers naturally did not give that attention 
to potatoes that they would have, had a fair 
price obtained. As a result large quantities 
of potatoes were spoilt during the winter, 
while, in addition, a great many were fed to 
the stock. 

The result of this waste became apparent 
between the opening of the spring and the 
incoming of the new crop : what was an 
over-supply had become a shortage. Then 
prices advanced by sharp bounds until 60 
to 70c. per bag represented the wholesale 
price. Dealers who had anticipated their 
wants at low prices made money that year. 

The price at which potatoes are selling 
to-day nets the grower little if any 
more than ten cents per bushel. At this 
price the producer is naturally not disposed 
to concern himself much about the care of 
stocks that he will be compelled to carry 
over till next spring. Then, whether large 
quantities are spoilt or not, it is quite reason- 
able to expect that potatoes will be liberally 
fed to the stock this winter, especially in 
sections of Ontario where the hay crop was 
short last year. 

But whether the experiences of 1885, even 
in a minor degree, will be repeated remains 
to be seen. Prices do cenainly seem to be 
at a point where they cannot well go lower, 
and, consequently, it is quite natural to 
expect at least an improvement on the figures 
now obtaining. 

Outside a few Early Rose potatoes no 
demand is looked for from the United 
States. This particular potato is used for 
seeding in the south, and, as planting be- 
gins about February or March, some enquiry 
on this account is in order soon. 



WHY CHEESE IS HELD. 

THE other week The Canadian 
Grocer pointed out some of the rea- 
sons for the prolonged dulness in the 
export cheese trade. Facts that have been 
made public since then explain pretty plainly 
why the British importers wanted to keep 
prices down. 

The estimated stocks at the two great 
centres of Liverpool and London on the 
first of the year show a shortage of 20,000 
boxes and 10,000 boxes respectively. 

No returns are available from the other 
centres, but there is good reason for be- 
lieving that the supplies of cheese in Great 
Britain generally are considerably less than 
they were a year ago. 

Being aware of this state of affairs, British 
buyers, who certainly lost heavily on their 
deals in 1894-95 cheese, have tried ever 
since the close of navigation to buy cheese 
in Montreal at gc. and under. If they could 
have done so to any large extent they would 
have had a wider margin to recoup for last 
season's losses. The exporters in Montreal, 
however, did not respond very freely to their 
bids, and a very small quantity of cheese 
has been sold at Montreal since the close of 
navigation. 

At this writing business still continues 
dull, and sellers in Montreal believe that 
their goods will be worth more money once 
the English demand really sets in. To be 
plain, they have strong reasons for their be- 
lief. 

The exports from New York are some 
300,000 boxes less than they were last sea- 
son. Our own Canadian exports from the 
1st of last May to date fall short of those for 
last year 50,000 boxes. 

The supplies in Great Britain are less 
than they were a year ago, and, with exces- 
sive drouth in the Antipodes, the receipts 
from that quarter are expected to be very 
much less. In fact, it seems pretty certain 
that Canadian cheese will have to fill a much 
larger void than usual in Great Britain this 
spring ; and, with the ruling price in Mont- 
real ic. below what it was a year ago, it is 
not surprising if holders think they will 
profit by holding for an advance. 



FOOD FOR SATISFACTION. 

There is probably no better indication of 
the condition or a country's trade than the 
character of its railway earnings. To this 
doctrine all leading commercial nations sub- 
scribe. 

A railway depends largely for its earnings 
upon the trade of the locality which it tra- 
verses. When trade is bad the earnings of 
the railway naturally reflect the fact. Con- 
sequently, the doctrine that the earnings of 
the railways indicate the condition of a 
country's commercial health is based upon 
facts, not theories. 

This acknowledged, it is gratifying to note 
that the earnings of the Canadian railways 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



show a satisfactory increase for the months 
of December and November last. 

For December the earnings were 8.4 per 
cent, larger than for the same month in 
1894, while in November they were 10.9 per 
cent, larger than in 1894. 

These increases are all the more gratify- 
ing from the fact that they are 2 and 2.3 re- 
spectively larger than were the increases of 
the United States railways for the same 
periods. 

In the trade situation in Canada there is 
much food for satisfaction. What we want 
is confidence in our country, confidence in 
ourselves, and courage to put our confidence 
into practice. 



CANADA'S FOREIGN TRADE FOR 
1895.. 

THANKS to the special meeting of the 
Dominion Parliament for the purpose 
of introducing remedial legislation re- 
garding the Manitoba school question, the 
country is in possession of the Trade and 
Navigation Returns a month or two earlier 
than is wont. 

It has always been a source of annoyance 
to newspaper men and others who are inter- 
ested in dissecting the foreign trade of the 
country to be compelled to wait some eight, 
nine, and even ten, mon.hs after the close of 
the fiscal year, for the b'ue book before they 
could do so. 

The aggregate foreign trade of the Do- 
minion for the fiscal year ending June 30 
last was $218,891,314, a decrease of $11,- 
727.618 compared with last year. 

Of the aggregate trade $113,638,380 were 
exports and $1 10,781,682 imports. Omitting 
the bullion and coin from both years our 
exports are shown to be $6,372,085 less 
than last year. In total imports there is a 
decline of $12,693,258, although in goods 
entered for home consumption only the de- 
cline is but $7,841,472. 

The decline in the imports, while not by 
any means a subject for congratulation, is 
not a matter of great concern. During the 
fiscal year of 1894-5 Canada felt the effects, 
in a minor degree, of the depression which 
existed in the United States in 1893-4. 
Being so closely connected with her by 
commercial relationship it could not well be 
otherwise. In consequence of this mer- 
chants of all descriptions anticipated their 
wants to a much less extent than usual. 
Under such conditions imports would natur- 
ally suffer. But when we come to consider 
that the decline in goods entered for home 
consumption was in percentage about 62, 
the figures lose some of their darkness. 
And when we remember the decline there 
was in prices they actually approach a stage 
where congratulation is in order. 

The proportion of free to dutiable goods 
for 1894 and 1895 respectively was 44.24 and 



43.80, or .44 per cent, in favor of the former 
year, an insignificant amount, indeed. 

A striking feature of the report is the in- 
crease in our exports to the United States. 
While we sent $6,671,866 worth less to 
Great Britain, and our shipments fell off to 
France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Italy, 
Holland, Belgium, Newfoundland, South 
America, China and Japan, our sales to the 
United States aggregated $41 297,676, or 
$5)487,736 larger than a year ago. Our 
exports to Great Britain were $61,856,- 
990. The imports from Great Britain for 
home consumption were $31,131,737, and 
from the United States $54,634,521. Our 
aggregate trade (exports and imports) with 
the two countries was $92,988,727 and $95,- 
932,197. 

Subjoined we give some of the principal 
imports and exports of interest to grocers 
and general merchants for the past fiscal 
year, together with a comparison of the same 
for 1894 : 

IMPORTS. 

Dutiable goods- 1895. 1894. 

Ale, beer and porter S126.066 .*168,246 

Arrowroot, biscuits, rice, macaroni, 

etc 530,297 365,025 

Flour and meals 187,743 252,253 

Brooms and brushes 86,810 106,534 

Candles 34,884 30,545 

Coffee 41,279 52,689 

Cotton, manufactures of 4,218,168 4,001,618 

Pish and products of 398,383 165,504 

Fruits and nuts, dried 855,320 904,263 

green 1,093,782 1,197,836 

Hats, caps, bonnets 1.195,401 1.216,062 

Oils, kerosene and products of.... 436,672 426,851 

" all other n.e.s 754,970 213,273 

Pickles, sauces and capers 65,001 74,058 

Hutter, cheese, lard and meats 658,486 900,494 

Salt 29,881 53,336 

Seeds and roots 471,182 482,608 

Soap of all kinds 206,618 163,961 

Spices 127,893 149.773 

Sugar of all kinds (see also free 

goods) 937,703 116.558 

Sugar molasses 743,425 817,217 

Sugar candy and confectionery 70,330 66.268 

Tea (see also free) 61,327 175,998 

Tobacco and manufactures of .... 256,444 280,311 

Vegetables 210,795 233.440 

Wool and manufactures of 7,952,932 9,493,629 

Free goods- 
Cotton wool and cotton waste ... . 3,507,310 2.902,816 
Oil cake and meal, cottonseed cake 

and meal 50,096 23,567 

Oil, cocoanut and palm 112,065 79,918 

Coffee, green 574,023 565,005 

Teas of all kinds n.e.s 3.053,698 2.863,939 

EXPORTS. 

Codfish, etc t) 3,467,061 s3.423.701 

Mackerel 465,061 496,800 

Halibut 102,730 60,966 

Herring 479,323 486,801 

Sen fish, other kinds 61,493 1,642 

Oysters 1,655 

Lobsters, fresh 306,775 258,325 

canned 1,837,676 2,102,925 

Salmon, fresh 124,615 134,172 

smoked 6,913 524 

canned 2,009,413 2.386,696 

•• pickled 48,740 81,196 

Salmon or lake trout 16,841 30,806 

Fish, all other, fresh 708.188 799,548 

pickled 7,348 6,766 

Fish oil, cod. seal, whale, etc 45,468 28,838 

HOtes 123,222 110,029 

Furs or skins of ash or marine 

animals 1,163,962 1,060,172 

Products of the forest 24,129,199 26,504,756 

Horses 1,548,867 1,178,806 

Cattle 7,121,148 6,499,717 

Swine 7,562 28,608 

9hee 1,627,089 849,651 

Poultry, etc 53,813 70,400 



Butter 709,126 

Cheese 15.118,894 

Eggs 807,991 

Furs, dressed 58,133 

undressed 1,584,285 

Hides and skins, other than fur.. . . 886,926 

Lard 104,563 

Honey 4.232 

Bacon 3,546,107 

Beef 452,906 

Hams 260,607 

Mutton 5,773 

Pork 67,541 

Poultry and game 20,091 

Tongues 11,761 

Canned meats 319,868 

Meats, all other, n. e. 8 70,826 

Sheep pelts 83.948 

Tallow 907 

Wool 1,057,376 

Flax seed 71,308 

Apples, dried 205,418 

" green or ripe 1.821,710 

Berries of all kinds 107,825 

Canned or preserved fruits 109,122 

Fruits, all others, n.e.s 147,598 

drain 11,537,433 

Flour and meal 1,400,902 

Hay 1,540,251 

Hops 29,330 

Malt 12,160 

Maple sugar 9,040 

Nuts 492 

Seeds, clover, grass; etc 861,166 

Tobacco leaf 98,610 

Vegetables, canned or preserved. 14,114 

potatoes 527,382 

all other vegetables.... 123,310 

Biscuits and bread 16,423 

Clothing and wearing apparel 44,694 

Cottons 553,576 

Dnigs, chemicals and medicines .. 132.611 

Manufactured furs 17,305 

Hats and caps 3,390 

Ice 4,825 

Liquors 365,012 

Mi .lasses 50,803 

Oil, n. e. s 25,961 

Soap 5,018 

starch 166 

Sugar of all kinds, n. c. 8 383,137 

Sugar, home syrup 674 

Tobacco (cigars, cigarettes, snuff, 

stems and cuttings) 92,674 

Vinegar 193 

Woolens 94,464 

Coffee 1,163 

Dried fruits, n. e. s 3,734 

Rice 467 

Rice meal 7,885 

Tea 132,949 



1,114,712 

16,267,309 

714.056 

22,553 

1.758,890 

309.896 

77,173 

3,874 

2,754,479 

173,807 

184,072 

6,336 

85,633 

20,362 

2,560 

730,744 

56,087 

5,665 

8,983 

16,332 

205 

98,988 

808,889 

103.240 

22,369 

136,849 

19,063,809 

2,169,730 

2,601,704 

43,138 

5.148 

29,844 

34 

603,382 

118,383 

13,785 

397,992 

114,879 

26,922 

42,191 

566,927 

85,632 

8.206 

2,048 

3,530 

236,753 

71,270 

39,749 

7.223 

486 

75,322 

830 

107,226 

156 

47,723 

4,134 

3,816 

461 

17,536 

110,432 



CANADIAN APPLES NET 42c. 

Advices received in Toronto from Liver- 
pool during the past few days indicate that 
the Canadian apples which arrived there 
lately have not proved satisfactory. 

One exporter who sent eight cars has 
been notified that his consignment only 
netted for.y two cents per barrel. He esti- 
mates his loss at $2,000. 

The cause of the low prices is the quality 
of the fruit. 

To all appearances, when shipped from 
here, the apples were in good condition, but 
it is presumed that the mild weather which 
was experienced before they left the country 
made them, in trade parlance, tender. 

The result has had a depressing effect on 
the trade, for although the unsatisfactory 
conditions were confined to the cargo of one 
vessel, it is not known how the shipments 
now on the way will fare. Exporting, how- 
ever, is still going on. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



CODFISH AND TABLE GOODS MEN. 

THE western agents of Gordon & Dil- 
worth and J. W. Beardsley's Sons, of 
New York, the other day paid a brief 
visit to their chief, W. H. C. Burnett, room 
509 Masonic Temple, Chicago. The party 
included : John H. Grant, St. Louis, Mo. ; 
K. L. Perrv, Cincinnati, O.; A S. Gamblee, 
Denver, Col ; Geo. O. Moule, Detroit, Mich.; 
W. D. Brewster, Toronto, Ont. 

Mr Burnett had his time fully monopo- 
lized during their stay, but, with the assist- 
ance of John G. Baylis, Chicago selling 
agent, he was enabled to prevent any of 
them getting lost in the holiday shopping 
crowds, and successfu'ly led them through 
the gastronomic feat of Christmas day with- 
out subsequent ill effects. " Monday," says 
The Chicago Grocer, " the day of their ar- 
rival, was spent in exchanging reminiscences, 
such as only ' Knights of the Grip ' can spin. 
Tuesday, they were given a peep at what 
Chicago can do in a retail way, finishing up 
wi.h a theatre party in the evening. Wed- 
nesday ? — The balance of the week was 
given to business, Their '95 work has shown 
up most brilliantly and Gordon & Dilworth 
and J. W. Beardsley's Sons can look for big 
things from their western agents in '96 if 
courage, confidence and pluck count, for a 
more enthusiastic lot of salesmen never 
started the New Year in be ter trim, and 
even after partaking of Christmas turkey, 
they cry unanimously — ' there's only one 
shredded — that Beardsley's,' 'The only 
table delicacies are G. & D's.' " 

A unique feature of the gathering was the 
fact that all the United States representa- 
tives present were Canadians, while the 
representative from Canada, Mr. Brewster, 
was an American, botn and bred. 



WHY DID PERRY ABSCOND? 

Everybody is wondering why A. W. Perry, 
the Toronto retail grocer doing business in 
Broadview avenue, absconded. 

He was doing a nice trade. Up to within 
a few d tys of his sudden departure he paid 
his accounts prorr.p ly, and, apparently, had 
at least a fair amount of capital. 

When he absconded, his 1 abilities aggre- 
ga'ed about $750. Agiinst this he hid 
stock and fixtures of $1,032 and book debts 
of S300. It is estimated by those who have 
examined the estate that when he shook the 
dust of Toronto tff his f.et he had about 
$200 or $300 in his pocket. " If," said 
one creditor, "he had first sold out his busi- 
ness and liquid Ued his liabilities, he could 
have taken away at least as much as he did, 
and, I think, a little more." 

When it became known that Perry had 
absconded, the landlord pu: in he bailiff for 
one month's rent. CI se upon bai iff number 
one's track was a bailiff representing one of 



the largest creditors. The latter, however, 
bought off the former and obtained posses- 
sion. 

The stock has since been sold, and the 
proceeds will be equally distributed among 
the creditors. 

Perry is an American, but from what part 
of the States he came no one knows, and 
whither he has gone no one knows. Perry, 
it will be remembered, bought out Langford 
Bros, less than two years ago. 



MAIL TRANSMISSION OF SAMPLES. 

The chief post office inspector has an- 
swered a complaint made to him in regard 
to delay and damage occurring to samples 
transmitted through the posts. 

He states that it is the wish of the depart- 
ment to afford all facilities and conveniences 
to the mercantile community in this connec- 
tion. As to delay, he adv.ses that the best 
method of avoi iing it will be to mail samples 
some time before the close of the mail 
Otherwise, as regular letters are given the 
preference, they may be subject to delay. 



SHIPPING AT ST. JOHN, N.B. 

Our St. John, N.B., correspondent writes: 
" The fact of the large shipments going 
forward from St. John, as a winter port, is 
still a matter of great interest to all here. 
The Donaldson line, which comes here 
without a subsidy, is well pleased with the 
business they are doing. The value of the 
cargo shipped by ss. Lake Ontario was 
about $95000, fifteen of which was local 
freight. Large quantities of American flour, 
oats and corn are going forward. The 
shipments of live stock are very important 
to us, and are increasing. For that going 
forward by the Concordia, forty tons of hay 
and fifteen tons of oats were bought here. 
It is reported one of the Allan Line will 
make a trip here. There is also an effort 
being made toward a direct line to Porto 
Rico. There are now direct steamers be- 
tween Halifax and Porto Rico." 



CANADIAN CANNED GOODS IN 
LONDON. 

W. Boulter & Sons, of Toronto and Pic- 
ton, recemly sent samples of their canned 
goods to the Imperial Instituie, London, to 
be placed on exhibition there. A few days 
ago the firm received the following acknow- 
ledgment from the Minister of Agriculture 
for Ontario : 

Toronto, Dec. 27, 1895. 
Gentlemen,— In reply to yours of the 26th inst., I 
am directed to say that the goods you shipped for exhi- 
bition at the Imperial Institute, arrived here in good 
Order and will be forwarded immediately. The Minister 
desires me to thank you for the handsome exhibit 
which he believes will make a very creditable display in 
the Ontario Section. He has given instructions to have 
it set up to the best possible advantage. 
Your obedient servant, 

Wm. B. Varley, Minister's Secretary. 
W. Boulter & Sons, 26 Bay strtet. 



WHAT ARE PROFITS? 

PERHAPS many readers are like my- 
self — often when reading the sugges- 
tions and pointed articles by writers 
for Trade Magazine, say : " Well, that may 
suit some merchants, but it does not apply 
to my business," and sometimes argue that 
it is not practical. While this may seem to 
be the case at times, I am going to touch 
on something that in all probability will fit 
the case of many readers, and it makes no 
difference what kind of business they are 
engaged in. He may be a grocer or drug- 
gist, a dry goods or a hardware merchant 
— it matters not, it is a true bill. 

Do you realize that on 25 per cent, of your 
goods you are making nothing ? That you 
may be doing what you and the public gen- 
erally consider a large business and still 
make no money ? 

Do you buy goods and sell them at the 
same price ? At once you say : " What an 
absurdity — No !" Grant it then that you do 
not, and that you put, say, 25 per cent, or 
more profit on the goods. You seem to sell 
them, and yet, after all the margin of profit 
tacked on, your bank account does not in- 
crease. 

Now, I am getting down to the point that 
I wish to make. Have you noticed lately 
or ever that a large part of your stock is only 
partly sold and that the balance is still on 
the shelves or sticking to the sides of the 
barrels and boxes ? Well, it is. Where is 
the profit — on the first portion or the last ? 
Come, let us go behind the counter and see. 

How much of this or that article did you 
buy ? 

How much have you sold ? 

Have you as yet even got back what 
money you put into it ? 

No? 

The profit is in that portion which is left, 
is it not? 

Yes, did I hear you say ? Well, yes is 
correct, and that's my point. 

We often congratulate ourselves on doing 
so well, and are prompted to congratulate 
ourselves and say : " Well, I certainly have 
done well on those goods," when in real 
solid truth you have not your money back 
that was paid for them. 

Maybe you are still skeptical in this re- 
gard. If you are, after finishing reading this 
article, take your pad and write down twenty 
articles and see if it is not true. How much 
have you that is stuck away, drying out, get- 
ting shopworn, and which, when once gray- 
headed, will not sell at any price ? 

Here are five rules that have helped me 
and may help you : 

1. Buy sparingly of goods not well known 
to the consuming public. 

2. Buy largely only goods that are always 
salable. 

3 Keep seasonable goods where they can 
be seen and call attention to them. 

4. Goods which are in season only two or 
three months push towards the front before 
the time is up — advertise them and get your 
money back with that 25 per cent profit. 

5. Make it an object to clean up. Sell all. 
That's your profit. — Ttade Magazine. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




WE DON'T 



MANUFACTURE 



Dixon's Carburet of Iron 
Stove Polish 



BUT WE SELL HUNDREDS OF GROSS. 



The factory is the largest of the kind in 
the world 

The polish is the finest made. 

For 68 years it has shone resplendent 
on the stoves and ranges all over 
North America 



If you are not selling D. C. of I. S. P. 
you are missing one of the good 
things. . . . . . 

The Profit you make is ioo per cent. 
We are agents for Ontario. 



W. H. GILLARD & CO., 



WHOLESALERS ONLY. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



v5 



^??!tfmmmmm?n???mn?nfm!?rttri?fm!?ft??!!f!tft?rnf!?frtnfnt!tfm?ttnrtt?n?nfi!fm!tf??tmm?nm^ 



I New Season's Teas 



3 
3 



JOSEPH TETLEY & CO., London, Eng., specially direct your attention 
to the extraordinary quality of their new blends that are now being placed on 
the Canadian market, and invite you to apply the most stringent tests at your 
disposal. Comparison of leaf, style, quality, strength and character. 



Useful Household Blend, purity guaranteed 



18 cents 



Pure Ceylon Pekoe Blend, good liquor 



21 cents 



Strong, Brisk, Pungent Indian and Ceylon Blend 



22 cents 



Handsome, Tippy Indo-Ceylon, rare cup 



25 cents 



Rare, Fragrant, Golden Pekoe Blend, delightful quality 35 cents 
Superb Blend of Choicest Indo-Ceylon, excellent value 40 cents 



1 TETLEY'S 



The above blends are packed in chests and half-chests 
containing ioo lbs. and 6o lbs. respectively. 

Packet Teas, Elephant Brand. New Package. 
Black and Green, 28c. to retail at 40c. 



SAMPLES SENT ON APPLICATION 



^iiiiuui.iiuiiiUiiiau^iiUiiiUiUiUiiiiuiUiUiUMUiiiiiiiUiUiUiuu^uaiiiiUi^aiaiiiiiUiiiauiUmUim^ 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




ONTARIO MARKETS. 
GROCERIES. 

THE grocery trade is little if any more 
interesting than it was a week ago. 
Business is getting into a more nor- 
mal condition because the travelers are 
again on their respective routes. But while 
this is so, there is nothing of a striking fea- 
tare to note, like there was last week, when 
the excitement obtained over the sharp ad- 
vance in sugar. Sugar continues firm at the 
recent advances, but there is no great 
movement, although taking the season into 
consideration there is a nice trade doing in 
this article. In canned goods there has 
been a little better demand for peas, but 
otherwise business in this line is much as 
before. While trade in general is light, the 
turn-over is fairly satisfactory for the season, 
and, compared with this time last year, 
better. 

CANNED GOODS. 
A little more enquiry is to be noted this 
week for peas. Otherwise there is no change 
to note. Prices on both tomatoes and peas 
continue strong. We quote : Tomatoes, 77 M 
to85c; corn, 75 to 85c; peas, 901095c. for 
ordinary ; sifted, $1.25 ; extra sifted, $1.35 ; 
peaches, $2.90 to $3 for 3's, $1.90 to $2 
for 2's ; raspberries, $1.40 to $2.00 ; straw- 
berries, $1.80 to $2.45, according to brand and 
quality; blackberries, $1.90 to $2.20; cherries, 
$2.40 to $2.45; apples, 3's, 85 to 90c; 
gallons, $1.9010 2.25; salmon, "Horseshoe," 
$1.35 to $1.40; "Maple Leaf," $1.35; "Lion," 
$1.35 to $1.40; Lowe Inlet, $1.27 to $1.30, in 
tall tins ; cohoes, $1.10 to $1.20 ; canned 
mackerel, $1.10 to $1.20; lobsters, $1.80 to 
$2.10, for tall tins; flats, $2.35 to$2.65; half 
tins, $1-45 t0 $1.50; Canadian canned beef, 
i's, $1.35 to $1.45; 2's, $2.25 to $2.35; 6's, 
$7.50 to $8; 14's, $15 to $16.50. 

COFFEE. 

Demand continues fairly good. The New 
York market is unsettled for Rio growths, 
but the local market is unaffected. The 
world's visible supply of coffee for the month 
increased 160,000 bags, while the gain in the 
world's reserve for the year is 870,000 bags. 
We quote green in bags : Rio, 19 to 21c; 
Eas* Indian, 27 to 30c; South American, 
21 to 23c; Santos, 19 to 22^c; Java, 30 
to 33c; Mocha, 33 to 35c; Maracaibo, 21 
to 23c; Jamaica, 21 to 25c. 

SYRUPS. 

The demand continues light for syrups, 
and prices are unchanged. We quote: Dark, 
30 to 32c; medium, 33 to 35c; bright, 40 to 
42c. 

MOLASSES. 

Advices received ihis week indicate a 
much stronger feeling in New Orleans 
molasses. Locally the situation in molasses 
is much about as before. We quote : New 
Orleans, barrels, 25 to 32c; half-barrels, 
33# to 35c; Barbadoes, barrels, 31 to 35c; 
half-barre}s, 33 to 37c 



SPICES. 

Singapore pepper has declined another 
point in New York. There is no change 
here. Spices generally are quiet. We quote : 
Pure black pepper, 10 to 12c. ; pure 
white, 18 to 25c; pure Jamaica ginger, 
231025c; cloves, 15 to 20c; pure mixed 
spire, 25 to 30c; cream of tartar, French, 25 
to 27c; ditto, best, 28 to 30c. per lb : all- 
spice, 14 to 18c. 

SUGAR. 

The sugar market remains firm at last 
week's quotations. There is not a great 
quantity of sugar going out, but neverthe- 
less the demand is good, considering the 
season. Quite a few assorted carloads 
have changed hands during the week. We 
quote : Granulated, 4% to $%c. ; yellows, 
y/z to 4c. for dark and extra bright re- 
spectively. 

NUTS. 

There is a fair after-holiday trade do- 
ing, especially in walnuts. We quote as 
follows : Brazil nuts, 14 to 15c; Sicily 
shelled almonds, 25 to 26c. ; Tarragona 
almonds, 14 to I4}4c; peanuts, 10 to 
12c. for roasted, and 7 to 10c. for 
green; cocoanuts, $4.50 to $5 per sack; 
Grenoble walnuts, 12 to I2^c. Marbot 
walnuts, 11 to 12c; Bordeaux walnuts, 9c. ; 
Sicily filberts, 8 to 10c for sacks and 
io'^ to lie. for small lots ; pecans, 10 j£ 
to lie. 

TEAS. 

There is a little enquiry for Ceylon and 
Indian teas, both at a price, and good flavor- 
ing and liquoring teas. Only a small hand- 
to-mouth business is being done in China 
teas. The situation in Japan teas remains 
much as before, the scarcity of low grades 
still being the feature of the market. We 
quote ruling prices to retailers as follows : 
Young Hysons, 12 to 18c. for low grades, 24 
to 27c. for mediums, and 30 to 45c. for 
high grades ; China Congous, 14 to 18c. 
for mediums, and 25 to 55c. for high 
grades; Japans, 15 to 20c. for mediums, 
28 to 35c. for high grades ; Indians and 
Ceylons, 18 to 22c. for mediums, and 30 to 
65c. for high grades. 

DRIED FRUITS. 

The demand continues fairly good at firm 
and unchanged prices. We quote : Off- 
stalk, t,y z to 4^c; fine off-stalk, 5 to 5#c. ; 
selected, 6 to 6&'c; layers, 6)£c. 

Currants are in fair demand for small 
sorting up lots considering that we are 
just out of the holiday season. We quote 
as follows: Provincials, 3^" to 4c. in bbls.; 
Fine Filiatras, in barrels, 4% to 4'Ac.; ditto, 
half-barrels, 4% to 4^c. ; ditto, half-cases, 
4% to 5c. ; Casalinas, cases, 5 to 5X C -; Vos- 
tizzas, cases, 6 to 6j£c. ; ditto, half-cases, d% 
to 6^c; ditto, extra fine, 6^ to 7%c; ditto, 
half-cases, 7% to 7>£c.; Panaretas, in cases, 
9c. 

In prunes the demand is light at un- 
changed prices. We quote prunes : Bos- 
nias, " Sphinx " brand, "A,'' 7075 to lb., 
9c; "B," 80-85 to lb. 7^0, "U," 110- 
115 to lb., 6*A to 63^0 ; California prunes, 
40-50, 10 to io^c. per lb.; 50-60 to 



box, 9 'Ac- per lb.; 60-70 to box, 9c ; 70 80 to 
box, 8^c. per lb.; French, 5 to 6c. 

California dried and evaporated fruits are 
quiet and unchanged. We quote: Apricots, 
13^ to 15c; peaches, io>£ to I2j£c; peirs, 
10^ to \7.%c; plums, t%.z. forunpitted, and 
I2^c. for pitted ; nectarines, 11 to 13c; 
loose muscatels, *,% to6j£c. per lb. 

Dates are firmer in the primary markets, 
and the New York market has responded in 
sympathy. Locally there is no change. It 
may be interesting to note that the total im- 
portations of new crop Persian dates at New 
York to Jan 1, amoun'ed to 135,000 boxes, 
or about 12,000 boxes less than on the same 
date last year. 

A good trade is reported in Sultana 
raisins for this time of the year. The idea 
as to price is still 5 to 5j£c 

Eleme figs are quiet and unchanged. 
We quote : Eleme, 14 oz., 9 to \o%c; 10 
lb, g l A to I2j£c.; 12 lb., I2j£c; 28 lb, 15c 
GREEN ERTJIT. 

The annual quiet after-holiday quietude 
obtains, and the market is devoid of feature, 
except it be that prices are lower on oranges 
than they were a week ago. We quote : 
Lemons — Messina, $2. 50 to $3.50 for 360's 
and 300's respectively per box ; Oranges — 
Jamaicas, $4.50 ; fancy, $5 ; California 
navels, $4 to $4 75; Valencia--, 420's, $425 
to $4.75 ; Jumbo's, 42o's, $6.25 to $6.50; 
ditto, 714's, $5.52 to $5 75 ; Mexicans, $5 to 
$5.50 per box. Bananas, $125 to $1.75 ; 
cocoanuts, $3.50 to $4 a sack; apples, $1.50 
to $3 a barrel ; Malaga grapes, $5 to $7 
per keg ; domestic onions, 60 to 65c. 
per bag ; Spanish onions, 40 to 50c. per 
small crate ; sweet potatoes, $3 to $3.25 
per bbl. ; cranberries, $10 per obi., and $3.50 
per case; hickory nuts, $1.50 to $1.75 per 
bush. 

BUTTER. CHEESE, POULTRY, EGGS. 

Butter — Receipts of butter during the 
past week have been principally confined to 
large rolls, and the trade has been supp'ied 

The Largest Sale. 

The Finest Flavored. 

The Best Friend of the 
Grocer. 

The Worst Enemy of the 
Pedlar. 

"SALADA" 

CEYLON TEA 



P. C. LARKIN & CO. 

25 Front St. East, 
and TORONTO 

318 St. Paul St., MONTREAL 



\ 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Don't overlook the name 

SURPRISE 



That's the name of the Soap your cus- 
tomers find to be economical — to be worth 
its price. 



Branches — 

MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO: Wright & Copp, 51 Colborne St. 
WINNIPEG : E. W. Ashley. 



THE ST. CROIX SOAP MFG. GO. 



ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



by this class of goods. There is rather more 
coming forward thin is required, and as a 
result prices are easier. We quote : Eirly 
summer dairy, store packed, 8 to 12c; good 
to choice fresh packed, 13 to 15c; large 
rolls, fresh, 13 to 15c; dairy pound prints, 
15^ to 16c. Fresh creamery — Tubs, 19^ to 
20;. ; do., pound prints, 21 to 22c. 

CHEESE — There is a little more enquiry 
on export account. There is not much doing 
locally. We quote: Summer make, 9c; Sept. 
and Oct., 9% to 10c. 

EGGS — Since the cold weather set in 
country receipts have fallen off, but values 
have not changed very much. We quote : 
Late gathered, 17c; strictly new laid, 21 
to 22c; cold storage and held fresh, 14 to 
150; pickled, 14 to 14^°- 

POULTRY — The poultry market is dull 
and neglected except in chickens and ducks, 
which are scarce and wanted. We quote : 
Geese, 5 to 6c. per lb.; turkeys, 6 to 8c. per 
lb.; chickens, 25 to 50c per pair ; ducks, 40 
to 75c. per pair. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Trade continues quiet. Prime 
medium are quoted at $1 to $1.10. 

Dried Apples— Are dull at 4c. 

Evaporated Apples — The situation is 
much as before with 6}4 to 7c. the idea as 
to price in a jobbing way. 

Potatoes — Buying has been a little 
brisker during the past week, but the volume 
of business is still of insignificant propor- 
tions. We quote 25 to 30c per bag out of 
store and 20 to 25c. on track. 

Honey — A good demand is reported on 
country account for strained clover honey, 



and locally there is a fair demand for comb 
honey. We quote : Strained, clover, 10 to 
io^c; dark, 5c. ; comb, clover, $1.90 per 
dozen ; dark, $1.50. 

PROVISIONS AND DRESSED HOGS. 

There has been little or nothing doing in 
provisions during the past week, but prices 
are much as before. Dressed hogs are a 
little firmer, there not being so many coming 
forward. For select weights of no to 250 
lbs., $4.50 to $4.55 is the idea, as to price ; 
for weights under or above, 25c. per 100 lbs. 
less. 

Dry Salted Meats— Long clear bacon, 
6#c- for carload lots, and 6>£ to 6^c for 
small lots ; backs, 7>£c. 

Smoked Meats — Breakfast bacon, 
10c; rolls, 7 to 7%c; hams, large, 22 lbs. 
and over, 9c; medium, 15 to 20 lbs., 10c; 
small hams, 10c; backs, 9 to 9'^c. ; pic- 
nic hams, 7c; all meats out of pickle, ic. 
less thin above. 

Lard — Pure Canadian, tierces, 7 to 
7#c; tubs, 7 l 4 to 8c. ; pails, 7% to 8c. 

Barrel Pork — Canadian heavy mess, 
$13.50; Canadian short-cut, 14 to $14.50 ; 
cleir shoulder mess, $12; shoulder mess, 
$11.50. 

FISH. 

Trade has continued quiet, but an im- 
provement is shortly anticipated. A feature 
of the trade this week is the arrival of a few 
carloads of Lake Winnipeg while fish, 
and they are finding a good demand at 
7% to 8c. per p mnd. They are choice 
fish. Oysters are 5 to 10c. per gallon dearer 
owing to the cold weather in the primary 
markets, and still higher values are antici- 



pated. We quote standards at $1.30 to 
$1.35, and selects $1.60. Fish are quoted as 
follows : Skinned and boned codfish, 6%c; 
boneless fish, 2>% to 4c; haddock, 5 to 
6c. ; Labrador herring, $3.25 to $3 50 per 
half barrel and $5.50 to $5 75 per barrel ; 
Newfoundland herring, $2.50 per half bar- 
rel, and $450 to $4.75 per barrel; fresh 
water salt herring, $3 per barrel ; blue- 
back herring, 3c; pike, 6 to 7c. per lb.; 
flitched cod, 5c; finnan haddies, £>%z.\ 
Digby herring, in bundles of 5 boxes, nc. ; 
ditto, lengthwise, 10c; large halibut, 12 to 
15c. ; Restigouche salmon, 20 to 25c; 
British Columbia salmon, 13 to 14c; mack- 
erel, 20 to 25c; steak cod, 6% to 7c: 
haddock, 5c. ; black bass, 9 to ioj^. Fre^h 
Lake Erie herring, $3 per 100 ; whitefish, 
8 to 9c; salmon trout, 7% t-> 8c; Lake Sup- 
erior whitefish, 8c; Lake Winnipeg white- 
fish, 7Yz to 8c. 

FLOUR AND FEED. 

Wheat— The street market is easier. 
There have been sales of white at 70c. and 
red at 67c. Gaose is nominal at 54c. 

Barley — Is steady with sales at 44c. 

Oats— Firm at 28j£c. 

Flour — Demand is moderate and prices 
steady. Transactions in straight roller are 
reported at $3.09 and in patents at $3.22, 
Toronto freifchis. 

Breakfast Foods — Business continues 
qu et. We quote: Oatmeal, cornmeal and pot 
barley from 10 to 15c. lower ; Standard oat- 
meal and rolled oats, $3.10 to $3 20; rolled 
wheat, $2 10 in 100 lb. barrels; cornmeal, 
$2 75; split peas, $3.25; pot barley, $3.25. 
DRESSED BEEF, VEU AND MUTTON". 

Cattle are much dearer. This is owing 
to the fact that, while the demand is good, 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 



THE TORONTO 

COLD STORAGE WAREHOUSE 



All information from W. H. LECKIE, Manager. 



THE TORONTO COLD STORAGE 
CO., LTD., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN TOMATO CHUTNEE 

For Soups, Gravies, Curries, Fish, Game, etc. 
Used foi lunch and breakfast as sandwiches. 
Highly recommended by H. R. H. Princess 
Louise and by the late Sir John A. Macdonald. 
For sale by leading wholesalers. 

Prepared by M. P. CARD, Guelph, Ont. 

Ask the Wholesale Houses for 

Hossiter's Household Brushes 

THE BEST. 

GEO. ROSSITER - TORONTO 

10 to 14 Pape Avenue. 



Telephone No. 471. 



Established X870. 



JOHN HAWLEY 

Provision and Commission Merchant 



Butter 
Eggs 



Lard 
Apples 



Cheese 
Etc. 



Raspberry Jam in 1, 5 and 30 lb. Pkgs. 

88 Front Street East, Toronto 



Sea Food 



"GEM OF THE SEA." 

i and 2 lb. Blocks. 

" FAVORITE." 

Pure Cod. 1 and 2 lb. Blocks. 

" SATISFACTION." 

Boneless Fish. 25 and 40 lb. Boxes. 



Packed by 

LEONARD BROTHERS 

ST. JOHN, N.B. 



JUST RECEIVED 

Evaporated Peaches 
Evaporated Apricots 
Evaporated Apples 

Prices Low. Stock Fancy. 

Write us for Quotations. 



GLEMES BROS., TORONTO 



supplies are light, good cattle having been 
bought up for the holiday trade. Then 
the higher prices for poultry had naturally 
turned the attention more toward meats, all 
kinds of which have advanced in conse- 
quence. We quote : Beef, S4.75 to $6.75 ; 
lamb, 7 to 7^c. ; mutton, 5 >£ to 6c. ; veal, 
5 to 7c. 

SALT. 
Business has fallen off a little during the 
past week, but prices remain unchanged. 
We quote at Toronto : In carload lots, 
$1 per barrel, and 60c. per sack; in less 
than carload lots, $1.05 per barrel and 65c. 
per sack. At the wells we quote : F.O.B. 
barrels, 70c; sacks 50c. for points west of 
Toronto, and 45c. for Toronto and points east 
of Toronto. 

HIDES, SKINS, WOOL AND TALLOW. 

Hides — Quiet and unchanged. Dealers 
are paying 1;, 4 and 3c. respectively for Nos. 
I, 2 and 3. Cured are nominal at 6Xc> 
trade being slow. 

Calfskins— Are still quoted at 6j£c. per 
lb 

Sheepskins — Lambskins and shearlings 
are still quo:ed at 80c. 

Wool — Dull. We quote: Fleece combing, 
24c; rejections, 17 j£ to \Z l /zZ. ; unwashed, 
13'A to I4^c. 

PETROLEUM. 

The demand continues fair at the recent 
decline in prices. We quote in 1 to 10 bbl. 
lots, imperial gallon, Toronto : Canadian, 
16c. ; carbon safety, 18c. ; Canadian water 
white, 18c; American water white, 2i^c; 
Pratt's Astral, 23c. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Oysters are 5 to 10c. per gallon dearer. 

Hannah & Co., of Toronto, are shipping 
turnips to the Southern States. 

Another shipment of new dates is report- 
ed by the Eby, Blain Co., Ltd. 

Gunn, Flavelle & Co. are experiencing an 
increasing demand for their pickled eggs. 

California Ruby prunes, from 30-40 to 
8ogo, are in stock with H. P. Eckardt & Co. 

The Port Fish Co. are this week in re- 
ceipt of a shipment of Lake Winnipeg white- 
fish. 

Clemes Bros, are in receipt of a carload 
of Pattie & Lett brand of California Wash- 
ington navel oranges. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., report another 
shipment of Trenor's selected and layer 
Valencias. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. have the following : 
Lake fi=h, (fall catch) ; white fish, trout, 
herring. 

John Sloan & Co. are this week in receipt 
of a shipment of Valencia raisins consisting 



Experience 



Enables me to select the 
finest stock — enables me 
to cure it in the surest and 
best manner. 



I 



Graham, McLean & Co. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
77 Golborne St. TORONTO. 

We solicit consignments of Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Poul- 
try and all kinds of 

FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCE 

Send us a trial shipment. 

We handle a special line of kettle-rendered Lard. 



B. T. Babbitt 

1776 SOAP POWDER, AND "BEST" SOAP 

^i^— New York 

WM. H. DUNN, . Representative 

394 St. Paul St., MONTREAL. 



& Co, 



Wholesale Produce and 
Commission Merchants 



62 FRONT ST. EAST, - TORONTO. 



Correspondence Invited. 

Consignments Solicited. 

EGG CASES SUPPLIED 

Liberal advances made 
on consignments. 

Bankers : Canadian Bank of Commerce. 



W. N. LAZIER 



Box 341, VICTORIA, B.C. 



Agent for . . 



R emington machine en. 

Refrigerating and Ice Machines. 

Complete Plants Installed for all Purposes. 

Robb Engineering Co. Economic Boilers. 

High Speed and Corliss Engines. 

Complete Plants Erected. All work 

guaranteed. 



COWAN'S 
OCOAS 
OFFEES 
HOCOLATES 

and ICINGS 

are absolutely pure. 
All orders promptly attended to. 



THE COWAN CO., Ltd. 

470 King St. West, 

Toronto, Canada. 



The Finest Lard on the Market. 
Write for Prices. . . . 

T. R. F. CASE, Seaforth, Ont. 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



What We Manufacture 



McLauchlan's Sodas. McLauchlan's Fine Biscuits. 
McL. & S. Cough Drops in 5c. packages and bottles. 
McL. & S. Fruit Tablets in 5c. packages and bottles. 
McL. & S. Imperial Chocolates. 



JAS. MCLAUCHLAN & SONS, 



OWEN SOUND. 



of 300 boxes of layers and 200 boxes of fine 
off-stalk. 

Rutherford, Marshall & Co. report a good 
demand for strained honey for shipment to 
the country. 

Dawson & Co. have in stock this week a 
carload each of Mexican oranges and low- 
priced lemons. 

Half-barrels of mackerel and salmon are 
in store with Lucas, Steele & Bristol. They 
also have kitts of the former. 

Molasses have advanced, but James Tur- 
ner & Co. secured a nice lot on time, which 
they will sell at right prices. 

Tea samples will be furnished by Lucas, 
Steele & Bristol for their January bargains 
on application. 

T. A. Lytle & Co. are receiving from the 
Eastern Townships large shipments of 
maple syrup of a superior quality. 

Lucas, Steele & Bristol are offering some 
special values in syrups and molasses. 
Their travelers have samples. 

James Turner &Co. have an excellent as- 
sortment of dried fruits. See prices and 
samples in their travelers' hands. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. are in receipt of a 
shipment of California apricots and peaches 
in bags. " Price and quality right," they 
report. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., have received 
a large shipment of Dem. Schisas fine Filia- 
tra currants in bbls., half-bbls., cases and 
half-cases. 

Upon receipt of a postal card W. H. Gil- 
lard & Co. will be pleased to submit samples 
of their standard lines of black teas to any 
retailer desiring same. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., report the ar- 
rival of a novelty in potted meats and pastes, 
put up by Meyers & Co., London, Eng., in 
neat tins to retail at 5c. 

A bargain in French imperial plums in 
25 lb. boxes is being offered by W. H. Gil- 
lard & Co. The season is approaching when 
these will be in demand. 

James Turner & Co. have a block of May 
picking Japan teas, which ihey feel assured 



show the best value in Canada for the 
money, grading from fine to choicest. 

" In teas to retail at 25c. we never had 
such all-round values,'' say Lucas, Steele & 
Bristol. " Our blacks are particularly good 
in the half-dollar lines." 

Dixon's Carburet of Iron Stove Polish has 
met with unprecedented success in the 
hands of W. H. Gillard & Co., which hrm 
has made very large sales and are receiving 
many repeat orders. 

W. H. Gillard & Co., who made the first 
shipment upon the opening of the T. H. & 
B. Railway from Hamilton to Brantford and 
Waterford, have received the first carload of 
goods from Montreal via the same line. 

The price of dried beef is lower than it 
has ever been before, and a representative 
of J. W. Beardsley's Sons, in conversation 
with The Canadian Grocer expressed 
the opinion that the lowest figure had been 
touched. 

Bart. Cottam & Co., bird food manufactur- 
ers, of London, report business brisk, and 
the demand for Cottam's bird seed increas- 
ing, and greater for the last three months 
than in any corresponding three months in 
the last twenty years. 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 9, 1896. 

GROCERIES. 

THE prominent feature of the grocery 
market this week has been the con- 
tinued activity and strength in sugar. 
Enquiry for the staple has not been checked 
by the recent advance, both wholesalers and 
retailers showing anxiety to place orders in 
anticipation of future wants. The tone is 
firm at the advance. In other lines nothing 
striking has occurred. Syrups, however, 
are working firmer in sympathy with sugar, 
while tea rules quiet. Nothing is doing in a 
large way between house?, as jobbers are 
fairly well supplied, but a better enquiry from 
retailers is expected next week. In dried 
fruit the sole feature of interest here is the 
scarcity of 4-crown layer raisins. Receipts 
of new shelled walnuts have arrived and re- 



lieved the stringency on these, while there 
are no pure Grenoble walnuts to be had 
here, wants being filled with mixed. Canned 
goods are quiet, and an easier tendency is 
noted in leading lines of green fruit. The 
same can be said of fish. 
SUGAR. 
The advance in prices has not checked the 
demand for this staple. On the contrary, 
enquiry has been brisk ever since the refin- 
ers advanced their price and a large volume 
of business has been transacted Refiners 
are not disposed to book orders any length 
ahead and prices have a very firm tendency. 
The demand from retailers is quite as brisk ; 
in fact, buyers generally, both large and 
small, show a strong desire to lay in a good 
stock of sugar at once, or provide for 
future wants by placing orders for future 
delivery. To-day granulated is firm at 4#c. 
for the best stock from second hands in a 
jobbing way, though No. 2 can be had for 
yic. less per lb. Yellows are equally firm 
and well enquired for at y/% to 4c. as to 
grade. 

SYRUPS. 

These are dull, but the market has a firm 
tone, and an advance is not at all unlikely, 
owing to the strength of the sugar market. 
Prices are steady at 1^0 for ordinary, and 
2%, to 3c. for bright stock. 
MOLASSES. 

There is very little doing in molasses, but 

the market is steady in tone. Barbadoes 

stock moves quietly for jobbing lots at 36 to 

37c, and Porto Rico ranges from 34 to 35c. 

RICE. 

There is no change in the rice market. 
Business rules quiet. 

SPICES. 

The spice market is quiet and few changes 
are to note. We quote : Pure black pep- 
per, 10 to 12c; pure white, 15 to 22c; pure 
Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c. ; cloves, 1 5 to 20c. ; 
pure mixed spice, 25 to 30c; cream of tar- 
tar, French, 25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 30c. 
per lb.; allspice, 12 to 15c. 
COFFEE. 

Quietness rules in coffee both from first 
and second hands. Jobbers, however, ex- 
pect an improvement in the course of a 
week or so, in fact, orders on this account 
are already beginning to show signs in that 
direction. We quote green in bags: Mara- 
caibo, 20 to 21c; Rio, 19 to 20c; Java, 28c; 
Jamaica, 20 to 21c, and Mocha, 32c. 
TEAS. 

There is little activity to note in the tea 
market at present, but next week a change 



WE ARE 

PAYING 
GASrt 

FOR 



j$*& 



W. B. BAYLEY & CO. 



EXPORT BROKERS 
42 FRONT ST. E. TOrOlltO 



There was no Coffee 

Sold in 1895 that gave such perfect 
satisfaction as 

CHASE & SANBORN'S 

Always Reliable. Always Uniform. AlW3.yS PlirC 

Have you ever tried a tin of "ROYAL BLEND ?" 

Tins 25 and 50 lbs., ground or whole ; Price, 32c. per lb. 




f" REINDEER" I 

StZHluS HlOTlG. Il is universally approved by the medical profession 

and is the only CONDENSED MILK that offers 
ABSOLUTE SECURITY in handling. Cases, 4 doz., price $6.75 per case. 
Special price on 5 or 10 cases. 



A NOVELTY IN IMPORTED POTTED MEATS 

A SPLENDID 5 CENT RETAILER. FOLLOWING VARIETY: 

VEAL AND HAM. TONGUE. 

BEEF. STRASBOURG MEAT. 

TURKEY AND TONGUE. HAM AND TONGUE. 
HAM AND CHICKEN. ANCHOVY PASTE. 

BLOATER PASTE. HAM. 

CHICKEN, HAM AND TONGUE. 



BOXES— 6 dozen assorted. 



They are bound to sell 



THE 



Eby, Blai/n Company 



LTD. 

WHOLESALE IMPORTING AND MANUFACTURING GROCERS 

TORONTO - - ONTARIO 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



for the belter is looked for. Little or noth- 
ing is doing in a large way on this market 
between jobbers except a few lots of com- 
mon Japans at 14c. Blacks aie enquired 
for in small jobbing tats of Indians and Cey- 
lons. We quote Japans : Low grades, 14c; 
medium, 15 to 18c. ; fine, 20 to 22c, and 
choice, 25 to 32c. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

Business in Valencia raisins is quiet on 
the whole, and prices are rather softer on or- 
dinary to fine. The contrary is the case 
with 4-crown layers, the market being al- 
most absolutely bare of this grade, 6J4c. be- 
ing paid this week bv wholesalers for sup- 
plies. We quote : Ordinary off-stalk, 4 to 
4%c; fine do., 4^ to4^c; selected, 510 
5>£c., and layers, 6yi to 7c 

California raisins continue firm in tone and 
meet a steady j )bbmg enquiry. We quote : 
3-crown, 5^ to 6c, and 4 crown, 7c. 

There is no change in table raisins, which 
continue as last noted. We quote Mala- 
gas as follows: Extra loose muscatels, $1.40; 
Imperial London layers, $ 1.7 C^; Imperial 
cabinets, $1.90 ; Connoisseur clusters, $2 20; 
extra dessert clusters, $3 ; Royal Bucking- 
ham clusters, $3 50. 

No sultanas are now available under 
6 l /ic and high grade goods have jobbed out 
at a range all the way up to 9,^0 for special 
brands. 

Advices in regard to currants conduce to 
firmness, and though demand is quiet, prices 
are strongly held. We quote : 3%V. in 
barrels, 4 to 4#c. in half-barrels, and 4% to 
4#"c. in cases. 

There is no change in prunes, which rule 
quiet but firm. Bosnia stock move quietly 
at 6 to b]/zz., while ordinary French have 
changed hands at 5c. There are few plums 
on the market, and prices are d fficult to 
quote. Fresh receipts of California prunes 
have come to hand, and the inside price is 
rather lower, sales having been made, at 7c, 
but for good to choice 9 to 10c. has been 
freely paid. 

There have been considerable receipts of 
bag figs during the week, which have been 
selling at 4c. This lact has imparted a rather 
eas er feeling, and sales of ordinary in boxes 
have been made at ?>% to 9}4c., while fancy 
are steady at 14c. 

Dates continue quiet and steady at 4}4 to 
5c, as to grade. 

NUTS. 

There are no pure Grenoble walnuts to be 
had on the market, but mixed have sold at 
n)4 to I2)4c. Receipts of new pecans and 
new shelled walnuts have come to hand, and 
values on both these varieties are quoted at 
a lower range as a result of this. We 
quote : Grenoble walnuts, uj£ to I2j£c; fil- 
berts, 7 Vz to 8c. ; Tarragona almonds, 11 }4 to 
\7.%c.\ new pecans, 9 to 12c, and new 
shelled walnuts, 18 to 20c. 

CANNED GOODS. 

Business in canned goods is limited, and 
prices are nominally unchanged. We quote: 
Lobsters, tails, $8 per case; flats, $9 to $9.50; 
sardines, ordinary brands, $7 to $8.50; 
best brands, $9 50 to $10.50 ; salmon, $1.25 
to $1.30 per doz.; tomatoes, 75 to 80c; 
peaches, $2 to $2.25; corn, 85 to 90c; mar- 
rowfat peas, 95c. to $1; strawberries, $2 to 
$2.25; raspberries, $175 to $2; greengages, 
$1.75 to $2; blue plums or damsons, $1.50 
to $1 75; pineapples, $2 to $2.25 and 3-lb. 
apples, 80 to 85c. 



"WINES AND SPIRITS. 

There has been no movement in these of 
any importance. 

1G8EEN FRUIT. 

This has been a fair week in green fruit, 
but orders have been generally for small 
quantines, and the range at the different 
auction sales rather lower. As a result prices 
in some cases are quoed down, especially 
on oranges, lemons and apples. 

Oranges — Trade has been quieter, and 
prices are lower. We quote: Jamaicas, $8 
to $9 per barrel, and $4 to $4.50 per box ; 
Valencias, 420's, $3.7*, to $4, and 714':., $4 50 
to $5. 

Lemons — Business has been moderate in 
these, and prices are 25c. easier for the in- 
side figure at a range of $2.50 to $3. 

Grapes — There is no change in Malaga 
grapes, which range from $5 to $6 per keg. 

Cranberries — Move quietly at lower 
prices, viz. : $9 to $10 per barrel as to 
quality, a decline of $1 on the lower grades. 

Apples — Dull and easy at $2.50 to 
$3 50, sales being very slow, even at the 
decline. 

Spanish Onions— At an auction sale this 
week the=e sold as low as 10c. per crate, but 
in a jobbing way we quote 40c. 
FiSH. 

The long spell of mild weather demora- 
lized the trade in fresh fish, and stocks have 
accumulated in all lines. Fresh haddock 
and cod have picked up a trifle this week 
under) the cold snap. Pickled fish are 
dull, and only a trifling trade has been 
transacted in smoked and boneless fish. 
We quote : Fresh haddock and cod at 
y/z and 4c; pickled No. 1 Labrador her- 
rings at $5.25, No. 1 N.S. at $4.25 to $4.50; 
and ordinary grades $3 to $4 per bbl. ; No. 
2 Labrador salmon, $13 per bbl.; B. C. sal- 
mon, $10.50 to $11 • No. 1 lake trout, $425 
per keg ; No. 1 green cod at $4.25 10 $4.50 ; 
No. 2 at $2.75 to $3 ; No. 1 mackerel at 
$20 ; No. 1 pickled sardines at $4 50 per 
bbl. Dried and boneless cod, $4.25 to 
$4 50 per 100 lbs. for dried ; ^ l / 2 to 6c. 
per lb. for boneless ; 5c. per lb. for boneless 
haddock; 3#c. per lb. for fish, and 11c. per 
lb. for shredded. Smoked haddies, dyi to 
7c. per lb., kippered herrings at $1.40 to 
$1.50 per box, Yarmouth and bay bloaters 
at 90c. per box, and smoked herrings at 8 to 
10:. per lb. 

DRESSED HOGS AND PROVISIONS. 

There was no new feature in the provision 
market. The demand was limited and 
business rules quiet at the recent de- 
cline. We quote : Canadian short cut, 
clear, $13; Canadian short cut, mess, 
$13.50; hams, city cured, per lb., 9 to 10c; 
lard, Canadian, in pails, 8X to 8J^c; bacon, 
per lb., 9 to 10c; lard, com. refined, per lb., 
6'X to 6>^c. 

The demand for dressed hogs was fair in 
small lots at steady prices. We quote car 
lots at $4 50 to $4 60, and jobbing lots at 
$4.75 to $5 per 100 lbs. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

EGGS— Business in eggs was quiet, the 
demand being limited, and only for small 
lots at steady prices. We quote : Boi'ing 
stock, 18 to 20c; Montreal limed, 14 to 15c; 
western limed, 13^ to 14c, and held fresh, 
13^ to 14c. per dczen. 

Beans — There was no change in beans, 
the market still being quiet and steady. We 
qunte : Car lots of choice hand-picked at $1 
to $1.05, and small quantities at $1.10 to 
$1.20. 



Poultry— The receipts of poultry for 
the past few days have been sma'l and the 
market at present is pretty well cleared up 
of nice bright sto:k. There was a fair de- 
mand to-day for fresh killed turkeys, but few 
were offering, and prices are firmer. Choice 
fresh killed turkeys s->ld at 7^ to 8c; chick- 
ens, 6 to 6j£c; ducks, 7 to 7%., and geese, 
5 to 5^c. per lo. 

Potatoes— Continue quiet and steady. 
Sales of four carloads were noted to-day at 
35c. per bag, and we quote 40 to 45c in an 
ordinary way. 

FLOUR, MEAL AND FEED. 

A firm local business has been transacted 
in fl >ur, and the market is moderately 
active and steady. We quote: Winter 
wheat, $3 60 to $3.80 ; spring wheat, patents, 
$3 75 to $3.85; straight roller, $3 30 to $3 40; 
straight roller, bags, $1.60 to $1.65 ; extra, 
bags, $1 40 to $1.45 ; Manitoba strong 
bakers', $3 40 to $3.65. 

The demand for oatmeal was slow, and 
the market is quiet at the recent decline in 
prices. We quote : Standard, bbls., $2.85 
to $2.95 ; granulated, bbls., $2.90 to $3; 
rolled oats, bbls., $2,90 to $3. 

The tone of the feed market was steady and 
business is quiet. We quote : Bran, $14 to 
$15; shorts, $15 to $16; mouillie, $19 to $20. 
CHEESE AND BUTTER. 

Cheese is dull. A firmer feeling has been 
developed, but the general expectation is for 
no radical change this month. To be p'ain, 
sellers consider their goods worth more 
money, and ihe fact will tend to check busi- 
ness. In a nominal way9Xc is the general 
idea for finest fall makes, but it would take 
an advance on this to move any large quan- 
tity of goods. 

The butter market was unchanged, busi- 
ness being confined to a jobbing trade on 
local account. Creamery for small parcels 
ranges from 20 >£ to 21c and dairy stock, 
18c for Townships, and 15c for western. 
HAY. 

The hay market has advanced $1 per ton, 
and we quote at $14 for No. 1 and $13 for 
No. 2. 

ASHES. 

The market is quiet and steady at $370 
for first pots and $3.50 for seconds ; pearls, 
$4.65. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

Oranges are easier this week, sales of Ja- 
maicas being made at $1 per bbl. less. 

It is expected that the firm feeling in 
sugar will lead to stronger prices on syrup, 

L. Chaput, Son & Cie. turned into stock 
this week consignments of new pecans and 
new shelled walnuts, which have been scarce 

Pease Meal^~ 
Glasgow Brose Meal 

The lightest and best food for 
those troubled with dyspepsia. 
The only genuine article manu- 
factured in Canada — by 

JAMES WILSON 

MONKLAND MILLS, FERGUS 



Manufacturer afto of the celebrated Brands of 

Rolled, Standard and Granulated OATMEAL 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



TRADE 



BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH 



Ready for the table in 10 minutes. 
No Soaking. No Boiling. No Odor. 



MARK 

Selling ( J. Harley Brown, London ; R. Thomson, Hamilton Chambers, 17 St. John St., Montreal ; J . E. Huxley. Winnipeg ; 
Agents:1W.M. P. McLaughlin, St. John, N.B.; WM. BREWSTER, Palmer House, Toronto, Canadian Selling Agent. 

J. W. BEARDSLEY'S SOfoS, New York, U.S.A. 



j?CoT\\<S«^£ 




Cottam's Celebrated Bird Seed 

Is hard to beat, as everybody knows. The 
people will have it, and no stock is complete 
without it. Every packet contains Bird Bread, 
of which we are inventors, patentees and sole 
manufacturers. 

BART. COTTAM & CO. - London, Ont. 

Dawson & O- 

FRUIT 

PRODUCE 

an d COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

32 West Market Street 

TORONTO. 



Consignments 
Solicited 



George McWilliam. Frank Everist. 

TELEPHONE 645. 

MCWILLIAM & EVERIST 

GENERAL.. FRUIT 

Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Consignments of FRUIT and PRODUCE SOLI- 
CITED. Ample Storage. 

All orders will receive our best attention. 



FOR 



SMOKED MEATS 

LONG CLEARS 
MESS PORK 
SHORT CUT PORK 
PURE LARD 
COMPOUND LARD 

Write for Prices. Send your ORDERS by mail. 
Careful Attention. Prompt Shipment. 



F. W. FEARMAN 



HAMILTON 



here. Tbey are offering them at a decline 
on previous rates. 

At an auction sale on the Fruit Exchange 
here Spanish onions sold as low as 10c. per 
crate. 

The only large lots of tea that have been 
moved between houses have been some com- 
mon Japans at 14c. 

Wholesale grocers are almost out of 4- 
crown layer raisins here and have paid full 
figures to obtain supplies. 

Rose & Laflamme report an increase of 
50 percent, over 1894 in the sales of Pater- 
son's sauces, etc., during 189^. 

Vipond, McBride & Co., have received 
shipments of the small sizes of California 
prunes, which are offering down to 7c. 

Advices to the St. Lawrence Sugar Co. 
state that the Cuban cane sugar crop is now 
officially estimated as not one quartet of last 
season's. 

Laporte, Martin & Cie. have received 
this week shipments of Grenoble shelled 
and unshelled walnuts, in 55-lb. cases, which 
they offer at good value. 

R. Greig, of Robt. Greig & Co., left for 
New York this week on his way to England 
to visit the various British firms which they 
represent on this side the Atlantic. 

W. Wonham, jr., is at present in the 
Maritime Provinces calling on the friends 
and patrons of W. R. Wonham & Co., with 
samples of the specialties they handle. 

Shipments of Dufour's shelled walnuts 
were received this week by Geo. Childs & 
Co. and J. J. Vipond. The latter firm also 
landed a consignment of fine Grenoble 
walnuts. 

Rose & Laflamme, agents for the T. A. 
Snider Preserving Co., of Cincinnati, are 
carrying a full line of their catsup, soups 
and chili sauce in store in Montreal, and 
report a brisk demand for the goods. 



NEW BRUNSWICK MARKETS. 

Office of The Canadian Grocer. 
St. John, N.B., Jan. 9, 1896. 

THE past week has been one of unusual 
quiet. The open weather continues. 
The country roads are so bad that 
going is impossible, which, of course, affects 
trade very much. In the woods the want of 
snow is much felt, operations being almost 




IF YOU WANT . . 

to get the highest market prices for your 
Butter, Eggs, Poultry, and general pro- 
duce, send your consignments to 

. r". rKlUt Street 

MONTREAL 



Reference: Empire Tobacco Co., or 

Merchants Bank of Halifax. 



BROCK'S BIRO SEED 

is like the new woman, 

UP TO DATE 

, In each i-Ib. packet there is a cake of Bird Treat. 
much appreciated by the Bird-Loving Public. 

NICHOLSON & BROCK - TORONTO 



W* RYAN 

PORK PACKER, 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

AND COMMISSION MERCHANT 

70--7'2 Front St. East, Toronto 

Liberal Advances 

made on Consignments. 

Egg Cases Supplied. 



S.K. 




(0N1MIS5I0N NIERCHANT 



Wholesale Dealer in . 



Oysters, Finnan Haddies, Fresh and 
Frozen Fish, Oranges, Lemons, Al- 
meria Grapes, Cranberries and Dates 

76 COLBORNE ST., 

TORONTO, ONT. 



Wishing you 
the Compliments 
of the Season 



D.Gunn,Flavelle&Co. 

Pork Packers and . . T^ ..«►,+„ 
Commission Merchants I TO MIO 



We haye 
in stock 



FANCY 



Sweet Jamaica Oranges 
Valencia Oranges 
Messina Lemons 



All Much Lower In Prices. 
Send Us Your Orders. 

HUGH WALKER & SON 

Guelph, Ont. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



at a standstill, so far there being but little 
frost in the ground. The mild weather is 
also a great drawback to the fresh fish busi- 
ness, which will be much felt by the fisher- 
men. Prices have been so low during tr\e 
fall that the good demand there always is 
for frozen fish would be much appreciated. 
The principal interest in markets is the con- 
tinued strengthening of the sugar market, 
which it is thought will hold. A number of 
our merchants have full stocks. One party, 
not a wholesale grocer, has one thousand 
barrels bought before the duty was changed. 
Present prospects are for colder weather. 

Salt — The movement continues light, 
with fair stocks held here. There were no 
ariivals this week. We quote : Coarse, 50 
to 55c. ; fine factory-filled, $1.10 ; 5-lb. bags, 
$3.25 per bbl.; 10-lb. bags, $3 per bbl.; 20 lb. 
boxes, 20c; 10-lb boxes, 12c; cartoons, $2 
per doz.; salt, bulk, $2.70 to $2 80 per bbl. 

OiL — There is fair business reported and 
prices continue firm at the advance. The 
fall trade was very large. We quote: 
Amenc in burning oil, 23 #c; best Canadian, 
2i>£ to 2i#c; prime, 19c. ; no charge for 
barrel. 

Canned Goods — There is no change in 
prices and stocks are fairly large, while little 
demand is noted. Salmon have not ad- 
vanced as many expected. This province 
continues to pack rather more sardines from 
year to year, but in nothing like as large 
quantities as just over the line in Maine. The 
largest quantity of the fish there packed are 
caught in New Brunswick waters. In corned 
beef demand is very light at this season. 
Prices are easy. We quote: Corn, 85 to 90c; 
peas, 90 to 95c; tomatoes, 90 to 95c; gallon 
apples, $2 15 to $2.25; corned beef, 2-lb. tins, 
$2.50 to $2.65; i-lb. tins, $1.60 to $165; 
oyster?, 2's, $2 to $2.25; i's, $1.60 to $1.65; 
peaches, 3's, $2.75 to $2.85; 2's, $1.90 to $2 ; 
pineapple, Canadian pack, $2.35; salmon, 
$1.40 to $1.50; lobsters, $1.75 to $2; haddies, 
$1.30; clams, $5 tor 4 doz. ; chowder, $2 75 
for 2 doz. ; scallops, $5.50 for 4 doz. ; Digby 
chickens, $1; kippered herring, $1.10. 

Green Fruit. — Returns from a shipment 
of a St. John house of apples to England 
have been received ; it was one ol the first 
direct shipments made from here. The 
parties are not very well pleased with the re- 
sult. The stock of apples is not large here, 
but there is no particular demand. Good 
fruit is held firm. Lemons show quite a fall- 
ing off in price. Valencia oranges are also 
quoted lower. West India oranges rather 
more than hold their own. Keg grapes are 
rather off in quality. For selected stock 
very firm prices are asked. California or- 
anges are now here in small quantities. We 
quote: Apples, $1.50 to $2,150; oranges, 16. 50 
to $7 per bbl., $3 50 to $4 per box; Lem- 
ons, $3 to $3.75 ; keg grapes, $5 to $6.50 ; 
Valencia oranges, $4 to $4.50. 

Dried Fruit — A few selected Valencias 
are still on the market. California fruit is 
quiet, with a fair but not large stock held here. 
Such stock as is here is largely raisins, 
evaporated fruits having very little demand 
in this market. Currants continues firm at 
the advance. Demand in all lines is auiet. 
There is rather better enquiry for evaporated 
apples, which seem firm. Dried very quiet. 
Some Bosnia prunes are to hand and some 
Cahfornias are daily exDected. Onions are 
quoted rather firmer. We quote: Valencias, 
i,y% to 5c. ; layers, 6 to b%c. ; California L. M. 
4-crown, 6 to 7c. ; 3-crown, 5 to 6c; London 
layers, $1.65 to $1.75. Currants, bbls., sJi to 
4c. ; cases, 4X l0 5 C -! cartoons, cleaned, 7 j£c.j 



bulk, cleaned, 6j£c: prunes, kegs, 4c; boxes. 
\% to 5c: half-boxes, 6 to 8c; dates, 4^ to 
5c; dried apples, 5c . ; evaporated apples, 
T}i lojtfc. ; California evaporated peaches, 
12 to 13c; apficots, 12 to 14c; pears, 12 10 
14c Canadian onions, $2 25 to $2.30; cocoa- 
nuts, $3 to $4 per 100 lbs.; figs, 10 to 12c; 
Sultana raisins, 7 to 8c. 

Dairy Produce— Butter continues very 
dull. There are large stocks of medium 
quality ; good would find fair market. In 
creamery tubs, at a price, if medium size, 
there would be good demand, but not at 
fancy price. Prints have been dull, owing to 
solt weather ; the trade has been well sup- 
plied, the retailers getting it direct from the 
creameries or farmers. Price shows no 
change, but rather easier. In eggs case 
stock sale is slow, and no large quantities 
of any are being sold. In cheese, though 
price is rather firmer, there are but few mov- 
ing. The factories supply a good deal of 
local trade. We quote : Common dairy but- 
ter, 1; to 16c; dairy, 17 to 18c ; new cream 
ery prints, 23 to 24c; cheese, %% to 9c; 
creamery, tubs, 20 to 21c; eggs, 17 to 19c 
by case. 

Sugar — There are fair stocks here, and 
this seems one of the bright spots in what is 
at present a very dull market. Prices are 
fully %c. firmer. There are, however, no very 
large quantities moving. At least one 
speculator has still 1,000 barrels granulated 
bought before the change of duty. The de- 
sire, however, to do business, together with 
the fact that many cannot hold goods, tends 
to keep price below what it should be, and 
this does not apply only to sugar. We 
quote: Granulated, 4K to aH c - \ yellow, 3^ 
to 4c ; Paris lump, \% to 5^c; powdered, 
e>% to s^c. 

MOLASSES — There is light movement at 
present. Stocks held are not large, and 
quality in many cases but fair. No better 
molasses than some handled here last season, 
however, has ever been upon the market. 
Said a merchant to The Grocer : " I 
almost hate to sell it, not knowing when I 
shall replace it." New Orleans in barrels 
finds a continued demand, and the sale of 
syrup is much larger than usual, an ex'ra 
quality being here. Prices of New Orleins 
molasses and syrup are very firm. We 
quote: Barbadoes, 30 to 33c; Trinidad, 
32 to 34c; Porto Rico, 34 to 36c, bbls.; New 
Orleans, 34 to 35c; St. Croix, 31 to 32c; 
syrup, 36 to 38c 

FlSH--The weather is somewhat colder, and 
the fresh fish business more active, which is 
much appreciated by both dealers and fisher- 
men, there being a steady demand for these 
goods. Fresh herring are not plentiful, but 
other fish are in good supply. The West 
India market is reported dull. There is no 
change in prices, at this season demand 
for pickled and dry being light, but in dry 
the price is steady. Smoked are still du 1 
with fairly large stocks here. We quote as 
follows : Fresh haddock, 2 to 2#c. 
per lb.; dry, $1.50; large cod, $360 to 
$3.7? ; medium, $3.35 to $3 50 ; pollock, 
$1.50 ; bay herring, $1.25 to $1.30 per half- 
bbl.; Ripplings, $1.65 ; Wolves, $1.85 to $2; 
smoked herring, old, 4 to 5c; new smoked, 
5 to 6c; Canso, $5 to $5.50 per bbl.; shad, 
half-bbl., $5 to $6; Grand Manan herring, 
half-bbl., $1.25 to $1.35; Shelburne, $3. 7s 
bbl., $1.65 half-bbl.; boneless, 2'A to 8c; 
oysters, 3 to $3.50 per bbl.; small cod, 
$2.50; frozen herring, 70c per 100. 

Provisions — Our local dealers are mak- 
ing money, if any is to be made at present. 
They are getting a good profit; in many cases 



E. T. STURDEE 

Mercantile Broker, 
Manufacturers' Agent, 

ST. JOHN, N.B. Etc -. Et c 

Wholesale trade only. 

Cleaver's Toilet Soaps. 
Bensdorp's Royal Dutch Cocoa. 
Pyle's Pearline. 

C. & E. MACMICHAEL, 

40 Dock St., St. John, N.B. 

FPPS'S COCOA 

L^tf 1-4 lb. Packets. 14 lb. Boxes 

secured in tin. 

Special Agent for the Dominion 

O. E. COLSON - MONTREAL 

A Good 
Resolution 



FOR 1896. 



You who have handled "GOLDEN" 
FINNAN HADDIES, canned, to buy no 
other. You who have not sold them, to 
place your orders at once. Every can of 
Golden Finnan Haddies is guaranteed 
or money refunded. 

NORTHRUP & CO. 

Packers' Agents. ST. JOHN, N. B. 



FISH- 

WIT HOUT A BONE. 

Ordinary Boneless Fish have some 
bones in them, but we now put up pure 
Codfish in 3-pound boxes 

WITHOUT A BONE. 

This is the best Fish packed in Can- 
ada, and very much superior to Fib- 
red or Shredded Fish. . . . 



JOHN SEALY - St, John, N.B. 



V 



JBHffCOilrATE. 



*t 



JOHN.P.MOTT&Co 

*- HALIFAX, NS. -*Z 
S-ESTABUSMEO,^ 



^ 



ASK FOR 



MOTT'S 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



Does it pay 



Yc 



ERTAINLY IT DOES 



^: : 


V^, 


"\~.MM .~^ 


11 


vIliMJ 


| HYGIfNJC | 

BUCKWHEAT 
bFLOUR gs 


1 


(always READ? FQ3 USE 


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Take no chances. The quality is of the very best. The manufacturers guarantee the 
quality of 

Dalley's Royal Hygienic Self-Rising Flour 

to all customers. There is no trouble in selling these flours — Tea, Graham, Pancake 
and Buckwheat. Once your customers have tried them they will not take any other. 
Order at once from your wholesale house 

THE F. F. DALLEY CO., Ltd,, Hamilton, Canada. 



Manufactured by 



Only the best fruit, thoroughly cleaned 
and picked, is used in making 



♦ CLARK'S ♦ 

f ENGLISH MINCE MEAT | 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

An Article fit for a 
King's Table. 

Every package guaranteed to be as 
represented. 



W. CLARK 



MONTREAL" j 



PUR 



Maple Syrup 

Finest quality. Write for quotations. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO. 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 
TORONTO 




^£52Si2&s2aai 



DON'T DELAY 




Order at once. The stock 
now on hand is limited. 
You want our goods. You 
may send in your order after 
the more wide-awake man 
has ordered ahead of you. 
Be first. The 



"KENT 



JJ 



Canning and 
Pickling Co, 



CHATHAM, ONT. 



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You cannot afford it with your canned 
goods stock. A woman is apt to judge 
your whole store by a single purchase of 
canned stuff, so — indifference as to what 
brands you buy doesn't pay. Reject un- 
known and bogus brands. Stock only 
reputable goods of unquestioned merit. 
Our goods are guaranteed always first-class. 
You can get them at any wholesaler's. 



DELHI CANNING CO. 



DELHI, ONT. 



9 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



a large profit above Ontario prices, even after 
freight is paid. S.ich goods as our market 
will not take are shipped to the West Indies, 
where a fine price is obtained. Lard is quot- 
ed lower, also hams. Business is quet. 
We quote: Clear pork, $15 to $15.50; 
mess, $1350 to $14 ; beef, $13 to $14 ; 
domestic mess pork, $14 to $14.50 ; hams, 
10 Vz to 12c; rolls, 8c. ; pure lard, 9 to 9>£c; 
compound, 7^ to 8c. 

Flour, Feed and Meal — In fliur there 
is no change, but a raiher steadier feeling, 
with but light business doing. In oats there 
is a rather easier feeling, and Ontario oats 
row have the market, as they are much be- 
low P. E. I., and much prelerred to New 
Brunswick. In cornmeal price is low, which 
effects the price of, and demand for, feed. 
Hay, though not moving here in quantities, 
is active through the province, and Ameri- 
cans are large buyers, they offering much 
better prices than the English market. 
There was a large quantity in the country, 
but stocks are much lighter. In buck- 
wheat meal the demand is light. We 
quote as follows: Manitoba, $440 to $4.50 ; 
best Ontario, $3 95 to $4 ; medium, $3 70 to 
$3.80; oatmeal, $3 50 to $3.65; commeal,$2 30 
to $2 35 ; middlings, $19 to $20 on track ; 
bran, $18 to $19 ; hand-picked beans, $1.25; 
prime, $1.20; oats, 33 to 35c; hay, $1225 
to $13 ; pot barley, $4 ; round peas, $365 
to $3.75; split peas, $3. 70 to $3.80; yellow 
eye beans, $1.85; buckwheat meal, $130 to 
$1.35. 



ST. JOHN NOTES. 

Hops are lower in }i and %-\b. packages. 

Cream of tartar took a sudden jump of 
10s. this week. 

The Virginia Peanut Association has gone 
into liquidation. 

Pownall, P.E.I , has this season shipped 
$3,000 worth of oysters. 

The farmers in Carleton County are get- 
ting $9 per ton for loose hay. 

Potatoes are sti 1 plentiful in this province. 
It is said in Victoria, too, there are 20,000 
bushels. 

The Duatt Castle took from here equal to 
3,000 barrels cargo, besides which there 
were 120 packages goods from Hong Kong. 

J. H. White has been appointed agent (or 
the Norfolk Storage Co., Norfolk. Tnis is 
one of the best known houses shipping pea- 
nuts. 

Potatoes in Carleton County are bringing 
almost twice as much per birrel as on the 
American side, the prices being about 35c. 
and 60c. per bbl. 

The Bay of Fundy Steamship Co.'s Str. 
City of Monticello, has been handed over to 
the Dominion Atlantic Railway. This will 
end the competition. 

We regret to see the British War Office 
has not f jllowel the example of the Admir- 
alty in buying evaporated vegetables in 
Canada rather than Begium. 

The shipment of deals is a very important 
business to St. J >hn and the province. The 
quantity shipped in 189; was 291,382,574 
sup. ft., about 35,000,000 less thau 1894. 



Alex. Gibson, who has bsen on the Nash- 
walk 30 years, has cut 1,000,000,000 ft. of 
logs. 

Leonard Bros, are send ng to their Mont- 
real house three cars fine frozen herring, 
very large and bright, the only quantity that 
arrived here this season. They are also re 
reiving large quantities of haddock and cod. 

On Christmas Day 2,000 pounds of butter 
were churned at the Central Creamery, 
P.E.I. , valued at $440. This was a venture 
this winter, and though patronzed as yet 
by only some 350 out of 16,000 farmers, is 
a success. 

The Bank of New Brunswick is to be con- 
gratulated. Beside a short time ago paying 
a half-yearly dividend of 6 per cent., it the 
other day added $25,000 to the rest, which 
is now larger than the capital stock by $50,- 
000, the capital stock being $500,000. 

Trade of St. John for 1895 was as follows 
as compared with 1894 : Exports — 1894 — 
$3,094,212; imports, $3,233,594 ; duty, $769,- 
711 ; free, $934,935 ; excise duty, $273,071. 
Exports — 1895— $3,352,123 : imports, $3,- 
508,479; duty, $763,445 ; free, $1,127,648; 
excise duty, $269,786. 

The trade of Fredericton in Dec, 1895, 
shows in exports a large increase over Dec, 
1894, the difference being about $13,000. For 
the past year the duty collected at Frederic- 
ton, as compared with 1894, shows an 
increase of about $4,000, the increase in 
imports being about $22,000. 



HALIFAX TRADE GOSSIP. 

MERCHANTS are not complaining 
about open weather this week. The 
cold snap struck Halifax on Satur- 
day, and produce and poultry dealers at 
once stopped selling goods at auction prices 
or less. There was a stiffening up all round, 
and on Monday the general tenor of trade 
was good. The holiday trade did not act 
as usual this Christmas. Previous years the 
whole city trade was doae the day before 
Christmas, but this time people made their 
purchases several days in advance, and con- 
sequen ly Christmas Eve was very dull. This 
is accounted for from the fact that owing to 
the extreme mild weaher provisions and 
poultry sold low, and buyers wanted to reap 
the benefit. At the present time business in 
provisions is very good, and is put down as 
far better than it was at this season last year. 
There is also considerable encouragement 
in sugar ; the refinery anticipating a good 
year's business. 

As has already been noticed, the fisheries 
have not proved remunerative, but, never- 
thrless, very little complaint is heard from 
the fishermen. The market to-day is quiet. 
Inferior grades of cod are somewhat easier, 
owing, no doubt, to the eagerness of St. 
Johns, Nfld., holders to get clear of their 
stocks. The Mediterranean and Brazilian 



markets have not been very good lately. 
Shipments to these ports have been exceed- 
ingly large and prices are kept down as a 
n itural consequence. Large and medium 
merchantable hold their former values, and 
if anything, are firmer ; in fact, there 
is not sufficient large, hard cured cod to 
supp'y the requirements until the new catch 
comes in. Really good fat, split herrings 
sell readily, but West India grades are in 
over supply. There are very few salmon 
in sight, and holders look for much higher 
prices. Mackerel do not seem to be called 
for. 

The Halifix refinery reports the market 
strong for refined and granulated. The low- 
est prices at the refineries to-day are granu- 
lated, 4j£c; yellows, 2'X to 4c. This is an 
advance of %c. since last report. 

Some P.E.I, produce vessels are lying 
up here for the winter, and intend to wait a 
change in the market before taking off their 
hatches. This seems to have made an easy 
feeling in produce, and potatoes and turnips 
have not advanced. 

There is very little change in the beef 
market. So called auction or light beef is 
fairly well cleaned up. We generally have 
a lot of that article, and as it sells at a very 
low rate, it interferes with legitimate business 
somewhat. Beef cattle, sinking pelts, is 
worth $6.50 to $8 50 ; mutton and lambs re- 
main inactive, and may be quoted at about 
A x /z to 6}4c. Little or nothing is doing in 
dressed hogs. Ontario stocks are quoted to- 
day at from 5 to 5>£c P.E.I, mess pork is 
in slow demand at $12.50 to $13, while prime 
mess is quo.ed at $10.50; hams are worth 
9c , and lard, 10c. 

The rush for poultry is over, but the cold 
weather maintains prices. Native turkeys 

BUSINESS CHANCES 

IN A CITY OF 10,000 — A PORK STORE — WELL 
• fitted up for the business; will dispose with or with- 
out fixtures; going out of the retail trade. Apply offije 
of this paper. (3) 

rtjQ AAA WILL PURCHASE A HALF 1N- 
^)^Jf\J\J\J terest in a well established manufac- 
turing business; centrally located; an article handled 
by all grocers ; purchaser to act as salesman. Address 
Box 3 Grocer. (t-f) 

PILUIETOrc POWDERED PERFUMED LYE 

"BELL BRAND" in ■ -lb. tins. 

Dillon & Co.'s Baking Soda 

" BELL BRAND " in «-lb. packages. 
Ask your wholesale grocer for them. 




E 




TAPIOCA 
PLEASES! SELLS! 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 



YES, 

RAINBOW 

COFFEE 

IS 

MOST 

DELICIOUS 



HAVE YOU TRIED IT? 




PURE GOLD HFG.CO 



3! §33 FRONT ST. EAST. 
TORONTO. 



sell at 9 to ioc, while Ontario, undressed, 
bring 8 to ioc. Ontario geese are worth 
from 7 to 8c. 

There is quite an improvement in the 
tone of the butter market. Quotations to- 
day are from 15 to 22c, as to quality. 

Eggs are moving easily. Strictly fresh 
laid stocks bring as high as 40c, and meet 
ready sales. Limed can be had for 15c, 
and case for 16c. 

There is very little doing in green fruit. 
The stocks are small and demand only fair. 

Molasses remains without any special 
feature. There are no fresh arrivals, and 
prices remain unchanged. 

The demand for dried fruit during the 
holiday season was only fair. Trade is quiet 
at present. 

There is nothing to note in breadstuff's, 
except that stocks remain light. The de- 
mand is fairly satisfactory. 

Canned goods are being more sought 
after, particularly in fruit. 

George McLellan has the contract to sup- 
ply the Halifax gaol and county poor farm 
with beef. 

Some few weeks ago it was noted that W. 
Wheatly had left for the States, and that 
the sheriff had charge of the business known 



as the Halifax Produce and Fruit Co. Mr. 
Wheatly has returned and announces that 
the business will be carried on at the corner 
of Sackville street and Bedford Row. 

The Halifax Confectionery and Baking 
Co., Ltd., has suspended. Dull business is 
the cause assigned. James M. Henderson 
is the manager. A number of leading Hali- 
fax men are shareholders in the concern. 

The Germans arrived here this week to 
engage in the business of smoking herrings 
and salmon for the American market. 

It is stated that a New York man has 
been in Halifax several days in connection 
whh a large fish combine proposed to be 
organ ; zed, with headquarters at New York 
and connections at Boston, Gloucester, 
Halifax and Yarmouth. It is the aim of the 
promoters to get the principal fish mer- 
chants of these places to join the combine. 
Beside the fresh fish landed by Gloucester 
vessels the combine propose to receive fresh 
mackerel, salmon and lobsters direct from 
the Mariiime Province?, by way of a fast 
line of steamers direct from Halifax and Yar- 
mouth and other ports. Refrigerators for 
preserving all kinds of fish and an artificial 
pond for keeping live lobsters would be pro- 
vided. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. W. Brewster, Canadian selling agent 
of Gordon & Dilwonh and J. W. Beards- 
ley's Sons, of New York, will leave on one 
of his periodical eastern trips next week in 
the interest of his firm. He will be away 
about two months, and will go as far east 
as Quebec, and possibly Halifax. 

William McDonald, one of Miner T. 
Foster's popular travelers, has gone with the 
well-known tea house of Rowley & Davies, 
London. He will look after their maritime 
business. 

Mr. C. R. Cooper, of the Toronto Salt 
Works, is this week attending the dairymen's 
conventions in Woodstock and Campbell- 
ford in the interest of the Windsor Salt 
Works. 

Mr. Quetton St. George, for many years 
in the wine and spirit business in Toronto, 
is dead. 

Mr. Geo. E. Tuckett, the tobacco manu- 
facturer, has been elected Mayor of Hamil- 
ton. 

Mr. H. Dawson, of Dawson & Co , To- 
ronto, is this week attending the convention 
of commission merchants in St. Louis, Mo. 



The wide-awake grocer handles B. F. P. 
cough drops. They are put up in fancy 5-lb. 
camsttrs, with glass fronts. 



Nearly every grocer now handles B. F. P. 
cough drops. They pay a good profit and 

soil themselves. 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Pinna ye hear the Slogan? 

If you drink Whisky, drink 



JOHN DEWAR'S SCOTCH 



HONORS AWARDED 



Purveyors by Royal Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Under competition the only Scotch drawn at the Bars of the 
largest Caterers in the World, viz. : Spiers & Pond, Ltd. Diploma 
of Honor and Gold Medal, Edinburgh, 1890 (Highest Award). 



Better Whisky cannot be had 



MEDALS 



Edinburgh 1 

Antwerp . - i 

Anglo-Danish 1 

Cookery i 

Brussels i 

London i 

Melbourne t 

Food (London) 1 

Sportsman i 

Paris 1 

Dunedin i 

Military 1890 



Edinburgh 1890 

London 1890 

Jamaica 1891 

Food 1891 

Tasmania 1892 

Dublin 1892 

Brussels 1893 

Chicago 1893 

Fisheries 1893 

Manchester 1893 

Brewers' Show, Manchester. 1894 



National Trades and Industrial Exhibition, 1894, etc., etc. 



THE COMMERCIAL TRAVELER. 

IN THESE days of enterprise, push and 
energy, says Texas Sandwich, the drum- 
mer has come to be recognized as a 
commercial necessity, and the sensible mer- 
chant greets him as a friend and an essen- 
tial factor in his business relations with 
wholesalers. Those who used to look upon 
the commercial traveler as they did a book 
agent or a lightning-rod peddler, and agree 
that they were nothing but expensive solici- 
tors sent out to worm money from them, a 
service for which the retailers had to pay, 
have entirely disappeared, and he is con- 
sidered a mutual friend who is not only a 
convenience, but a money-saver to the buy- 
ers, for he can see six or eight or a dozen 
merchants and sell them bills with as little 
expense as either of these buyers would be 
at were they compelled to visit the markets 
in person, to say nothing of the loss 
of time which would be occasioned by 
such visits, and thus the expense of buying 
goods is reduced to one-sixth or one-twelfth. 
Then, traveling over the same territory from 
month to month he becomes familiar with 
the interests of his customers, and, with the 
honor and candor which characterizes the 
profession, he may usually be relied upon as 
an adviser and a counselor in the selection 
and purchase of a bill of goods. Black 
sheep have crept into the fold, it is true, as 



in every other profession, and the good have 
had to suffer because of their practices ; but 
the black sheep has had to go, other objec- 
tionable characters have been relegated to 
the rear, and the weeding-out process has 
continued until the great army of knights of 
the grip is now composed of up-to-date busi- 
ness men who seek only legitimate methods, 
and no more gentlemanly, courteous or use- 
ful men can be found in any of the avoca- 
tions of life. 



A WINDOW DISPLAY. 

A novelty ! that is what the grocer needs. 
Something made from stock and simple to 
arrange. We'l, what more novel and easily- 
devised trim could you have than a light- 
house, made up as follows : Take the largest 
washtub you have in stock, and nail it to the 
floor of your window, bottom side upwards. 
On top of the tub place a frame made of 
lumber in circular form, with shelves if you 
like ; to this frame secure packages of soap, 
arranged in pyramidal form, tier above tier. 
On top of these place a barrel cover, then 
stack up cans of oysters and surmount the 
whole with a large pumpkin. The pumpkin 
should be hollowed out and a light placed 
inside. For the floor use green tissue paper, 
streaked with white paint, to imitate the 
water. Try this design — we predict it will 
please you. — Harry Harman. 



A GROCER EARNS A PENSION. 

There is a grocer in Bay City, Mich., that 
merits a life pension from the millers of the 
world, says American Miller. He has 
originated and induced his competitors to 
sign an agreement which, as soon as it goes 
into effect, will confine the city's flour trade 
to the products of the home mills. The 
dealers will be guaranteed a profit of not 
less than 25 cents a barrel in return for their 
agreement to handle only home-made flour. 
Competition is becoming so severe that 
the millers can no longer afford to give the 
flour retailer a profit of 50 cents to $1 a 
barrel on all grades. Unless the local 
dealers give the home mills a chance to 
make a living in the home market they must 
expect them to do a retail business. The 
interests of their own business will drive 
them to do it. 



BLINDNESS OF GROCERS. 

A contemporary says that when a merchant ties up a 
parcel he gives it a weigh. And when he sells on credit a 
parcel of goods to a dead-beat he gives it away. — Cana- 
dian Grocer. 

True, but many grocers won't believe it. 
They don't see it this way. It goes in with 
the bad debt account. Some merchants 
argue that they have to lose some money in 
bad debts ; it might as well be by Jones as 
Smith. And all this time the cash system — 
easy, invigorating, remunerative — is waiting 
to help them get rid of their cumbersome 
credits. — Grocery World. 



CRESCENT BRAND 



BRUNNER, MOND & CO., Ltd, 

NOETHWIOH, ZEUSTa-Ii-A-IN-ID 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



ma BICARBONATE of SODA 

T *ADE MA** 

SODA CRYSTALS 



REFINED and RECRYSTALIZED— The Purest and Cheapest in the Market. 



Of the Finest Quality. 

In Barrels and Drums. 
Orders for direct importation from 
the Wholesale Trade only. 

■wmsrnsr &c HOLZL^iN-nD ziucoiisrTiRiEL^Xj 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 




IF YOD CANNOT SATISFY 



Customers from the stock of Baking Powders you carry 
— and this is a very general complaint with the trade — 
the remedy is simple. Get a supply of JERSEY 

CREAM BAKING POWDER. Pure 
and Sure. 



Lumsden Bros., Hamilton, Ontario 



EWIIG. HEBRON S CO. 

Have Tons 

OF GARRAWAYS 

Recleaned and double sifted. Samples 
and quotations sent on enquiry. 

Trade Mills - - 



WE MAKE. 



FOA]V[ 
YEAST 

The Foam Yeast Co., Ltd. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



Pure, clean, fresh, and always per- 
fectly reliable. 



JTEAS 






New Ceylons and Assams 
in store and arriving. Also 
good values in Japans, Young 
Hysons and Congous. 



JOHN SLOAN & 00. 



Wholesale Grocers 



TORONTO 



NOW IN STORE 




Excellent style and liquor 

10c. to 12c. 



Warren Bros. & Boomer 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

36 and 37 Front St. East, Toronto. 



Excelsior lostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 

Perfecto Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 
London Layers. Black Baskets. 

A full and complete stock of Christmas Fruits. 




wj Write for prices. 

P. M. LAWRASON 

London, Ont. 



T.KINNEAR&GO. 

49 Front St. E., TORONTO. 



Sugars- 

^ AND 



S 



yrups 



Send for samples and quotations. 



Perkins, Inge & Go. 



TORONTO. 



J. W. Lang & Co. 

Have in stock . . . 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Extra." 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Fine." 

Curtice Bros.' " Monroe Brand " 

Strawberries. 
Shredded Codfish, " pkges." 

Very fine. 

J. W. Lang & Co. 

59, 61 and 63 Front T"l,_ _,_._+ _ 
Street East X OxOIi LO. 

We have just received a 
quantity of 

Blue Basket 
Raisins 



too late for Xmas trade. Will 
sell at a very low price. 



SMITH & KEIGHLEY 

9 Front St, E. TORONTO. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MOLASSES MAKING. 

IT IS molasses-making time in Mississippi 
— at once a busy and festive period with 
the farmers and their families — writes a 
Dixon, Miss., correspondent of The Phila- 
delphia Times. To one unused to the art it 
is a sight of some interest, while to the in- 
itiated it seems to be the crowning glory of 
the year's toils and pleasures. 

Of course nothing is done on so extensive 
a scalr as on the Louisiana sugar planta- 
tions. Both the crop and utensils for work- 
ing it up are less imposing, certainly, but 
not less effective. 

Early in the spring the cane is planted by 
laying it in furrows, three or four stalks to- 
gether, continuously, thus producing from 
the " eyes " at the joints a beautiful growth 
of almost impenetrable thickness, but other- 
wise much resembling corn in height and 
foliage. Very little work is required for its 
cultivation. 

Late in the autumn, before frost, men 
may be seen with grubbing hoes taking 
down seed cane. In this case the stalks are 
not stripped or topped, as when prepared 
for the mill, but piled in a heap and covered 
with earth, to remain until spring. If it is 
not a severe winter the stubble may be 
counted upon to furnish a fine crop the next 
year. An acre of cane will easily produce 
400 or more gallons of molasses, and with 
less labor than any other crop ; so that of 
this commodity there is always plenty, what- 
ever else may lack or fail. 

There are few late fruits here, save fox 
grapes and muscadines, those allies of chills 
and fever, so the sugar cane fills a real 
want. 

Children carry it to " teachers " in lieu of 
fruits and flowers, and a girl's popularity may 
sometimes be reckoned by the number of 
stalks she has stacked up in the corner of the 
piazza. Without actually witnessing it one 
can scarcely credit the dexterity with which 
even small boys and girls, armed with dull 
barlows, can peel the hard points, while a 
grown man, arrived at courting age — not al- 
ways synonymous with " years of maturity " 
— considers himself accomplished only when 
he can with a sharp knife peel a six-foot 
stalk completely without cutting it or break- 
ing the strips of bark. Having acquitted 
himself of the performance he rests assured 
of the adoration of all young women and 
very small boys. 

It is quite wonderful what an amount of 
luscious sweetness can be extracted from it 
after it is peeled, cut and split into conveni- 
ent pieces. The art of chewing gracefully 
in the society of her " best young man " is 
one receiving much thought from the coun- 
try lass, while her manner of disposing of 
the discarded " chews " is looked upon by 
bachelors and widowers as offering a key to 
her qualities for housewifery. 

That the exercise is reckoned, physiologi- 
cally, more productive of jaw power than of 



longevity of teeth needs but the proof of 
ocular testimony for confirmation. There is 
seldom seen a full fair set of teeth in the 
South, and this lack has, through cane chew- 
ing, the goober habit and snuff-dipping (the 
last happily becoming defunct), come to be a 
profitable field for the dental fraternity. 

Thus, when molasses-making time rolls 
around and Mr. Jack Frost has begun to 
leave his visiting cards, there is a twinge of 
melancholy in the hearts of the young that 
is not all due to reflection upon the dying 
summer, and they chew faster than ever. 
There is a busy day or so when negroes or 
the farmers' boys strip and top the cane 
chewing madly at every interval of rest ; the 
farmer rigs up the old-fashioned mills, 
cleans more or less thoroughly his evapor- 
ator, and, putting on his gunny-sack apron, 
goes gayly to work. 

Early and late the cane mill is the trysting 
place of all ages and conditions. Each 
comer claims a draft of the juice as it trickles 
from the mill, while the feeders, drivers and 
boilers take frequent pauses and imbibe so 
copiously that one wonders mutely, if unini- 
tiated, sympathetically if one is " to the 
manner born." 

This juice is never known to hurt any 
one, and it will bring roses into pale baby 
faces in a manner to arouse all doctors to 
envy. This is witnessed scores of times. 

Certainly a visit to the cane mill is cal- 
culated to confirm or to cure any taste for 
molasses one may have boasted of pre- 
viously, for it can be the dirtiest place im- 
aginable, and is, no matter how cleanly, un- 
equalled in power to be smeary and sticky. 
Even the odor of the boiling juice is smeary. 

The evaporator is a long, shallow iron pan 
with bars dividing it into compartments. At 
one end may be the fresh juice, while from 
the other is being drawn off molasses. If 
sugar is desired it is boiled very thick and 
put in open barrels to granulate. No 
amount of boiling will render the molasses 
fit for making candy unless it has been pre- 
viously boiled and cooled ; otherwise a cane 
mill would be an ideal place for an old- 
fashioned "candy-pulling." 

At a typical mill visited by the writer 
recently all appointments were of the rudest 
kind. The furnace door and bars were 
home-made ; the odd stool on which the 
boiler sat to skim the syrup, the tall stand 
on which the pine knots flame at night, and 
all barrels, tubs and strainers. Even the 
boiler himself was home-made and plain, 
savoring of old times and no fashions. He 
discoursed to his visitors on politics and the 
church, dipping and skimming and stirring 
the while. Every comer was pressed to 
drink a brimming gourd of juice and carry 
home a jugful of hot syrup for the family. 

Later on, when the resinous odor of the 
pine knots mingles with the rich yet repuls- 
ive savors of the evaporator, when the mill 



has ceased to go round and round and the 
weary mule dreams among his fodder after 
his day's work pulling the ponderous lever, 
there will be fewer sun-bonnets in the group 
and the gourd will pass blithely about, not 
from the juice barrel, but ladling out beer. 
This vile concoction is distilled from the 
skimming, and is the shadow of evils which 
darken the autumn festival. It also brings 
its roses, but they do not adorn the cheeks 
of babes. 



EGG CANDLERS OF NEW YORK. 

A UNIQUE labor organization in New 
York, according to a New York 
piper, is the Egg Candlers' or Egg 
Testers' Union, composed principally of 
East Side Hebrews. It is little talked of 
because it is a closed corporation, and none 
but people who have proved themselves ex- 
perts at the business can be admitted to 
membership. It is one of the oldest labor 
bodies in New York, and was originally 
known as the Egg Candlers' Union, because 
it was organized before the days of gas or 
electric lights, and in those days eg^s were 
tested by holding them before lighted can- 
dles. It required a keen sight and a prac- 
tical eye to detect the first symptoms of the 
advent of the chicken in an egg that had 
been partly hatched and then forsaken by 
some giddy hen, who could not be induced 
to sit on a nest, or to detect the first traces 
of over-ripeness. 

Only about one man out of a dozen can 
make an egg candler, and the egg candlers 
themselves say that egg candlers, like all 
other geniuses, are born, not made. A steady 
hand is required, and for this reason a man 
addicted to excessive use of stimulants could 
not be an egg candler. A plank in the 
constitution of the union provides that no 
person habitually given to the use of intoxi- 
cants can be admitted to membership. The 
members of the Egg Testers' or Egg Cand- 
lers' Union are greitly in demind among 
the dealers in Washington and Fu'ton mar 
kets, and they command good prices. He 
can detect symptoms of addling where or- 
dinary people would pronounce the egg as 
pure as the virgin snow. 



AN •♦IMPERTINENT" GROCER. 

Mrs. Harduppe — John, the grocer from 
where we used to live has found out our 
address. He called with that last year's bill 
and was real impertinent. 

Mr. Harduppe (hotly) — Impertinent, was 
he ? Well, now, we'll let him wait for his 
money. 



All along the line, and way back in the 
cross roads, B. F. P. cough drops hangers 
decorate the counters and shelves of live 
grocers, drawing their customers' attention 
to a seasonable article of undisputed merit. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



MARINE INSURANCE 

The Mannheim Insurance Company 

Grant Open Policies to Wholesale Gro- 
cers and Importers at specially favor- 
able rates. 



Further particulars obtainable by applying 
to Local Agent, or to 

JAMES J. RILEY & SONS 

Managers for Canada Montreal 



Notice 



TO THE WHOLESALE 
TRADE ONLY . . . 
Vnil Tail ftllV PlUR tobaccos duty paid. 

I UU tdU BUJ Sweet Navy Chewing, all sizes, 
25c. to 35c. per lb. Bright Honey Chewing, all sizes, 33c. 
to 43c. per lb. All kinds of Cut Tobaccos, 20c. to 55c. per 
lb., put up in any kind of package or style required. 

CIGARETTES 

All kinds of Cigarettes from $2.50 per i.coo 
to §10 per 1,000. 

CIGARS 

All kinds of Cigars from $13.50 per 1,000 to 
$100 per 1,000. 
Write for samples and prices. Correspondence solicited. 
See price current. 



J. iW. FORTIER 



MANUFACTURER 
141 to 151 
St. Maurice Street 



Montreal 



JAPAN TEAS 



• • 



New 
Season's" 



FROM 13 CTS. UP. 

Best value in Canada to-day. See our travellers or write for samples. 



J. F. RAMSAY & CO. 



WHOLESALE TEA IMPORTERS 



14 and 16 Mincing Lane 



Toronto. 




BOISSEUER'S 



One Tablet makes an excellent Cup of Cocoa. 




A perfectly pure 
compressed . 
Cocoa . . 
Extract 



In boxes 

of one dozen 

20-cent tubes, each 

tube containing 18 

tablets 



ALL LEADING GROCERS KEEP IT. 



WE WANT YOU 



D 



^ 



To keep us in mind for 1896. We will 
try not to let you forget us. It will pay 
you to watch our space each week. Goods 
well bought are half sold. We are con- 
stantly advertising "snaps." Thanking you 
for your patronage of the past year. 



LA PORTE, MARTIN & C1E. 



MONTREAL 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



eX5X 



You will find that 
these packets are the 
most attractive you 
have ever seen and that 
their contents make the 
most delicious TEA 
you have ever tasted — 

TAKE 
THEM 

ON 

and they will make a 

TRADE 
FOR 
YOU!! 



<r X^X 



rfppieton 'a tfndia ff *€ej//on 7ea4 

THE "TAPIR" BRAND. 

SOLD IN LEAD PACKETS 




Agents 



MONTREAL— FRANK MAQOR & Co., 16, St. John Street. 
[TORONTO— THOMPSON & THOMPSON, 18, Front Street East. 





r 



m 



PUREST & BEST 



Windsor Salt 



-..1 11.? J '.I 



m r«D s on 



"WINDSOR 



WfRtOft J*LT ItQKKi T11ND1M 



w$m 



Is manufactured by the "Vacuum" Process, the most modern 
and the best system known to the Salt industry. We use this process 
in order to be able to make the best Salt. 

That we have succeeded in this, is evident by the fact that in 
every City, ; Town and Village in Canada you will find Windsor Table 
Salt coming into general household use. Housekeepers want it and 

you should Keep it in Stock. 

You can order Windsor Table Salt from any wholesale house. 
The WINDSOR SALT WORKS, WINDSOR, ONT. 




WIHOSOR 

TA BLE S ALT 



HIHI14*. JALT W>Hl,Wm HH 



Iff 











THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 



1896 



Will be a 



Banner Year 



for 



I vJU if you will buy and use 



Ceylon Teas 



Ask your wholesale 
grocer for Ceylon Teas. 
They are all GOOD. 



THE /?/J£ OF //V0//7/V /7/V0 CE^O/Y TEA AND THE ECL/PSE OF C////VA TfFf 

1894 I8B4-. I874 . 

1864 







THE ARtA IN EACH CIRCLE REPffE.5E.Kr5 THE QUANTlTV OF TEA CONSUMED IN GRE.AT BRITAIN IN THE YEAR NAMED 

W=M ft£PKES£HTS /NO/0/Y Tztf. \ \ ft£P % /?ESEHrS C£)'LOA Tsa. ■■§ /p£P#£5£/VrJ C////V* 7s/r 



36 



THE CANADIAN* GROCER 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS.COMPROMISES 

CANTWELL & SMITH, a large com- 
mission fish exporting house, St. 
Johns, Nfld., is seriously involved. 
The firm compromised last winter and is 
now unable to pay the dividend that fell due 
in January. The trouble is due to the un- 
remunerative price of fish in the foreign 
market. 

Jos. A. Debien, grocer, Montreal, has as- 
signed. 

G. J. Babcock, grocer, St. John, N.B, has 
assigned. 

W. A. Cardwell, merchant, Cobourg, has 
assigned to A. J. Armstrong. 

J. H. Ross & Son, general merchants, 
are financially embarrassed. 

Thos. B. MtQuarries, general merchant, 
Mabou, N.S., has assigned. 

Mrs. C. Germain, general merchant, has 
compromised at 50c. on the dollar. 

A demand of assignment has been made 
upon S. H. Pigeon, St. Tile, Que. 

E. G. Smith, tea dealer, Stratford, is offer- 
ing to compromise with his creditors. 

John Saunders, grocer, Harriston, has 
made an assignment to F. H. Lamb. 

R. L. Rolls, general storekeeper, Centre- 
ton, has assigned to Richard Tew, Toronto. 

Lena McKlvey, general merchant, Min- 
den, has assigned to E. R. C. Clarkson, To- 
ronto. 

Elie Reberge, general merchant, St. 
Denis, Que., is offering to compromise at 
25c. on the dollar. 

A meeting of the creditors of A. Beauleau, 
general merchant, St. Pacome, Que., is 
called for to-day (Friday). 

L. A. & T. Doan, general storekeepers, 
Dorchester South, have p'aced their estate 
in the hands of VV. Warnock. 

S. H. Frigon, general merchant, St. Tite, 
Que., has assigned, and a meeting of credi- 
tors has been called for 16th inst. 

J. & J. Lugsdin, hats and furs, Toronto, 
have assigned. They owe between $25,000 
and $30,000, and the assets are estimated at 
the same. 

J. H. S. Hoover, grocer, Toronto, has as- 
signed to E. Maybee. The estate is small 
and he is now offering to compromise at 
40c. on the dollar. 

P. T. Haffey, grocer, 200 Queen street 
west, Totonto, has assigned to T. F. Slat- 
tery. Creditors will meet on the 15th. 
Competition in that line of business in the 
neighborhood was too keen for Mr. Haffey. 
CHANGES. 

Chas. Dube is starting a grocery business 
in Montreal. 

The firm name of Bdlentyne, Johnston & 
Co., grocers, Sherbrooke, Que., has been 
changed to R. Johnston & Co. 



J. E. DeWolfe & Co., teas, flour, e:c, 
Kentville, N.S., have sold out their business 
to Ralph H Lamont, form any years in the 
employ of S. S.,Sirong. 

H. S. Law, grocer, Victoria, B.C., has re- 
moved to Wellington. 

Charles Reid, groceries, Ottawa, has sold 
out to J. J. Chapman. 

The Empire Tobacco Co., of Montreal, is 
moving to Granby, Que. . 

T. R. Flood, general merchant, Harrow, 
is to be succeeded Feb. 15 by Clarke & 
Bell. 
PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Sproule & Dawc, grocers, Winnipeg, 
have dissolved. J. S. Dawss continues. 

John Duncan & Co., wholesale teas, 
Montreal, have dissolved. The bu-iness 
will be carried on by John Patterson under 
the o'd firm name. 

Law, Young & Co., general merchants, 
Montreal, have admitted G. D. Law as 
partner. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

J. Z. Forest, grocer, Montreal, has sold 
out. 

M. C. Anderson, grocer, St. Thomas, has 
sold out to R. H. Smith. 

G. F. Marter & Son, mfrs. spices, Toronto, 
have sold out to McKee, Smith & Co. 

The assets of A. Bell & Co., general mer- 
chants, St. Agathe, Que., are to be sold. 

G. H. Jones, jr., general merchant, Slat- 
ington, Que., has sold out to M. Davidson. 

The stock of James Scott & Co., groceries 
and liquors, Halifax, has been sold to J. M. 
Allen. 

The general stock of M. Langanier, St. 
Alban, Que., has been sold at 56c. on the 
dollar. 

James S. Cavanagh, groceries and fruits, 
New Glasgow, has sold out to J. E. Mc- 
Donald. 

The stock, etc., of the estate of W. T. 
Wickham & Co., wholesale grocers, Brant- 
ford, is advertised to be sold by auction 
January 15. 

These stocks have been sold at Suckling's: 
Cross Bros., general merchants, Drayton, 
$2,822, 10 Neill & Small, Fergus, at 60c. on 
the dollar ; boot and shoe stock of George 
Howell, Toronto, $6,300, to Henry Arland, 
Hamilton, at 61^ c. on the dollar. 
FIRES. 

C. C. Wight & Co , grocers, Montreal 
West, have been burned out; insured. 

The general stock of R. N. Reid, Aylwin, 
Que., has been partially damaged by fire 
and water. 

E A. Piche and J. N. Turcotte, general 
merchants, Drummondville, Que., have been 
burned out. 

The stock in fac'ory of Dubord & Co., 
tobacco, etc., Montreal, has been damaged 
by fire and water. 



Charles Lethbridge, grocer and brick 
manufacturer, Brookholm, Ont, has had his 
store burned out. 

DEATHS. 

Robert G. Lindsay, grocer, Halifax, is 
dead. 

W. McEvi:la, general merchant, Roxton 
Falls, Qae., is dead. 

Wm. D. Atkinson, of Atkinson & Switzer, 
Richmond Hdl, is dead. 

Kate Fiendal, general merchant, New 
Germany, N. S., is dead. 



A BURNING RECORD. 

The following table was published by The 
N. Y. Journal of Commerce a few days ago. 
It deals with the fire record in the United 
States and Canada during 1895. The table 
is interesting, if not satisfactory, owing to 
the prominent positionthree Canadian cities 
occupy therein : 

Toronto, Ont., newspaper building, etc $ 750,000 

Toronto. Out., business block 800,000 

Macon, Ga., dry goods stores, etc ■ 715,000 

Halifax, N.S. elevator and dock property 600,000 

Toronto, Ont,, business houses 1,140,000 

New Orleans, La. , cotton yard, etc 500,000 

Kansas City, Mo., packing house 700.000 

Milwaukee, Wis., dry goods store, etc 890,000 

Pasadena, Cat, Hotel Raymond . 500,000 

Ardsmore, I. T., business portion of town 500,000 

Montreal, Que. , tobacco factory 500,000 

San Francisco, Cal., various 1,000,000 

Menomee, Mich., saw mill and lumber 500,000 

Sprague, Wash. , railroad property 1,000,030 

Newark, N.J. , tinware factory 500,000 

Warren, R.I. , cotton mills 1,250,000 

New Orleans, La., rice mills 500000 

New York City, various 1,000,000 

Chicago, 111., several business houses 500,000 



CEYLON IS GAINING. 

Americans use more than 90,000,000 pounds of tea a 
year, nearly all of which comes from China. — N. Y. Com- 
mercial Advertiser. 

Ten years from now Ceylon will give 
China a close rub in the race. She's gaining 
right along. — New England Grocer. 



"SILICO" 

THE UP-TO-DATE 
CLEANING SOAP. 

Cleans quickly and . . . 

DOES NOT SCRATCH 

Try a Three-Dozen Case for $2.26. 

For Sale by Grocers and Druggists. 

Consignments Stored in Bond 

And shipped when sold, to proper addresses. 
Specially convenient for consignments partly 
sold in transit. 



BLAIKLOCK BROTHERS, MONTREAL 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



THE NEW WOMAN 



WON T HAVE OLD TAPIOCAS 



SHE . . 
WANTS 



INSTANTANEOUS 




Champion Fire and 
Burglar-Proof Safes . . 

Made with Solid Welded An- 
gle Iron Frame, Iron Inside 
Doors; 1,000,000 Changes 
Combination Lock. Twelve 
years trial have proven them 
the Best. Fifteen sizes in 
stock. Write for our Price 
List. 

S.S. KIMBALL 
577 Crai? St., Monti-pal, P.Q. 



THE PEOPLE'S 

Building and Loan Association 

(INCORPORATED) 

Head Office - - London, Ont. 



When business is prosperous every merchant should 
put by a regular monthly sum in our Class "A" stock. 
It will be available when you need it most $3 deposit- 
ed monthly is estimated to mature a S500 certificate ia 
yYz years. Larger amounts in like ratio. 

Security, first mortgage loans— the basis of wealth. 

Money loaned to buy a home, to build, to re-model the 
old house or pay off old mortgages. 

Agencies in all the principal towns and cities in 
Ontario 

Write for manuals and name of resident agent in your 
locality. 

Do not delay. It will pay you. 



A GOOD RESOLUTION 



A.D. MDCCCXCVI 

Capture coffee trade by using only 
that 

" MOST EXCELLENT " 




OUR NEW 

BOURBON 



FRENCH 

CREAM 
COFFEE. 




OELICIOUft 

BOUQUET- 



COFFEE 



Cultivated French Plantation Coffee. 

Bourbon for Broahfast, for Banquet, tho Best. 




TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO 



W 



ITCH K LOTH 



The latest and best for cleaning Gold, 
Silver, Brass, Nickel, Copper, Bicycles, 
etc. Retails at 15c. Send small 
sample order. 

Sole Agency tor Canada 

TEMPLE BUILDING, 113a, MONTREAL 



New York Fancy Brand. Have a good light. Use 



Samuel Rogers & Co. Toronto. 



Every Oil known to trade and industry — wholesale. 



Brown & Polsons 

Corn Flour 



With MILK, Excellent for 
CHILDREN AND INVALIDS. 
Makes DAINTY DISHES for 
Breakfast, Dinner & Supper, 

NO PACKET GENUINE WITHOUT 
THESE SIGNATURES— 





SOLE AGENT FOR CANADA, Write for samples and quotations 

JOHN A. ROBERTSON, Board of Trade Building, MONTREAL 

The Gulf of Georgia Cannery 



MALCOLM & WINDSOR, Ltd. 

Sole Proprietors, and Agents for 

"Ice Castle Brand" Canned Salmon 

All salmon packed under the " Ice Castle Brand " are 
guaranteed to be the celebrated Sockeye. 



FACTORY, Stcveston, B.C. 



OFFICE, Vancouver, B.C. 




Free ... 

a handsome Glass 
Jar with . . . 

Tutti Frutti 



Get one from your whole- 
saler. Send postal to us 
for elegant signs to deco- 
rate your window. 



ADAMS & SONS CO, 

11 & 13 Jarvis Street, Toronto 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HALIFAX WEST INDIA TRADE. ALL THE ANNEXATIONISTS DEAD. 



THE following shows the imports of 
sugar at Halifax, together with the 
names of importers and the places 
imported from for 1895, together with the 
imports of previous years : 



IMPORTERS- SUCiAR. 


H. 


T. 


B. 


BAGS 




148 

891 

1,192 

3,484 

911 


259 

111 

9 

1 


5 
' 9,408 
1,754 
274 
77 
378 
45 

251 

448 

2,452 

15,092 


299,510 


G. P. IMitchell & Sons 

A. G. Jones & Co 


10,399 
13,757 




1,807 


Ot-o E. Boak & Co 


2,329 


Walter Mitchell . . 


3,378 


R. I Hurt 


285 
273 
73 


'"2 
7 
25 
28 

442 


200 


H. R. Silver 


1,886 




1,348 


John Taylor &, Co.. . 


1,351 




133 
7,390 


2,944 


Imported from— 


338,909 
137,152 










130,973 


Windward and West India 


2,033 
5,078 


306 
3 


12,801 

82 

378 

1,831 


24,325 




3,656 




34,957 




279 


133 


2,846 




5,000 












Imports previous years— 

1890 


7,390 

13,698 
7.069 
5,507 
3,290 
7,294 


442 

199 
64 
464 
279 
645 


15,092 

3,192 
1.083 
3.500 
9,027 
13,181 


338,909 
137,813 


1891 


222,204 


1892 


276,735 


1893 


240.276 


1894 


353,039 











The following shows ihe imports of mo- 
lasses, with names of importers for 1895, to- 
gether with imports for previous years : 



IMPORTERS— MOLASSES. 


P. 


T. 


B. 


G. P. Mitchell & Sons 


3,845 
1,446 
918 
738 
657 
646 
559 
469 
441 
361 
209 
115 
726 


334 
111 
20 

111 
56 

39 
60 
57 
15 

20 


747 


Geo E. Boak & Co 


183 




150 








63 




79 


H. R. Silver 




Walter Mitchell . 


22 


John Tobin & Co 


90 




31 


R. I. Hart 


415 








110 






Imported from— 


11,130 

6,027 

4,230 

870 


316 
507 


1,890 
372 




1,518 










Imports previous years— 

1890 


11,130 

12,765 
12,893 
9,730 
9.092 
7.978 


823 

839 
1,489 
773 
812 
701 


1,890 
1,828 


1991 


1,066 


1892 


1,772 


1893 


1.212 


1894 


2,096 







The quantity of fish exported from Halifax 
to the West Indies during 1895 was con- 
siderably below that of 1894, as will be seen 
by the following : 



EXPORTS-FISH. 


Qtls. dry 


Barrels 
Pickled. 


Exported to— 


97,650 
67,568 
30,965 
25,573 
21,801 
17,070 


39,876 




9,005 




2,082 




3,557 


Hayti . . 


5,183 










Exports for previous years — 


260,627 

241,539 
247,537 
262,896 
238,807 
300,290 


59,703 
36,983 


1891 


36.170 


1892 . . 


45,773 


1893 ... 


46,206 


1894 


65,124 







RIO COFFEE SHIPMENTS. 

The shipments of coffee from Brazil dur- 
ing December were as follows : From Rio, 
66,000 bags to Europe, 162,000 to United 
States, 18,000 to other countries ; from San- 
tos, 229,000 bags to Europe, 114,000 to 
United States ; from Victoria, 18,000 bags to 
United States ; total, 547,000 bags. 



THERE were, until recently, two annex- 
ation newspapers in Canada, or at 
least in Ontario, namely The Goderich 
Signal and The Simcoe Reformer. The 
editors and publishers of these papers, 
"Dan" McGillicuddy and Hal B. Donly, 
are personally two of the most popular of 
the fraternity among their fellow journalists, 
both being thorough good fellows, and have 
had to stand lots of chaff for what they have 
always been careful to designate as their 
"Continental union" views. It carries 
special gratification therefore through the 
ranks of the Ontario Press Association to 
note how The Signal and The Reformer 
take the war scare. Brother McGillicuddy 
in The Signal says : 

The duty of Canadians is plain, whether 
they be Grits or Tories, colonists or conti- 
nentalists. They all love the land in which 
their lot is cast, and where the remains of 
their loved ones lie, and rather than yield 
one foot of the sacred soil to the armed foe- 
man they are prepared to march to the music 
of The Maple Leaf Forever, and defend 
fair Canada, if necessary, until the last man 
dies in the last ditch. 

Mr. Donly in The Simcoe Reformer an- 
nounces himself with equal vigor thus : 

Three years ago many Canadians would 
have cheerfully voted for union with the 
United States, to-day we believe no differ- 
ence of opinion exists from one end of Can- 
ada to the other. War will not be discredit- 
ably avoided. The voice of England is the 
voice of Canada. Conscious that we are 
right and that the opinion of the whole 
civilized world is with us and adverse to the 
United States, strong in the fact that with us 



it will be a war in defence of all we hold dear 
— freedom, home and native land — we will 
resist to the last the advance of enemies, be 
they of our blood and language, or no. 

It is an ill wind that blows no good, and 
Cleveland's ill wind tends at least to solidify 
Canadian patriotism. — Ottawa Journal. 



A NEW DEPARTURE. 

Messrs. Britten & Bradshaw, of 48 and 
50 Lombard street, Toronto, who have suc- 
ceeded in establishing an enviable reputa- 
tion as manufacturers of popcorn and chew- 
ing gum, have decided to manufacture licor- 
ice. 

They have made many additions to their 
factory in the shape of the latest improve- 
ments in machinery from England and the 
United States, and will be prepared in a 
very short time to put on the market all the 
different grades of flexible and pure licorice. 

Having entered into this business the firm 
intend to thoroughly establish for their goods 
a reputation second to none. [Advt. 



CANADIAN BUTTER FOR JAPAN. 

Mr. Robt. Scott, of Shoal Lake, has left 
for Japan, with a large consignment of but- 
ter, which he manufactured at his own 
creamery. He tailed for the Flowery King- 
dom on the 5th, and will be accompanied by 
Mrs. Scott. Mr. Scott, according to The 
Winnipeg Free Press, is the leading butter 
maker of Manitoba, and has shipped the 
product of his factory to nearly every part of 
the world. 



An Endless 
Belt ... 

15 LIFE INSURANCE 

which will bring back all you put on 
it. Its'value in keeping the wheels 
moving and equalizing the strain on 
business men is more or less recog- 
nized, yet not so fully appreciated as 
it should be and will be. For full 
"particulars of a Model Policy send 
to the . . . 

Confederation Life Association 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO 



GASPE DRY CODFISH, GREEN COD- 
FISH, N.S. AND C.B. HERRING 

B.C. Salmon, Canned Lobsters, Mackerel and 
Blueberries, Nfld. and Gaspe Cod Oil 

CLARETS 

Alex. Andreae Kraay & Co 's very fine old Clarets 

BASS' ALE 

The Bugle Brand is the best imported 

GUINNESS' STOUT 

Bulldog Brand, the highest grade bottled 
Cockburn & Co.'s Very Old Highland Whisky 

SPECIAL LIQUEUR WHI8KY 



J, & R. McLEA, 23 Common St. 



MONTREAL 



no s v o a ot.a FIBRED CODFISH 



REPRESENTS the highest achievement in 
the art of curing and preparing Codfish ready 
for cooking. 

NOTHING is used in this product but the 
finest of shore Codfish especially cured and 
dried for it. 



EVERY particle of skin and bone being re- 
moved and the water evaporated, there is 
absolutely no waste. The contents of each 
package, therefore, is worth to the house- 
keeper about three times its weight in Cod- 
fish as ordinarily sold. 



THE disagreeable odor usually considered 

to be a necessary evil to be endured while 

cooking Codfish will be found to be entirely 

lacking in this. 

DADI/CD C A l/l UC B Ofl Curers and Dealers in Fish 
rAnrXtn, CAM PIO Ot UU. for Home and Export Trade 



PUT UP in half-pound cartons, 3 doz. car- 
tons to the case, and sold by the wholesale 
and retail grocers throughout Canada. 



YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 



flllllllMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIffillll^ 




Condensed Mince Meat 



Guaranteed 

First-class. 



PURE 

WHOLESOME 

DELICIOUS 

For sale by all wholesalers, and put up by 



IIH 



« 



i 



J. H. WETHEY, 



St. Catharines i 



miiiiiiiHiiiiiiii: 



| CAUSES OF FAILURE 

•* In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. 

As long as there are failures, subjects that furnish 
information how to prevent them will always be 
timely. We have published, in pamphlet form, 
three admirable papers on the above topic, in which 
Over-Stocking, Expense, Capital, Credit, Dis- 
counts, Buying, etc., etc., are ably discussed. We 
will mail the whole three essays *\VZ g-r% 4- 
to any address on receipt of ^D CdlTS 

HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto 

Onion Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

OF PORTLAND, MAINE 



Only Company whose Policy Contracts 
are governed by the statutes of the . . . 

NIQlriE NONFORFEITURE LAW 

WALTER I. JOSEPH, Manager 

Room 2, 162 St. James Street, Montreal 




It's 
Natural 

to suppose, when we are mak- 
ing satisfactory shipments to 
our present customers, that we 
can do the same for you ; isn't 
it ? It's also natural that we 
should wish to increase our 
business, and would like to 
have your trade. We sell Salt in 
car lots. When you want any- 
thing in salt write US. 




The Toronto Salt Works 

128 Adelaide Street East 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Toronto Agents for the Windsor Salt Works. 



THE 



Sydenham Glass Co. of Wallaceburg 

Limited 




WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Prescription Ware 

Flasks and Liquor Bottles 
Celebrated Beaver 

Fruit Jars, Jelly Jars 



PRIVATE MOULDS A SPECIALTY 



OILS 
OVALS 
SALADS 
SAUCE 



BOTTLES 



PICKLES 
PANELS 
BEER and 
MINERAL 



We make bottles of extra weight to order. We invite inquiry 
relative to lettered ware and bottles from private moulds 
Prompt attention to orders and inquiries. 
Mention this journal. 

Toronto Representative : G. A. McC ANN. 208 Dundas St. 
Tees & Persse, Winnipeg, Martin & Robertson, Vancouver and Victoria, 

Agents for Manitoba and Northwest Territories. Agents for British Columbia . 



Fine Fruit Tablets 



ENGLISH FORMULA 
TABLETS 

Have been our specialty 
and have been a success. 
Packed in elegant Flint 
Glass Jars, large glass 
stopper, the finest pack- 
age in the Dominion. 
Also in round jars, similar 
to English, but made two 
inches shorter to fit the 
ordinary shelf. A large 
variety. List of flavors 
and prices on application. 




G. J. HAMILTON 
SONS 

PICTOU, N.S. 




40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



ARE YOU HANDLING THEM ? 



14 



lobinson's Patent Barley 



AND 



Vinson's Patent Groats 



ARE BEING ASKED FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND, 



They are the Standard Foods for Infants and Invalids. 




Toronto, Jan. 9, 1896. 

This list is corrected every Thursday. The 
prices are solicited for publication, and are 
for such qualities andquantities as are usually 
ordered by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt pay are 
generally obtainable at lower prices. 

All quotations in this department are under 
the direct control of the Editor, and are not 
paid for or doctored by any manufacturing oi 
jobbing house unless given under their name, 
the right being reserved to exclude such firms 
as do not furnish reliable information. 
BAKING POWDER 

Snow Drift - 
% lb. tins, 4 doz. in case per doz. 



1 00 

1 75 

3 00 

20 

20 



*0 75 



1 "2 " " 2 00 

3 " 1 " " 6 50 

5 " % " " 10 00 

10 lb. boxes per lb. 16 

301b. pails " 16 

Dominion— 
'/£ lb. tins, 4 doz. in case per doz 

% " 2 ■; ;; 

1 " 2 

10 lb. boxes per lb 

30 lb. pails " 

pure gold. per doz 
1 5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

lb. cans, doz. in 

case 16 00 

1 2% lb. cans, 1 and 2 

1 doz. in case 10 50 

1 16 oz. cans, 1, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 4 60 

1 12 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 60 

| i oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. Is case 2 40 

'6 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 1 80 

4 oz. cans, 4 and 6 doz. in case 1 25 

10 cent can ° *• 

Cook's Friend— 

Size 1, in 2 and 4 doz. boxes * * *9 

" 10, in 4 doz. boxes 2 10 

" 2,in6 " 



^*m?.to 






80 



" 12, in 6 doz. boxes 7C 

" 3, in 4 " 45 

Pound tins. 3 doz. in case 3 00 

oz. tins, 3 doz. in case 2 40 

oz. tins, 4 " 1 10 

ilb. tins, % doz. in case 14 00 

Q, F. MARTER & SON. 

Barton's Baking Powder— per doz. 

1 lb. sealer jars, 2 doz. in case $ 2 25 

1!4 lb. jelly jars, 2 doz. in case 2 25 

■4 lb. " 2 " " 1 25 

2 lb. fancy enamelled tins, 2 doz 2 75 

1 lb. tins, 2 doz. in case 2 00 

%lb. " 3 " " 1 V 

'41b. " 4 " " 75 

Gold Medal— per lb 

'4 lb. paper package, 10 lb. in box 12 

%lb. •' .... 12 

lib. .... 12 

W. H. GILLARD & CO., PROPRIETORS. 

Diamond— 

% lb. tins, 4 oz. cases 67% 

% lb. tins, 3 doz. cases 1 17 

1 lb. tins, 2 doz. cases 1 98 

I.UMSDEN BROS.' 

Boston Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins. . . *1 23 

Standard Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins.. 1 50 

Jersey Cream B'kg Powder, %-lbs... 75 

%-lbs.. 1 25 

1-lbs.. 2 25 

BLACKING. 

DAY & MARTIN'S BLACKING. 

Paste. (Boxes of 3 doz. each, per gross. 

No. 1 size (4 gross to a case) * 2 40 

No. 2 size 3 " " 3 30 

No. 3 size 3 " " 5 00 

No. 4 size 2 " " 6 85 

No, 'size 2 " " 9 00 

Embos'd97 4 " " 6 00 

Liquid. per do?. 

Pints, A (6 doz, per bbl) $330 

% " B 9 " " 2 25 

% " C15 " " 1 25 

Russet Paste. (3 doz. in box) per gross. 

No. 1. In tins $ 3 75 

"2. " 5 65 

" 3. " 7 85 

Russet Cream. (1 gross cases) per doz. 
No. 1. In bottles (080 



No. 1. 
'.' 2. 

" 3. 



ottles 1 60 

190 

2 60 

Polishing Paste. 
(3 doz. in box) per gross. 

In bottles $3 75 

5 65 

7 85 

Polishing Cream. 

(1 gross cases) per doz. 

In bottles SO 80 

1 35 



2 25 

1 90 

per doz. 



No. 1. 

" 2. 

" 3. 

In Metal Tubes 

Ivorine. 
Small. In patent stoppered bottles, 

sponge attached $0 80 

No. 1. " 1 35 

" 2. " per gross. 25 00 

p. o. FRENCH blacking. per gross 

"4 No. 4 «4 00 

'4 No. 6 4 50 

% No. 8 7 25 

% No. 10 8 25 

P. G. FRENCH DRESSING. per doz. 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box $2 00 

No. 4, 1 or 2 doz. in box 1 25 

per gross. 
900 



CROWN PARISIAN DRESSING. 



BLACK LEAD. 

Kerkiu s Black Lead, per box $1 15 

Each box contains either 1 gross, 1 
oz., % gro, 2 oz., or % gro. 4 oz. 

per gross. 

Silver Star Stove Paste $9 00 

Dixon's Carburet of Iron Stove 

Polish, 70c doz 7 20 

BLUE. 

KEEN'S OXFORD. peril). 

1 lb. packets $0 17 

% lb. " 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 12-lb. box 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 5 box lots 16 

CORN BROOMS 

CHAS. BOECKH & SONS. 

Carpet Brooms— 
" Imperial," extra fine, 8, 4 strings. 
7, 4 strings. 
" " 6, 3 strings 



per doz- 

net. 
S3 65 
3 45 
3 25 



" Victoria,' 



" Standard, 
' Standard, 



tine, No. 8, 4 strings. . 

7, 4 strings. . 

6, 3 strings, 

8, 4 strings. . 

7, 4 strings. . 
6. 3 strings.. 
5, 3 strings. . 

GOODS. 



select, 
select 



3 30 
3 10 
2 90 
2 90 
2 75 
2 60 
2 40 



CANNED 



per doz. 

A pples, 3s *0 85 S095 

gallons .*... 2 00 2 25 

Blackberries, 2 1 75 2 00 

Blueberries, 2 90 1 10 

Beans, 2 75 95 

Corn, 2's 75 95 

Cherries, red pitted, 2s 200 2 25 

Peas, 2 s 90 95 

" Sifted select 1 05 1 10 

" Extra sifted 145 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 1 65 1 75 

" 3's 2 40 

Pineapple, 2's 1 75 2 40 

3's 2 40 2 50 

Peaches, 2's 1 90 2 20 

3s 2 65 3 00 

Plums, Green Gages, 2'« 185 2 00 

" Lombard 160 175 

" Damson Blue 1 60 1 75 

Pumpkins, 3's 085 090 

gallons 2 10 2 25 

Raspberries, 2's 1 40 2 00 

Strawberries, choice, 2's 1 90 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 1 15 

Tomatoes, 3's 080 095 

Lobster, tails 1 75 2 25 

Hats 2 30 2 60 

Mackerel 110 120 

Salmon, Sockeye, tails 135 140 

Hats 1 55 1 75 

Cohoes 1 15 1 20 

Sardines, Albert, Vi's tins 13 

'4 8 tins .... 20 21 
Sportsmen, %'sgenu- 
ine French high grade, key 

opener 12% 

Sardines, key opener, %'s 10% 

" Exq. fine Fr'ch, k.o.p. %s 11 11% 

'2s 10% 11 

%s 18% 19 

Sardines, other brands 9% 11 16 17 

P. St, C, %'s tins .... 23 26 

" " %'• " .... 33 8 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



41 



Canada 

Prepared 

Corn. 

Silver Gloss. 

Satin Starch. 

Rice Starch. 



When you buy 





STARCH 




See that you get the 
right thing. You can't 
go wrong if you have any of our lines. 



Edwardsburg Starch Co. o* <** 



»• 

t 

? 

; 
; 

t 

t 
t 
t 

; 



; 



■a- .... 04V 
%'s " .... 09 
Mustard, % size, cases 
50 tins, per 100 10 00 

MARSHALL & CO., SCOTLAND 

Fresh Herring, 1-lb 1 10 

Kippered Herring, lib 1 65 

Herrings in Tomato Sauce — 170 

Herrings in Shrimp .Sauce 2 00 

Herrings in Anchovy Sauce . . 2 00 

Herrings a la Sardine 2 40 

Preserved Bloaters 1 8a 

Real Findon Haddock 1 8o 

CANNED MEATS. 

(CANADIAN.) 

$1 40 

2 40 



7 75 
16 00 



Coinp Corn Beef 


1-lb. cans 
2 


Minced Callops 


6 
14 

2 "' 


Lunch Tongue 


1 


English Brawn 
Canib Sausage 


2 
1 


Soups, assorted 


1 


Soups and Boull 


2 

6 




. 09 

11 

11 00 

1 15 
1 90 
1 90 



1 90 
1 90 



$1 50 
2 55 

825 
18 00 
2 60 

2 65 

3 50 
6 00 
2 80 
2 50 

4 00 

1 50 

2 25 
1 80 
\ 50 



Acme 
Sliced 
Beef. 

No, 1 tins, 
key, 2doz., 
per doz. $2.50. 

Beardsley's 
Boneless per 
Herring, doz 

2 do?..... 1 4 



2 60 

3 40 



2 75 



Codfish. 

Beardsley's Shredded, 2 doz. pkga 




CHEWING GUM. 

adams & sons CO. per box 

Tutti Frutti, 36 5c bars $1 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 23 5c packages . . 75 
Pepsin Tutti Fnuti, in glass-covered 

boxes, 23 5c packages 80 

Horehound Tutti Frutti, glass tops, 36 

5c packages 1 20 

Cash Register, 3905c bars and pkgs . . 15 00 
Tutti Frutti Show Case, 180 5c bars 

and packages 5 50 

Glass Jar with Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 

115 5c packages 3 75 

Tutti Frutti Girl Sign Box, 160 5c 

bars and packages 6 00 

Tutti Frutti Cash Box, 160 5c bars 

and packages 6 00 

Variety Gum (new), 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Orange Blossom, 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Flirtation Gum, 150 lc pieces 65 

Monte Cristo, 180 lc pieces 1 30 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c bars 1 20 

Sappota, 150 lc pieces 90 

Orange Sappota, 160 lc pieces 75 

Black Jack, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Rose, 115 lc pieces 75 

Magic Trick, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Spruce Chico, 200 lc pieces 1 00 

CHOCOLATES & COCOAS. 

cadbury's. per doz. 

Cocoa essence, 3 oz. packages $1 65 

per lb, 
Mexican chocolate, % and % lb. pkgs. 40 

Rock Chocolate, loose 37% 

1-lb. tins 40 

Cocoa Nibs, 11-lb. tins 40 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO .'s. 

Chocolate— per lb. 

French, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Caraccas, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 35 

Premium, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Sante, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond. %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 22 

Sticks, gross boxes, each 1 00 

Cocoa- 
Homeopathic, %'s, 8 and 14 lbs. . 30 
Pearl, T ' " " " . . 25 
London Pearl, 12 and 18 " . . 22 

Rock 30 

Bulk, in boxes 18 

per doz. 

Royal Cocoa Essence, packages 1 40 

Cocoa— epps . per lb. 

Case of 112 lbs. each 5i 

Smaller quantities 37% 



FRY'S. 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents.) 

Chocolate— per lb. 

Caraccas, %'s, 6-lb. boxes 42 

Vanilla, %'s 42 

"Gold Medal " Sweet, 6 lb. bxs. . 29 

Pure, unsweetened, %'s, 15 lb. bxs. 42 

Fry's "Diamond," %% 61b. bxs. 24 

Fry's " Monogram," %'s, 6 lb. bxs. 24 
Cocoa — per doz 

Concentrated, %'s, 1 doz. in box. . 2 40 

%'s, " 

libs. " 

Homeopathic, %s, 14 lb. boxes . . 33 

V 2 lbs. 12 lb. boxes. 33 

JOHN P. MOTT & CO.'S. 

(R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott's Broma peril). 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homeopathic Cocoa (%'s) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa (in tins) 45 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate 28 

Mott s Caraccas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate 22 

Mott's French-Can Chocolate 18 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Chocolate . . 27 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 35 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 05 

Vanilla Sticks, per gross 90 

Mott's Confectionery Chocolate. 21 43 

Mott's Sweet Chocolate Liquors. 19 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Hygienic Cocoa, % lb. tins, per doz. . $3 75 

Cocoa Essence, % lb. tins, per doz. . 2 25 

Soluble Cocoa, No. 1 bulk, per lb 20 

Diamond Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb. cake, per lb 22% 

Royal Navy Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb. cake, per lb 30 

Mexican Vanilla Chocolate, 12 lb. 

boxes, % lb. cake, per lb 35 

WALTER BAKER & CO. '8 

Chocolate — 

Premium No. 1, boxes, 12 lbs. each.. 42 

Baker's Vanilla in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 50 

Caraccas Sweet, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. 37 
Vanilla Tablets. 416 in box, 24 boxes 

in case, per box, net 4 20 

German Sweet Chocolate- 
Grocers' Style, in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 25 
Grocers' Style, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. . 25 
Eight cakes to the lb., in bxs, 6 lbs. e. 25 

Soluble Chocolate— 

[n canisters, 1 lb.. 4 lb. and 10 lb 50 

Breakfast Cocoa— 

n bxs, nd 12 lbs, each, % lb., tins, 49 



COFFEE. 

Green . 

per lb, 

Mocha 28 30 

Old Government Java 30 33 

Rio 20 21% 

Plantation Ceylon 29 31 

Porto Rico 24 28 

Guatemala 24 26 

Jamaica 21 22 

Maracaibo 21 23 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO. S 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey " o 30 

Laguaya " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 28 30 

Santos 25 27 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum §0 02 $0 03 

Blue Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstone 03 03 1 /. 

Borax o 10 12 * 

Camphor 80 85 

Carbolic Acid 25 50 

Castor Oil, 1 oz. bottle, p. gross 4 20 

2 .... 6 00 

3 .... 8 40 

4 .... 10 00 

%pint " " .... 12 00 

Olive Oil, % pts,, 2 doz. to case, 

per case 1 25 

pints, 2 doz. to case 

per case 2 50 

Epsom Salts 02 02% 

Extract Logwood, bulk 13 14* 

" boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 13 

Glycerine, per lb 17 18 

Hellebore 16 17 

Iodine 5 50 6 00 

Insect Powder 26 30 

Saltpetre 08% 09 

Sochi, Bicarb, per keg 2 75 2 90 

Sal Soda 1 00 1 26 

Madder 12% .... 

EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold, No. 8, per doz $0 75 

" 1, 1% oz.... 1 25 

" 2. 2 oz 1 75 

3, 3oz 2 00 



42 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUY IjPTON S 



AWARDED TWWGHEM H0N0R3AT THE WORID) FAIR.! 
5UPgjED UNDER SPECIAL ROYAL WARRANT TO 






«^ Over 1,000,000 

*^* * Packages Bold weekly 

UPTON'S 

Delicious Teas 

possess that most delicate 
flavor and'exquisite aroma 
peculiar to the choicest 
growths of Ceylon and 
India. . . . 

They are put up in one 
pound and half-pound 
tight package", and retail- 
ed at 30. 40. and 50c. per 
pound. Reasons why you 
Should Bell LiptOn'S Teas: 
Because everybody likes 
them. They have the lar- 
gest sale in the world. 
They will increase your 
trade. You can buy from the 
following wholesale agents : 
Caverhill, Hughes Co., Montreal 
H. H. Brennan & Co., 
W. G. Craig & Co., 
Balfour & Co., - 
A. M. Smith & Co., - 
T. Kenny & Co., - - 



Ottawa 

Kingston 

Hamilton 

London 

■ Sain i a 



Chief Offices: City Road, Lou ion, England. 

United States Offices : 80 Front St., New York. 



L I PTO N TEA PLANTER 

CEYLON 



Batty's 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦ 




BOB 



PICKLES 

and 

SAUCE 



♦♦♦♦♦♦•»♦♦♦■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Are unquestionably the finest and 
most enjoyable in the world. Have 
been awarded 



ALL WHOLESALERS 
HAVE THEM. 



. . EIGHT PRIZE MEDALS 



Canadian Agents 



J. A. GORDON & CO. 

. . . Montreal 



s torekeepers 

who cater to a coun- 
try trade must keep 

Salt 



to suit their custom- 
ers. 

A MEDIUM GRAIN SALT 

is what farmers re- 
quire. We sell it. 



The Canada 
Salt Association 



CLINTON, ONT. 



BROOMS . . . 

R 

O 

O 

M 

3 



OUR BRANDS : 

Imperial Gold Medal Victoria 

Bamboo Carpet Standard Leader 

A variety of sizes in each line. Give us a trial order. 

Freight allowed to Ontario points in 5 doz. lots. 



CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers. TORONTO, ONT. 



S^^Qi^Sffl^^KfeH' 



CONFIDENCE 

in the merits of the goods you sell is an important element of success. 

JOHNSTON'S 

FliOlD BEEF 

rf( can always be sold with the most absolute guarantee that it is the best beef § 
& preparation. We will back you up in this statement to the fullest extent. K 



i 
1 




THE JOHNSTON FLUID BEEF CO. 



MONTREAL, 




THE CANADIAN GROCER 



43 



WHY DON'T YOU 

Push Butter Crackers in 3-pound packets ? The biggest package of biscuits on 
earth to retail at 25 cents. Try a few packages. It is twice the size of a three- 
pound box of Sodas and costs the same. 



The Toronto Biscuit & Confectionery Co. 



Henry C. Fortier. 



7 FRONT STREET EAST, TORONTO. 



Charles J. Peter. 



Crown Brand ( Oreig & Co.)— 

1 oz. London gross 6 00 

2 " Anchor.... " 12 00 

1 '• Flat Crown " 
2 

2 " Square .... M 
2%" Round .... " 

4 oz. Glass Stopper doz 




10 80 
18 00 
21 00 
24 00 
3 50 
7 00 

Parisian Essence gross 21 00 

Ketchup, Fluted Bottles . . . .gross 12 00 

Screw Top " 21 00 

S.&L. "High Grade" 

per doz 3 50 

Pepper Sauce, per gross 15 00 

FLUID BEEF. 

JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL. 

Fluid Beef— No. 1, 2 oz. tins $ 3 00 

No. 2, 4 oz. tins 5 00 

No. 3, 8 oz. tins 8 75 

No. 4, lib. tins 14 25 

No. 5,21b. tins 27 00 

Staminal— 2 oz. bottles 3 00 

4oz. " 6 00 

8 oz. " 9 00 

16 oz. " 12 75 

Fluid Beef Cordial— 20 oz. bottles. . . . 15 00 

Milk Granules, in cases, 4 doz 6 00 

Milk Granules with Cereals, in cases, 

4 doz 5C 

FRUITS. 

FOREIGN. 

per lb. 
Currants— Provincials, bbls . . 04 04V4 
%bbls .. 04V. 04% 

Filiatras, bbls 04% 04% 

% bbls . . 04% 04% 

i, obis 04% 05 

J / 2 bbls 04% 05 

005 



7* 
Patras, bbls. 04% 05 

" 6 05-/0 
Vostizzas, cases 05% 07% 



cases 



Panarete, cases 08 



o vt 72 
08% 

Dates, Persian, boxes 04% 05% 

Figs— Eleme, 14 oz 09 10% 

" 101b 09% 12% 

" 18 lb 13 15 

28 lb 16 



03% 
Prunes— Bosnia, cases 05% 



taps 



Bordeaux 04 : 

Raisins— Valencia, off stalk.. 04 : 

Fine, off stalk 05 

Selected 06 



18 
04 
07 
06% 
04% 
05% 

ieieccea uuo 06-a 

Layers 06% 

Sultanas 05% 08 

Cal. Loose Musca- 
tels 50 lb. boxes . . 05% 06% 
" Malaga— per oox. 

London Layers 2 00 2 20 

Black Baskets 2 75 3 20 

Blue Baskets 3 25 3 50 

Choice Clusters 3 25 3 50 

" Dehesa Clusters 4 25 4 50 

Royal Clusters 5 00 5 25 

" Buckingham Clusters 4 50 

Non Plus Ultra Clusters .... 6 50 

" Royal Windsor Clusters 6 50 

Lemons — Messina, boxes 3 50 4 00 

Malagas, half chest.. 5 00 6 00 

boxes 2 50 3 00 

Oranges— Jamaica, fncy in bxs 5 00 5 50 

" Jamaica, choice, boxes 4 75 5 00 

Cal. Navels, in boxes.. 4 25 5 00 

" Mexican, in boxes 5 50 6 00 

Jamaica, in bbls 9 00 9 50 

DOMESTIC. 

Apples, dried, per lb 04 05 

evaporated 07 07% 

FOOD. 

per brl. 

Split Peas $3 50 

Pot Barley 3 75 

Pearl Barley, XXX 6 50 

ROBINSON'S BARLEY AND GROATS. 

per doz. 

Patent Barley, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

Groats, % lb. tins '. 1 25 

" lib. tins 2 25 

HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 
Cut Nails— From Toronto— 

50 to 60 dy basis 2 50 

40 dy 2 55 

dy 2 60 



20 16 and 12 dy 2 65 

10 dy 2 70 

8 and 9 dy 2 75 

6 and 7 dy 2 90 

5 dy 3 10 

4 dy A P 3 10 

3dyAP 350 

4dyCP 300 

3 dy C P 4 10 

Horse Nails— 

Canadian, dis. 55 per cent. 
Horse Shoes— 

From Toronto, per keg 3 60 

Screws— Wood— 

Flat-head iron, 80 p. c. dis. 
Round-head iron, 75 p. c. dis. 
Flat-head brass, 77% p. c. dis. 
Round-head brass, 72% p. c. dis. 
Window Glass. [To find out what break 
any required size of pane comes under, 
add its length and breadth together. 
Thus in a 7x9 pane the length and breadth 
come to 16 inches, which shows it to be a 
first-break glass, i.e. not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in. and under) 1 15 

2nd " 20 to 40 inches) 130 

3rd " (50 to 60 inches 2 90 

4th " (51 to 60 inches 3 20 

5th " (61 to 70 inches) 3 50 

Rope— 

Manilla 09% 09% 

Sisal 07 07% 

Per box 6 00 12 00 

Shot— 

Canadian, dis, 17% per cent. 

Hinges— 

Heavy T and strap 04% 05 

Screw, hook and strap .... 03% 04 

White Lead — Pure Association guarantee, 
ground in oil. per lb. 

25 lb. irons 04% 

No. 1 04% 

No. 2 04% 

No. 3 04 

Turpentine— 

Selected packages, per gal. 39 41 

Linseed Oil— 

Raw, per gal 58 

Boiled, " 61 

Glue— 

Common per lb 07% 08 

INDUBATED FIBRE WARE. 

THE E. B. EDDY CO. 

% pail, 6 qt $3 35 

Star Standard, 12 qt 3 80 

Milk, 14 qt 4 75 

Round-bottomed fire pail, 14 qt 4 75 

Tubs, No. 1 13 30 

" 2 11 40 

" 3 9 50 

Fibre Butter Tubs (30 lbs) 3 80 

Nests of 3 2 85 

Keelers No. 4 8 00 

" 5 7 00 

" 6 6 00 

" 7 5 00 

Milk Pans 2 65 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 2 65 

" " round bottoms 2 50 

Handy Dish 2 25 

Water Closet Tanks 17 00 

Dish Pan, No. 1 7 60 

2 6 20 

Barrel Covers and Trays 4 75 

Railroad or Factory Pails 4 75 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

SOUTHWELL'S GOODS. 

per doz. 

Orange Marmalade 1 60 

Clear Jelly Marmalade 2 00 

Strawberry W. F. Jam 2 30 

Raspberry " " 2 20 

Apricot " " 2 00 

Blackcurrant " 2 00 

Other Jams " " 155 190 

Red Currant Jelly 3 10 

(All the above in 1 lb. clear glass pots. 

KNOX'S GELATINE. 

Sparkling calves foot 1 20 

Crystalized Fruit, flavored 1 65 

Acidulated 1 50 

(Sold by all wholesale grocers.) 



LICORICE. 

YOUNG & SMYLIES LIST. 

5-lb. boxes, wood or paper, per lb $0 40 

Fancy boxes (36 or 50 sticks) per box . . 1 25 

"Ringed" 5 lb. boxes, per lb 40 

"Acme" Pellets, 5 lb. cans, per can. . 2 00 
"Acme" Pellets, fancy boxes (40) 

per box 1 50 

Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers, 5 lb. 

cans, per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb. glass jars 1 75 

" 5 lb. cans 1 50 

" Purity " Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 

" " 100 sticks 73 

Dulce, large cent sticks, 100 in box... 75 

MINCE MEAT. 
Wethey's Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

COLMAN'S OR KEEN'S. 

Square Tins — per lb 

D. S. F, 1 lb. tins $0 40 

% lb. tins.. 42^ 

% lb. tins 45 

Round Tins— 

F. D., % lb. tins 25 

" % lb. tins 27% 

" 4 lb. jars, per jar 75 

1 lb. " " 25 

" 4 lb. tins, decorated, p.t. 80 
FRENCH MUSTARD. 
Crown Brand— (Greig & Co.) 

Pony size, per gross 9 00 

Small Med. " 7 80 

Medium " 10 80 

Large " 12 00 

Spoon " 18 00 

Mug " 16 20 

Tumbler " 12 00 

Cream Jug " 2100 

RICE, ETC. 

Rice— per lb. per lb. 

Standard " B " 03% 03% 

Patna 04% 

Japan 05 

Imperial Seeta 05% 

Extra Burinah 03% 04 

Java Extra 06'/» 06% 

Genuine Carolina 09% 10 

Grand Duke 06% 06% 

Sago 03% 05 

Tapioca 03% 05% 

Goathead (finest imported) 06% 

STARCH. 

EDWARDSBURG STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches — 

No. 1 White or Blue, cartoons 05% 

Canada Laundry 04% 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. draw-lid boxes 

and fancy packages 07 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. tin c mnisters. . 07 
Edwardsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. 

chromo package 07 

Silver Gloss, large crystals 06% 

No. 1 White, bbls and kegs 04% 

Benson's Enamel, per box 3 00 

Culinary Starch— 

W. T. Benson & Co.'s Prepared 

Corn 07% 

Canada Pure Corn 06% 

Rice Starch— 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White, 1-lb. 

cartoons 09 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White or 

Blue, 4-lb. lumps 07% 

THE BRANTFORD STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches- 
Canada Laundry, boxes of 40 lbs.. 04% 
Finest Quality White Laundry— 

3 lb. cartoous, cases 36 lbs 05% 

Bbls.,1751bs 04% 

Kegs, lOOlbs 04% 

Lily White Gloss- 
Kegs, extralargecrystals,1001bs. 06% 
1 lb. fancy cartoons, cases 36 lbs. 07 
6 lb. draw-lid boxes, 8 in crate 

48 bs 07 

6 lb. tin enamelled cannisters, 

8 in crate 48 lbs 07 

Brantford Gloss— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases 36 lbs. 07% 
Brantford Cold Water Rice Starch— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases281bs 09 

Canadian Electric Starch— 

40 packages in case 3 00 



Culinary Starch — 

Challenge Prepared Corn- 
lib, pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 06% 

No. 1 Pure Prepared Com — 
1 lb. pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 07%, 

KINGSFORD'S OSWEGO STARCH. 




f 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. pkgs., 08% 
SILVER.; 6-lb. boxes, sliding covers 

GLOSS ^ (12-lb. boxes each crate. 08% 

PURE 12-lb. boxes 07% 

OSWEGO i 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. 

CORN STARCH, f packages 07% 

For puddings, custards, etc. 
ONTARIO i 38-lb. to 45-lb. boxes, 

STARCH f 6 bundles .....0 06% 

STARCH IN I Silver Gloss 07% 

BARRELS ! Pure n 06% 

Brown &, Polson's Cornflour. 

J-'b Packages 07 

40-lb boxes j 80 

SUGAR. 

n—.tM.m °- P er lb. 

Granulated 04% 04% 

Paris Lump. bbls. and 100-lb 

bo! < es o 05% 

in 501b. boxes 05% 

Extra Ground, bbls. Icing. ... 05% 05% 

Powdered, bbls 05% 05% 

Extra bright refined 3 i 4 00 

Bright Yellow 03% 3 85 

Medium Yellow 3 60 3 70 

Dark Yellow 03% 3 60 

Raw Demerara o 03'/£ 03% 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 
syrups. per gallon. 

„ , bbls. %bbls. 

P/rk o 30 33 

Medium 33 38 

Bright 38 43 

Redpath s Honey 40 

2 gal. pails, i i6 1 15 

3 gal. pails. 1 45 1 50 
SOAP. 

Babbitt's " 1776 " Soap Powder .... $3 50 




1 Box Lot 5 oo 

5 Box Lot 4 90 

Freight prepaid on 5 box lots. 
p. M. lawrason's soaps. 

Wonderful, 100 bars 54 00 

Supreme, 100 bars , 3 go 

Our Own Electric, 100 bars 2 00 

Sunflower, 100 bars 2 00 

brantford soap works CO. 



OTVW 



Ivory Bar— per box. 
31bB. and 2 6-16 lbs., 60 bars in box $3 30 
13% oz. and 1 lb., 60 bars in box. . 3 30 
12 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 4 00 



44 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



1896 MOTTO 

PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 




ey 



SELLING 



BRANTFORD STARCH 



10 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 3 80 

Twin cake, 11 '/ t oz., 100 cakes in 

box 3 85 

All wrapped with lithographed wrapper, 
printed with finest alkali proof ink. Quota- 
tions of lower grades of all kinds of soap 
furnished on application. 

OUELPH SOAP CO. 

Pure, 60 bars, 12 oz., per box $3 00 

Silver Star, 100 bars, 12 oz., per box. . 4 00 

Royal City, 3-lb. bar, per lb 05 

Peerless, 2'/ 2 -lb. bar 04% 

Genuine Electric, 72 bars, per box 2 50 

TEAS. 

BLACK. 
Congou— per lb. per lb. 

Half Chests Kaisow, Mon- 

ing, Paking 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 035 055 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 18 25 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

CHINA GREENS. 

Gunpowder — 

Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

Young Hyson- 
Cases, sifted, extra firsts. 42 50 
Cases, small leaf, firsts . . 35 40 
Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

Half Chests, seconds .... 017 19 

" thirds 15 17 

" common.... 13 14 
PINO SUEYS. 
Young Hyson— 

Half Chests, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 
JAPAN. 
Half Chests- 
Finest May pickings 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 028 030 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 13% 15 

Nagasaki, '/, chests Pekoe 16 22 

" " Oolong.... 14 15 

•• Gunpowder 16 19 

'• Sittings.... 07'/, 11 



"8ALADA " CEYLON. 

per lb. 

Green label, retailed at 30c 22 

Blue " " 40c 30 

Red " " 50c 36 

Gold " " 60c 44 

Terms, 30 days net. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

British Consols, 4's; Twin Gold 

Bar, 8's 59 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8's 57 

Laurel, 3's 49 

Brier, 7's 47 

Index, 7's 44 

Honeysuckle, 8's 56 

Napoleon, 8's 50 

Victoria, 12's 47 

Brunette, 12s 44 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 48 

" " in 40-lb. boxes 48 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T. & B., 

3's 60 

Lily, 7's 47 

Diamond Solace, 12s 50 

Myrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb. tins 70 

!4-lb. plug, 6-lb. boxes 70 

oz. plug. 5-lb. boxes 70 

CANADIAN TOBACCO CO., MONTREAL. 
Cut Tobaccos — 
, ,-rmvATheo, 1-6, 5 lb. box. . 20 
klfiBwCorDiort, 1-6, 5 lb. box 22 
'Champion,l-10,51b.bx 38 
I. O. F., 1-10. 5 lb. box 28'/, 
Sohmer, 1-10, 5 lb. box 32% 
Imperial Cigarette Tobacco, 1-10, 

5 lb. box 40 

Quesnel Tobacco, all sizes 60 

Crown Cut Plug Mixture, >/, lb. tin 50 
1 lb. tin 47 
Cigarettes — 

per 1,000 

Sonadora Havana 10 00 

Royal Turkish Egyptian 10 00 

Creme de la Crenie 7 50 

Marquise cigarettes, Canadian .... 7 00 
Imperial " " .... 3 50 

Plug tobaccos (sweet chewing)-- 

Navy, in caddies 35 

Navy, plug mark 33 35 

Honey, boxes and caddies 43 

Spun roll chewing, boxes 55 

Plug smoking (with or without tags)— 

per lb. 
Black Crown smoking, in 

caddies 35 

Crown Rouge smoking 38 

Leaf tobacco, in bales. ... 08 20 
Cigars- 
La Sonadora Reina Vic- 
toria Flor Fina, 1-20 $85 00 




La Sonadora Reina Bou- 
quet, 1-10 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 

Victoria Extra, 1-20 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 

Victoria Special, 1-20 50 00 

Honey moon, Regalia Com- 

111c il Fait, 1-40 55 00 

Kl Caza Culebras, 1-40 55 00 

La Fayette Reina Vic- 
toria, 1-20 32 50 

Noisy Boys, Blue Line, 1-20 .... 25 00 

Princess of Wales, Prin- 
cess, 1-10 25 00 

Ditto, low grades 13 50 20 00 

Cigars. 

8. DAVIS SONS, MONTREAL. 

Sizes. Per M. 
Madre E' Hijo, Lord Lansdowne. . . .*60 00 

" " Panetelas 60 00 

" " Bouquet 60 00 

" •' Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow 85 00 

" " Reina Victoria .... 80 00 

" Pins 55 00 

El Padre, Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Victoria Especial.. 50 00 

" Conchas de Regalia 50 00 

Bouquet 55 00 

Pins 50 00 

Longfellow 80 00 

Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo, Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas 30 00 

" Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes— All Tobacco- 
Cable 7 00 

El Padre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

Cigarettes— Per M. 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 25 

B.C. No.l 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 75 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

Cut Tobaccos— per lb. 

Puritan, lOths, 5-lb. boxes 70 

Old Chum, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes .... 75 
Old Virginia, 1-10 lb. pkg., 10-lb. 

boxes 62 

Gold Block. 9ths, 5-lb. boxes. ... 73 

Cigarette Tobacco— 

B. C. N. 1, 1-10, 5-lb. boxes 83 

Puritan, 1-10 5-lb. boxes 83 

Athlete, per lb 115 



Plliii Totj&CCOB 

Old Chum, plug, 4s, Solace, 16 lbs. 

8s, " 16 

" 8s, R. & R. 13V, 
" " chew 7s, R. & R. 14% 

' 7s, Solace, 14V, 

" 8s, R. & R. 16 

8s, Solace, 15 

O. V. " plug 88, Twist, 16 
O. V. " " 3s, Solace, 17'/, 
O. V. " " Is. " 17 
Derby " 12s, " 17V4 

Derby " 7s, " 17 

Athlete " 5s, Twist 9 



068 
068 
068 
058 
58 
058 
058 
058 
058 
55V4 
51 
51 
74 



WOODBNWARE. 



per doz. 

$ 1 60 
1 65 
1 40 
1 
1 
9 

7 50 
650 
5 50 
200 
1 40 

1 85 

2 75 
2 25 
200 
1 80 
1 75 
1 30 



Pails, 2 hoop, clear. No. 1 

" 3 

" 2 2 

" 3 2 

" " " painted" 2 

Tubs, No. 

1 

2 

3 

Washboards, Globe 1 90 

Water Witch 

Single Crescent 

Double " 

Jubilee 

" Globe Improved 

•' Quick and Easy 

World 

" Rattler 

THE E. B. EDDY CO. 

Washboards, Planet 

Waverly 

XX 

X 

Electric Duplex 

" Special Globe. . 

Mops and Handles, combined 

Butter Tubs 

Butter Bowls, crates assort d. 
Matches — 
Steamship (10 gross in case). 
Single case and under 5 

cases 3 10 

5 cases, freight allowed 3 10 

Per Case. 
Matches— 5-Case Lots, Single Case 

Parlor $1 70 $1 75 

Red Parlor 1 70 1 75 

Telephone 3 10 3 30 

Telegraph 3 30 3 50 

Safety 400 420 

French 3 00 3 10 

Favorite 2 25 2 35 

Flamers 220 240 



1 60 
1 50 
1 40 

1 25 

2 25 

i'25 
360 

3 60 



Licorice Goods 



SOME OF OUR 
LEADERS ARE : 






AGERE 

Licorice 



^ ^Pellets 

Stick bicoRicE 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



Pare Calabria "Y&S" Licorice 
Acme Licorice Pellets 
Tar Licorice and Tola Wafers 
Licorice Lozenges 
"Purity" Penny Licorice 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



▼ ▼▼ ▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ 



For 



25 cents { 

We will mail you a valuable ♦ 
little book on X 



BUYING 
SELLING AND 
HANDLING OF TEA 

This is a complete and use- 
ful work, which every grocer 
should have in his possession. 



t 



♦ The MacLean Publishing Co. t 

X 26 Front St. West, Toronto. X 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »t ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»» 



DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE& SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT, 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Bteel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly fall off. The hoops expand and contract 
With the wood. BEST GOODS MADE; 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



THE 

OakYille Basket Co., 

MANCFACTDBHB8 OF 




i, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets. 
1,. 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
1, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For tale by all Woodenware Dealers 



Oakville, Ont. 



English 
Malt 



Six GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

. .OPART'S SPECIALTIES. . 



HIGH CLASS - 



GREAT NOVELTY - 



GOOD PROFIT 



ODART'S PICKLE -_and_ ■ ODART'S SAUCE 

OD ART Sc CO.. PARIS, FRANCE, AND LONDON, ENG. 



%0rt* 



TELLS what to buy and how to sell it ; gives a 
regular course of Window Dressing, Store 
Management, Advertising; describes all new 
goods, etc. What more do you want? One Pointer 
from a single copy should net you at least Two 
Dollars. Twelve copies, or one year, should net you 
Twenty-four Dollars. This is a fact, and the reason 
we have subscribers 




3! 



CLUBBING RATES 

The Dry Goods Review and 
The Canadian Grocer 



$3.00 



Send tor Samples. 



THE DRY GOODS REVIEW 

TORONTO .... .... MONTREAL 




Crosse & 
Blackwell 



CELEBRATED FOR 






§ 






*> 



Jams, 

Pickles, 

^aUOeS, 

Potted Meats, 
Table Delicacies, 

• SOLD BY 



All Grocers in Canada 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




f " Mighty fine weather 



tv 



for them as is well wrapped up," said 
the polar bear to himself when he was 
practising his skating. 

" Mighty fine weather for the man 
who has seasonable goods " says the 
grocer to himself as he makes out 
change for a pound of 

B.F.P. Cough Drops 




The "GENUINE" 



s a Chimney full of quality 

See our Registered Trade 

Mark on each one. 





Full Lead ~~ 
Flint-Wrapped 
and Labelled 



Do not buy any so-called 
Flint Chimney, but insist 
on having the GENUINE 



GOWANS, KENT & CO., Toronto 



COX'S GELATINE 



Always 
Trustworthy. 



ESTABLISHED 1726. 



Agents for Canada: 

C. E. COLSON, Montreal. 

D. MASSON & CO., Montreal. 
ARTHUR P. TIPPET & CO , 

Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Montreal 



EDWARD STILL 

Assignee, Accountant, Auditor, etc. 



1 Toronto Street, 



TORONTO. 



Commercial Accounts and those of Estates, Munici- 
palities, etc., thoroughly audited and investigated. 
Charters obtained for Joint Stock Companies. 
Parties in difficulties can procure prompt settlements 
with creditors, on easy terms, without publicity. 



CHARLES F. CLARK, EDW. P. RANDOLPH 

Pbesident. Treasurer. 

ESTABLISHED 1849. 

THE BRADSTREET 

nERCdNTlLE dQENCT 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY, 

Executive Offices, PROPRIETORS. 

NOS. 279, 281 AND 283 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Offices in the principal cities of the United Statu 
Canada, the European Continent, Australia and 
in London, England, 
The Bradstreet Company is the oldest and, 
financially, the strongest organization of its 
kind— working in one interest and under <ne 
management— with wider ramifications, with 
more capital invested in the business, and it 
expends more money every year tor the collec- 
tion and dissemination of information than any 
similar institution in the world. 

TOBOKTO 0,-CKsi? {BffiSSSSt,. 

TH08. C. IRVING, Superintendent. 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

The Original and only Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery. 



John Oakey & Sons, limited, 

Manufacturers of Emery, Black Lead, Emery and 
Glass Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Representative in Canada : 
JOHN FORMAN, 650 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



VOL. X 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 17, 1896. 



No. 3 



IN COMPETITION WITH THE WORLD 

We have received the Highest Awards Made, 



Sell 

ONLY 

THE 
BEST! 



THESE substantiate our claim that 



(d olman's M ustard 

IS ™ E BEST 1N ™ E WORLD 



To Groeers 



The season is on for Marshall's popular Scotch Pickled Herrings. All 
principal wholesalers carry stock. The margin of profit to the dealer 
is good. He should not be without this leading brand. 



££ 



CROWN" 



BRAND 



Marshall's Scotch Herrings 



FROM THE FAMED ABERDEEN FISHERIES 



In Kegs 
Firkins 
Half Barrels 
Barrels 



FULLS and 
MEDIUMS 

SOLE AGENTS : 



N. B. — Marshall & Co., Aberdeen, own their fishing fleet ; 
pack only the Finest Selected Herrings. Every package 
guaranteed. Their Kippered. Fresh Herrings, Herrings in To- 
mato Sauce, etc., are very superior. 



WALTER R. WONHAM & SONS, 



31 5 and 3 
Board of Trade B 



&.«„.. Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



139 MEDALS AND HIGHEST AWARDS FROM THE WORLD'S EXHIBITIONS. 



Purveyors by special appointment 
to Her Majesty 

THE QUEEN 

Empress of India. 




Purveyors by special appointment 
to H. R. H. the 

PRINCE OF WALES 

K.G., K.T., K.P. 



MACONOCHIE 



131 Leadenhall Street 



LONDON, ENG. 



BROTHERS 



First Quality 



Potted Meats and Fish Delicacies 




Fresh Herrings 
Kippered Herrings 
Bloaters and Bloater Paste 
Scotch Findon Haddocks 
Herrings in Shrimp Sauce 
Herrings a la^Sardine 



AlljHerrings prepared by us are pre- 
served at Fraserburgh, Scotland, which is 
the largest fishing station in the world, 
and the quality of the Fraserburgh Her- 
rings is superior to all others. 




All particulars from agents : — 

SEETQN k MITCHELL, Halifax, N.S. 
LIGHTBOUND, RALSTON k CO,, Montreal 



Agents for British Columbia ; 



k 



Vancouver and Victoria 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Standard Goods ^BesttoHandte 



FRY'S 



Pure Concentrated 
Cocoa 

Pure Chocolate 

Vanilla and de Sante 
Chocolate 

Caracas Chocolate 



USE 




FRY'S 



Homeopathic Cocoa 

Diamond Chocolate 

Monogram Chocolate 

Gold Medal Sweet 
Chocolate 



THESE GOODS ARE SECOND TO NONE 



AFIiIUF P. Tipp6t & xjO. Maritime Provinces, Ontario and Northwest. 



FOR 



P URITY 



vX>ona,t e , 



FOR 



S TRENCTH 



TRADE MARK 



This brand is always reliable. 



Highest test 98^% pure. 



Made 



ST* The UNITED ALKALI CO., Ltd., Liverpool. 

"New Process" Soda, finest on the market. 



"LAZENBY'S 



J J MULLIGATAWNY and other soup squares, 
CURRY POWDER and SOLIDIFIED 
JELLY are the goods to use this cold weather. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 

A. P. TIPPET & CO. 



ST. JOHN. N.B. 



F. H. TIPPET & CO. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The Value of 
Strength . . . 




In Wrapping Paper is known and appreciated 
by every wholesale and retail grocer. 

We have special brands for this use — 

MANILLLA, 
BROWN WRAPPING 

ETC., ETC. 

noted for long and strong fibre — and made to 
stand more than ordinary wear and tear. 



ITS SUPERIORITY WILL QUICKLY ASSERT ITSELF. 
WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



THE 



E. B. Eddy Co. 

Hull, Canada 



ltd. 



319 St. James Street, MONTREAL 



38 Front Street West, TORONTO 



Agents: F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec; A. Powis, Hamilton; J. A. Hendry, Kingston; 
Schofield Bros., St. John ; J. Peters & Co., Halifax; Tees & Persse, Winnipeg; James 
Mitchell, Victoria. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



These Letters speak f f 

.... the virtues of 



CRAND MOCUL" 



A resident on Palmertton 
Avenue, Toronto, writes 
us as follows: 

Jan'y 8, '96. 
T. B. Escott & Co. 

Sirs, — Enclosed please 
find twenty-five cents and 
postage, for which kindly 
send me at once J^-lb. 
Grand Mogul Tea. I am 
unable to get it here. 
Yours respectfully, 

Wm. 

♦♦♦ 

A resident on Arthur Street 
writes : 

T. B. Escott & Co., 

London. 
Gentlemen, — I tried 
several stores in the vain 
hope of obtaining Grand Mogul Tea, I theretore apply to you and 
will thank you to mail me j£-lb. I enclose 25 cents and postage. 
Yours etc., George 

p. S. — To all enquirers we beg to say that we shall introduce Grand 
Mogul Tea to all the Toronto trade very shortly. 

The above are samples of letters we are receiving 
daily from the Queen City of Ontario. 



DELICIOUS FLAVOUR 



MOGUL 

TEA. 

A Luxury All May Enjoy 

30,40,50,60 0. 

INPKGS. 



Demanded 



T. B. ESCOTT <Sc CO. 

Sole Agents for Canada and the United States. 




By Consumers because it has 
no equal. 



Sold 



It has no equal. 
Packed in White 
Opal Jars, 4 sizes. 



By Retailers because no trouble 
to sell. 



Bought 

By every Jobber because his 
trade requires it. 



Prepared and Guaranteed by 



A. F. MacLaren & Co. 



51 COLBORNE ST. 



TORONTO. 



When 
Write 

and we will 
give you 

Pointers 



How to increase your 
Tea Trade. 



you have caught on 



us 




ROSE & LAFLAMME 

MONTREAL 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



mc St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Laboratory of Inland Revenue, 
Office of Official Analyst, 

Montreal, April 8th, 1895. 

" I hereby certify that I have drawn, by my own hand, ten samples 
of the ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO.'S EXTRA STAND- 
ARD GRANULATED SUGAR, indiscriminately taken from ten lots 
of about 150 bbls. each, I have analysed same, and find them 
uniformly to contain : 

99ilo to 100 per cent, of Pure Cane Sugar 

with no impurities whatever." 

(Signed) JOHN BAKER EDWARDS, Ph.D., D.C.L 

Prof, of Chemistry and Pub. Analyst, 

MONTREAL. 



Do You Sell Crockery ? 

Then we want your business. We manufacture all kinds of Yellow, and Bristol 
Glazed goods, also Rockingham Ware, which we guarantee fully equal to any on 
the market, either of home or foreign production. Catalogues, prices or travelers' 
attendance, if you drop us a card. 



Brantford Stoneware Mfg. Go. Ltd. - Brantford. 



OTHER SPECIALTIES. 

NOUGAT 
RAHAT LAKUHM 
ALMOND ROCK 
EL MAHNA 



IS^SS 




BUTTER SCOTCH M 

IL (The Celebrated Sweet for Children). Jk 



MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS. 

PARIS 

SYDNEY 

MELBOURNE 



CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., Toronto. »> &"&*?*«*<*'■•,-- ^M ROSE 4 LAFLAMME, Montreal. 



WORKS : LONDON. W.C, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Package Goods 
Trade 



With us beats all 
previous years. Never 
had such a demand 
for fine goods before. 
All varieties selling 
with the most gratify- 
ing success. Can't we 
make you up an order 
out of the following 
choice assortment ? 

Desiccated Rolled Oats 

Desiccated Rolled Wheat 

Desiccated Rolled Barley 

Breakfast Hominy 



Buckwheat Flour ( se.f-Raisin g) 



Price List. 



The IRELAND NATIONAL FOOD CO. ud. 

OPERATING The Largest and Most Complete Breakfast Tnrnfl tf\ C» «» l\ i\ 

Cereal Food Mills in the Dominion. -■■ <-" tJUlO, CcllllKld. 



Condensed Coffees 



If you have not handled "Reindeer" Brand 
Condensed Coffees, we should like you to give 
a sample order and try for yourself whether 
they are good or not. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



5-lb- Boxes 



333 



EARLY 

CROP 

MAY 



AND 



301b. Caddies 



JAPANS 



To retail at 25 cents per pound, is something that catches the eye of the consumer, 
and is just the thing to bring up your Japan Tea sales. 

For further information will write you personally if you are on the lookout for the 
good things. 

FROM A GREAT RANGE of Teas of undoubted merit we can successfully 
cater to your requirements. It's easy to buy TEA, but it requires your time and 
attention to secure the best values going. When you are on the lookout, drop us a 
line. Our hiding place is Hamilton, and we enjoy the reputation of being a very 
good house on Teas. 



W. H. G1LLARD <£ CO. 



WHOLESALERS 
ONLY 



Hamilton, Ont. 



JOHN MOUAT, Northwest Representative, WINNIPEG 



WHA T M ORE ? 



Inch by inch our goods have worked their 
way to the very top 



Their Excellence of 
PURITY and FLAVOR 

commands the attention of people who are particular what they eat. 



SELL 



Boulters' 

Peerless " LION " Brand Canned Goods this year. 



We did a tremendous business in '95. 

. . . . Watch us during '96. 



slllllll 






iiiiiii! 



iw; 



m 




Condensed Mince Meat 



Guaranteed 

First-class. 



PURE I 

WHOLESOME 

DELICIOUS 

I 

For sale by all wholesalers, and put up by 

J. H. WETHEY, - - St. Catharines \ 

8!lllll!«ll!lllll«ll||||«ll!llllipillllll!ffillll!IIH 



This journal has the largest circulation and the largest advertising 

patronage of any^grocery paper in the world. We prove it. 




Vol. X. (Published Weekly) 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 17, 1896 



($2.00 per Year) No. 3 



DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. 

Coal is not much use until worked into 
energy; neither is man. 

A know-nothingat-all is usually he who 
thinks he knows everything. 

Brokers' ; views on a question appertain- 
ing to trade are often united. 

He who makes errors is not a fool ; but 
he who profits not by them is. 

The quality of a merchant's perseverance 
often depends on the veering of his purse. 

While a man is waiting patiently for suc- 
cess he should take off his coat and hustle. 

"Monkeying" is all right in its place; 
but its place is with the hand-organ, not in 
the store. 

People who do not read trade papers live 
in the Land of Ignorance ; and not Blissful 
Ignorance either. 

As constructing a house in a quagmire is 
it for a young man to essay to build his life's 
success on falsehood. 

Tobacco on the shelves is all right ; but 
tobacco in the man's mouth who is behind 
the counter is all wrong. 

In the same boat with he who says too 
much with his mouth is the merchant who 
says too much in his " ad.'' 

Advertisements quoted with glowing state- 
ments that are false are ultimately pursued 
by imprecations into oblivion. 

The Danes dispose of $25,000,000 worth 
of butter annually. They evidently Dane 
(deign) to lead the world in this particular. 



In the fight between the retailer and the 
department store the former has the con- 
sciousness that he did not begin the war- 



fare. But to have a conscience void of 
offence is after all small consolation to the 
merchant who sees his customers going over 
to the enemy. 

A contemporary announces that locomo- 
tives are trained for fast work. In other 
words, trained to draw a train. 

" Maple " syrup is being made from corn 
cobs down in Vermont. By and-bye we 
shall hear of whisky being made from cork- 
screws. 

The Montreal Trade Bulletin asks : " Is 
there money in pork ? " The grunts of dis- 
gruntled speculators would seem to say 
" Nay." 

Land lubbers who essay to navigate ships 
and ignoramuses who undertake to manage 
stores frequently meet with the same fate — 
shipwreck. 

They are " raising Cain " down in Cuba 
more vigorously than ever, and still the bulls 
persist in declaring that the sugar cane crop 
will be 600 tons short. 

The horse trade at the Chicago stock 
yards was last year the largest on record. 
Qnite likely. A larger number of equines 
than usual went into cans. 

It is said that the seven boilers from the 
Dominion Cabinet are depressed. This is 
understood to be characteristic of men who 
suddenly forsake the Bowell. 

The number of people who earn the 
bread by the sweat of their brow will be 
augmented just in proportion as merchants 
discontinue loose credit methods. 

People who imagine themselves the block 
and tackle whereby the morale of business 
is to be elevated, are sometimes blocks of 
granite barring the way to progress. 

The retail grocers of St. John, N.B., once 
had an association. I cannot say that 



though dead it yet speake'.h ; yet I can say 
that the want of it speaketh. Arise, ye that 
sleepetb ! 

They have a dog in Philadelphia that 
chews tobacco. I have heard animals with 
two legs that chew tobacco dubbed dogs 
and supplemented too with the prefix dirty. 

The profits of the united retail grocers of 
Brooklyn from their food exposition aggre- 
gated $1,600. It is to be hoped the profits 
from their experience will aggregate more 
even than this. 

There are scores of people in every city 
who are liberal in their cash bestowals upon 
the actor, but who have seldom a dollar for 
the grocer. It would evidently pay the mer- 
chant to turn actor once in a while and as- 
sume the role of highwayman. 

Vastly different is the attitude of the 
world toward the commodity that becomes 
worth less in dollars and the man that be- 
comes worth less in dollars : a commodity 
may grow in public favor, but it is in dis- 
favor that the man grows. 

From a political standpoint Col. Prior 
certainly did not have a prior claim to the 
Controllership of Customs, but from a busi- 
ness man's standpoint he certainly had. 
There does not, however, appear to be any 
business men's standpoint in the govern- 
ments of to-day. 

The Guelph Herald has issued an in- 
dustrial number. It is well termed such : 
It sets forth amply, by illustrations and let- 
ter iress, the industries of the "Royal City" 
and illustrates the industry and ability of 
the publisher of The Herald and his staff. 

The special illustrated edition of The 
Woodstock Sentinel-Review shows that pro- 
prietor Andrew Pattullo is not allowing his 
paper to deteriorate while he is devoting so 
much of his time and attention to furthering 
the cheese industry of the country. The 
edition is beautifully and amply illustrated, 
and is reple.e with much interesting and 
valuable information. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CHEESE MAKING 25 YEARS AGO.* 

By A. F. MacLaren. 

TWENTY FIVE years ago compara- 
tively few cheese were made in 
Canada on the factory system, or, in 
other words, the manufacture of cheese as 
an industry was simply in its infancy. The 
first factory was built and operated in the 
Township of Norwich, Oxford County, in 
1862, by the late Harvey Farrington, the 
well-known, practical and experienced cheese 
maker from the noted Herkimer County, 
New York State, to whom much credit is 
due for the establishment of the great cheese 
industry in Canada, which developed very 
slowly for a time, only a few factories being 
in existence up to the date of which I am 
about to write. 

Thinking of cheese making twentv-five 
years ago carries me back to the time when 
I first entered the Fullarton cheese factory, 
in Fullarton Township, Perth County, for 
the purpose of learning the business. The 
factory was that season rented by Mr. Geo. 
Hamilton, who also owned the Cromarty 
factory. The cheese maker was Mr. Wm. 
Huxley, who, I understand, received his first 
instruction and education in cheese making 
from the above-mentioned "grand old man," 
Mr. Harvey Farrington. 

In those early days everything in connec- 
tion with the cheese business was entirely 
different to what it is at present. In the 
first place factories were generally located 
on low ground and usually close to or 
directly over a running stream, and if pos- 
sible in close proximity to a spring of pure 
cold water, which, if possible, was secured at 
an elevation high enough so that the water 
could be taken to the factory in pipes and 
allowed to flow under the vats to be used for 
the purpose of cooling the milk when de- 
livered at the factories twice daily, as was 
then the custom. In this respect, the Ful- 
larton factory was and is splendidly situated 
and we seldom had to make cheese twice 
daily, as with this plentiful supply of very 
cold water running under the vats of milk 
all night we had no difficulty in keeping the 
milk perfectly sweet. 

We will now proceed, metaphorically 
speaking, to convert a vat of pure sweet 
milk into cheese as it was done twenty-five 
years ago. We will suppose the milk is set 
at a temperature of 82 deg. Fah. The milk 
has sufficiently coagulated, time for cutting 
curd having arrived, the curd having been 
cut, we begin to stir by hand from 10 to 11? 
minutes. We then apply heat and gradually 
begin the cooking process (still stirring by 
hand), which was no pleasant task, and only 
those who were possessed of a good strong 
back, perseverance and patience would con- 
tinue this hand stirring and gentle handling 

* " Cheese-making 25 Years Ago " appeared in the 
illustrated number oi The Woodstock Sentinel-Re- 



which the curd required so as to secure a 
good average. Impatient, careless cheese 
makers would be inclined to use the rake too 
soon, thereby' handling the curd so roughly 
that the whey became white, or, in other 
words, the butter fat which should have re- 
mained :n the curd passed into the whey. 
It was our custom in those days to keep 
on stirring by hand until the mass of 
whey and curd had been heated to over 
90 deg. Fahrenheit and the curd had be- 
come somewhat hard. We were then allowed 
to use the rake (wooden rake) and continue 
agitating and heating until curd was 100 
deg. Fah. more or less, according to condi- 
tion of curd. Then the curd was allowed 
to remain in whey until acid developed. 
Then the whey was removed by the use of a 
syphon. This being done, the curd was 
dipped into a slat sink covered with a cloth 
strainer From the time dipping began M 

~^ 

X 



ft 




A I •'. MacLaren 

available help was on hand to stir curd in 
sink so as to prevent matting and allow all 
whey to escape. As soon as curd was stirred 
sufficiently dry, and the necessary acid hav- 
ing developed, salt was then added, well 
stirred in and the curd was ready for press. 
At that time we used upright presses only, 
and now we proceed to put curd to press : 
Large press cloths were then used, which 
were placed in each hoop. The curd was 
then placed therein ; hoops filled ; then end 
of press cloth pulled over top of curd, when 
followers were put on and gradual pressing 
began. As soon as curd was pressed suffi- 
ciently hard, or so that it could be removed 
from the hoop, it was taken out and band- 
aged. A small cotton head cloth placed on 
each end of the cheese, when it was returned 
to hoop and press, where it remained 
unde' heavy pressure until morning. Then 
the cheese were taken out and turned, ends 
of bandages turned down and any cheese 
which may hwe projected pared off. These 
shoulders or projections are generallycaused 
by followers being too small, thereby allow- 



ing cheese to press up between followers 
and hoop, and if not removed would materi- 
ally affect the value and finish. The cheese 
were again returned to press and allowed to 
remain until the presses were required for 
the second day's curd. They were then re- 
moved to the curing or drying room, where 
they were allowed to remain for a short time 
until sufficiently dry to admit of the appli- 
cation of whey butter on each end so as to 
prevent them from cracking. We were then 
supposed to turn and rub the cheese on 
each end every morning, this being neces- 
sary for the purpose of properly curing the 
cheese. And I may say that in these days 
one of the great causes of trouble and loss in 
many factories was the careless manner in 
which cheese were handled in the curing 
room. 

During the summer months some careless 
cheese makers would allow the cheese to 
crack and check, which allowed the cheese 
fly and skipper to complete their work of 
destruction. And then again late in the 
season it was almost impossible to find 
cheese which were properly cured. Even 
to-day there is great room for improvement 
along these lines. 

From reading the above the modern 
cheese maker will observe there were many 
difficulties to contend with at that time, and 
when I enumerate the many advantages the 
cheese makers of the present day have com- 
pared with those of a quarter a century ago, 
it is easily understood why cheese of the 
present day has attained its high standard 
of perfection. 

The patrons are better educated and have 
received a great deal of experience and in- 
struction from careful study and close ob- 
servation as to how milk should be pro- 
duced and handled so as to bring it to the 
factories in the best possible condition. 

In those days it was necessary for us to 
make our own rennet extract. We had no 
rennet test ; no Babcock milk tester ; few 
factories had engines and no such thing as 
agitators to be worked by steam, for the pur- 
pose of stirring the mass of curd and whey 
in the vat during the cooking process. No 
sweet dipping, no matting of curd, no curd 
mill, no bandagers, no gang press, no pres- 
sing of cloths on top of cheese, no seamless 
bandages, no milk inspectors or instructors, 
etc. And still there are hundreds of fac- 
tories right in our midst where still greater 
improvement could be made. 

And just before I close my article (as I 
am afraid I am now making it too long), I 
would like to suggest to the factorymen and 
patrons the great necessity of at once stop- 
ping the ruinous practice of having the sour 
whey returned in their milk cans. I am 
sure there are no intelligent farmers who 
would not be convinced if they knew how 
serious a matter this is, as in almost every 
case this practice is ruinous to the flavor of 
the cheese. My observation in examining 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Our Tea Deal is still on . . . 



We have the goods and we are free sellers, 
buy without hearing what we have to say. 



Do not 



SAMPLES ON APPLICATION. 



LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, 



Hamilton, Ont. 



HILLWATTEE TEA AGENTS 



Two Extremes 



^ 



j 



RAM 



LAVS 
PURE 



INDIAN 
TEA 



Never Fails to Please. 



The tea jobbers who are crowding 
the advertising mediums to attract 
public attention from brands that are 
considered as staple as gold have very 
successfully imitated the external ap- 
pearance of one of the choicest 
beverages to be found on the tables 
of the poor and rich alike, namely, 
Ram Lai's Pure Indian Package 
Tea ; but they are just as unsuccessful 
in imitating the quality of the goods 
as they have been successful in imi- 
tating the label. 



JAMES TURNER & CO. E? Hamilton 



TEAS 



We will offer during January exceptional 
values to clear out short lines. See our 
samples before buying. 



BALFOUR & CO. 



Wholesale 
Grocers 



Hamilton, Ont, 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



^ , i^lisi^^^^^^^S^S$^)^S^!^^t!^^^!^/^&&r 1 



i^^ffi^Sl^fl^s^^^^Sitl^SnSfii^^f^rmf^l^^^ 



FISH 



Lake Fish (Fall catch) 

White Fish 

Trout and Herring 



No. i Labrador Herring in barrels and half-barrels. 

No. i Split Herring in half-barrels. Loch Fyne Herring in kegs. 

Codfish — Fletched and Table Cod in ioo-lb. cases. 

Quintals Dry Codfish. Also a full line of Boneless Fish. 




H. P. ECKARDT & CO. 



Wholesale 
Grocers, 



TORONTO 



I 



®S(®5SS5g5JSS®5 



cheese where the above named practice is 
prevalent is that in 99 cases out of a 100 more 
or less whey flavor had developed. It may 
not be noticed to any great extent while 
cheese remain on the shelves in this country, 
but it is almost sure to develope before it 
reaches the consumer's table in the Old 
Country. If this practice were discontinued 
I feel satisfied that the producer would be 
the gainer of from l /z to 1 cent per pound. 
I sincerely trust that ere long some system 
will be devised whereby this practice may 
be abolished. 

I would further suggest the grouping of 
say 20 to 30 factories in different sections of 
the country and placing them under the 
supervision of a practical cheese maker. His 
salary and expenses could be paid by each 
factory contributing its proportion according 
to amount of cheese made. In this way 
there should be no trouble in having the 
cheese made in each group almost as good 
and uniform in quality and size as if made in 
one factory. 

In adopting this system it would be advis- 
able to use the same kind and very best 
material in the manufacture of cheese in all 
the factories in each group, and by purchas- 
ing in large quantities the cost could be ma- 
terially reduced. As my readers can easily 
see, that by using the same rennet extract, 
same coloring, same salt, same curd mill, 
same s ; ze hoop, same presses, then weigh 



the curd so as to have each cheese the same 
weight and size, and last, but not least, by 
having all boxes made of the same size and 
of the very best material. If the above 
suggestions were carried out I feel confident 
that our cheese would receive a still higher 
reputation in the markets of the world than 
they do to-day. 

A few words to my brother cheese makers 
and I have done : There are a few things 
that many of you could improve on at the 
present time and with the factories as they 
now are. In the first place the cheese maker 
himself should as far as possible see every 
can of milk as it is dumped into the weigh 
can. That is the time to ascertain if the 
flavor is right or not. If the flavor is not 
right advise the producer and get to work at 
once to find out the cause of the trouble. 
Secondly, see that every man in your factory, 
who is there to learn the business, is careful 
about keeping himself and everything in and 
outside the factory neat, clean and tidy. 
Don't think the work is done when the 
cheese are put to press. Look round and 
you will find many little things to fix up, and 
above all in the fall of the year take better 
care of your cheese. I know how I used to 
like to get away from cheese and factory, as 
soon as the last cheese for the season was 
made. But it is a mistake. At present I 
find great carelessness in the curing of fall 
cheese. The temperature is seldom found to 
be just right. And now I implore of you, 



don't neglect a cheese ; don't leave them 
alone for an hour, till the last box is shipped. 
Many times this last fall and early part of 
winter I have gone to see how the cheese I 
had bought were being cured. The first fac- 
tory I called at I found the cheese maker 
away, and the cheese too warm. The next 
factory I tound too cold, and the cheese 
maker was away. At the third factory I 
found the temperature too low, the last make 
of cheese on the lower shelves, when they 
should have been on the top shelves and 
nearer the fire. At the fourth factory I found 
everything as it should be. 

Now if you can spare the time, go to 
Guelph or Kingston Dairy Schools where, 
you receive a gteat many useful lessons, not 
only with regard to making cheese and but- 
ter, testing milk, etc., but you will carry away 
with you many ideas whereby you can im- 
prove many things in connection with your 
own factories. 



PERSIAN DATE SHIPMENTS. 

It is reported that the total shipments of 
dates from the Persian Gulf for this season 
were less than 550,000 boxes, against over 
700,000 in the previous year, which results 
that the stock carried over in London is 
small. The Hills Bros.' Co. report, accord- 
ing to The N. Y. Journal of Commerce, that, 
by late cable advices, only 116,000 boxes ex- 
ist in that market, against 280,000 boxes on 
hand January 1, 1895. in v,ew °f tne small 
stocks the London dealers are holding their 
goods with great firmness, and desirable 
brands of Hallowee cannot now be imported 
to cost less than 3#c. without a penny al- 
lowed for commissions or profit to dealers 
here. 



Glacial . . 
Acetic Acid 



We are makers of Highest Grade Double 
Refined Acetic Acid. 

80, 85, 90 and 95% in demijohns, and 30 
to 80% in wood. 

Also Crude Acetic Acid for dyeing and 
manufacturing purposes. 



Enquiries Invited. 



MONTREAL. 

TORONTO. 

VICTORIA. 



The Canada Paint Co., Ltd. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 11 

aimmmmmiinfflff^ 



| Table 
1 Jellies 



EBENR. ROBERTS' 

Unequalled for Purity and Flavor 

ALL FLAVORS 
Quarts, Pints and Half-Pints. 



| DAVIDSON & HAY, SST Toronto, Ont. | 

J|\ON'T CARRY IT TOO FAR j 

^ft^fflB -p^jg econom i s i n g. Don't wait until one of your best 

^eSmffl customers has become disgusted with that cheap B 

. ^ Buckwheat Flour 

you are selling before you buy the absolutely pure article from 

\ THE TILLSON COMPANY, Ltd. ThmtakO-t. j 






i 



i 



We could write a book 



about Salmon and Salmon Packing, but if we did you might not have 
time to read it. Our knowledge takes form in our goods. The best 
evidence of our ability to pack a first-class article is the article itself — 
Flag-Ship Salmon. Have you got it ? 



,,,«. : Canadian Pacific Packing Co. 



ROBERT WARD & CO. 
Sole Agents 

4 victoria, b.c. LULU ISLAND, B.C. 



I 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HINTS TO BUYERS. 

PERKINS, INCE & CO. have a ship- 
ment of Indian and Ceylon tea arriv- 
ing, which they are offering at special 
value. 

Pure lard is being offered at low prices by 
T. B. Escott & Co. 

A drive in bag peaches is being offered by 
Lucas, Steele & Bristol. They also offer 
Harvest prunes. 

"Grand Sultan" coffee is having good 
sale. See letters re "Grand Mogul" ad- 
vertisement. 

A handsome 2-lb. tin of syrup is be- 
ing placed on the market by Lucas, Steele 
& Bristol. It will retail at 10 cents. 

T. B. Escott & Co. have large shipment 
molasses arriving, bought before recent ad- 
vance. 

A shipment of Moyune Young Hysons, 
half-chests, which they claim are splendid 
value, is in store with the Eby, Blain Co., 
Ltd. 

Shipment California prunes, 40's, received 
at low prices, have been received by T. B. 
Escott & Co. 

"Yes, we are moving a good many teas 
this month," say Lucas, Steele & Bristol. 
" We are constantly having applications for 
samples." 

W. H. Gillard & Co. report a good de- 
mand for early crop May Japan teas in 5-lb. 



boxes and 30-lb. caddies. This is a handy 
sized package for the jobbing trade. 

T. B. Escott & Co., ot London, have large 
lines of Indian and Ceylon teas, they advise, 
at great bargains. 

Extra values in jams and marmalades in 
7-lb. pail, are offered by Lucas, Steele & 
Bristol. Their prices for 2 and 3-lb. peaches, 
they advise are very low. 

"We have just made up our books for 
last week's business," said Mr. Larkin, of 
P. C. Larkin & Co., " and we find that our 
sales of " Salada " tea exceeded those of any 
previous week in our history." 

W. H. Gillard & Co. beg to advise the 
trade that their long-looked-for " Hay- 
castle " currants arrived a short time ago 
and all back orders have been filled. A 
good sized stock is still on hand at bargain 
prices. 

The Snow Drift Co. claim to have just 
wound up the most successful year of their 
history, and, in view of the fact, propose to 
follow the same old policy : " First-class 
values in pure goods at lowest possible 
prices." 

W. H. Gillard & Co. are having a lively 
sale for their special blends of pure coffee, 
"W. H. G. No. 2" and "Purity." These 
lines are put up in handsome 25-lb. pack- 
ages, retail at popular prices, and shew the 
retailer a handsome margin. 

The Snow Drift Co. have just passed into 
stock another hundred sacks of that very 



choice Tellicherry, and more on the way. 
They did an enormous trade in pepper last 
year, and are determined to keep it going. 
" Blood tells," they writ*. 

A TRUE GRAPE STORY. 

A friend of mine, says a writer in Retail 
Grocers' Advocate, told me he bought a nice 
lot of Malaga grapes cheap, at $3.75 a bar- 
rel, each barrel marked 55 pounds. 

I asked him if he ever put down what he 
got out of a barrel of grapes, (1 saw the bar- 
rels myself and they seemed to be very 
light). 

He said he never did, but he promised to 
do it with the next barrel he would open. 

He sold it over Christmas, and this is what 

he got out of it. He sold them at 18 cents 

per pound. 

1% pounds 27 

2 pounds 35 

impounds 27 

V4 pound 09 

2 pounds 35 

1 pound 18 

1 pound 18 

2 pounds 35 

1 pound.. 18 

2 pounds 35 

% pound 09 

2 pounds 35 

2 pounds , 35 

19 pounds $336 

5 pounds loose grapes. 50 

Total $3.86 

Profitof 11 

Where he thought his profit would be at 

least $4. 



Why not investigate for yourself ? 




DON'T LET OTHERS 
INFLUENCE YOU 



We have the greatest commercial discovery of the Nine- 
teenth Century. It will keep eggs fresh all the year round — 
absolutely safe to use it — cost so little we do not even figure 
down enough. It has been tried and proved of real actual 
value to everyone who wants to put away eggs. 



KNOX'S EGG PRESERVER 



When used on strictly fresh eggs will keep them as good as the day they 
were laid down for one year. We guarantee this or money refunded. 



ASK YOUR WHOLESALE GROCER FOR IT. 



A. E. Richards <S Co., 



Sole Agents 
for Canada, 



Caledonia, Ont. 



Also Agent3 for KNOX'S SPARKLING CALVES FOOT GELATINE. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



Robert Greig & Co. 



456 St. Paul St. 



MONTREAL 



ROWNTREE'S 



Elect Cocoa 



UNRIVALLED FOR PURITY 
AND STRENGTH. . . . 



I LB. MAKES 120 GUPS 



For Druggists and 
Confectioners 



M. A. CRAVEN & SON 

YORK - ENGLAND 

Fruit Drops 
Lozenges 

Cachotis, etc. 



Of Finest 
Qualities. 



MCKAY'S 



KOLA-CAFE 



The Finest Liquid Coffee 
on the market. 



PUT UP IN 12 OZ. BOTTLES 




CARR & CO.'S 



E 





Are exported to all parts of the world. 



Established 1831. 

The original manufacturers of 
Fancy Biscuits by Machinery. 

Appointed Biscuit Manufactur- 
ers to H. M. the Queen by special 
warrant, dated May 8th, 1841. 

CARR & CO. Ltd 

CARLISLE, ENGLAND. 



Agems for Canada 



Robert Greig & Co, 



456 St. Paul St. 
, MONTREAL 




CROWN BRAND EXTRACTS 

For Strength and Purity are unexcelled. 

ROBERT GREIG & CO. 



1?«=S 



456 St. Paul Street 



REGISTERED 



A FULL LINE OF FRENCH 
CANNED GOODS IN STOCK 



. . . Montreal 



14 THE CANADIAN GROCER 



FULL RANGE- 



FANCY GROCERIES 



TABLE 
RAISINS 



London Layers Imperial Clusters 
Fancy Clusters London Layers 

2 H " Cartoons. 

Dehesa Clusters Loose Muscatels 



All varieties California Evaporated Fruits 

Franco American Plum Pudding, pound tins 
Glace Lemon, Orange and Citron Peels 

Batger's Nonpareil and Compote Jellies 

New Nuts, Tarragona S. S. Almonds 

Valencia Shelled Almonds, Barcelona and 
Sicily Filberts, Grenoble Walnuts. 



Turner, Mackeand & Co, - - Winnipeg 



Always Uniform 

THOROUGHLY TESTED IN EVERY WAY 

SNOW DRIFT BAKING POWDER 

No one ever complains if you sell them this perfectly pure 
Baking Powder. ........ 

The Snow Drift Co. - Brantford. 



-Snowdrift 



^Snow Drift C? 

"*- Brantford. Ont. ^ 



Effectual Sweepings 



Are only ) The DAISY 

to be made THISTLE 

by using ) ROSE 



BROOflS 



The best value, retailing at Lots of 5 dozen assorted freight allowed. 
20, 25 and 30 cents. 

H. A. NELSON & SONS - Toronto and Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 




J. B. MazLEAN, 

President. 



HIGH C. MacLEAX, 

Sec.-Treas. 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

LIMITED 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

and 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

TORONTO : ... 26 Front St. W. 

MONTREAL: - - 146 St. James St. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH: 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

John Cameron. General Subscription Agent. 



BRITISH AND U.S. CONTRIBUTIONS 
TO OUR DUTIES. 

AMONG the interesting features to be 
noted in the Trade and Navigation 
Returns jast issued is one rela'ing 
to the duty paid by British and American 
goods respectively. 

A glance over the trade returns shows 
that only on six occasions during the last 
twenty-three years have our imports from 
Great Britain exceeded those from the 
United States, and yet, in spite of this fact, 
the grea er proportion of the duties collected 
on the goods brought in from the two coun- 
tries in question have invariably been borne 
by those from Britain. 

But the disproportion between the duties 
paid by British and American goods has 
undergone a marked change since 1872, the 
most remo e year to which the figures we 
have at hand carry us back. 

In that year the proportion to the whole 
was 6 30 and 1.80 respectively. Last year, 
1895, the proportions borne by each were 

6.36 and 545. This, compared with 1894, 
was a decrease of .14 in the ratio on British 
goods and an increase of .58 on United 
States goods. 

In 1872 the impor s from Great Britain 
for home consump ion were 58.87 of the 
whole, and those from the United Sta'es 
32.70. List year ihe proportions were 29.50 
and 5140 respective y, or an increase of 
18.70 in Americ .n goods and a decrease of 

9.37 in British goods. 

Last year, however, is rather an unfair year 
by which to make comparisons of this kind. 

What we import from Great Britain is 
large'y finished products. From the United 
S ates, on the other hand, we bring in a 
great deal of raw material to be turned by us 
into the finished article. This not only ex- 
plains why British goods pay a larger pro- 
portion of the duty, bu', furthermore, it had 



its influence in a marked degree on the im- 
ports from the respective countries for the 
fiscal year 1894-95. 

As we pointed out a week ago in dealing 
with the returns, last year the importers of 
finished products, owing to the depression in 
the United States, and the influence it 
exerted on this country, were cautious to an 
unusual degree, a condition which naturally 
exhibited itse'f in the returns showing the 
imports from Great Britain. 

As 1895 progressed it will be remembered 
the manufacturing industries in Canada be- 
gan to put on their normal activity, with 
the result that more raw material was 
wanted. The imports from the United States 
would natura ly reflect this. But, further- 
more, the tide of imports from that country 
was augmented during the first half of the 
fiscal year 1894 95 by the influx of American 
finished products into Canada, the urgent 
need of money on the other side inducing 
the manufacturers there to slaughter the 
Canadian market in order to get the "need- 
ful." The British manufacturer, on the 
other hand, not experiencing the same acute 
depression nor the same pronounced need 
of money, did not resort to the same tactics. 

I Taking the more normal year of 1893 4 

jthe percentage to the whole of the imports 

from Great Britain was 34 60, and from the 

United States 46.90, as compared with 29 50 

and 51 40 last year, as already sta ed. 

By way of comparison, it may be interest- 
ing to note that whi'e our total exports to 
Great Br, tain in 1872 were but 3040 to the 
whole, in 1895 tne V were 54. With regard 
to exports to the United States, in 1872 they 
were 4380 to the whole, and in 1895 the 
proportion had fallen to 35.39. And our 
exports to the United States in 1895 were 

,1a ger than for any previous year sinLe 1883, 
while those to Great Britain were nearly 
seven m Ilions less than in 1894, and about 

! three millions less than in 1892 and 1893. 



CAUSE OF LAST YEAR'S CHEAP 
CHEESE. 



T 



'HE pastt year was not an altogether 
satiifacrory one for Canadian cheese 
makers and dealers. The depres ion 

of 1893-4-5 the worl J over had something to 

do with it, but not all. 

For the excessive stocks that existed last 
spring Canadians had themselves largely to 
blame. 

The clean sweep of the awards which 
Canadian cheese made at the World's Fair 
stimulated enoi mousy the production of 
cheese in Canada in 1894. When the store- 
houses and refr gerators throughout the 
country groaned with the quantity of cheese 
packed away in them, people groaned too, 
and charged that over-production was the 
cause. And there was over-production, inso- 



far as the storehouses were overcharged, but 
scarcely in the sense that the market was 
over supplied. 

The world over during 1893-4, it will be 
remembered, there was a gradual and un- 
usual decline in the values of staple goods, 
with one exception. That exception was 
cheese, and it was accomplished by the 
manipulation of speculators, with the result 
that the price of cheese in Canada was ulti- 
mately a great deal above the parity of other 
food staples. With the realization of this 
fact consumers at home and abroad turned 
their attention to the foods that were 
cheaper ; and what the consumers did the 
storekeepers had perforce to do likewise. 
This ultimately accomplished what, in the 
natural order of things would have been 
done before : it brought prices down. 

Last year prices ranged from 5^ to 9c, 
while the year before, 1894, the range was 
from 9 to lie. These latter figures were 
much about the same as those which ob- 
tained during the fat years, or the good 
times. Had the factorymen and exporters 
twelve or fifteen months ago conceded a 
cent or two per pound they would not have 
experienced the low values and unfavorable 
conditions to the extent they did, for the 
cheese would have gone into consumption 
and thus have prevented prices falling to 
the point they did, just as it is possible to 
save a dam by opening the sluice gates. 
When the price ultimately did go down con- 
sumption increased until today the tendency 
of values is again upwards. 

While we would not for one moment say 
that there was an over-production of cheese 
in Canada, yet it is just possible we have 
reached a point where it is well to consider 
whether we are or not getting near that con- 
dition. 

A gentleman who is acknowledged to stand 
in the first rank of cheese authorities on the 
continent expressed the opinion to The 
Canadian Grocer the other day during a 
conversation on this particular subject that 
as far as quantity was concerned, cheese- 
making in Canada had reached a point 
where it should stop, for the time being at 
any rate, and that factorymen should devote 
their energies to improving the quality, good 
and all as the quali.y is to-day. 

The Canadian Grocer does not know 
but what he is n fe ht. It is not enough that 
the quality of our cheese should be main- 
tained : It must be improved, if from no 
other fact than that we have competitors 
who are assaying to climb to the high posi- 
tion we occupy as cheese-makers. 

In Ontario alone there were in 1894 no 
less than 1,011 factories, producing 97,284,- 
547 pounds of cheese, against 1,567 in the 
whole Dominion in 1891, and 709 ten years 
before. The growth has been, indeed, rapid, 
and it is well to be careful that we do not 
grow too fast. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CHEESE ADVANCING. 

THOSE owners of cheese who have all 
along expressed a determination of 
holding for 9>£c. per lb. are in fair 
way of receiving what they want and possibly 
more. 

This is clearly shown by the more active 
demand that has been expressed during the 
past week for the product. 

Fully 30,000 boxes of cheese, ranging all 
the way from summer to finest Quebec fall 
goods, have changed hands at Y% to Xc. 
more per lb. than would have been paid last 
monih. 

This development tends to confirm what 
has been said by The Canadian Grocer 
before, with regard to the cheese market. 
In fact, at the present writing it is extremely 
doubtful if any export buyer who went on 
the market to fill an order for, say 3,000 
boxes or so, could do so unless he offered 
more than oj^c. per lb. 

All this must be decidedly satisfactory to 
those who have stubbornly held on, for pre- 
sent indications point to even higher prices, 
and though the expectations of the more 
sanguine for from 1 to i^c. per pound more 
may not be realized, it is safe to expect some 
advance on ruling values. 



THE CATCH OF LAKE WINNIPEG 
WHITE FISH. 

A few carloads of white fish from Lake 
Winnipeg have been received on the Toronto 
market during the past week or two. The 
fish shows exceptionally fine quality and 
demands slightly better prices than the ordin- 
ary white fish found on that market. 

The outlook for this kind of fish is ac- 
counted to be more satisfactory than for 
some seasons. 

Heretofore the catch has exceeded by far 
the capacity of the dealers to dispose of 
within a reasonable time to prevent their 
spoiling. The consequence was that fisher- 
men and dealers every spring lost money 
on account of the low prices and the heavy 
losses entailed by the fish going bad. 

Some time ago, however, the fishermen 
consummated an agreement to limit the 
catch to 1,200 tons. This is from six to 
eight thousand tons less thaD last year, and 
is expected to prevent the reckless waste of 
former years, and to net all concerned better 
prices. 



FLOUR ACTIVE AT MONTREAL. 

Although there has been no actual change 
in flour prices, the market in Montreal was 
a very interesting one during the past ten 
days or so. the volume of business trans- 
acted involving a sensible reduction in the 
stocks in store at that place. 

At this writing the tendency of values is 
distinctly higher in consequence of the ad- 



vance on Ontario grades at milling points of 
10 to 15c. 

Dealers generally state that they have 
seldom experienced a more active demand 
for flour at this season of the year. 

Orders for Manitoba flour have absolutely 
poured in, a notable point in this connec- 
tion being an active export enquiry. This 
has involved the turnover of some 10,000 
barrels on this account, and the fact that mil- 
lers' agents here have refused orders for fully 
8,000 to 9,000 barrels from the Lower Pro- 
vinces, because bids were too low to suit 
them, is an unusual circumstance in the flour 
market. They are not disposed to operate 
ahead either to any large extent at current 
rates. 

To-day advices from Winnipeg to the two 
Manitoba milling firms in Montreal quoted 
wheat 3c. higher at all points, with 18c. 
freight, the best prices for choice goods being 
43 to 44c. This is cons dered a strong point 
for an advance, especially as stocks here are 
only a little over those of last year, viz., 3,000 
barrels. 



OUR PICKLED EGGS IN BRITAIN. 

CANADA'S export egg trade to Great 
Britain has been of a somewhat 
unique character during the past 
season. This applies particularly to the ex- 
ports of pickled eggs, shipments of them 
having been very large. 

The chief reason for the increase is no 
doubt due to improved methods of shipping. 

Heretofore eggs have been shipped in 
cases holding 120 dozen, but this season the 
rule has been to send them in cases of 30 to 
36 dozen each. These smaller cases have 
taken well, and largely increase the sale of 
Canadian pickled eggs in Great Britain. 
The steamer which last week left Portland 
for Liverpool carried 1,100 cases, and that 
from Boston for Glasgow 800 cases. 

Stocks of pickled eggs in Canada are 
now generally conceded to be pretty well 
cleaned up. 

As far as we can learn, fresh eggs have 
not done as well as would be desired on the 
English market. The chief reason appears 
to be that the eggs were not fresh enough 
to suit the taste of the English buyers, they 
being held too long on this side before fav- 
orable shipping weather developed. 

This fact has increased the desire of 
shippers for facilities which will enable them 
to send their eggs forward whether the 
weather be warm or cold. 

Our shipments of eggs to Great Britain 
for the fiscal year ending June 30th last ag- 
gregated 4,184,271 d- zen, against 3,449,243 
in 1894, and to the United States 2,256,518 
against 1,611,881 dozen. 

The panicky condition of the United States 
market prevents eggs being shipped to that 
country. 



ORANGE-FLAVORED TEA. 

The religious sentiment of many of the 
tea brokers in Toronto has not improved 
during the past couple of weeks. The cause 
is not their own natural tendency to evil, 
but an orange flavor which has permeated 
their samples of tea, which arrived by two 
mails in succession. 

Tea is even more suscep ible to foreign 
odors than a woman is to flattery. It does 
not matter whether the odors are sour or 
sweet, offensive or pleasant, tea will absorb 
them readily. The samples of tea in ques- 
tion were no exception to the rule. And 
although they were encased in tin packages, 
unsealed it is true, they partook of the flavor 
of the oranges which must have been near 
them in the ship's hold. 

The samples were of course spoilt. If it 
was the value of the tea alone that was con- 
cerned the loss would not be of great mo- 
ment, but as it prevents the broker from do- 
ing business in the particular teas of which 
they were the samples until fresh lots are 
sent out from London, the loss is consider- 
able, and is sufficiently serious to demand 
the attention of the Post-Office Depanment 
in order that its repetition may be obviaed. 



ILL-LOOKING TEA PACKAGES. 

Editor Grocer, — Can some of your 
good readers tell me why I cannot buy my 
Indian and Ceylon teas in nice neat pack- 
ages similar to those which we now get our 
China and Japan teas in ? It does not mat- 
ter whether I order a 20-lb. box, or 50-lb. 
box, or 100-lb. box of these teas, they all 
come in such rough, untidy looking boxes 
that I am ashamed to put them in a con- 
spicous place in my store with my other 
teas. 

The other day one of my best customers' 
little daughter came in for a pound of " your 
best Indian tea." I had not filled up my 
regular tea tin, so had to go to my store- 
room for some. My small but inquisitive 
customer following me, saw me take the tea 
for her order out of a box resembling an ash 
box, when she remarked : " Mother said it 
must be your best," and it took me some 
time to persuade her that anything good, let 
alone " best,'' could be contained in such a 
package. 

I could mention several similar cases 
which have come under my notice, which 
shews that the public cannot understand 
this careless way of putting up an article 
more sensitive and requiring more care than 
any other article handled by a grocer any 
more than I can. Thanking you for the 
space and hoping that the packers of these 
teas may soon learn that " what is worth 
doing is worth doing well." 
Yours, etc., 

Norman McLeod. 

609 Dundas street, London. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



TORONTO RETAIL GROCERS' ASSO- 
CIATION. 

MONDAY night's meeting of the To- 
ronto Retail Grocers' Association 
was one of the most interesting that 
has been held for some time : It witnessed 
the inauguration of the officers elected at the 
December meeting, and the starting of the 
after-meeting social hour. 

Retiring President F. S. Roberts occu- 
pied the chair, and among those present 
were : J. G. Gibson, R. B. Snow, F. W. 
Johnston, A. G. Booth, J. S. Bond (vice- 
president), R. Davies, D. W. Clarke, T. W. 
Squires, D. Bell, B. Panter, W. J. McCleary, 
R. M. Corrie (general secre'ary), Robert 
Mills (hon. secretary), Martin McMillan 
(treasurer), A. White (president-elect). 

It was decided to defer till the next meet- 
ing the matter of considering an At Home. 

Secretary Corrie brought up the matter of 
the cigar and tobacco license. Some of the 
members considered that the present license 
fee of $5 shou'd be reduced to $i, and 
eventually a committee composed of J. G. 
Gibson, Robert Mills, A. White and F. S. 
Roberts were appointed to consult the civic 
authorities regarding the matter. 

Hon. Sec. Mills presented the report re- 
garding the special fund, showing a balance 
on hand of $512 92. 

Treasurer McMillan's report showed a 
balance on hand of $253 in the general 
fund. 

Gen. Sec. Muat-Corrie showed the mem- 
bership of the association to be 148. 

Mr. Roberts retired from the chair, and 
introduced the new incumbent, Mr. A. 
White, which event was characterized by 
much applause. Mr. White followed with a 
brief and pointed speech. He urged the 
members to attend the meeting regularly 
and to come in good time, as he was re- 
solved on opening at 8.30 p. m. sharp. Any 
duty imposed upon a member should be 
performed willingly and with expedition. 
Among the opinions he threw out was one 
suggesting that the members of the associa- 
tion band themselves together for the pur- 
pose of purchasing their supplies in large 
lots and thus securing better discounts. He 
urged that by this means they would be bet- 
ter able to compete with the department 
stores. 

A pleasing feature of the meeiing was the 
voting of fifty dollars to Hon. Sec. Mills for 
services rendered during the two years he 
has filled his present position. Before the 
matter was brought up Mr. Mills was, ac- 
cording to prior arrangements, informed he 
was wanted at the telephone, and by the 
time he came back the necessary motion had 
been put and carried. 

Mr. A. G. Marmion suggested that the 
association formulate some scheme where- 
by, in the event of a member losing his horse 



through accident or illness, the other mem- 
bers might contribute a fund for reimbursing 
him. " I think the members of this associa- 
tion should help one another," he said. " Of 
course some of the members may be too 
well off or too proud to take the money — 
(laughter)— but we're not all rich." He gave 
notice that he would introduce the matter 
at the next meeting. 

The meeting formally adjourned at 10 
o'clock, and then a pleasant hour was spent 
in card-playing, checkers, parlor balls and 
other games. This was the first occasion 
this feature was introduced. It was voted 
a success, and will be continued hereafter. 



LARD IS HIGHER. 

Lard is occupying a good deal of atten- 
tion on the Toronto market at the moment. 

This is the season when prices are usu- 
ally favorable to buyers, and, as a conse- 
quence, they anticipate their wants to a 
more or less extent. The extremely low 
range of values which has obtained up to 
within the last few days has stimulated the 
demand to such an extent that the pro- 
ducers have advanced prices three-quarters 
to one cent per pound, and still there is a 
good trade doing. Notwithstanding the 
advance prices are still about a quarter to 
half cent per pound belo* the range of 
values a year ago at this time. 

The while the price of pure lard has been 
so cheap, the price of cotton seed oil, one of 
the ingredients in the compound article, is 
relatively high. These two factors have 
naturally caused a falling off in the sale of 
the latter. 



PEEP INTO A COLD STORAGE 
WAREHOUSE. 

The Toronto Cold Storage Co. has been a 
success from the first. The necessity for 
such a plant in a large centre like Toronto 
was felt for a long time. The new enterprise 
received immediate patronage from the city 
dealers, and has assisted these dealers to 
very materially increase their profits. 

Country dealers should find it much to 
their advantage to send in poultry, eggs, 
etc , to the cold storage warehouse when it 
is considered advisable to hold them. 

The Canadian Grocer was shown 
through the large building on Jarvis street, 
occupied by the Toronto Cold Storage Co., 
a few days ago, and found a number of 
rooms filled with all kinds of things that 
were being kept to await the time when the 
sale of them would bring greater profits than 
if sold earlier. 

There are sixteen rooms in the three 
floors, and they are all fitted up with the 
latest improvements in the way of refrigera- 
tors, hooks, etc. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 

Editor Grocer.— As I know you have the interests of 
the trade at heart, and are always ready to supply useful in- 
formation on topics pertaining to suuh, I would like your 
opinion in respect to these : 

1. Stock-taking time, so much dreaded, is at hand. Pro- 
viding hoth partners have equal shares in a business, and it 
is understood that each is to draw an equal stated amount 
out during the year for their private use : No. 1 overdraws 
his account during year SlOO, and gives No. 2 a note with 
signature of the firm for the amount, drawing interest so as 
to balance both accounts and make them equal. How 
should the interest be paid : should No, 1 pay it out of his 
private funds, or should it be drawn out of the business'/ 

2. We pay almost daily bills for freight from London, 
Hamilton and Toronto; also frequently we receive express 
parcels. We receive our bills and pay whatever is asked, not 
knowing whether rate is correct or not. We sometimes 
stumble on an error, but on the whole do the thing in the 
dark. Should not the railway furnish us with freight rates 
and classification of goods, showing rate on each, and Ex- 
press Co. do the same. 

3. Would it be possible for wholesale houses to mail in- 
voice of goods same day as shipment We often have goods 
knocking around and getting mislaid before invoice arrives, 
and I think the claim for shortage arises from that cause. 

REMARKS— I. la the event of a partner 
drawing more than his share from the busi- 
ness the amount of such overdraft should be 
charged direct to his account. A note 
should be treated similarly, as the firm — 
having signed same— is directly responsible 
for its payment. The interest should be paid 
by the partner who obtained the loan, and 
certainly is not chargeable Jo the firm. 

2. The railway and express companies 
will supply you with classification on your 
making application, this will enable you to 
check rates when goods are delivered. 

3. Wholesale houses should send on in- 
voices same day as goods are shipped, we 

'know several that would not allow it to be 
otherwise. We believe a letter to the delin- 
quents will have the desired effect. 

The Editor. 



SETTLING UP TIME. 

This is the month of the year when we ask 
our subscribers to "pay up." The process 
of their paying up is an exceedingly pleasant 
pastime to us, not alone for the many Two 
Dollars received, but for the many kind 
words from satisfied intelligent subscribers. 
Here are examples : 

Dear Sirs,— We herewith hand you five dollars in 
payment for our subscription for The Canadian Grocer 
10 August 31st, 1896, and one year's subscription for The 
Dry Goods Review from January 10th We find Thk 
Grocer an invaluable paper, and no doubt The Review 
will, also, be its equal for pointers on trade and com- 
merce. 

Yours respectfully, 

M. B. Perine & Co. 



That's not bad, is it ? Here's another : 

Dear Sirs,— Having acquired the interests of Mr 
Morns, of the firm of Morris & Co., in future please ad- 
dress The Canadian Grocer to me. I enclose Domin- 
ion Express money order $4.50, for payment in arrears 
and renewal subscription to The Grocer and The Dry 
Goods Review. I am very much pleased with The 
Grocer and would not be without it if it cost double the 
price. 

Yours faithfully, 

Lacombe, Alta. M. J. MacLeod. 



How is this for a wind up ? 



Dear Sirs,— Your traveler, or canvasser, called on us 
last week and we paid him S3 lor subscription to The 
Canadian Grocer and The Dry Goods Review. We 
couldn't keep store without these papers. Keep right on 
improving. 

Yours trully, 
Beamsville. Barry & Co. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CITY TRAVELERS' NEW PRESIDENT 

BY wire-pulling, pipe-laying and sundry 
other methods, men of mediocre abili y 
may suddenly spring into positions, 
but they just as suddenly disappear. They 
have been found wanting when placed in the 
balance. The subject of the accompanying 
sketch, Mr. R. (Muat) Corrie, has for some 
years not only stood the test of business de- 
mands, but as an officer of business men's 
organizations he has for some years occupied 
a prominent position. For five years he has 
been secretary of the Retail Grocers' Asso- 
ciation of Toronto, and ever since the incep- 
tion of the City Travelers' Association he has 
been a prominent figure of that organization. 
In the latter association he has filled, as far 
as my memory serves, every office, the 
members a couple of weeks ago electing him 
to the presidency. 

Mr. Corrie was born in Dumfries, Scot- 
land. How long ago I don't know. Prob- 
ably about 37 years, I should judge. But 
this reminds me that his real name is not 
Corrie. His right name is Muat. And the 
way in which his original name was lost sight 
of leads me to the conclusion that after all 
there is not much in a name sometimes. 
When he came to this country as a boy 
eighteen years ago it was to live with a 
guardian, whose name was Corrie. A good 
many people thought he was Mr. Corrie's 
son, and Corrie, of course, the boy Muat was 



called by these. As no effort — continuous 
effort, at any rate — was made to disabuse 
their minds, his real name gradually be- 
came lost in fhat of his guardian. Those, 
however, who may contemplate leaving him 




Mr. R. (Muat.) Corrie. 

a million or two of dollars will please take 
notice that his name is R. Muat. 

Mr. Muat-Corrie, for I suppose that is 
how I should really write his name, before 
coming to Canada had a good business 



foundation laid. The most important part 
of it was during the five years he was with 
Dakin & Co., the oldest retail tea house in 
London, England. His first experience in 
Canada was with Swan Bros., of Toronto. 
Another well-known house with which he 
was later on was that of Robert J affray 
& Co., and then he was eight years with 
James Shields & Co., three of which he was 
foreman. Since then he has been city sales- 
man for J. W. Cowan & Co., the Toronto Soap 
Works, and D. Williams & Son. For some 
years he has been carrying on with much 
success a manufacturers' agency. 

Besides being well versed in business 
matters, he knows human nature pretty well 
— a valuable essential to a salesman, while 
his push and perseverance stand out as pro- 
minently as any other of his characteristics. 

Mr. Muat-Corrie has had some experience 
as a soldier as well as a business man, hav- 
ing served five years in the Governor- 
General's Body Guard, and was sergeant in 
that regiment during the Northwest rebellion 
in 1885. 

The public wil 1 not be kept much longer 
in suspense regarding the details of the Hud- 
son Bay canal scheme. Col. Scoble is in 
Winnipeg promoting his application for a 
charter, but progress is slow owing to the 
disturbed condition of the Government. 
However, he has no reason to fear that he 
will not be successful. 



Cm 



ur rants 



We have sold thousands of cases of new goods 
and a reputation is established for the 

HAYCASTLE and PARADISE BRANDS 

When you want currants write us. If we cannot suit you on both 
prices and quality YOU ARE VERY HARD TO PLEASE. . . 
Our trade in this line is immense, because we always have repeat 
orders for the goods we handle. 



Prices and Samples on application. 



H. GILLARD & CO., 



WHOLES A LERS ONLY, 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



%%v5 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




ONTARIO MARKETS. 

GROCERIES. 

TRADE is not active. Such is not to 
be expected immediately after the 
holidays, when retailers are engaged 
in taking stock. Notwithstanding that busi- 
ness is quiet, it is the general opinion among 
wholesalers that the turnover is larger than 
it was this time a year ago. " We appear 
to be doing a great deal of what we usually 
do in February," remarked one wholesale 
man. An increased activity is reported for 
canned vegetables, particularly peas, al- 
though a fair proportion of tomatoes are 
going out. Teas of Ceylon and Indian growth 
and Young Hysons are receiving fairly good 
attention. Molasses are in good demand, 
with the price of the New Orleans kind 
dearer. In spice there is a fair demand for 
allspice, pepper and ginger. There has been 
no further quotable change in sugar, but the 
outside markets continue to gather strength. 
Foreign dried fruits are, as a rule, quiet. 
CANNED GOODS. 
The demand is fairly active for peas and 
tomatoes, an improved enquiry having de- 
veloped for both. The feeling in regard to 
both these commodities is strong. Fruits are 
quiet and there are no new features in regard 
to salmon. We quote : Tomatoes, 77^ 
to85c; corn, 75 to 85c; peas, 901095c. for 
ordinary; sifted, S1.2? ; extra sifted, $1.35; 
peaches, $2.90 to $3 for 3's, $1.90 to $2 
for 2's ; raspberries, $1.40 to $2.00 ; straw- 
berries, $1.80 to $2.45, according to brand and 
quality; blackberries, $1.90 to $2.20; cherries, 
$2.40 to $2.45; apples, 3's, 85 to 90c; 
gallons, $1 90 to 2.25; salmon, "Horseshoe," 
$1.35 to $1.40; "Maple Leaf," $1.35; "Lion," 
$1.35 to $1.40; Lowe Inlet, $1.27 to $1.30, in 
tall tins ; cohoes, $1.10 to $1.20 ; canned 
mackerel, $1.10 to $1.20; lobsters, $1.80 to 
$2.10, for tall tins; flats, $2.35 to$2.6S; half 
tins, Si. 45 to $1.50; Canadian canned beef, 
i's, $1.35 to $1 45; 2's, $2.25 to $2.35; 6's, 
7.50 to $8; 14's, $15 to $16.50. 
COFFEE. 

There is not a great deal doing, and 
there is no special feature to note. We 
quote green in bags : Rio, 19 to 21c; 
Eas' Indian, 27 to 30c; South American, 
21 to 23c; Santos, 19 to 22j£c; Java, 30 
to 33c; Mocha, 33 to 35c; Maracaibo, 21 
to 23c; Jamaica, 21 to 25c. 

SYRUPS. 
There is the usual quiet demand for the 
season. We quote: Dark, 30 to 32c; medium, 
33 to 35c; bright, 40 to 42c. 
MOLASSES. 
New Orleans molasses is about 4c. per 
gallon dearer than it was, and there is an 
active demand to note as a result. We 
quote: New Orleans, barrels, 32^ to 35c; 
half-barrels, 35 to 37j£c; Barbadoes, bar- 
rels, 31 to 35c; halt-barrels, 33 to 37c. 
SUGAR. 

The outside markets continue strong, with 
an upward tendency. A cable received by 



Warren Bros. & Boomer, on Tuesday, from 
London, announced that quotations for 
January had advanced to us., February to 
13s., and June to 13s. 6d. The estimate on 
the Louisiana crop has been reduced 30,000 
tons, Hawaiian, while it is said the rebels in 
Cuba have issued a proclamation forbidding 
grinding on penalty of the factories being 
destroyed. On the local market prices are 
firm but unchanged. There are a few car- 
load lots moving, but generally speaking the 
turnover is not large, although fair for the 
season. We quote : Granulated, i, l /2. to 
AH C - J yellows, 2>% to 4c. for dark and 
extra bright respectively. 

SPICES. 
There is a fair demand for pepper, ginger 
and cloves. A further advance has taken 
place in cream of tartar in the primary 
markets. We quote : Pure black pepper, 
10 to 12c. ; pure white, 18 to 25c. ; pure 
Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c; cloves, 15 to 
20c; pure mixed spice, 25 to 30c; cream of 
tartar, French, 25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 
30c. per lb.; allspice, 14 to 18c. 

NUTS. 

Trade is quiet and featureless. We quote 
as follows : Brazil nuts, 14 to 15c; Sicily 
shelled almonds, 25 to 26c. : Tarragona 
almonds, 14 to i&,%c; peanuts, 10 to 
12c. for roasted, and 7 to 10c. for 
green; cocoanuts, $4.50 to $5 per sack; 
Grenoble walnuts, 12 to I2j|c. Marbot 
walnuts, 11 to 12c; Bordeaux walnuts, 9c. ; 
Sicily filberts, 8 to 10c. for sacks and 
io'<£ to lie. for small lots ; pecans, 10 j£ 
to lie. 

TEAS. 

Inconsequence of the exceptional values 
offering in Young Hysons, buyers have been 
tempted to enter the market a lutle more 
freely. China blacks — A few sales have 
been reported this week, with a little better 
enquiry for good liquoring Monings. Japan 
teas are neglected. In Ceylon teas the 
wholesale men have been buying for impor- 
tation. The kind most in demand have been 
good mediums. Flavory Pekoes are wanted, 
but buyers are rather reluctant to pay the 
price asked to-day in London for these teas. 
We quote ruling prices to retailers as follows : 
Young Hysons, 12 to 18c. for low grades, 24 
to 27c. for mediums, and 30 to 45c. for 
high grades ; China Congous, 14 to 18c. 
for mediums, and 25 to 55c. for high 
grades; Japans, 15 to 20c. for mediums, 
28 to 35c. for high grades ; Indians and 
Ceylons, 18 to 22c. for mediums, and 30 to 
65c. for high grades. 

DRIED FRUITS. 

Currants continue in fairly active de- 
mand. We quote as follows : Provincials, 
3^ to 4c. in bbls.; Fine Filiatras, in bbls., 
4^t04J^c; ditto, half-bbls., 4X to 4^c; 
ditto, half-cases, 4^ to 5c; Casalinas, cases, 
5 to 5X c -ii Vostizzas, cases, 6 to (>%z.; ditto, 
half-cases, £>% to 6^c; ditto, extra fine, 6^ 
to 7%c; ditto, half-cases, 7X to 7}4c.; Pan- 
amas, in cases, 9c. 

Valencia raisins continue firm with de- 
mand light. Stocks in New York are re- 
ported to be 12,000 boxes, compared with 
1 36,000 boxes the same time last year. The 



consumption there during December was 
over 30,000 boxes. We quote : Off-stalk, 
\ l A. to 4^c; fine off-stalk, 5 to 5^c. ; select- 
ed, 6 to 6^c; layers, 6^c 

Further advances are to be noted in the 
price of Bosnia prunes, according to advices 
from Trieste. The advance is more marked 
in the smaller sizes, which are about is. 6d. 
dearer. The demand is fair on the local 
market and good demand is looked for later 
on owing to the small crop of domestic 
fruits. The higher grade prunes are also 
firmer in California. We quote prunes : Bos- 
nias, " Sphinx " brand, " A," 65 to lb., 
9c; "B," 75 to lb. 7%c, "U," 102 to lb., 
6% to 6^c. ; California prunes, 40-50, 10 
to ioj4c per lb.; 50-60, g'Ac. per lb.; 60-70, 
9c; 70 80, 8 'Ac. per lb.; French, 5 to 6c. 

California dried and evaporated fruits are 
quiet with very low prices offering for loose 
muscatels. Apricots are hrm and dear. 
Peaches are steady with some lower grades 
offering. Peaches in bags are being offered 
by the wholesale houses as low as 8c. per lb. 
We quote : Apricots, 15 to 16c; peaches, 
8c, in bags, and 10 to 15c. in boxes ; pears, 
10^ to I2j£c. ; plums, 6>£c. forunpitted, and 
I2^c, for pitted ; nectarines, 11 to 13c; 
loose muscatels, *,% to6j£c. per lb. 

Eleme figs are quiet and unchanged. 
We quote : Eleme, 14 oz., 9 to io^c. ; 10 
lb., 9^ to I2^c; 12 lb., izyic; 28 lb., 15c 

GREEN FRUIT. 

Trade is seasonably quiet in all kinds of 
green fruit, and will remain so till milder 
weather sets in. The feature of the trade this 
week isafurtherdeclineinthepriceoforanges, 
which are from 25 to 50c. per box. We quote: 
Lemons — Messina, $2. 50 to $3.50 for 360's 
and 3oo's respectively per box ; Oranges — 
Jamaicas, $4.50; fancy, $5 ; California 
navels, $4 to $4 75; Valencia*, 420's, $425 
to $4.75 ; Jumbo's, 420's, $6.25 to $6.50; 
ditto, 714's, $5.52 to $5 75 ; Mexicans, $5 to 
$5.50 per box. Bananas, $1.25 to $1.75 ; 
cocoanuts, $3.50 to $4 a sack; apples, $1.50 
to $3 a barrel ; Malaga grapes, $5 to $7 

The Largest Sale. 

The Finest Flavored. 

The Best Friend of the 
Grocer. 

The Worst Enemy of the 
Pedlar. 

"SALADA" 

CEYLON TEA 



P. C. LARKIN & CO. 

25 Front St. East, 
and TORONTO 

318 St. Paul St., MONTREAL 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Don't overlook the name 

SURPRISE 



That's the name of the Soap your cus- 
tomers find to be economical — to be worth 
its price. 



BRANCHES- 
MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO: Wright & Copp, 51 Colborne St. 
WINNIPEG: E. W. Ashley. 



THE ST. CROIX SOAP MFG. GO. 



ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



per keg ; domestic onions, 60 to 65c. 
per bag ; Spanish onions, 40 to 50c. per 
small crate ; sweet potatoes, $3 to $3.25 
per bbl.; cranberries, $10 per bbl., and $3.50 
per case; hickory nuts, $1.50 to $1.75 per 
bush. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

Butter — Trade is still principally con- 
fined to large rolls, receipts of which are 
considerably in excess of requirements, and 
prices are easier. There is not much doing 
in creamery butter, owing, to some extent, to 
the low price of dairy rolls. We quote : Early 
summer dairy, store packed, 8 to 12c ; good 
to choice fresh packed, 14 to 15c; large 
rolls, fresh, 13 to 15c; dairy pound prints, 
i5/£ to 17c. Fresh creamery — Tubs, ig>£ to 
20c. ; do., pound prints, 21 to 22c. 

Cheese— There is no special feature to 
note, beyond the fact that the country mar- 
ket continues strong. We quote : Summer 
make, 9c; Sept. and Oct., 9^ to 10c. 



COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Trade continues quiet. 



Prime 



medium are quoted at $1 to $1.10. 

Dried Apples — Continue dull at 4c. 

Evaporated Apples — Business con- 
tinues dull at by z to 7c. 

EGGS— Fresh eggs are firm and wanted. 
We quote : Fresh, 17 to 18c; packed, 14^ 
to 15c. 

HONEY— A fair demand is being experi- 
enced for honey at quotations. We quote : 
Strained, clover, 10 to ioj£c; dark, 5c.; 
comb, clover, $1.80 per dozen ; dark, 84c. 
per dozen. 

Potatoes— The market is a little easier 
at 20 to 23c. on track and 25 to 30c. per 



bag out of store. The potato dealers are 
practically doing nothing. 

Turnips — There is no local demand, but 
a good many are being exported to the 
Southern States. 

Poultry — Demand is limited. We quote: 
Geese, 5 to 6c. per lb.; turkeys, 7 to 8c. per 
lb.; chickens, 25 to 50c. per pair ; ducks, 40 
to 75c. per pair. 
PROVISIONS AND DRESSED HOGS. 

There has been a slight revival in the 
provision trade, especially in lard, which is 
about ic. per lb. dearer. Carload lots of 
dressed hogs have changed hands on track 
at $4.50 to $4.60. 

Dry Salted Meats— Long clear bacon, 
d%z. lot carload lots, and b% to 6#c. for 
small lots ; backs, 7 j£c. 

Smoked Meats — Breakfast bacon, 
ioc; rolls, 7 to 7#c; hams,large, 22 lbs. 
and over, 9c; medium, 15 to 20 lbs., 10c; 
small hams, 10c; backs, 9 to 9'^c. ; pic- 
nic hams, 7c; all meats out of pickle, ic. 
less thin above. 

Lard— Pure Canadian, tierces, 7^ to 
8c; tubs, 8 to 8^c ; pails, 8'/ to 8>£c. 

Barrel Pork — Canadian heavy mess, 
$13.50; Canadian shott-cut, 14 to $14.50 ; 
cle^r shoulder mess, $12; shoulder mess, 
$11.50. 
DRESSED BEEF, VEAL AND MUTTON. 

Trade is fairly good. We quote : Fore- 
quarters, $2 to $4 per 100 lbs., hindquarters, 
$5 to $7.50, according to quality ; lamb, 
7>£c. ; mutton, 5^ to 6c. ; veal, 5 to 6j£c 
EISH. 

Business is still light and prices unchang- 
ed. We quote oysters: Standards at $1.30 to 



$1.35, and selects $1.60. Fish are quoted as 
follows: Skinned and boned codfish, 6j£c; 
boneless fish, y/z t0 4c; haddock, 5 to 
6c. ; Labrador herring, $3.25 to $3 50 per 
half barrel and $5.50 to $5 75 per barrel ; 
Newfoundland herring, $2.50 per half bar- 
rel, and $4 50 to $4.75 per barrel ; fresh 
water salt herring, $3 per barrel ; blue- 
back herring, 3c; pike, 6 to 7c. per lb.; 
flitched cod, 5c; finnan haddies, 6>£c; 
Digby herring, in bundles of 5 boxes, 11c. ; 
ditto, lengthwise, ioc; large halibut, 12 to 
15c. ; Restigouche salmon, 20 to 25c; 
British Columbia salmon, 13 to 14c; mack- 
erel, 20 to 25c; steak cod, 6y& to 7c: 
haddock, 5c. ; black bass, 9 to ioj^c Fresh 
Lake Erie herring, $4 per 100 ; whitefish, 
8 to 9c; salnnon trout, i% ti 8c; Lake Sup- 
erior whitefish, 8c; Lake Winnipeg white- 
fish, -]]/ z to 8c 

FLOUR AND FEED. 

Wheat — Prices ate higher than a week 
ago. We quote: White, 71^ to 72c; red, 
69c; goose, 54c 

Barley — There have been sales on the 
street at 40 to 44>£c 

Oats— Remain much as before at 28 to 
29c. 

Flour — The market is strong, with de- 
mand good. We qaote : Old crop Manitoba 
patents, $4.10, and bakers', $3 70 ; new crop, 
patent?, $3.80, and bakers', $3.50. 
SALT. 

Business has improved during the week, 
and is now good. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote at Toronto : In carload lots, 
$1 per barrel, and 60c per sack; in less 
than carload lots, $1.05 per barrel and 65c. 
per sack. At the wells we quote : F.O.B. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 



THE TORONTO 

COLD STORAGE WAREHOUSE 



All information from W. H. LECKIE, Manager. 



THE TORONTO COLD STORAGE 
CO., LTD., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN TOMATO CHUTNEE 

For Soups, Gravies, Curries, Fish, Game, etc. 
Used (ui lunch and breakfast .is sandwiches 
Highly recommended by 11. R. II. Princess 
Louise and by the hue Sir John A. Macdonald. 
For sale by leading wholesalers 

Preparedby M. P. CARD, Guelph, Ont. 

Ask the Wholesale Houses I ir 

Rossiter's Household Blushes 

THE BEST. 

GEO. R0SS1TER - TORONTO 

io to 14 Pape Avenue. 



Telephone No. 471. 



Established 1870. 



JOHN HAWLEY 

Provision and Commission Merchant 



Butter 
Eggs 



Lard 
Apples 



Cheese 
Etc. 



Raspberry Jam in 1, 5 and 30 lb. Pkgs. 

88 Front Street East, Toronto 

Sea Food 



"GEM OF THE SEA." 

1 and 2 lb. Bloi 1 

" FAVORITE." 

Pure Cod. 1 and 2 Il>. Blocks. 

" SATISFACTION." 

Boneless Fish. 25 and 40 lb. Boxes. 



Packed by 

LEONARD BROTHERS 

ST. JOHN, N.B. 

JUST RECEIVED 

Evaporated Peaches 
Evaporated Apricots 
Evaporated Apples 

Prices Low. Stock Fancy. 

Write u- for Quotations. 



GLEMES BROS., TORONTO 



barrels, 70c; sacks 50c. for points west of 
Toronto, and 45c. for Toronto and points east 
of Toronto. 

HIDES, SKINS AND WOOL.. 

HIDES— Steady, with demand fair. Dealers 
pay 5c. for No. 1 ; 4c. for No. 2; 3c. for No. 
3. Cured hides quoted at 6 to 6Xc 

Calfskins— 6c. for No. i, and 5c. for 
No. 2. 

Sheepskins— Unchanged at 80c. 

Wool — Trade quiet. Fleece combing is 
quoted at 23 to 24c. ; clothing, 23c. ; supers, 
21 to 22c; extras, 23 to 23^c. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Lard is about ic. per lb. dearer. 

Bosnia prunes are dearer in the primary 
markets. 

Toronto dealers are shipping turnips to 
the United States. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. have a shipment of 
new shelled walnuts in store. 

John Sloan & Co. are in receipt of a ship- 
ment of first Young Hysons. 

A shipment of California fruits is arriving 
for Warren Bros. & Boomer. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., have received a 
shipment of fine, highly polished fancy Patna 
rice. 

Gunn, Flavelle & Co. report that their 
consignments of butter, poultry and eggs 
nearly doubled last year. 

T. Kinnear & Co. are putting mixed 
"' Victoria " package tea on the market in 
half and one pound packages. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. are in receipt of 
shipment of Atlas prunes, A, B and D 
brands. New goods in cases. 

The Snow Drift Co. have just taken into 
stock another 100 sacks of directly imported 
Singapore pepper. The quality is even 
better than the last lot. 

An attractive show card has been issued 
by J. W. Beardsley's Sons, New York. It 
represents a French cook holding up to view 
a package of Beardsley's shredded codfish. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., have been ap- 
pointed wholesale Canadian agents for 
" Mazawattee " tea, and, having taken over 
their entire stock, are in a position to fill 
orders for same. 

The J. W. Beardsley's Sons' traveling 
cooking school, now touring Northwestern 
Ontario, is at Goderich. From there they 
go to Collingwood, and from thence to 
Winghim. This school will be kept on the 



Graham, McLean & Co. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
77 Golborne St. TORONTO. 

We solicit consignments of Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Poul- 
try and all kinds of 

FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCE 

Send us a trial shipment. 

We handle a special line of kettle- rendered Lard. 



ENAMELINE. 




'The Modern Paste Stove 
Polish" has the largest sale 
in the world. 

Beware of imitation. 



WM. H. DU1SIS, 

Canadian Representative, 
394 St. Paul St. Montreal 



k Co. 



Wholesale Produce and 
Commission MenJt.uiis 



62 FRONT ST. EAST, - TORONTO. 



Correspondence Invited. 

Consignments Solicited. 

EGG CASES SUPPLIED 

Liberal advances made 
on consignments. 

Bankers : Canadian Bank of Commerce. 



W. N. LAZIER 

Box 341, VICTORIA. B C. 

Agent for . . . 

R emington machine co. 

Refrigerating and Ire Machines. 

Complete Plants Installed for all Purposes. 

Robb Engineering Co. Economic Boilers. 

High Speed and Corliss Engines. 

Complete Plants Erected. All work 

guaranteed. 

COWAN'S 
OCOAS 
OFFEES 
HOCOLATES 

and ICINGS 

are absolutely pure. 
All orders promptly attended to. 



THE COWAN CO., Ltd. 

470 King 8t. West, 

Toronto. Canada. 



HAMS, BAOON, SHOULDERS, SIDES 



All guaranteed finest on the market. 



L^IRID 



T. R. F. CASE, 



SEAFORTH, ONT. 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



819 PEACH JE LLY WAFERS ^r d udediny " 

JAS. M C LAUCHLAN & SONS Biscuit Manufacturers OWEN SOUND 



road the greater part of 1896, teaching people 
how to cook Beardsley's cod, " Acme " beef 
and "Star" herrings. 

The Port Fish Co. are in receipt of 
another carload of Lake Winnipeg white 
fish. 

Griffin & Skelley have this week shipped 
their first carload of Washington California 
navel oranges. 

D. E. Scott, of Port Hope, offers his 
business for sale, together with lease of 
premises. He does a good family trade. An 
advertisement in another page gives further 
particulars. 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 16, 1896. 

GROCERIES. 

THE want of snow is a general com- 
plaint with the jobbing trade here, 
who assert that their business in Que- 
bec, the Ottawa Valley and Eastern Ontario 
is seriously interfered with for this reason. 
The expectation was for a sensible improve- 
ment in the volume of business during the 
week under review, and the fact that it has 
not come is generally attributed to the above 
fact. Few features are to note, nor are 
there any changes in values in any of the 
important lines. Staple lines, such as sugar, 
tea, dried fruit, etc., continue precisely as 
they were, so far as the spot position is con- 
cerned. 

SUGAR. 

The sugar market continues firm, but 
business is quieter than it was, jobbers hav- 
ing supplied themselves. Demand from re- 
tailers is not brisk this week, and is confined 
to small orders. We quote granulated 4% 
to 4#c, and yellows t,J4. to 4c. 

SYRUPS. 

There is no change in syrups this week. 
The want of snow is interfering with the 
distributive movement in Quebec Province 
and also in Ontario. We quote i^c. for 
ordinary, and 2% to 3c. for bright stock. 

MOLASSES. 

The local situation in molasses remains 
unchanged, business ruling quiet. We quote: 
Barbadoes, 36 to 37c, and Porto Rico, 34 



to 35c. In a large way the only sales of im- 
portance have been some carload lots of 
Barbadoes at 35c. 

RICE. 

The rice market rules quiet and un- 
changed. We quote: Japan standard, $4.25 
to $4.40 ; crystal Japan, $4.75 to $5 ; stand- 
ard B., $3.41; ; English style, $3.30 ; Patna 
$4.25 to $5, and Carolina, $6.50 to $7.50. 

SPICES. 

There is no change in spices locally, 
and nothing very interesting in outside 
advices. We quote : Pure black pepper, 
10 to 12c; pure white, 15 to 22c; pure 
Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c. ; cloves, 15 to 20c; 
pure mixed spice, 25 to 30c; cream of tar- 
tar, French, 25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 30c. 
per lb.; allspice, 12 to 15c. 

COFFEE. 

There is a fair demand for coffees of a 
jobbing character. Prices generally are 
steady as follows : We quote green in bags : 
Maracaibo, 20 to 21c; Rio, 19 to 20c; Java, 
28c; Jamaica, 20 to 21c, and Mocha, 32c. 

TEAS. 

The tea market is quiet and unchanged on 
the whole. Jobbers appear to be supplied 
for the immediate future, for they are not 
doing much either in Japans or medium 
priced China teas. In the former low priced 
teas continue scarce, but there appears to be 
enough of other kinds to go round without 
causing any special enquiry. Indian and 
Ceylon teas continue in fair enquiry in a 
jobbing way. We quote Japans : Low 
grades, 14c; medium, 15 to 18c. ; fine, 20 
to 22c, and choice, 25 to 32c. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

There is a fair jobbing demand for Valencia 
raisins. We quote : Ordinary off-stalk, 4 to 
4#c. ; fine do., 4^ to 4|^c. ; selected, 5 to 
5^c, and layers, b]4. to 7c. 

No change is to note in California raisins, 
which meet a fair demand at 5^ to 6c. for 
3-crown, and d% to 7c. for 4-crown fruit. 

Table raisins are quiet and steady at 
present: We quote Malagas as follows : Ex- 
tra loose muscatels, $1.40; Imperial London 
layers, $1.75 ; Imperial cabinets, $1.90; Con- 
noisseur clusters, $2 20; extra dessert clus- 
ters, $3 ; Royal Buckingham clusters, $3.50. 

Sultanas move quietly and steadily at b% 
to 6j^c. for ordinary grades. 

Currants are in fair demand to fill up 
blanks in stocks. Prices are firm and advices 
from primary markets are equally so. We 



quote : 3^c. in barrels, 4 to 4X0 in half- 
barrels, and 4>£ to 4#c. in cases. 

A moderate demand is noted for prunes at 
steady prices. We quote : French, 5c; 
Bosnia, 6 to 6>(c., and California 7 to 10c. 
as to size. 

Figs are steady and quiet at the following: 
Bags, 4c; ordinary boxed, 8>£ to 9c, and 
fancy, 12 to 14c. 

Dates are the same as noted last week, at 
4^ to 5c. 

NUTS. 

There is a fair seasonable trade in nuts, 
which is of the usual moderate volume 
characteristic of the season. We quote : 
Grenoble walnuts, iij£ to I2#c; filberts, 
TVz to 8c. ; Tarragona almonds, \\% to 
I2j£c; new pecans, 9 to 12c, and new 
shelled walnuts, 18 to 20c. 

CANNED GOODS. 

There are few features to report in canned 
goods, any demand noted being confined 
strictly to supplying actual necessities. We 
quote: Lobsters, tails, $8 per case; flats, $9 to 
$9,150; sardines, ordinary brands, $7 to $8.50; 
best brands, $9.50 to $10.50 ; salmon, $1.25 
to $1.30 per doz.; tomatoes, 75 to 80c; 
peaches, $2 to $2.25; corn, 85 to 90c; mar- 
rowfat peas, 95c. to $1; strawberries, $2 to 
$2.25; raspberries, $1.75 to $2; greengages, 
$1.75 to $2; blue plums or damsons, $1.50 
to $1.75; pineapples, $2 to $2.25 and 3-lb. 
apples, 80 to 85c. 

WINES AND SPIRITS. 

Business in this branch of trade is motion- 
less, aside from an occasional sorting order. 
Import business has not commenced yet on 
spring account. 

GREEN ERUIT. 

The green fruit market has exhibited a 
moderate degree of activity during the past 
week, but few new or striking features are to 
note. 

Oranges — These are not as active as 
they were, and prices are soft at the decline, 
viz. : Jamaicas, $8 to $9 per barrel, and $4 
to $4.50 per box ; Valencias, 420's, $3.75 to 
$4, and 714's, $4 50 to $5. 

Lemons — Continue dull and unchanged 
at $2.50 to $3. 

Grapes — Malaga grapes move quietly 
and steadily at $5 to $6 per keg, as to quality. 

Cranberries — The easy feeling on these 
continues, and the range is lower at $8. 50 to 
$10 per barrel, as to quality. 

Apples — Dull and easy in tone at $2 to 
$3.50, as to grade. 



WE ARE 



PAYING 
GASft 



ieR:ple§ 



FOR 



tR'AP P 



W. B. BAYLEY & CO. 



EXPORT BROKERS 



42 FRONT ST. E. TOTOfltO 



ANOTHER CARLOAD 




California 



Evaporated 
Fruit 



IN BAGS 



Prunes 



90/ioos. 

80/90S. 

70/80S. 

60/70S. 

40/50S. 



Egg Plums. 

Choice Bartlett Pears. 

Unpeeled Peaches. 
Fancy Apricots. 

White Nectarines. 



SULTANAS 

We have 800 boxes 1894 fruit, in good condition, 
which we will clear out at 4 cents. J'$ A BARGAIN. 

Keep your eye open for 

"KOLONA" next week 



THE 



Eby, Blain Company 



LTD. 



WHOLESALE IMPORTING AND MANUFACTURING GROCERS 

TORONTO - - ONTARIO 









24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Dried, Etc. — Dried apples range from 
4 to Ayic, and evaporated, 6 to 6^0. 

Spanish Onions— There is no change in 
these, which we quote at 40c. per crate. 

FJSH. 

The fish market has materially benefitted 
by the cold weather, which has stimulated the 
jobbing demand on city acccunt. Fresh her- 
rings here rule scarce, but prices are un- 
changed. We quote: Fresh haddock and cod 
at 3X and 4c; pickled No. 1 Labrador her- 
rings at $5.25, No. 1 N.S. at $4.25 to S4.50; 
and ordinary grades $3 to $4 per bbl. ; No. 
2 Labrador salmon, $13 per bbl.; B. C. sal- 
mon, $10. 50 to $ii- No. 1 lake trout, $425 
per keg ; No. 1 gteen cod at $4.25 to $4.50 ; 
No. 2 at $2.75 to $3 ; No. 1 mackerel at 
$20 ; No. 1 pickled sardines at $4 50 per 
bbl. Dried and boneless cod, $4.25 to 
$4,150 per 100 lbs. for dried ; ^ l / z to 6c. 
per lb. for boneless ; 5 :. per lb. for boneless 
haddock; 3#c. per lb. for fish, and uc. per 
lb. for shredded. Smoked haddies, 6% to 
7c. per lb., kipoered herrings at $1.40 to 
$1.50 per box, Yarmouth and bay bloaters 
at 90c. per box, and smoked herrings at 8 to 
10c. per lb. 

PROVISIONS AND DRESSED HDGS. 

There is little change in the situation of 
the provision market. The demand for 
all lines is limited, and trade continues 
slow. We quote : Canadian short cut, 
clear, $13.50; Canadian short cut, mess, 
$14 ; hams, city cured, per lb., 9c; lard, 
Canadian, in pails, 8c; bacon, per lb., 9 to 
10c; lard, com. refined, per lb., 6#c. 

The demand for dressed hogs was fair, 
and the tone of the market is firm. Car lots 
of nice, fresh stock sold at $4.80 to $4 90 
per 100 lbs., and in a jobbing way $5.25 to 
$5.50 was paid. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

EGGS— There was no change in eggs, 
and values are steady. We quote : Boiling 
stock, 18 to 20c; Montreal limed, 14 to 15c; 
western limed, 13^ to 14c, and held fresh, 
13^ to 14c. per dozen. 

Beans — The demand for beans was slow 
and the market dull. We quote : Car lots 
of choice hand-picked at $1 to $1.05, and 
small quantities at $1.10 to $1.20. 

Poultry — Enquiry for turkeys was good, 
and nice fresh stocks hive a ready sale at 
7%. to 8c. Chickens are scarce and wanted, 
while ducks and geese are little enquired 
for. Choice fresh killed turkeys sold at 7% 
to 8c; chickens, 6 to6^c; ducks, 7 to 7/£., 
and geese at 5 to 5/^c. per lb. 

FLOUR, MEAL, AND FEED 

The flour market has developed marked 
activity during the past week, and prices 
are much firmer than they were. We quote : 
Winter wheat, $3.60 to $3.80 ; spring wheat, 
patents, $3 75 to $3.85; straight roller, $3 30 
to $3 40; straight roller, bags, $1.60 to $1.65; 
extra, bags, $1.40 to $1.45 ; Manitoba strong 
bakers', $3 40 to $3.65. 

The demand for oatmeal was slow, and 
the maiket is quiet, with no change in prices 
to noie. We quote: Standard, bbls., $2.85 
to $2.9:; ; granulated, bbls., $2.90 to $3; 
rolled oats, bbls., $2,90 to $3. 

A fair business was done in feed, and the 
market is moderately active and steady. We 
quote: Bran, $14 to $15; shorts, $15 to $16; 
mouillie, $19 to $20. 

CHEESE AND BUTTER. 

The cheese market maintains its healthy 
tone, and buyers are picking up cheese 
wherever they find a seller. The latter, 



however, are very firm in their views, being 
strongly disposed to obtain 9/^c. and over 
for finest fall makes. So far, we have not 
heard of any^important transactions on that 
basis, but it is reported that quite a few lots 
were put through to-day at within a fraction 
of that price. The public cable advanced 
6d. to-day. 

Butter continues quiet and steady in a 
jobbing way, at ZO%c. for creamery, and 14 
to 18c. for dairy stock. 

HAY. 

The firm feeling in hay has been accen- 
tuated since last writine, and prices are 50c 
to $1 per ton higher,at $14 50 to $15 for No. 
1 and $13.50 to $14 for No. 2. 
ASHES. 

There has been an easier feeling in ashes, 
and under large receipts prices are 10c. 
lower, at $3 60 for first pots and $3.40 for 
seconds. Peirls are purely nominal in the 
absence of business. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

J. A. Mathewson & Co. have just turned 
into stock a shipment of Lazenby's jellies. 

Geo. Childs & Co. landed this week a 
shipment of Griffin & Skelley's fine Santa 
Clara prunes. 

There are no Va'encia raisins at all, from 
ordinary to fine off-stalk, in first hands here, 
of any consequence. 

Rose & Laflamme note an increasing de- 
mand for Indian teas, " Ram Lai " sharing 
in it with other grades. 

Laporte, Martin & Cie. call attention to 
their large stock of teas, full particulars 
being given in this week's advertisement. 

A. P. Tippet & Co. note an increasing 
demand this season for the larger and finer 
sizes of Santa Clara California prunes. 

The easier tone in raw sugar in Europe is 
attributed to political complications. It is 
not expected to have any effect on values 
here. 

Laporte, Martin & Cie. received the first 
carload of a shipment of No. 1 Barbadoes 
molasses on Tuesday. Others follow dur- 
ing the week. 

Joseph Tetley & Co. call attention to 
their new season's teas referred to in last 
week's advertisement. Samples sent on 
application. 

H. & A. Allan have decided to use Radnor 
Water on their mail steamers. "We have 
had some of the Radnor Water analyzed and 
the result is highly satisfactory," they wri:e. 



NEW BRUNSWICK MARKETS. 

Office of The Canadian Grocer. 
St. John, N.B., Jan. 16, 1896. 

BUSINESS continues quiet, stocks held 
being large in many cases. In fact, 
they are larger than usual owing to 
prices ruling so low during the late fall and 
the last months of the year, particularly 
sugar, beans, flour, oatmeal, pork and lard. 
In some of these lines large quantities are 
bought ahead. It is a doubtful question if 



there is an advantage in such large stocks 
in a market no larger than ours. In many 
cases the smaller dealers, often not strictly 
wholesalers, have been able to buy as low 
as the larger dealers, and in proportion 
have as large a stock. Then the presence 
of stocks in the hands of those anxious to do 
business tends to keep the price below the 
market, and a much smaller per cent, of 
profit is made, while interest, risk and labor 
is much more. The lack of snow has very 
much lessened the volume of business in all 
lines. 

Salt — There is nothing moving; it is the 
dull season. Fair stocks are held here, 
some in bond, which is not usual. The fish 
caught at this season are sold frozen, which 
is one reason of the quiet. We quote : 
Coarse, 50 to 55c ; fine factory-filled, 
95c. to $1.10 ; 5-lb. bags, $3.25 per bbl.; 
10-lb. bags, $3 per bbl.; 20-lb. boxes, 20c ; 
10-lb. boxes, 12c; cartoons, $1.90 to $2 per 
doz. ; dairy, bulk, $2.80 per bbl. ; cheese, 
bulk, $2.70 per bbl. 

Oil — There is good business doing in 
burning oil, at even prices. The great bulk 
sold in the city is American. For one grade 
of Canadian rs high a price is asked, but the 
larger quantity of the Canadian sold is at a 
lower price In lubricating oil this the first 
season and little is doing. We quote : Best 
American, 2^j4 c - I best Canadian, 2i^c. ; 
prime, 10c No charge for barrels. 

Canned Goods— In all light groceries 
the movement is particularly small, there 
being not even the excitement of an advanc- 
ing market. And then, «vhen out of season, 
there is a less demand, as goods are bought 
largely to last through a season. No adver- 
tisements in The Grocer are better gotten 
up, or attracting more interest, than those of 
the different canners. In salmon this year ' 
the chief brand on this market, or perhaps 
it would oe better to say, the brand of which 
there is the largest quantity in stock, is the 
O- Wee-Kay-No. For some years it has 
been the Bri ish America, but the others 
this season were somewhat cheaper. We 
quote as follows : Corn, 85 to 90c ; peas, 
90 to 95c. ; tomatoes, 90 to 95c ; corned 
beef, 2-lb. tins, $2.60 to $2.75 ; i-lb. tins, 
$1.50 to $i.6c; oysters, 2's, $2 to $225 ; i's, 
$1 60 to $1.65; peaches, 3's,$2.85 to $2.90; 2's, 
$1.90 to $2; lobsters, $1.75 to $2; haddies, 
$1.40; salmon, $135 to $1.50; flat, $175; 
clams, $5.50 for 4 doz.; chowder, $3 for 2 
doz.; scallops, $5.50 for 4 doz. ; Digby chick- 
ens, $1; pineapples, $2.35 ; kippered herring, 
$1.10; American peaches, $2.40. 

Dried Fruit — In this line there is little 
to say that is new. There is rather more 
inquiry for dried apples, and those holding 
Nova Scotia are beginning to want to sell; 
market is, however, dull. There is rather 
more movement in evaporated, though not 
any particular demand, prices being rather 



Is the lightest and best food for dys- 
pepiics. The only genuine article 
manufactured in Canada is put up by 

JAS. WILSON 



Manufacturer of 

andsof 



Monkland Mills 



ROLLED 

STANDARD and 
GRANULATED 



OATMEAL 



Fergus, 
Ont, 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



TRADE 



BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH 



MARK 



Ready for the 
No Soaking. 



table in 10 minutes. 
No Boiling. No Odor. 



Selling ( J. Harley Brown, London ; R. Thomson, Hamilton Chambers, 17 St. John St., Montreal j J E. Huxley Winn 
Agents:") W. M. P. McLaughlin, St. John, N.B.; \VM. BREWSTER, Palmer House, Toronto, Canadian Selling Agent. 

J. W. BEARDSLEY'S SONS, New York, U.S.A. 



ipeg ; 



^C0XT\^S«Kt^ 




Cottam's Celebrated Bird Seed 

Is hard to beat, as everybody knows. The 
people will have it, and no stock is complete 
without it. Every packet contains Bird Bread, 
of which we are inventors, patentees and sole 
manufacturers. 

BART. COTTAM & CO. - London, Ont. 

Dawson & O- 

FRUIT 

PRODUCE 

and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

32 West Market Street 

TORONTO. 



Consignments 
Solicited 



George McWilliam. 



Frank Everist. 



TELEPHONE 645. 

MCWILLIAM & EVERIST 

GENERAL.. FRUIT 

Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Consignments of FRUIT and PRODUCE SOLI- 
CITED. Ample Storage. 

All orders will receive our best attention. 



FOR 



SMOKED MEATS 

LONG CLEARS 
MESS PORK 
SHORT CUT PORK 
PURE LARD 
COMPOUND LARD 

Write for Prices. Send your ORDERS by mail. 
Careful Attention. Prompt Shipment. 



F. W. FEARMAN 

HAMILTON 



firmer. Some are buying. The dates to hand 
this season are looking very nice. Prunes are 
quiet with a few California to hand. There 
are no California evaporated fruits moving. 
Peanuts are reported rather firmer. We 
quote : New Valencia?, 5 to 6c; new figs, 
10 to 12c. ; new 4-crown Cal. L. M. raisins, 6 to 
7c; new 3-crown Cal. L.M. raisins, sK t0 6c; 
keg prunes, 4c; boxes, 4^ to 6c; new Cal. 
L. L. taisins, $1.50 to $175; new currants, 
bbls., 3^ to 4c; half-cases, 4 to 4>^c.; new 
evaporated apples, 7 to 7>£c. ; dried apples, 
5 to 6c; dates, 4% to 5c; California evapo- 
rated peaches, 12 to 13c; do. apricots, 12 to 
14c; do. pears, 121013c. ; clean currants, bulk 

5 to 6>£c.;i-lb. cartoons, 7 t07^c; Canadian 
onions, $2 to $2,215 P er bbl.; cocoanuts, $4 to 
$4.50 per 100; citron, 15 to 16c; orange, 13 
to 14c; lemon, 12 to 13c; Valencia layers, 

6 to 6}^c 

Green Fruit — Apples are rather higher ; 
there is no large stock here. Nova Scotia 
exporters are well satisfied with returns from 
England. But few California oranges are 
yet to hand ; a few Floridas are seen in the 
retail stores. They get 6<;c. per dozen, 
while Valencias are retailing as low as 17c. 
per dozen. Some West India oranges here 
are very nice quality, and retail at about 30c. 
In lemons, price is lower. Cranberries con- 
tinue in light demand, owing to high price. 
The cold weather keeps movement light. 
Bananas are only seen in the retail stores. 
We quote : Lemons, $3 to $4 ; West India 
oranges, $6 to $7 per bbl.; Malaga grapes, 
$5 to $6 ; Valencia oranges, $3,715 to $4.50 ; 
Pippins and winter fruit, $1.50 to $3 ; na- 
tive cranberries, $8 per bbl.; Cape Cod do., 
$11 to $12 per bbl. 

Dairy Produce — There is no improve- 
ment along these lines. Butter of medium 
quality continues plenty, with light sale, and 
while good is hard to get, there is difficulty 
in getting an extra price. Creamery prints 
are in but fair demand. In eggs, while high 
prices are paid for hennery stock, case eggs 
sell slowly. Cheese shows little improve- 
ment, there being but light demand, and 
English price is low. We quote : Cheese, 9 
t0 9>£c.; butter, 17 to 18c; eggs, 17 tc 19c; 
fresh creamery prints, 23 to 24c.; tubs, 21 
to 22c. 

Molasses — Price is rather easier than 
was expected, though holders of good grades 
are not pushing sales except at firm figures. 
New Orleans in barrels, which has been so 
largely sold here, giving good satisfaction, 
is very firm, while syrup is also firm at 
quotation, showing a good demand. Stocks 
of Barbadoes,contrary to what was expected, 
are larger than at this season last year, and 
by some low prices are quoted. We quote : 
Barbadoes, 30 to 33c. ; St. Croix, 30 to 32c; 
Porto Rico,34 to 36c; syrup,35 to 38c; Trini- 
dad, 32 to 33c; New Orleans, bbls., 35 to 
36c. 

Sugar — Price has been again advanced. 
Stocks held are in some cases reported large 



Just received 
a carload of 



ONIONS 

"Yellow Danvers" 



Send for 
quotations. 



H. F. PRICE 



102 Foundling 
Street 

MONTREAL 




PUSH YOUR BUSINESS 

By offering that celebrated 
and well-known 

BROCK'S BIRO SEED 

In each i-lb. packet there is a cake of I*.ir<l Treat, 
much appreciated by all liircl Fanciers. 

NICHOLSON & BROCK - TORONTO 



W" RYAN 

PORK PACKER, 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

AND COMMISSION MERCHANT 

7 0-- 7 2 Front St. East. Toronto 

Liberal Advances 

made on Consignments. 

Egg Cases Supplied. 

S. K. MOYER" 

(ON|IV|lSSlOri N|ER(HANT 

\Vholesale Dealer in . . . 

Oysters, Finnan Haddies, Fresh and 
Frozen Fish, Oranges, Lemons, Al- 
m?ria Grapes, Cranberries and Dates 

76 COLBORNE ST., 

TORONTO, ONT. 



USE 



"Maple Leaf" Brand 



Pure Lard 
Hams, Backs 
Breakfast Bacon 



D.Gunn,Flavelle&Co. 

Pork Packers and . . T^b/m^,*/* 
Commission Merchants I OrONlO 






We have 

in stock 



FANCY 



Sweet Jamaica Oranges ♦ 
Valencia Oranges ♦ 

Messina Lemons ♦ 



All Much Lower in Prices. 
Send Vs Your Orders. 

UGH WALKER & SON 

Guelph, Ont. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



for this market, one firm holding over 
4 ooo barrels and another over 3,000, with 
other dealers well stocked. In the above 
there ate some vel'ows, but the larger part 
is granulated. Demand is not luge. We 
quote : Granulated, 4.60:. to 4%c. ; yellow, 
3'A 'o 3%c-; Pans lump, 5X to 5#c; 
powdered, (,% to $j4c. 

Fish — Qu te a quantity of frozen trout 
were received from Quebec during the past 
week. The arrivals of frozen fish have been 
light. A better business is expected this 
week. There is a good demand. A large 
business is also being done in shipping 
bloaters, haddies and boneless fish west. 
The West India market is still dull. Smoked 
herring move very slowly. Dry fish are firm. 
We quote as follows : Frozen herring, 60 
to 70c. Der 100 ; frozen cod and haddock, 
2% to lYzC.; bloaters, 60c. ; haddies, 4>£c.; 
Medium cod, $3.35 to $3.50; large, 
$3.65 to $3.75; small, $2.25 to $2.50; 
pollock, $1.50; bay herring, $1.25 to $1.30; 
Grand Manan, $1.30 to $1.40; ripplmgs, $1.65 
to $1.70; wolves, $1.90 to $2; Quoddy River, 
$2,715 t0 $3 ! smoked, 5 10 6c. ; shad, half- 
bbl., pickled, $4.50 to $5; Canso, $5;halfs, 
$2. 75; Shelburne, $2.75 to $3 per bbl. 

Provisions — There has been quite an 
active week. Owing to advance in prices 
many dealers have bought quite largely in 
pork and lard. Though lard is firmer some 
of the lowest prices of the season have been 
quoted during the week. The advance in 
pork has so far been about '_oc. per bbl. 
Beef as yet shows no change. Little busi- 
ness is yet doing in smoked meat except 
by local curers. We quote : Domestic mess 
pork, $14.50 to $15 ; American, $14 to 
$14.50 ; clear pork, $15.50 to $16; beef, $13 
to $14; pure lard, 8^ to 9;.; compound 
lard, 8c; rolls, 8c; hams, io^ to 12c 

Flour Feed and Meal — Market tends 
upward, and fair sales are reported by millers. 
A combine among the smaller Manitoba 
mills is reported, and they are making a 
push for business. In oatmeal there is also 
an advance, and dealers have bought largely 
in many cases ahead to arrive. O its are 
aKo firm, though still low. B;ans show no 
change, but the feeling is fjr higher figures. 
In hav price continues high, with large 
quantities going to the American market. 
Buckwheat meals show hgh- demand. We 
quote: Manitoba, $4.35 to $4.60 ; best On- 
tario, $4 to $4. 10 ; medium, $3 90 to $395 ; 
oatmeal, $3 6u to $3 70 ; cornmeal, $2.30 to 
$2 35 ; hand picked beans, $1.20 to $1.25; 
prime, $1.10 to $115; split peas, $3 70 ; pot 
barley, $4.10 to $4.25; hay, $12 to $13; oats, 
34 to 36 :. ; middlings, $19 to $20 on track ; 
bran, $18.; buckwheat meil, domestic, $1.25 
to $1.30 ; western, $1.75 to $2. 



ST. JOHN NOTES. 

About one car of fish per day is being sent 
west, largsly haddies, bloaters, boneless cod 
and frozen fish. 

John Sealy received a large consignment 
of frozen fish this week. He makes regular 
shipments west, where he has a large trade. 

Brooms and brushes are being quoted 
rather lower. The most marked change is 
in brooms. The cause is the lower price of 
stock. 

St. John merchants shou'd push for a dir- 
ect steamer to Porto Rico. Hal. fax now has 
one. We hive fish and other goods to send 
Porto R-co molasses is also a favorite here. 



A lirge quantity of extra quality arrived here 
this season. 

The exports of New Brunswick to the 
United States for 1895 exceed those for 1894 
by $807,000. The total exports aggregated 
$2,219,000. 

At the last meeting of the Board of Trade 
a letter was read from the Provincial Gov- 
ernment promising co-operation in the mat- 
ter of cold storage. 

Quite a large seizure of bass under size 
was made here during the week. It is hoped 
this will stop a practice which hurts no one 
more than the fishermen. 

J. K. Dunlop, Jr., has opened a hay, oats, 
feed and flour store on Mill street. He is in 
a new building fitted up for the business 
near the railway, and should do a large 
trade. 

One shipper of cattle by the steamers sail- 
ing from here brought with him a car of 
feed to send across with his cattle. He was 
not a little surprised, as well as somewhat 
disappointed, to find he could have bought it 
better here. 



SUGAR OF THE EMPIRE. 

An English exchange says : At a meeting 
of the London Royal Colonial Institute at 
London, recently, a paper was read by Mr. 
Justice Conde Williams, of Mauritius, on 
" The Future of Our Sugar - Producing 
Colonies." Mr. Justice Williams said that the 
all-important question just now was, can the 
struggle against the bounty-fed product be 
longer maintained by our own sugar produc- 
ing colonies? If the home market alone 
were available the answer would be in the 
negative ; but, fortunately, there were other 
markets in the great colonies and in the 
United States. In view of possibilities it was 
desirable in the case of all our West Indian 
possessions, and essential in the case of some 
of them, to maintain at all hazards the manu- 
factureof sugar. This could onlybe done, with- 
out loss to the producer, by perfecting the 
methods of manufacture. The hour had arriv- 
ed for adopting the central factory system, 
which was freely employed by other coun- 
tries. British Guiana contained possibilities of 
wealth beyond the dreams of avarice. The 
colony was as large as the British Isles, and 
wiih a population of less than three to the 
square mile, its exports in 1893 94, in spite 
of all bounties and depression, amounted to 
nearly ,£2,500,000, of which more than £1,- 
500,000 was in sugar and rum, and /500,- 
000 in gold, obtained almost wholly from 
alluvial washing. The output of gold had 
increased tenfold during the past five years. 
Vast upland regions remained to be exploit- 
ed, prolific in every resource and condition of 
tropical culture. Mr. Justice Williams said 
he believed in the hopeful cul'ure of our 
sugar-producing colonies, no less than in the 
future of cane sugar itself, when at length 
freed from the subsidized competition of 
what was after all a very inferior rival." 



E. T. STURDEE 

Mercantile Broker, 
Manufacturers' Agent, 

ST. JOHN, N.B. Etc -> Et c- 

Wholesale trade only. 

Cleaver's Toilet Soaps. 
Bensdorp's Royal Dutch Cocoa. 
Pyle's Pearline. 

C. & E. MACMICHAEL, 

40 Dock St., St. John, N.B. 



FPPS'S COCOA 

Mi d 1-4 lb. Packets. 14 lb. Boxes 

secured in tin. 

Special Agent for the Dominion 

C E. COLSON - MONTREAL 

It's quality 



that tells . . 
every time 



. THE REASON THAT 



Golden Finnan Haddies 

Still take the LEAD in canned haddies 
is that only the BEST fish are picked. 
Be sure and specify " Golden Brand " 
in your next order. Every can war- 
ranted. 

Wholesale by 

NORTHRUP & CO. 

Packers' Agents. ST. JOHN, N. B 

FISH* 

WIT HOUT A BONE. 

Ordinary Boneless Fish have some 
bones in them, but we now put up pure 
Codfish in 3-pound boxes 

WITHOUT A BONE. 

This is the best Fish packed in Can- 
ada, and very much superior to Fib- 
red or Shredded Fish. . . . 



JOHN SEALY - St. John, N.B. 



«fc 



^OT"P s - 

f ''DIAMOND" 

CHOCOLATE 



** 



JOHN.P.MOTT&CO 

SsJ MAUF*X,KS s>- 

■*w_ establish toyr* 



ASK FOR 



& 



MOTT'S 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



Does it pay 



Yc 



ERTAINLY IT DOES 




Take no chances. The quality is of the very best. The manufacturers guarantee the 
quality of 

Dalley's Royal Hygienic Self-Rising Flour 

to all customers. There is no trouble in selling these flours — Tea, Graham, Pancake 
and Buckwheat. Once your customers have tried them they will not take any other. 
Order at once from your wholesale house 

THE F. F. DALLEY CO., Ltd,, Hamilton, Canada. 



Manufactured by 



Only the best fruit, thoroughly cleaned 
and picked, is used in making 



♦ CLARK'S ♦ 

| ENGLISH MINGE MEAT ! 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

An Article fit for a 
King's Table. 

Every package guaranteed to be as 
represented. 



W. CLARK 



MONTREAL 



PUR 



Maple Syrup 

Finest quality. Write for quotations. 



T. A. LYTLE & CO 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 
TORONTO 




*ts i 



DON'T DELAY 




Order at once. The stock 
now on hand is limited. 
You want our goods. You 
may send in your order after 
the more wide-awake man 
has ordered ahead of you. 
Be first. The 



1 



"KENT" 



Canning and 
Pickling Co. 




CHATHAM, ONT. 



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There's a 

Subtle Something 




In all our goods that makes them favorites 
wherever they are tried. 



Purity of stock and strict attention to detail 
in manufacture ensures a superior article. 
This is why our goods never disappoint 
consumers, but grow in favor the more 
they are used. 



DELHI CANNING CO. 



^DELHI, ONT. 



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28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HALIFAX TRADE GOSSIP. 

THE reports from Toronto and Mont- 
real of a rise in flour have not affected 
this market, and prices are not likely 
to change for some time at least. A good 
business is being done in Manitobas. 

The local sugar market remains firm at 
prices quoted last week. The refinery is 
doing a good business. 

Hay is in good demand. An Amherst 
firm is offering good prices for an exportable 
article. Halifax quotation is about $11.50 
in car lots, which is mainly for Quebec hay. 

Stocks of creamery and roll butter are 
large, and the enquiry is only light. Cream- 
ery in tubs is worth 22c, and dairy rolls 18c. 

"Eggs, 10 cents per dozen," was the sign 
displayed in an Argyle street store all last 
week. It did not attract custom, though it 
certainly attracted attention. Housekeepers 
fight shy of eggs at that price at this season 
of the year. Guaranteed fresh stock is worth 
20c. retail. 

The local cheese market is somewhat 
firmer, though prices have not come up any. 
Antigonish September is sold at io^c. 

The green fruit market is very quiet after 
the holidays. Stocks are light and there is 
little or no demand. Good eating apples are 
worth $3. Grapes have gone up somewhat, 
$6 being asked for heavy kegs. Valencia 
oranges are cheaper. 

There is some enquiry from the west for 
frozen herring, but otherwise the fish market 
is without interest. 

The demand for molasses is quiet. A sale 
of 100 puncheons Trinidad to Boston is re- 
ported. 

P. E. Island poatoes were never so low 
in this market, and shippers are billed to lose 
heavily They are selling at 15c. per bushel 
from schooner, which is only a small ad- 
vance on first cost. 

P.E. Island oats are in fair demand at 

34C 

The provision market is unchanged. 

Canned goods are meeting with little or 
no enquiry, but dealers look for business 
next month. 

The poultry market is depressed. Good 
Ontario turkeys are retailing at 10c, and 
geese, ducks and chickens at proportion- 
ately low rates. 

A fire at Kentville last Sunday destroyed 
the grocery stores of S. S. Strong, and 
Dodge & Dennison. Strong's loss is $3,- 
000, and he has $1,200 insurance. Dodge 
& Dennison's loss is $2,000, with $500 in- 
surance. The latter firm saved most of their 
stock. 

The Canadian Grocer is this week in 
receipt of a unique New Year's card from 
one of its old subscribers, A. Neilson, gen- 
eral merchant, Manito*aning, Ont. It is of 
birch bark with the letters and decorations 
in porcupine quills of green, purple, pink, 
yellow and white. We shall preserve it for 
posterity. 



"CUTTING" IN PAPER. 

Editor Grocer, — The " talk " about 
war, the dissolution, the bolters and the cut 
in price of paper and paper products, are 
stirring topics in Canada just now, and as 
we are getting a full share of attention from 
your readers in connection with alleged 
" cutting," permit us to say that every 
course and action leading to or encouraging 
these ends is disastrous. 

Much of the " talk " is senseless and 
much of the "bluster" is reckless. 

Some song writer has flippantly con- 
densed England's portion in the event of 
war into a couple of lines of jingle. 

Permit us for the benefit of the trades in- 
terested in paper and paper bags to parody 
the rhyme — but not with less force and truth 
— so as to show our position, thus : 

We don't want to cut, but by Jingo if we do, 
We've got the mills, we've got the stock, we'll get the 
business too. 

It has been said that the action of " the 
bolters " reminds one of the pets of " Little 
Bo-Peep" ; and this brings to us the recol- 
lection that we lost a few customers for 
paper last year and the year before because 
we would not then meet, with our better 
stock, an inferior sheet at a "cut" price. 
However, most of the friends who left us 
then have returned or are returning to the 
fold, for when left alone they all come home 
and bring their tails (tales of poor quality 
and indifferent treatment received elsewhere) 
behind them. Yours, etc., 

The E. B. Eddy, Co., Ltd. 

Hull, Canada, January, 1896. 



DEARTH OF GROCERY SALESMEN. 

From all indications there is a rapidly- 
increasing dearth of first-class traveling sales- 
men to travel among the grocery trade. In 
one Philadelphia newspaper of last Sunday 
there were eight advertisements for whole- 
sale grocery salesmen. Six of these were by 
Philadelphia houses, and one by a New 
York house who wanted a Philadelphia sales- 
man. The eighth was by another New York 
concern who wanted a Philadelphia man- 
ager. 

The strong point of all these advertise- 
ments was that they all, in nearly the same 
words, stated that they were after men who 
had " established trade." Not a great while 
ago the supply of good salesmen was fully 
equal to, if not in excess of, the demand. 
The present tremendous competition, how- 
ever, and the hundred and one schemes 
which are used to-day to capture trade, have 
resulted in a raising of the standard, so that 
the grocery salesman who could succeed five 
or ten years ago may be now very nearly a 
failure. 

This condition means that there is a first- 
class chance for young men who want to 
make their mark in the world. A young 
man who has the selling talent is more in 
demand to-day than he ever was before. If 



any young grocer or clerk reading this paper 
has the faculty of a salesman, he will do well 
to leave the retail grocery business for the 
wider and more remunerative field of road 
work.— Grocery World, Philadelphia. 



P. E. I. WANTS A DIRECT STEAMER. 

Great interest is being taken in Prince 
Edward Island in dairying, and a cold stor- 
age warehouse and a direct steamer to Eng- 
land are among the things hoped for in the 
near future. Since the first of the year a 
shipment of 15,000 lbs. fresh made bjtter 
was sent to Halifax for the English market. 
The central depot in Charlottetown turned 
out since December 3rd 25,000 lbs.; and 
another season a great deal more is ex- 
pected. There are two other creameries at 
work, turning out about 5,00 lbs. each per 
week. The output of cheese during the sea- 
son ending about October 31st was 1,750,000 
lbs., and of butter 55,000 lbs. The manu- 
facturing is in the charge of the Govern- 
ment. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. C. E. Dubord, of Quebec, manufac- 
turer of the "Dominion" and " Phoenix " 
matches, was in Toronto this week. 

Mr. George Lightbound, of Montreal, is 
in Toronto this week looking up business. 

Mr. Roberts, the northern " Snow Drift" 
man, is just in from his first trip north, and 
while trade is not booming, his men have 
met their obligations well. He looks for- 
ward hopefully to a fair year's work. 



R 



AGENCIES WANTED. 



ESPONSIBLE MAN WANTS A FEW GOOD 
agencies— anything pertaining to liquor or grocery 
trades. Applicant has had connection with above trades 
for past twenty years. First-class references from best 
firms and banks in Montreal. Can give security if desired 
Address V.P., care of E. Desbarats, 146 St. James Street, 
Montreal. 



WANTED. 



JOB LINES OF ELECTRIC OR OTHER SOAPS, 
Bath Brick, Shoe Blackings, Matches and General 
Grocers' Sundries, for spot cash. Kussill in the Market, 
St. Lawrence Market, Toronto. (3) 

BUSINESS CHANCES 

IN A CITY OF 10.000 — A PORK STORE -WELL 
• fitted up for the business; will uispose wiih or with- 
out fixtures; going out of the retail trade. Apply office 
of this paper. (3) 

<£0 OOO W1LL PURCHASE A HALF 1N- 
^>0)UvU terest in a well established manufac- 
turing business; centrally located; an article handled 
by all grocers ; purchaser to act as salesman. Address 
Box 3 Grocer. (3) 

FOR SALE— GRO FRY WITH LEASE OF PRE- 
inises, live business, long established, best sund 111 
town, good family trade in fine staple and fancy grocer- 
ies, stock full and in first-class condition, good reasons 
given for selling. Personal inspection invited, or refer- 
ences given Montreal or Toronto D. E. Scott, Poit 
Hope, Ont. (5) 




E 




TAPIOCA 

PLEASES! SELLS! 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 



It Took 
Hard Thinking 

to get this package 
right. We have to date 
received two complaints 
of the bottom of the 
package bursting out — 
but there will be no 
more. We thank our 
friends who told us. 




Push these and save 
your yearly bill for lamp 
glasses 

Each contains i lb. 
net of first-class Baking 
Powder. . . . 



PUT UP 1 DOZEN IN CASE 



You can guarantee it. 



Write us. 

See our travelers 



PURE GOLD M FG.CO 



31 &33 FRONT ST. EAST. 
TORONTO. 



TRADE CHAT. 

WH. Hill's grocery, Sarnia, was bur- 
galamed Friday night and some 
• money and goods taken. 

C. J. Northcott has removed his stock of 
groceries to Strathroy. 

The private bank of Miller & Bouchier, 
Sutton, Ont, has stopped payment. 

The M. C. R. are loading 168 cars of ice 
daily at Waterford. The ice is eight inches 
thick. 

During 1895 the declared value of exports 
from Brockville to the United States was 
$225,543, as against $140,952 for 1894. 

Several of the cheese factories in this 
neighborhood have their October and No- 
vember cheese on hand yet. — Belmont 
Times. 

Mr. Robert Hamilton, a merchant at Car- 
man, is in the city, accompanied by his bride, 
nee McLaren, daughter of a prominent busi- 
ness man at St. Mary's, Ont. They are 
guests at the home of Mr. Thos. McKee, 
276 Ellice street. — Free Press, Winnipeg. 

A new classification sheet on through 
business has been issued by the Canadian 
Pacific Railway to affect all local points 

Lwest of Port Arthur and all through business 
to points east of Port Arthur on the 15th 



A number of important changes in the rules 
and regulations and in the classification of 
goods have been made. 

Much interest is being taken in Bothwell 
in regard to oil at the present time. The 
Gatling well will be in shape for pumping 
just as soon as all preparations can be com- 
pleted. The drilling at the Crowell well 
has been going on steadily, and this well 
will be pumping in a very short time. The 
Moore Bros, have shut down their well in 
order to rebuild their tanks, which were leak- 
ing badly. They have now got them in 
good repair, and again running, the well 
producing a good supply of oil. 

The grocery store of J. M. Rousseaux, 
King street east, Hamilton, was entered by 
thieves Monday night and a large quantity 
of tea and coffee and $9 in money stolen. 
The money was taken from the safe, the 
door of which had been unintentionally left 
open. This is another instance in which 
entrance was effected with the aid of a 
duplicate or skeleton key. 

Large shipments of flour have been made 
from Minneapolis to St. John for shipment 
to Liverpool and London. Ninety-three car- 
loads were delivered there in one day per 
C.P.R. 



CHARLOTTETOWN, P. E. I., BOARD 
OF TRADE. 

The annual meeting of the Charlottetown, 
P.E.I., Board of Trade was held in their 
room, Masonic Temple, Wednesday night, 
the 8th inst. 

After the transaction of ordinary and im- 
portant business, a resolution for the affilia- 
tion of the Charlottetown Board with the 
Maritime Board was passed, and Hon. Don- 
ald Farquharson was elected councillor for 
the Maritime Board. 

The officers of the Charlottetown Board 
were elected as follows : 

President — P. Blake, re-elected. 

Vice-President — W. H. Aitken. 

Sec.-Treas.— B. D. Higgs, re-elected. 

Councillors — John Newson, S. W. Crabbe, 
T. Handrahan, H. Haszard, D. Laird, N. 
Rattenbury, C. Lyons and Ben. Rogers. 

Arbitrators — Thos. McLean, J. Newson, 
D. Laird, W. W. Beer, H. Haszard, N. 
Rattenbury, J. Paton, S. W. Crabbe, B. 
Rogers, J. J. Davies, J. T. Crockett, and W. 
W. Clarke. 

A. T. CLE6H0RN 

General 
Commission Agent 



Corresponde nee 
solicited. 



LONDON, CAN. 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Pinna ye hear the Slogan ? 

If you drink Whisky, drink 



JOHN DEWAR'S SCOTCH 



HONORS AWARDED 



Purveyors by Royal Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Under competition the only Scotch drawn at the Bars of the 
largest Caterers in the World, viz. : Spiers & Pond, Ltd. Diploma 
of Honor and Gold Medal, Edinburgh, 1890 (Highest Award). 



Better Whisky cannot be had 



MEDALS 



Edinburgh 

Antwerp 

Anglo- Danish . 

Cookery 

Brussels 

London 

Melbourne 

Food (London) 

Sportsman 

Paris 

Dunedin 

Military 



Edinburgh 

London 

Jamaica 

Food 

Tasmania 

Dublin 

Brussels 

Chicago 

Fisheries 

Manchester 

Brewers' Show, Manchester. 



National Trades and Industrial Exhibition, 1894, etc., etc. 



1892 
1893 
1891 
1893 
1893 
1894 



AMERICAN TOMATO PACK. 

THE sixteenth annual report of The 
American Grocer shows the total 
pack of tomatoes in 1895, ia 
comparison with the output of previous 
years, and demonstrates that an earnest 
and successful effort has been made to 
bring supply and demand into their pro- 
per relation. The acreage was reduced in 
nearly every tomato-picking state; and this, 
coupled with unfavorable weather, a delay- 
ed season and early closing, resulted in a 
pack of 3,844,780 cases, against 6,686,979 
cases in 1894 — a reduct on of 2,842,199 cases, 
or 42^ per cent. A careful study of the 
output for three years indicates that under 
normal conditions the annual requirements 
of the United States are amply met by a 
pack of 4,500,000 cases — in fact, the actual 
consumption has not reached that quantity. 
The total output in three years — 1893-95 — 
was 15,166,942 cases, a yearly average of 
5,055,647 cases. Had not this supply been 
beyond requirements, the market would 
have advanced. The fact that prices 
throughout the year have ruled compara- 
tively steady, at or below thj cost of pro- 
duction, is sufficient evidence that the out- 
put has been enough greaer than require- 
ments to keep the market down. The law 
of supply and demand is inexorable, and if 
the former is below the latter, it is inevitable 



that prices improve. They have not ad- 
vanced, and the conclusion must be reached 
that invisible stocks are larger than esti- 
mated. The total output in 1895 and 1894 
(revised to include districts not heretofore 
reported) compares with the pack of previous 
years as follows : 



Year. 
895.. 



893 
892.. 
891.. 
890.. 



Total for nine years 

Average per year 

Average per year 1894-95. 



Cases of 2 doz. 
tins each. 
3,844,780 
6,686,979 
4.635.183 
3.366.792 
3.405.365 
3,166,177 
2,976,765 
3-343, '37 
2,817,048 



34,242,226 
3,804,692 
5,265,879 



PROSPECTING IN HAMILTON. 

In a report of the meeting of the Finance 
Conmittee of the Council, The Hamilton 
Herald says : In connection with the ap- 
plication for exemption from taxation and 
water rates from the Aylmer Canning Co., 
Ontario Canning Co. and Simcoe Canning 
Co., there were several representatives of 
the companies present. 

On behalf of the Aylmer Canning Co., 
which wished to come to this city if exemp- 
tion could be secured, S. F. Washington 
spoke, calling attention to the fact that in 



the packing season the company employed 
from 100 to no hands, and it would be a 
desirable enterprise to have in the city. 

Chairman Colquhoun called attention to a 
letter from the Simcoe Canning Co., which 
has been paying taxes, but which would not 
care to go on doing so if exemption were 
granted an opposition firm. 

President Marshall, of the Aylmer Co., 
said his company was the oldest of the kind 
in the country, and it was a company of 
high standing. He had been offered induce- 
ments to go elsewhere with his factory. 

Aids. Watkins and McAndrews were op- 
posed to the asked-for exemptions, the for- 
mer reiterating strong objections to exemp- 
tions, and suggesting that all businesses in 
the city be exempted. 

A motion to the effect that the requests be 
refu ed was about to be pat, but at Lawyer 
Washington's request the committee decided 
to allow the matter to go over for the new 
Finance Committee to attend to. 



TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS. 

We want our subscribers to let us know if 
they do not receive their copy of THE 
Canadian Grocer regularly everv week. 
Every Thursday evening of every week of 
every month of every year, wi hout excep- 
tion, this paper has been m .iled, but not- 
w ihstanding great care on cur par', we are 
freq lentiy in receipt of complaints regarding 
its non-de ivery. The p blishers are not to 
blame, and un ess subscribers n uify them 
promptly, errors cannot be rectifi d. 



S. Sc H. HARRIS'S HOUSEHOLD REQUISITES. 



IIARRIS^ 

BRITISH 

Polishing 
Paste. 

3rass Copper, Tin, Pewer,merall 
i Plate. Couch G lasses s Window // 



Ebonite Blacking 

( WATERPROOF.) 

FOR BOOTS AND SHOES. 



Does not 
Injure the 
Leather 




Requires 
No. . 
Brushing 



Trade Mark. 

..ASK FOE IT. 



XANTHOSCUTE] 



[[BROWN LEATHER| 
RESTORER, 

For Cleaning and J-rrservlng 

BROWN BOOTS AND SHOES 

And all kinds of Russet 

Leather. ^,- 

tyf* gtaniifirlorr : 



SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



MANUFACTORY : LONDON, E., ENGLAND. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 




IF YOD CANNOT SATISFY 



Customers from the stock of Baking Powders you carry 
— and this is a very general complaint with the trade — 
the remedy is simple. Get a supply of JERSEY 

CREAM BAKING POWDER. Pure 
and Sure. 



Lumsden Bros., Hamilton, Ontario 



EW1HG. HON 4 CO. 

Have Tons 

OF CARRAWAYS 

Recleaned and double sifted. Samples 
and quotations sent on enquiry. 

Trade Mills - - 



WESTERN 



Incorporated 
1861. 



ASSURANCE COMPANY 



Fire and Marine 



Capital - - - 
Assets, over - - 
Annual Income - 



$2,000,000.00 
2,375,000.00 
2,200,000.00 



Head Office : TORONTO, ONT. 



Geo. A. Cox, President. J. J. Kenny, Vice-President 

C. C Foster, Secretary. 



TEAS 



New Ceylons and Assams 
in store and arriving. Also 
good values in Japans, Young 
Hysons and Congous. 



JOHN SLOAN & CO. 



Wholesale Grocers 



TORONTO 



Y. Hysons 



; 



New Season Moyune, 
good style and liquor 



10c, 12c, and 15c. 



•i iuu *j 



Warren Bros, k Boomer \ 

wholesale grocers % 

35 and 37 Front St. East, Toronto. A 





P. M. LAWRASON 

a 
London, Ont. g 



NOW IN STORE 



Excelsior Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 

Perfecto Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 
London Layers. Black Baskets. 

A full and complete stock of Christmas Fruits. 



T. KINNEAR & CO. 

49 Front St. E., TORONTO. 

Teas 



SPECIAL VALUE IN INDIAN 
AND CEYLON : 

Shipments now coming 1 
to hand. 



J, W. Lang & Co. 

Have in stock . . . 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Extra." 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Fine." 

Curtice Bros.' " Monroe Brand " 

Strawberries. 
Shredded Codfish, " pkges." 

Very fine. 

J. W. Lang & Co. 

It 9 r 'eet 1 ^ 8 d t 63Front Toronto. 

THE NEW VEGETABLE 

Hulled Corn 



^D 



ln'3-lb. handsomely 
labelled cans. 



90c. per dozen 



Perkins, Inge & Go. 



TORONTO. 



SMITH & KEIGHLEY 

9 Front St. E, TORONTO. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HINTS TO YOUNG GROCERS. 

IF accident and luck put the young grocer 
in a store that does more than support 
him comfortably, the road to success is 
straight and pleasant, says Retail Grocers' 
Advocate. All he has to do is to stay there 
and save his money. But if his first store 
happens to be one in which he can hardly 
make a living, while his capital is hardly 
enough for his business, the greatest business 
ability would not be of much avail. He may 
work hard but he makes no headway. All 
he can do is to sell his store and start else- 
where. He is fortunate if he finds a buyer 
in due time at a price that will enable him to 
buy a paying store ; but if he cannot sell out 
to advantage, he is unfortunate indeed if he 
does not realize enough to procure a good 
store with it. To buy a store at a small price 
is like gambling at best. A good store com- 
mands a price, and if the young grocer can- 
not pay it, the history of the next store will 
be the same as that of the first, and the 
grocer may never be well on his feet. This 
has been the fate of many an able and hard- 
working grocer. But very often failure in the 
grocery business is due to causes that can 
easily be avoided, and the experience of one 
should be a lesson to the other. 

The grocer's business policy should be in 
harmony with his neighborhood. If his 
store is in a first-class neighborhood he 
should be careful about the quality of his 



goods, for his customers will care more for 
good quality than low prices. If he is in a 
low neighborhood, he must be prepared to 
sell cheap and work hard. His hours must 
be longer and his clerks must work harder 
too. In order to make his clerks work hard, 
he must set them an example by working 
hard himself. 

Never have too many clerks. If two clerks 
can do your work, they will do it better than 
three. Necessity will make them work quick, 
and their minds will be more centred upon 
their work than if you had an extra clerk, 
and all had more time to think of other 
things. If business drags along slowly, 
think of ways and means to draw new trade, 
and ask advice from your fellow grocers, 
who may be able to give you pointers. 

Join the grocers' association, where you 
will get acquainted with people from whom 
you can learn. 

If you have neglected to do these things 
in the old year, think of them in the new 
year. 



boxes of 50 lbs. each. Of fresh apples are 
only wanted Baldwins (red). Of wheat flour 
they handle all grades, but mills that export 
Manitoba flour made from hard wheat can 
do large business in the Scandinavian 
countries if able to compete with United 
States mills. C. E. S. & Co. think there 
could be sold large quantities of Canadian 
cheese in the Scandinavian countries, and 
would like to correspond with an exporter. 
They answer cheerfully all questions in re- 
gard to Canadian export. 



CANADIAN FOODS IN NORWAY. 

C E. Sontum & Co., Christiania, Nor- 
way, commercial agents for the Government, 
announce that they have sold several car- 
loads of Canadian rolled oats, wheat flour, 
evaporated apples, etc., during the last 
couple of months. Rolled oats they buy in 
barrels of 180 lbs., evaporated apples in 



U. S. AND CANADA SALMON PACK. 

M. S. Lowenthal, of San Francisco, has 
issued a prepared statement of the pack and 
distribution of canned salmon on the Coast 
for 1895. The pack is estimated as follows : 

Cases. 

Columbia Kiver 634,900 

Other Oregon rivers 230,1 to 

Alaska 607,048 

California 26,000 

British Columbia 603,068 

Total 2,101,116 

The shipments from Sin Francisco by 
water, from June I, have bejn as follows : 

Cases. 

To England 497,984 

To other foreign ports 46,770 

To New York 180,294 

Total from San Francisco 725,048 

From Columbia River direct 78,201 

From Puget Sound direct '7,313 

From British Columbia direct 351,434 

Total by s«a 1,171,996 




who cater to a coun- 
try trade must keep 



Salt 



to suit their custom- 
ers. 

A MEDIUM GRAIN SALT 

is what farmers re- 
quire. We sell it. 



The Canada 
Salt Association 



CLINTON, ONT. 



OUR BRANDS : 



BROOMS . . . 

R 

O 

O 

M 

S 



Imperial Gold Medal Victoria 

Bamboo Carpet Standard Leader 

A variety of sizes in each line. Give us a trial order. 

Freight allowed to Ontario points in 5 doz. lots. 



CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers. TORONTO, ONT. 



CONFIDENCE 

in the merits of the goods you sell is an important element of success. 

JOHNSTON'S 

FLtUlD BEEF 

can always be sold with the most absolute guarantee that it is the best beef 
preparation. We will back you up in this statement to the fullest extent. 

THE JOHNSTON FLUID BEEF GO, MONTREAL, 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



MARINE INSURANCE 

The Mannheim Insurance Company 

Grant Open Policies to Wholesale Gro- 
cers and Importers at specially favor- 
able rates. 



Further particulars obtainable by applying 
to Local Agent, or to 

JAMES J. RILEY & SONS 

Managers for Canada Montreal 



Notice 



TO THE WHOLESALE 
TRADE ONLY . . . 
Vnii foil Riiv plug tobaccos duty paid. 

1 UU Kjd.ll £>UJ Sweet Navy Chewing, all sizes, 
25c. to 35c. per lb. Bright Honey Chewing, all sizes, 33c. 
to 43c. per lb. All kinds of Cut Tobaccos, 20c. to 55c. per 
lb., put up in any kind of package or style required. 

CIGARETTES 

All kinds of Cigarettes from $2.50 per 1,000 
to $to per 1,000. 

CIGARS 

All kinds of Cigars from $€3.50 per 1,000 to 
$roo per 1,000. 
Write for samples and prices. Correspondence solicited. 
See price current. 



J. M. FORTIER 

MANUFACTURER 

Montreal 



141 to tSI 
St. Maurice Street 



JAPAN TEAS1 



ew 
Season's 



»_" 



FROM \3X CTS. UP. 

Best value in Canada to-day. See our travellers or write for samples. 



J. F. RAMSAY & CO. 



WHOLESALE TEA IMPORTERS 



14 and 16 Mincing Lane 



Toronto. 




BOISSEUER 




A perfectly pure 
compressed . 
Cocoa . . . 
Extract 



One Tablet makes an excellent Cup of Cocoa. 

ALL LEADING GROCERS KEEP IT. 



boxes 

zen 

each 

tube containing 18 

tablets 



TEAS TEAS TEAS 



D 



"> 



We have a very large assortment of JAPANS, HYSON 
and GUNPOWDER TEAS on hand just now, and for 
quality and price it would be hard for us to replace 
them. . . . We specially recommend the "Victoria" 
and tl Princess Louise" Brands for those in search of a 
good selling Japan. Put up in 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 
and 80-lb. packages. 



SAMPLES SENT ON APPLICATION. 



LAPORTE, MARTIN & CIE. 



MONTREAL 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



oy(5>C 



You will find that 
these packets are the 
most attractive you 
have ever seen and that 
their contents make the 
most delicious TEA 
you have ever tasted — 

TAKE 
THEM 

ON 

and they will make a 

TRADE 
FOR 
YOU!! 



-x^x 



tfpptefon '4 r&ndia fc *€ej//on 9ea4 

THE " TAPI R" BRAND. 




Agents 



MONTREAL— FRANK MAQOR & Co., 16, St. John Street. 
TORONTO— THOMPSON & THOMPSON, 18, Front Street East 



PUREST & BEST 



Windsor Fine Salt 




In Barrels, 200ID. Sacks and 50ID. Sacks is shipped in car lots 

to all parts of Canada. The Salt is the 
finest made and the best for general farm 
use. Our barrels are machinery made and 
one end carries a neat paper label. The 
sacks are made of superior bleached Jute, 
and will stand more handling than the 
ordinary salt sacks. A glance at the cut 
will convince you that the appearance of 
our barrels and sacks is a great help in 
selling the salt. Write us or our agents 
for prices or samples. 

The WINDSOR SALT WORKS, WINDSOR, ONT. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 



1896 



Will be a 



Banner Year 



for 



I vJ U if you will buy and use 



Ceylon Teas 



Ask your wholesale 
grocer for Ceylon Teas. 
They are all GOOD. 



THE ff/S£ OF /HD/tfN 0/VO CEfLO/V TEFI /WD THE ECL/PSE OF C////VS? TEFf 

1894 >88*. .874. 

1864 







THE AREA IN EACH CIRCLE R E PRE.5 E.NT.S THE QUANTITY OF TE.A CONSUME.0 IN CREAT BRITAIN IN THE. YEAR NAMED 

^=^ ,?£P/t£3£/Yr.S /HO/fl/Y T£fi. [ \ ft£P.R£S£HrS C£)'LO/Y 7~£#. HH f?£Pfi£S£/vrj Crt//V# T£/f 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



SUGAR SITUATION IN CUBA. 

Willett & dray publish the following upon 
the situation in Cuba : " A certain number 
of plantations at Pmar del Rio, Havana, and 
part of the province of Matanzas are now 
grinding ; but the totality of those in the 
eastern and central part of the island, with 
the only exception of two or three at Man- 
zanilla and one at Guantanamo, owing to the 
war still raging in said regions, are as yet 
unable to start the crop. The invasion by 
the rebel forces under the command of 
Meximo Gomex and Maceo, of the province 
of Santa Clara, or more recently of that of 
Matanzas, has given scope to the destruction 
of several plantations and numerous cane 
fires, the weather prevailing for several 
weeks past having placed the fields under 
the most favorable conditions to be quickly 
and thoroughly destroyed. It is said that in 
the sole district of Cienfuegos the quantity 
of cane burnt is enormous and represents a 
loss of above $8,000,000 ; were plantations 
able to immediately grind the burnt cane, a 
certain quantity of same might as yet be 
made available for sugar manufacturing, but 
unfortunately such is not the case and the 
totality of the cane that has been in contact 
with the flames may be considered as irre- 
missibly lost and on this account the pro- 
duction next year will be reduced to an ex- 
tent that cannot as yet be fully ascertained 
even in an approximate manner.'' 



BIT OFF THE PICKLES' ENDS. 

A Ludington grocer, according to an ex- 
change, was giving instruction to a green 
clerk. The most important thing, he said, 
was to give customers exactly what they 
wanted. If they wanted " black-strap " 
molasses, flavored with " nigger's heels," 
instead of crystal syrup, that was what they 
ought to get. The clerk would thus please 
both the customer and his employer. The 
same afternoon a lady called in a cutter to 
order some cucumber pickles. " I am very 
particular " said she, " about the form and 
shape of my pickles, and I will show just 
what I want." She picked up a small, well 
formed sample, bit the end off to taste it, 
and then held it up. " There," said she, " I 
want them just like that — that is very nice." 
Imagine the horror of the lady when the 
pickles were brought out at a select tea, with 
every one bit off at the end. There was a 
rumpus in the store next morning and the 
new clerk went out into the. cold, cheerless 
world. The proprietor said^he liked. exact 
and obedient clerks, but this fellow pleased 
him "toOiWell." 



Siamese Twins 




are debt and difficulty, difficulty and 
debt — they are inseparable. We need 
not discuss their causes here, either. 
What we want to point out is that no 
man with a family, or with large 
business interests at stake, should 
neglect life insurance. Stick to the 
policy you have, and when you want 
more insurance see one of our agents 
about it, or call in at Head Office. 
No medical examination is required 
for our pension. 
Bond policy and rates are away down. 

MANUFACTURERS' LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

Head Office, Toronto, Can. 



The Secret of the Canary Breed -rs 
of the Hartz Mountains 




BIRD MANNA is a great seller. Price -S180 per frame of 

18 cakes. Order at once from your wholesale house. 

Bird Book Free. 



T. J. COOKE & CO. 

Agents for Canada. 



Montreal 



PIUIIETOrS POWDERED PERFUMED LYE 

"BELL BRAND" in .-lb. tins. 

Dillon & Co.'s Baking Soda 

" BELL BRAND " in .lb. packages. 
Ask your wholesale grocer for them. 



p**^r**^ t *^P**^ 



I: " Going { 

to 
Insure" 



i 
i 



i 
i 



! 



The man who is simply 
"going to insure" is usually 
no better than the man who 
hasn't made the decision. 
In fact, he is usually worse, 
because he has considered 
the subject and been con- 
vinced of his duty, but has 
not done it. Life Insurance 
is emphatically a matter in 
which " nothing is done so 
long as anything remains un- 
done." 

Send at once to the Head 
Office of the Confederation 
Life Association, Toronto, 
and you will receive by re- 
turn of mail full information 
in regard to their new Un- 
conditional Policy. 

Confederation 

Life 
Association 



»"•"•"•"•"•" ll «M» ll <.. + ll « l ,«„ #H I 



McLAREN'S 



is Honest Goods and just 
the Thing on Which to 
make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



THE NEW WOMAN 



WON T HAVE OLD TAPIOCAS 



SHE . . 
WANTS 





Champion Fire and 
Burglar-Proof Safes . . 

Made with Solid Welded An- 
gle Iron Frame, Iron Inside 
Doors; i,ooo,coo C hanged 
Combination Lock. Twelve 
years trial have proven them 
the Best. Fifteen sizes in 
stock. Write for our Price 
List. 

S. S. KIMBALL 
577 Craig St., Montreal, P.Q. 



^l/ILD -fO-PO.V fHfrJ, 
WlTH A f r \ftr* a-np 

' — Xo-rva-&e££o-t'r 



DO YOU? 



mm 

&;? ^ aaz/erttserneat 

To^orslro 

o/<// brtng you, 
tenders/ 'rem t/'t 
best contractor*?. 



1 

a in <&$ 

wir _ 



LfJUK 



V-l 



.-:-f"L-_\ 




OF 



Awards the palm to that 



CAPITAL COFFEE 




OUR NEW 

BOURBON 




COFFEE 



Cultivated French Plantation Coffee. 



Bourbon for Breakfast, for Banquet, the Beat. 



TODHUNTER. MITCHELL & CO. 

Coffee Importers md Sellers, TorojaSfi. 



toted for the bcit and most uniformly roasted Cbfftos on the 

m-.rku Being packed la airtight cert. Ihej reUio Uiaw 

anginal flavor *nd uomi for any reasonable time 



w 



ITCHKLOTH 



The latest and best for cleaning Gold, 
Silver, Brass, Nickel, Copper, Bicycles, 
etc. Retails at 15c. Send small 
sample order. 

Sole Agency tor Canada 
TEMPLE BUILDING, U3a, MONTREAL 



New York Fancy Brand. Have 



a good light. Use3 



So* 



/BURNINGS 

OIL 

fc , INTME' 



S9I 

NO SrVL ke » 



seH- ,T - 
Samuel Rogers & Go. Toronto. 



Nos? 



Every Oil known to trade and industry — wholesale. 



no so a ot.a FIBRED CODFISH 



REPRESENTS the highest achievement in 
the art of curing and preparing Codfish ready 
for cooking. 

NOTHING is used in this product but the 
finest of shore Codfish especially cured and 
dried for it. 



EVERY particle of skin and bone being re- 
moved and the water evaporated, there is 
absolutely no waste. The contents of each 
package, therefore, is worth to the house- 
keeper about three times its weight in Cod- 
fish as ordinarily sold. 



THE disagreeable odor usually considered 
to be a necessary evil to be endured while 
cooking Codfish will be found to be entirely 
lacking in this. 

PARKER, EAKINS & CO. SKi^^SK YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 



PUT UP in half-pound cartons, 3 doz. car- 
tons to the case, and sold by the wholesale 
and retail grocers throughout Canada. 



The Gulf of Georgia Cannery 



MALCOLM & WINDSOR, Ltd. 



Sole Proprietors, and Agents for 



"Ice Castle Brand" Canned Salmon 



All salmon packed under the " Ice Castle Brand " 
guaranteed to be the celebrated Sockeye. 



are 



FACTORY, Steveston, B.C. 



OFFICE, Vancouver, B.C. 




Free . . . 

a handsome Glass 
Jar with . . . 

Tutti Frutti 



Get one from your whole- 
saler. Send postal to us 
for elegant signs to deco- 
rate your window. 



ADAMS & SONS CO. 

11 & 13 Jarvis Street, Toronto 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSlGNMENTS,COMPROMISES 

TA. GARLAND, general merchant, 
Portage la Prairie, has compromised 
• with his creditors at 600 on the 
dollar. The liabilities are about $200,000, 
and the assets, nominally the same, consist 
of stock ($40,000) and lands ($160,000). The 
real estate is held in trust by Mr. J. K. 
Macdonald. Mr. Garland is one of the larg- 
est retail dealers in the Northwest. 

A. Gerinani, groceries and lfquors, Mont- 
real, has assigned. 

Chas. Rowe, grocer, Belleville, is offer- 
ing to compromise. 

C. Turgeon, general merchant, St. David, 
(Levis Co ) has assigned. 

Robert J. Jukes, general merchant, Spring 
Hill, N. S., has assigned. 

Peter Sinclair, general merchant, Isaac's 
Habor, N. S., has assigned. 

P. B. Coyne, general merchant, Portage 
du Fort, Que, has assigned. 

A. F. Duclos, general merchant, Duclos, 
Que., is asking an extension. 

Joseph Boujie, general merchant, St. 
Louis de Gonzagne, has assigned. 

W. D. McDougall, general merchant, 
Whycocomagh, N. S., has assigned. 

Ross & Rourke, grocers, etc., Penetan- 
guishene, have assigned to A. Thompson. 

The stock of tobacco of N. F. Harbottle, 
Toronto, has been seized by the landlord. 

f. D. White & Co., grocers, Montreal, are 
offering to compromse at 20c. on the dollar 
cash. 

J. Armstrong & Co., grocers, Peterboro, 
are offering to compromise at 40c. on the 
dollar. 

The stock of T. H. Carvell, general mer- 
chant, Hampton, has been seized under bill 
of sale. 

W. English, commission, fruits and auc- 
tioneer, St. John's, Newfoundland, has as- 
signed. 

E. A. Piche, general merchant, Drum- 
mondville, Que., has assigned to Kent & 
Turcotte. 

Geo. Lambert, grocer, Bienville, Que., is 
importuning his creditors to accept 20c. on 
the dollar. 

R. Sleep & Co., general merchants, Sea- 
grave, have been closed out under a chattel 
mortgage. 

A. L. De Courvel, trader, Arthabaska, 
Que., is offering to compro-nise at 20c. on 
the dollar. 

David Moreault, general merchant, St. 
Ange!e de Laval, Que., has assigned to Kent 
& Turcotte. 

W. C. Ross, jr., general merchant, Hope- 
town, has called a meeting of his creditors 
lor 25th inst. 



J. B. Gould & Co., general merchants, 
Havelock, are offering to compromise at 
65c. on the dollar. 

J. H. Ross & Son, general merchants, 
Iroquois, have assigned to Sheriff Mclntyre, 
and a meeting of creditors will be held on 
the 22nd inst. 

Hart Bros., of Castleton, general store- 
keepers, have assigned to W. A. Campbell. 
The liabilities are placed at $3,000, with 
assets nominally the same. 

W. H. Smith, general merchant, Oakville, 
has assigned to Thomas Howarth, banker 
of the same place. A meeting of the credi- 
tors has been called for the 28th. 

B. S. Moorehouse, general merchant, of 
Newbury, has assigned to Henry Barber & 
Co. The liabilities are estimated at $5,400. 
A meeting of creditors has been called for 
the 22nd. 

John Graham, Charles McLean and 
Donald Munro have been appointed trustees 
of the estate of Wm. Gibson, general mer- 
chant, Benton, N. B., under the Absconding 
Debtors' Act. 

A meeting of the creditors of the estate 
of R. Fisher, Hagersville, general store- 
keeper, was held in Assignee Tew's office 
this afternoon, when inspectors were ap- 
pointed and the assignee instructed as to 
the disposal of the estate. 
CHANGES. 

James Johnston is starting in the grocery 
business in Montreal. 

Mrs. J. S. Young, grocer, Brockville, has 
sold out to Rober; Davis. 

D. Manchester, general merchant, Hunt- 
ley, has sold out to T. Cathcart. 

M. Schroeder, general merchant, Chesley, 
has been succeeded by W. Schroeder. 

T. W. Evans, baker and confectioner, 
Glencoe, has sold out to T. A. McLichlan. 

Huston & Co , general merchants, Glen- 
coe, have been succeeded by A. Finlayson. 

C. B. Gordon, general merchant, Mani- 
tou, Man., has been succeeded by the Don- 
aldson Trading Co. 

Mary A. Dawson, wife of R. J. Logan, 
has been registered proprietress of the Lon- 
don and Ceylon Tea Co., Montreal. 
SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

Thomas Lamb, grocer, Montreal, is offer- 
ing business for sale. 

J. C. Price, general merchant, Wheatley, 
is advertising business for sale. 

The stock of the estate of F. D. Cherrier, 
grocer, Hamilton, has been sold. 

The grocery stock of Malcolm MacDon- 
ald, Montreal, is to be sold by auction. 

N. Cressman & Co., general merchants, 
Baden, Ont., are advertising business for 
sale. 

The general stock of L. Paquette, Wind- 
sor Mills, Que., has been sold at 51c. on the 
dollar. 



The grocery stock of the estate of J. N. 
S. Hoover & Co., Toronto, is advertised for 
sale by tender. 
PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Papineau & Tellier, general jobbers, 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

Joseph Daoust, general merchant, Ven- 
dome, Que., has assigued. 

Durant & Beckstead, general merchants, 
Chesterville, have dissolved. M. Durant 
continues. 

G. E. Forbes, W. E Forbes and A. P. 
Forbes have registered a partnership to carry 
on business as wholesale grocers in Mont- 
real. 

Tames Rutherford and Stuart C. Durand 
have registered to carry on business in 
Montreal as tea merchants under the style 
of Rutherford, Durand & Co. 
FIRES. 

The bakery of Black Bros., grocers, etc., 
Amherst, N.S., has been burned. 
DEATHS. 

Geo. Middlemas, sr., general merchant, 
Caledonia Corner, N.S., is dead. 



SUGAR CONSUMPTION. 

Mr. James Dunn, of London, in his annual 
sugar circular gives the following interesting 
comparison of the consumption of sugar in 
the Atlantic States and the United King- 
dom: 

Through the In the 

Four United 

Atlantic Ports. Kingdom. 
years. Tons. Tons. 

1 935.648 1,080,212 

993,409 '>'53,s8i 

> 1,022,584 1,038,407 

'.097 493 ■,"97,599 

1 1,088,909 1,146,478 

1 1,046,254 1,253,728 

1800 1,150,054 1,216,284 

~^i 1,466,294 [,327,452 

1892 1,4^1,290 1,289,542 

1893 1,400,000 1,320,000 

1894 1,550,000 1,360,000 

1895 1,520,000 1,450,000 



46 



SILICO " 



THE UP-TO-DATE 
CLEANING SOAP. 

Cleans quickly and . . . 

DOES NOT SCRATCH 

Try a Three-Dozen Case for $2.26. 
For Sale by Grocers and Druggists. 

BLAIKLOCK BROTHERS 

Customs Brokers 

Forwarders 

Warehousemen 

41 Common St. Montreal 

Correspondence Solicited. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 



A NEW DEPARTURE 



The L 



of much importance 
to the . ... 




GROCERY TRADE 



CO. lu. 



. OF MONTREAL 



Have added a Canned Meat Department to their General 
Packing Business, and will in future have a full line of Canned Meat 
Goods, Soups and Sundries of the very finest quality, every can be- 
ing guaranteed. These Anchor Brand Goods are put up in all 
the convenient sizes and newest shapes, with patent key- 
openers, and are not surpassed by any other goods on the market. 

WRITE FOR PRICE LIST 



CAUSES OF FAILURE 

In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. 

As long as there are failures, subjects that furnish 
information how to prevent them will always be 
timely. We have published, in pamphlet form, 
three admirable papers on the above topic, in which 
Over-Stocking, Expense, Capital, Credit. Dis- 
counts, Buying, etc., etc., are ably discussed. We 
will mail the whole three essays ~_ . 

to any address on receipt of 2. J C6f\TS 

HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto 



Union Mutual Life Insurance Go. 

OF PORTLAND, MAINE 



Only Company whose Policy Contracts 
are governed by the statutes of the . . . 

MAINE NONFORFEITURE LAW 



WALTER I. JOSEPH, Manager 



Room 2, 162 St. James Street, Montreal 





It's 
Natural 



to suppose, when we are mak- 
ing satisfactory shipments to 
our present customers, that we 
can do the same for you ; isn't 
it ? It's also natural that we 
should wish to increase our 
business, and would like to 
have your trade. We sell Salt in 
car lots. When you want any- 
thing in salt write US. 



I The Toronto Salt Works 

: J 28 Adelaide Street East 

TORONTO, ONT. 
8g Toronto Agents for the Windsor Salt Works. 




THE 



Sydenham Glass Co. of Wallaceburg 

Limited 




WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Prescription Ware 

Flasks and Liquor Bottles 
Celebrated Beaver 

Fruit Jars, Jelly Jars 

PRIVATE MOULDS A SPECIALTY 



OILS 
OVALS 
SALADS 
SAUCE 



PICKLES 



BOTTLES K 



and 
MINERAL 



We make bottles of extra weight to order. We invite inquiry 
relative to lettered ware and bottles from private moulds 
Prompt attention to orders and inquiries. 
Mention this journal. 



Toronto Representative : G. A. McCANN, 208 Dundas St. 
Tees & Persse, Winnipeg, Martin & Robertson, Vancouver and Victoria, 

Agents for Manitoba and Northwest Territories. 



Agents for British Columbia. 



Fine Fruit Tablets 




ENGLISH FORMULA 
TABLETS 

Have been our specialty 
and have been a success. 
Packed in elegant Flint 
Glass Jars, large glass 
stopper, the finest pack- 
age in the Dominion. 
Also in round jars, similar 
to English, but made two 
inches shorter to fit the 
ordinary shelf. A large 
variety. List of flavors 
and prices on application. 



6. J. HAMILTON 
SONS 

PICTOU, N.S. 







40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Jams, Jellies 
and Marmalades 




Don't buy cheap and adulterated goods 
at any price. If you have any regard 
for your customers and their trade, keep 
in stock only pure and reliable goods. 
We guarantee Southwell's strictly pure, 
made from finest selected fruit by most 
improved processes. 




Agents for the Dominion 



ASK YOUR WHOLESALER 
FOR PRICES OF SOUTHWELL'S 



Frank Magor <£ Co., 

1 6 St. John St.. Montreal. 




Toronto, Jan. 16, 1896. 

This list is corrected every Thursday. The 
prices are solicited for publication, and are 
for such qualities and quantities as are usually 
ordered by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt pay are 
generally obtainable at lower prices. 

All quotations in this department are under 
the direct control of the Editor, and are not 
paid for or doctored by any manufacturing oi 
jobbing house unless given under their name, 
the right being reserved to exclude such firms 
as do not furnish reliable information. 

BAKING POWDER. 



.per do/-. #0 75 



200 

6 50 

10 00 

16 

16 



Snow Drift— 
Va. lb. tins, 4 doz. in case. 

?::§" :::::: = 

3 " 1 " 

5 " % " " „ 

10 lb. boxes per lb. 

301b. pails 

Dominion— 
'A lb. tins, 4 doz. in ease per doz. 

V4 ': 3 ;; ;; 

1 " 2 " 

10 lb. boxes per lb. 

301b. pails " 20 

PURE gold. per do z 
4 5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 

|4 lb. cans, doz. in 

I case 

12% lb. cans, 1 and 2 

I doz. in case 

|16 oz. cans, 1, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 4 60 

1 12 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 60 

1 8 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

I doz. incase 2 40 

'6 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 1 80 

4 oz. cans. 4 and 6 doz. in case 1 25 

lOcentcan u 9U 




1 00 

1 75 

3 00 

20 



19 80 
16 00 
10 50 



Cook's Friend- 
Size 1, in 2 and 4 doz. boxes $ 2 40 

" 10, in 4 doz. boxes 2 10 

" 2. inR " 80 

" 12, in 6 doz. boxes 7C 

" 3, in 4 " 45 

Pound tins. 3 doz. in case 3 00 

oz. tins, 3 doz. in case 2 40 

oz. tins, 4 " 1 10 

lb. tins, % doz. in case 14 00 

W. H. GILLARD & CO., PROPRIETORS. 

Diamond— 

'4 lb. tins, 4 oz. cases 67% 

V& lb. tins, 3 doz. cases 1 17 

1 lb. tins, 2 doz. cases 1 98 

LUMSDEN BROS.' 

Boston Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins. . . *1 23 

Standard Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins.. 1 50 

Jersey Cream B'kg Powder, 54-lbs... 75 

%-lbs.. 1 25 

1-lbs.. 2 25 



BLACKING. 

DAY & MARTIN'S BLACKINi. 

Paste. (Boxes of 3 doz. each, per gross. 

No. 1 size (4 gross to a case) $ 2 40 

No. 2 size 3 " " 3 30 

No. 3 size 3 " " 5 00 

No. 4 size 2 " " 6 85 

No. 5 size 2 " " 9 00 

Embos'd97 4 " " 6 00 

Liquid. per doz. 

Pints, A (6 doz, per bbl) $330 

% " B 9 " " 2 25 

% " C15 " " 1 25 

Russet Paste. (3 doz. in box) per gross. 

No. 1. In tins S 3 75 

"2. " 5 65 

"3. " 7 85 

Russet Cream. (1 gross cases) per doz. 
No. 1. In bottles #080 

2. tn bottles 1 60 

3. " 1 90 

4. 260 



No. 1. 
" 2. 


Polishing Paste. 
(3 doz. in box) 


per gross. 

$3 75 

5 65 


" 3. 


•» 


7 85 


No. 1. 


Polishing Cream. 
(1 gross cases) 


per doz. 
... *0 80 


" 2. 




... 1 35 


" 3. 


<■ 


... 2 25 



In Metal Tubes 1 90 

Ivorine. per doz. 

Small. In patent stoppered bottles, 

sponge attached $0 80 

No. 1. " 1 35 

" 2. " per gross. 25 00 

P. O. FRENCH BLACKING. per gross 

%No.4 $4 00 

% No. 6 4 50 

% No. 8 7 25 

% No. 10 8 25 

P. G. FRENCH DRESSINO. per doz. 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box 82 00 

No. 4, 1 or 2 doz. in box 1 25 

per gross. 
9 00 



CROWN PARISIAN DRESSING. 



BLACK LEAD. 

Reckitt s Black Lead, per box $1 15 

Each box contains either 1 gross, 1 
oz., % gro, 2 oz., or % gro. 4oz. 

per gross. 

Silver Star Stove Paste $9 00 

Dixon's Carburet of Iron Stove 
Polish, 70c doz 7 20 

BLUE. 

KEEN'S oxford. per lb. 

1 lb. packets $0 17 

% lb. " 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 12-lb. box 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 5 box lots 0. 16 

CORN BROOMS 

chas. boeckh & sons, per doz. 
Carpet Brooms— net. 

" Imperial," extra fine, 8, 4 strings. . S3 65 
" 7, 4 strings. . 3 45 

" " 6, 3 strings 3 25 



" Victoria," tine, No. 



"Standard," 

' Standard," 



select, 
select 



CANNED 



8, 4 strings. . 

7, 4 strings.. 

6, 3 strings.. 

8, 4 strings. . 

7, 4 strings.. 
6. 3 strings. . 
5, 3 strings. . 

GOODS. 



3 30 
3 10 
2 90 
2 90 
2 75 
2 60 
2 40 



per doz. 

Apples, 3 s $0 85 $0 95 

'• gallons 2 00 2 25 

Blackberries, 2 1 75 2 00 

Blueberries, 2 90 1 10 

Beans, 2 75 95 

Corn, 2's 75 95 

Cherries, red pitted, 2 s 2 00 2 25 

Peas, 2's 90 95 

" Sifted select 1 05 1 10 

" Extra sifted 145 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 1 65 1 75 

" 3's 2 40 

Pineapple, 2's 1 75 2 40 

3's 2 40 2 50 

Peaches, 2's 1 90 2 20 

3's 2 65 3 00 

Plums, Green Gages, 2's 1 85 2 00 

" Lombard 160 175 

" Damson Blue 160 175 

Pumpkins, 3's 85 o 90 

,r gallons 2 10 2 25 

Raspberries, 2's 1 40 2 00 

Strawberries, choice, 2's 1 90 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 115 



Tomatoes, 3's 80 

Lobster, tails 1 75 

fiats 2 30 

Mackerel 1 10 

Salmon, Sockeye, tails 1 35 

" flats 1 55 

Cohoes 1 15 

Sardines, Albert, %'b tins 

" " %'s tins .... 20 

" Sportsmen, '4'sgenu- 
ine French high grade, key 

opener 

Sardines, key opener, %'s 

" Exq. fine Fr'ch, k.o.p. 



W 

Sardines, other brands 9% 11 
P. kC, ft'itini .... 



o n 

10)/ 
18^ 
16 
23 
33 



95 
2 25 
260 

1 20 
1 40 
1 75 
1 20 
13 
21 



12 



11 
19 
17 
25 
6 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



41 



I 



; 
; 



; 



Canada 
Prepared 
Corn. 

Silver Gloss. 
Satin Starch. 
Rice Starch. 



When you buy 





STARCH 



i 

i 

; 




See that you get the 
right thing. You can't 
go wrong if you have any of our lines. 



| Edwardsburg Starch Co. 



; 



Cardinal, Ont t 

? 



Sardines, Amer., %.s " .... 04% 09 
%'s " .... 09 Oil 
" Mustard, % size, cases 
50 tins, per 100 10 00 1100 

MARSHALL & CO., SCOTLAND. 

Fresh Herring, 1-lb 1 10 

Kippered Herring, 1-lb 1 65 

Herrings in Tomato Sauce 1 70 

Herrings in Shrimp Sauce 2 00 

Herrings in Anchovy Sauce ..• 2 00 

Herrings a la Sardine 2 40 

Preserved Bloaters 1 85 

Real Findon Haddock . . 1 85 

CANNED MEATS. 

(CANADIAN.) 

Comp Corn Beef, 1-lb. cans . 
" " "2 



1 15 
1 90 
1 90 



1 90 
1 90 



Minced Callops 
Lunch Tongue 




51 40 $1 50 
2 40 2 55 



7 75 
16 00 



2 60 

3 40 



2 75 



8 25 
18 00 
2 60 

2 65 

3 50 
6 00 
2 80 
2 50 

4 00 
1 50 
225 
1 80 
4 50 



Acme 
Sliced 
Beef. 

Mo, 1 tins, 
key, 2doz., 
perdoz. $2.50. 

Beardsley's 
Boneless pe. 
Herring, do* 

2doz.... 14 






Codfish. 

Beardsley's Shredded, 2 doz. pkgs. 



per doz. 
. 90 



CHEWING GUM. 

adams &, sons Co. per box 

Tutti Frutti, 36 5c bars $1 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 23 5c packages . . 75 
Pepsin Tutti Frutti, in glass-covered 

boxes, 23 5c packages 80 

Horehound Tutti Frutti, glass tops, 36 

5c packages 1 20 

Cash Register, 390 5c bars and pkgs . . 15 00 
Tutti Frutti Show Case, 180 5c bars 

and packages 'j 50 

Glass Jar with Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 

115 5c packages 3 75 

Tutti Frutti Girl Sign Box, 160 5c 

bars and packages 6 00 

Tutti Frutti Cash Box, 160 5c bars 

and packages 6 00 

Variety Gum (new), 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Orange Blossom, 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Flirtation Gum, 150 lc pieces 65 

Monte Cristo, 180 lc pieces 1 30 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c bars 1 20 

Sappota, 150 lc pieces 90 

Orange Sappota, 160 lc pieces 75 

Black Jack, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Rose, 115 lc pieces 75 

Magic Trick, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Spruce Chico, 200 lc pieces 1 00 

CHOCOLATES & COCOAS. 

CADBURYS. per doz. 

Cocoa essence, 3 oz. packages $1 65 

per lb, 
Mexican chocolate, % and % lb. pkgs. 40 

Rock Chocolate, loose 37% 

1-lb. tins 40 

Cocoa Nibs, 11-lb. tins 40 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO.'S. 

Chocolate— per lb. 

French, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Oaraccas, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 35 

Premium, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Sante, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond. H's— 6 and 12 lbs 22 

Sticks, gross boxes, each 1 00 

Cocoa — 

Homeopathic, %'s, 8 and 14 lbs. . 30 

Pearl, Tl 25 

London Pearl, 12 and 18 ".. 22 

Rock ..0 30 

Bulk, in boxes 18 

per doz. 

Royal Cocoa Essence, packages 1 40 

Cocoa— EPP8 . per lb. 

Case of 112 lbs. each 35 

Smaller quantities 37% 



FRY'S. 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents.) 

Chocolate— per lb. 

Caraccas, %'s, 6-lb. boxes 42 

Vanilla, %'s 42 

"Gold Medal" Sweet, 61b. bxs.. 29 

Pure, unsweetened, %'s, Gib. bxs. 42 

Fry's "Diamond," %'s, 61b. bxs. 24 

Fry's " Monogram," %'s, 6 lb. bxs. 24 
Cocoa— per doz 

Concentrated, %'s, 1 doz. in box. . 2 40 

%'s, " 

libs. " 

Homeopathic, '/4's, 14 lb. boxes . . 33 

% lbs. 12 lb. boxes. 33 

JOHN P. MOTT & CO.'.s. 
(R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott's Broma per lb. 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homeopathic Cocoa (Vis) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa (in tins) 45 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate 28 

Mott s Caraccas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate 22 

Mott's French-Can Chocolate 18 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Chocolate . . 27 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 35 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 05 

Vanilla Sticks, per gross 90 

Mott's Confectionery Chocolate. 21 43 

Mott's Sweet Chocolate Liquors. 19 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Hygienic Cocoa, % lb. tins, per doz. . $3 75 

Cocoa Essence, % lb. tins, per doz. . 2 25 

Soluble Cocoa, No. 1 bulk, per lb 20 

Diamond Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb. cake, per lb 22% 

Royal Navy Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb. cake, per lb 30 

Mexican Vanilla Chocolate, 12 lb. 

boxes, % lb. cake, per lb 35 

WALTER BAKER & CO.'S 

Chocolate- 
Premium No. 1, boxes, 12 lbs. each.. 42 
Baker's Vanilla in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 50 
Caraccas Sweet, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. 37 
Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 boxes 

in case, per box, net 4 20 

German Sweet Chocolate- 
Grocers' Style, in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 25 
Grocers' Style, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. . 25 
Eight cakes to the lb., in bxs, 6 lbs. e. 25 

Soluble Chocolate- 
In canisters, 1 lb., 4 lb. and 10 lb 50 

Breakfast Cocoa— 

nbxs, ndl21bs. each, % lb., tins. 49 



COFFEE. 

Green. 

M ,^ha o 28 30 

Old Government Java 30 33 

g>° 20 21^ 

Plantation Ceylon 29 31 

Porto Rico 24 28 

Guatemala o 24 26 

Jamaica o 21 22 

Maracaibo o 21 23 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO.'S 

Excelsior Blend o 34 

Our Own " o 32 

Jersey " ...', 030 

Laguaya " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 6 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 28 30 

Santos 25 27 



DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 



$0 02 
06 
03 
10 
80 
25 



Alum 

Blue Vitriol 

Brimstone 

Borax 

Camphor 

Carbolic Acid 

Castor Oil, 1 oz. bottle, p. gross 

2 " 

3 „ 

4 ■' 
" % pint " 

Olive Oil, % pts., 2 doz. to case 

per case 

" pints, 2 doz. to case, 

per case 

Epsom Salts 

Extract Logwood, bulk 

" boxes 

Gentian 

Glycerine, per lb 

Hellebore 

Iodine' 

Insect Powder 

Saltpetre 

Soda, Bicarb, per keg 

Sal Soda 

Madder 

EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold, No. 8, per doz. ... $0 75 
" 1, 1% oz.... 1 25 

2, 2 oz 1 75 

3, 3oz 2 00 



SO 03 
07 
03% 
12 
085 

50 
4 20 
6 00 
8 40 

10 00 
12 00 

1 25 

2 50 
02% 
14 
17 
13 
18 
17 
6 00 
30 



02 
13 
15 
10 
17 
16 
5 50 
26 

08% 09 
2 75 2 90 

1 00 1 25 
12% .... 



RECKITT'S Blue and Black Lead |™J,U 



42 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUY [IPTON'S 

AWARD[DM(IIGtlDTH0N0fi5ATTHtHf0filD)FAIR./*^^ ^ - 
5UPPUE0 UNDER SPECIAL ROYAL WARRANT TO Mym 





LIPTON'S 

Delicious Teas 

possess that most '1< 
flavor and exquisite aroma 
peculiar to the choicest 

frowths of Ceylon and 
ndia. . . . 
They are put up in one- 
pound and half-pound air- 
tight packages and retail- 
ed at 30, 40, and 50c pa 
pound. Reasons why you 
should sell Lipton's Teas: 
Because everybody likes 
them. They have the lar- 
gest sale in the world. 
They will increase your 
trade. You can buy from the 
following wholesale agents : 
Cavcrhill, Hughes Co., Montreal 
H. H Hrennan&Co., 
W fi. Craig & Co., 
Balfour & Co., - 
A. M Smith & Co., 
T. Kenny & Co., - 



Ottawa 

Kingston 

Hamilton 

- London 

- Sarnia 



LIPTON 



Chief Offices: City Road, London, England. 
United .States Offices : 80 Front St., New York 



TEA PLANTER 

CEYLON 



Batty's 



♦^^♦♦♦♦•^^♦♦"^••♦"♦-♦^•♦^♦-♦^♦•♦-♦■♦"M* 




B 



PICKLES 



and . . . 



SAUCE 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦ 



Are unquestionably the finest and 
most enjoyable in the world. Have 
been awarded 



ALL WHOLESALERS 
HAVE THEM. 



. . . EIGHT PRIZE MEDALS 



Canadian Agents 



J. A. GORDON & CO. 

. . . Montreal 



Established a Century. 



Manufacturer* to Her Majesty the Queen and H. R. H. the 
Prince of Wales. Contractors to the Army and Navy. 




DAY & MARTIN'S 

Real Japan Liquid-Oil Paste Blacking 



Several Piize Medals, i<t Order of Merit and Special Mention Melbourne 
Exhibition, 1888. Certificate of Award, Chicago Exhibition, 1893. 



Kid Renovating Polish. 

Japanese Waterproof Blacking 

Brunswick and Berlin Black, 
for stoves. 

Universal Harness Composition, 
in tins. 

Harness Oil, in bottles and 
in bulk- 



Kid Reviver, in tins (three sizes). 
Patent Leather Polish (two sizes) 
Polishing Cream (two sizes). 

Brass Burnishing Paste (four 

sizes). 

Furniture Polish (four sizes). 

Russet Cream for Brown Boots 

(four sizes). 



DAY* MARTIN S 
RUSSET 

CREAM 

For Clfiium; * Prmriinf R'oJ'.u 

Ltilhrr. Brian Ualfcrr Boetsnd 

Sho?-. Travpllmr 8*ri 4; . 



>Mr W,ik,.r It, U-.hf/y/tVlk' 



DUBBIN, INK, ECLIPSE GLOSS, AND POUCH BLACKING. 



All of Superior 
Quality. 



London and Liverpool. 



E. T. 8TURDEE, 8t. John, N.B., 

for Maritime Provinces. 



CHA8. GYDE, Montreal, MARTIN & ROBERTSON, Victoria and Vancouver. 

for Ontario and Queoec. for British Columbia. 

TEE8 & PERS8E, Winnipeg, for Manitoba and North-West Territory. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



43 






ERS 



(The New Biscuit) 



That won't get as hard as rocks are 
those made by 

The Toronto Biscuit & Confectionery Co. 



Henry C. Fortier. 



7 FRONT STREET EAST, TORONTO. 



Charles J. Peter. 




Crown _Brand (Greig & Co.)— 

1 oz. London gross 6 00 

2 " Anchor.... " 12 00 

1 '• Flat Crown " 10 80 
2 18 00 

2 " Square .... " 21 00 
2%" Round .... " 24 00 

4 oz. Glasa Stopper doz. 3 50 

8 ' 7 00 

Parisian Essence gross 21 00 

Ketchup, Fluted Bottles . . . .gross 12 00 

•' Screw Top " 21 00 

8. &L. "High Grade" 

per doz 3 50 

Pepper Sauce, per gross 1500 

FLUID BEEF. 

JOHNSTONS, MONTREAL. 

Fluid Beef— No. 1, 2 oz. tins $ 3 00 

No. 2, 4 oz. tins 5 00 

No. 3, 8 oz. tins 8 75 

No. 4, lib. tins 14 25 

No. 5, 21b. tins 27 00 

Staminal— 2 oz. bottles 3 00 

4oz. " 6 00 

8oz. " 9 00 

16 oz. " 12 75 

Fluid Beef Cordial— 20 oz. bottles. ... 15 00 

Milk Granules, in cases, 4 doz 6 00 

Milk Granules with Cereals, in cases, 

4 doz 5 8 

FRUITS. 

FOREIGN. 

per lb. 

Currants— Provincials, bbls . . 04 04% 

" % bbls .. 04% 04% 

" Filiatras, bbls 04% 04% 

% bbls . . 04% 04% 

Patras, bbls 04% 05 

" %bbls 04>|0 05% 

" cases 05% 

Vostizzas, cases. ... 05% 07% 

Panarete, cases 08 08% 

Dates, Persian, boxes 04% 05% 

Figs— Eleme, 14 oz 09 10% 

" 101b 09% 12'/., 

" 181b 13 15 

" 281b 16 18 

" taps 03% 04 

Prunes— Bosnia, cases 05% 07 

" Bordeaux 04% 06% 

Eaisins— Valencia, off stalk. . 04% 04% 

Fine, off stalk 05 05% 

Selected 06 06 a 

Layers 06% 

Sultanas 05% 08 

Cal. Loose Musca- 
tels 5J lb. boxes . . 05% 06% 
" Malaga— per oox. 

London Layers 2 00 2 20 

Black Baskets 2 75 3 20 

Blue Baskets 3 25 3 50 

Choice Clusters 3 25 3 50 

" Dehesa Clusters 4 25 4 50 

Royal Clusters 5 00 5 25 

" Buckingham Clusters 4 50 

Non Plus Ultra Clusters .... 6 50 

" Royal Windsor Clusters 6 50 

Lemons — Messina, boxes 3 50 4 00 

Malagas, half chest.. 5 00 6 00 

boxes 2 50 3 00 

Oranges— Jamaica, fncy in bxs 5 00 5 50 

" Jamaica, choice, boxes 4 75 5 00 

Cal. Navels, in boxes.. 4 25 5 00 

" Mexican, in boxes 5 50 6 00 

Jamaica, in bbls 9 00 9 50 

DOMESTIC. 

Apples, dried, per lb 04 05 

r ' evaporated 07 07% 

FOOD. 

per brl. 

Split Peas $3 50 

Pot Barley 3 75 

Pearl Barley, XXX 6 50 

ROBINSON'S BARLEY AND GROATS. 

per doz. 

Patent Barley, % lb. tins 1 25 

1 lb. tins 2 25 

Groats, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 
Cut Nails— From Toronto— 

50 to 60 dy basis 2 50 

40 dy 2 55 

dy 2 60 



20 16 and 12 dy 2 65 

10 dy 2 70 

8 and 9 dy 2 75 

6 and 7 dy 2 90 

5 dy 3 10 

4dyAP 3 10 

3dyAP 350 

4dyCP 300 

3 dy C P 4 10 

Horse Nails— 

Canadian, die. 55 per cent. 
Horse Shoes— 

From Toronto, per keg 3 60 

Screws— Wood— 

Flat-head iron, 80 p. c. dis. 
Round-head iron, 75 p. c. dis. 
Flat-head brass, 77% p. c. dis. 
Round-head brass, 72% p. c. dis. 
Window Glass. [To find out what break 
any required size of pane comes under, 
add its length and breadth together. 
Thus in a 7x9 pane the length and breadth 
come to 16 inches, which shows it to be a 
first-break glass, i.e. not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in. and under) 1 15 

2nd " (20 to 40 inches) 130 

3rd " (50 to 60 inches 2 90 

4th " (51 to 60 inches 3 20 

5th " (61 to 70 inches) 3 50 

Rope— 

Manilla 09% 09% 

Sisal 07 07% 

Per box 6 00 12 00 

Shot— 

Canadian, dis, 17% per cent. 

Hinges— 

Heavy T and strap 04% 05 

Screw, hook and strap .... 03% 04 

White Lead — Pure Association guarantee, 
ground in oil. per lb. 

25 lb. irons 04% 

No. 1 04% 

No. 2 04% 

No. 3 04 

Turpentine— 

Selected packages, per gal. 39 41 

Linseed Oil— 

Raw, per gal 58 

Boiled, " 61 

Glue— 

Common per lb 07% 08 

INDURATED FIBRE "WARE. 

THE e. B. EDDY CO. 

% pail, 6 qt S3 35 

Star Standard, 12 qt 3 80 

Milk, 14 qt 4 75 

Round-bottomed fire pail, 14 qt 4 75 

Tubs, No. 1 13 30 

" 2 11 40 

" 3 9 50 

Fibre Butter Tubs (30 lbs) 3 80 

Nests of 3 2 85 

Keelers No. 4 8 00 

" 5 7 00 

" 6 6 00 

" 7 5 00 

Milk Pans 2 65 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 2 65 

" " round bottoms 2 50 

Handy Dish 2 25 

Water Closet Tanks 17 00 

Dish Pan, No. 1 7 60 

' 2 6 20 

Barrel Covers and Trays 4 75 

Railroad or Factory Pails 4 75 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

SOUTHWELL'S GOODS. 

per doz. 

Orange Marmalade 1 60 

Clear Jelly Marmalade 2 00 

Strawberry W. F. Jam 2 30 

Raspberry " " 2 20 

Apricot " " 2 00 

Black Currant " 2 00 

Other Jams " " 1 55 1 90 

Red Currant Jelly 3 10 

(All the above in 1 lb. cleir glass pote. 

KNOX'S GELATINE. 

Sparkling calves foot *. 1 20 

Cry9talized Fruit, flavored 1 65 

Acidulated 1 50 

(Sold by all wholesale grocers.) 



LICORICE. 

YOUNG & 8MYLIES LIST. 

5-lb. boxes, wood or paper, per lb $0 40 

Fancy boxes (36 or 50 sticks) per box. . 1 25 

"Ringed" 5 lb. boxes, per lb 40 

"Acme" Pellets, 5 lb. cans, per can. . 2 00 
"Acme" Pellets, fancy boxes (40) 

per box 1 50 

Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers, 5 lb. 

cans, per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb. glass jars 1 75 

" " 5 lb. cans 1 50 

" Purity " Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 

" 100 sticks 73 

Dulce, large cent sticks, 100 in box... 75 

MINCE MEAT. 

Wethey's Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

COLMAN'S OR KEEN'S. 

Square Tins— per lb 

D. S. F., 1 lb. tins «0 40 

" % lb. tins 42 

% lb. tins 45 

Round Tins— 

F. D., % lb. tins 25 

% lb. tins 27% 

" 4 lb. jars, per jar 75 

1 lb. " " 25 

" 4 lb. tins, decorated, p.t. 80 

FRENCH MUSTARD. 

Crown Brand— (Greig & Co.) 

Pony size, per gross 9 00 

Small Med. " 7 80 

Medium " 10 80 

Large " 12 00 

Spoon " 18 00 

Mug " 16 20 

Tumbler " 12 00 

CreamJug " 2100 

RICE, ETC- 

Rice — per lb. per lb. 

Standard " B " 03% 03% 

Patna 04% 

Japan 05 

Imperial Seeta 05% 

Extra Burmah 03% 04 

Java Extra 06% 06% 

Genuine Carolina 09% 10 

Grand Duke 06% 06% 

Sago 03% 05 

Tapioca 03% 05% 

Goathead (finest imported) 06% 

STARCII. 

EDWARDSBURG STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches — 

No. 1 White or Blue, cartoons 05% 

Canada Laundry 04% 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. draw-lid boxes 

and fancy packages 07 

Silver G103S, 6-lb. tin c nnisters. . 07 
Edwardsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. 

ehromo package 07 

Silver Gloss, large crystal? 06% 

No. 1 White, bbls and kegs 04% 

Benson's Enamel, per box 3 00 

Culinary Starch— 

W. T. Benson & Co.'s Prepared 

' Corn 07% 

Canada Pure Corn 06% 

Rice Starch— 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White, 1-lb. 

cartoons 09 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White or 

Blue, 4-lb. lumps 07% 

THE BRANTFORD STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches- 
Canada Laundry, boxes of 40 lbs.. 04% 
Finest Quality White Laundry— 

3 lb. cartoons, cases 36 lbs 05% 

Bbls.,1751bs 04% 

Kegs.lOOlbs 004% 

Lily White Gloss- 
Kegs, extralargecrystals,1001bs. 06% 
lib. fancy cartoons, cases 36 lbs. 07 
6 lb. draw-lid boxes, 8 in crate 

48 bs 07 

6 lb. tin enamelled cannisters, 

8 in crate 48 lb3 07 

Brantford Gloss— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases 36 lbs. 07% 
Brantford Cold Water Rice Starch— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases 281bs. ... 09 
Canadian Electric Starch— 
40 packages in case 3 00 



Culinary Starch — 

Challenge Prepared Corn— 

1 lb. pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 06% 

No. 1 Pure Prepared Corn — 
I lb. pkgs, boxes 40 lbs 07% 

KINOSFORD'S OSWEGO STARCH. 




f 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. pkgs., 08% 
SILVER.; 6-lb. boxes, sliding covers 

GLOSS ^ (12-lb. boxes each crate. 08% 

PURE 12-lb. boxes 07% 

OSWEGO I 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. 

CORN STARCH, f packages 07% 

For puddings, custards, etc. 
ONTARIO , 38-lb. to 45-lb. boxes, 

STARCH < 6 bundles 06% 

STARCH IN > Silver Gloss. . . . 07 3 4 

BARRELS ! Pure . 06% 

Brown & Polson's Cornflour. 

IftVK P . ackaeea 07 

40-lb boxes 2 80 

SUGAR. 

Granulated 04% "o 04% 

Paris Lump. bbls. and 100-lb 

00 ^f 8 ••.•• v n -,v-- 05% 

in 501b. boxes 05% 

Extra Ground, bbls. Icing. ... 05% 05% 

Powdered, bbls 05% 05$ 

Extra bright refined 3:0 4 00 

Bright Yellow 03% 3 85 

Mertnim Yellow 3 60 3 70 

Dark Yellow 03% 3 60 

Raw Demerara 03% 03% 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 
syrups. per gallon. 

„ , 1.1.1s. %bbls. 

£*<* 30 33 

M< r dmm 33 38 

J> n f ht ::',w 38 43 

Redpath s Honey 40 

" 2 gal. pails, i'io 1 15 
3 gal. pails. 1 45 1 50 
SOAP. 
Babbitt's " 1776 " Soap Powder .... «3 50 




| goxLot 500 

5 Box Lot 4 go 

Freight prepaid on 5 box lots. 

P. M. LAWRASON'8 SOAPS. 

Wonderful, 100 bars P $4 00* 

Supreme, 100 bars 3 go 

Our Own Electric, 100 bars 2 00 

Sunflower, 100 bars 2 00 

BRANTFORD SOAP WORKS CO. 



mi 



Ivory Bar— per box. 

3 lbs. and 2 6-16 lbs., 60 bars in box $3 30 
13% oz. and 1 lb., CO bars in box. . 3 30 
12 oz. cakes, 100 rakes in box 4 00 



44 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




YOU CAN 

PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 



BY 



SELLING 



BRANTFORD STARCH 



10 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 3 80 

Twin cake, 11 % oz., 100 uakes in 

box 3 85 

All wrapped with lithographed wrapper, 
printed with finest alkali proof ink. Quota- 
tions of lower grades of all kinds of soap 
furnished on application. 

OUELPH SOAP CO. 

Pure, 60 bars, 12 oz., per box $3 00 

Silver Star, 100 bars, 12 oz., per box. . 4 00 

Royal City, 3-lb. bar, per lb 05 

Peerless, 2'/ 2 -lb. bar 04% 

Genuine Electric, 72 bars, per box 2 50 

TEAS. 

BLACK. 
Oongou— per lb. per lb. 

Half Chests Kaisow, Mon- 

ing, Paking 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow 18 50 

INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 18 25 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 020 040 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

CHINA GREENS. 

Gunpowder- 
Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half Chests, ordirary 

firsts 022 038 

Young Hyson- 
Cases, sifted, extra firsts. 42 50 
Cases, small leaf, firsts . . 35 40 
Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

Half Chests, seconds .... 017 19 

" thirds 15 17 

" " common.... 13 14 
PINO 8UEYS. 
Toung Hyson- 
Half Chests, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 
JAPAN. 
Half Chests- 
Finest May pickings 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 13% 15 

Nagasaki, % chests Pekoe 16 22 

" Oolong .... 14 15 

" Gunpowder 16 19 

" Sittings.... 07% 11 



"BALADA" CEYLON. 

per lb. 

Green label, retailed at 30c 22 

Blue " " 40c 30 

Red " " 50c 36 

Gold " " 60c 44 

Terms, 30 days net. 

TOBAC( O AM> « 1GAUS. 

British Consols, 4's; Twin Gold 

Bar, 8's 59 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8's 57 

Laurel, 3's 49 

Brier, 7 s 47 

Index, 7'a 44 

Honeysuckle, 8's 56 

Napoleon, 8's 50 

Victoria, 12's 47 

Brunette, 12b 44 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 48 

in 40-lb. boxes 48 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T. * B., 

3's 60 

Lily, 7's 47 

Diamond Solace, 12's 50 

Myrtle Cut Smoking. 1 lb. tins 70 

%-lb. plug, 6-lb. boxes 70 

oz. plug. 5-lb. boxes 70 

CANADIAN TOBACCO CO., MONTREAL. 
Cut TobaccOB— 
—CTuThen, 1-6, 5 lb. box. . 20 
JlMBH Com fort, 1-6. 5 lb. box 22 
Champion, l-10,51b.bx 38 
I. OF., 1-10. 5 1b. boi 28 1 /, 
Sohmer, 1 -10, 5 lb. box 32'/? 
Imperial Cigarette Tobacco, 1-10, 

5 lb. box 40 

Quesnel Tobacco, all sizes 60 

Crown Cut Plug Mixture, % lb. tin 50 
1 lb. tin 47 
Cigarettes— 

per 1,000 

Sonadora Havana 10 00 

Royal Turkish Egyptian 10 00 

Creme de la Creme 7 50 

Marquise cigarettes, Canadian .... 7 00 

Imperial " " 3 50 

Plug tobaccos (sweet chewing)--- 

Navy, in caddies 35 

Navy, plug mark 33 35 

Honey, boxes and caddies 43 

Spun roll chewing, boxes 55 

Plug smoking (with or without tags) — 

per lb. 
Black Crown smoking, in 

caddies 35 

Crown Rouge smoking 38 

Leaf tobacco, in bales 08 20 

Cigars- 
La Sonadora Reina Vic- 
toria Flor Fina, 1-20 $85 00 




La Sonadora Reina Bou- 
quet, 1-10 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 
Victoria Extra, 1-20 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 
Victoria Special, 1-20 50 00 

Honey moon, Regalia Coin- 
il Fait, 1-40 55 00 

El Caza Culebras, 1-40 55 00 

La Fayette Reina Vic- 
toria, 1-20 32 50 

Noisy Hoys, Blue Line, 1-20 .... 25 00 

Princess of Wales, Prin- 
cess, 1-10 25 00 

Ditto, low grades 13 50 20 00 

Cigars. 

S. DAVIS SONS, MONTREAL. 



Puritan, 1-10 5-lb. boxes 
Athlete, per lb 



Sizes. 
Madre E' Hijo, Lord Lansdovrne. 
" Panetelas 



Bouquet 

Perfectos 

" Longfellow 

" Reina Victoria ... 

" Pins 

El Padre, Reina Victoria 

Reina Victoria Especial. 

Conchas de Regalia 

11 Bouquet 

" Pins 

" Longfellow 

" Perfectos 

Mungo, Nine 

Cable, Conchas 

" Queens 

Cigarettes -All Tobacco- 
Cable 

El Padre 

Mauricio 



PerM. 

.$60 00 
60 00 
60 00 

. 8500 
85 00 
80 00 
55 00 
55 00 
50 00 
50 00 
55 00 
50 00 
80 00 
80 00 
35 00 
30 00 
29 00 

7 00 
1 00 
15 00 



DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

Cigarettes— Per M. 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 25 

B.C. No.l 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 75 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

Cut Tobaccos— per lb. 

Puritan, lOths, 5-lb. boxes 70 

Old Chum. 9ths, 5-lb. boxes .... 75 
Old Virginia, 1-10 lb. pkg., 10-lb. 

boxes 62 

Gold Block, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes. ... 73 

Cigarette Tobacco — 

B. C. N. 1, 1-10, 5-lb. boxes 83 



Plug Tobaccos— 

Old Chum, plug, 4s, Solace, 16 lba. 

8s, " 16 

" 8s, R. 4 R. 13% 
" chew 7s, R. ft R. 14% 

7s, Solace, 14% 

' 8s, R. ft R. 16 

8s, Solace, 15 

O. V. " plug 8s, Twist, 16 
O. V. " " 3s, Solace, 17% 
O. V. " " Is. " 17 
Derby " 12s, " 17% 

Derby " 7s, " 17 

Athlete " 5s. Twist 9 



083 
1 15 



068 
068 
68 
058 
58 
58 
058 
058 
058 
55% 
51 
51 
74 



WOODEN W A KK. 



Pails, 2 hoop, clear, No. 1 

" 3 

" 2 2.... 

" 3 " " "2... 

" " " painted" 2 

Tubs, No. 

1 



Washboards, Globe 1 90 

Water Witch 

Single Crescent 

Double " 

Jubilee 

Globe Improved 

" Quick and Easy 

World 

Rattler 

Butter Tubs 160 

Mops and Handles, combined 

Butter Bowls, crates assort d 

THE E. B. EDDY CO. 

Washboards, Planet 

" Waverly 

XX 

X 

Electric Duplex 

" Special Globe 



per dor. 

$ 1 60 
1 65 
1 40 
1 
1 
9 

750 
6 50 
5 50 
200 
1 40 

1 85 

2 75 

2 25 
200 
1 80 
1 75 
1 30 
360 
1 25 

3 60 



1 60 
1 50 
1 40 

1 25 

2 25 
1 50 



Matches — 



Per Case. 
5-Case Lots, 



Telegraph $3 30 

Telephone 3 10 

Tiger 2 60 

Parlor 1 70 

Red Parlor 1 70 

Safety 4 00 

Favorite 2 25 

Flamers 2 20 



Single Cue 

$3 50 
330 

2 80 
1 75 

1 75 
4 20 

2 35 
2 40 



Licorice Goods 



SOME OF OUR 
LEADERS ARE : 



*fc[0ORG S CffiyUIE'S 



^ 



AGfflE 

Licorice 



4> .^Pellets 

Stick bicoRicE 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



Pure Calabria "Y&S" Licorice 

Acme Licorice Pellets 
Tar Licorice and Tola Wafers 
Licorice Lozenges 
"Parity" Penny Licorice 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



For 



25 cents 



t 

i 

! 

! 

1 



We will mail you a valuable 
little book on 

BUYING 
SELLING AND 
HANDLING OF TEA 

This is a complete and use- 
ful work, which every grocer 
should have in his possession. 



♦ The MacLean Publishing Co. ♦ 

I 26 Front St. West, Toronto. T 

DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE& SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, ONT., 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly fall off. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE. 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & Sons, Toronto, 

H. A. NeKon & Sons, Montreal. 



THE 

Oakrille Basket Co., 

MANOFACT0BBB8 OF 




i, 2, 3 bushel grain and root baskets. 
1, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
1, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For tale by all Woodenware Dealer! 



Oakville. Ont. 



English 
Malt 



Six GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

. . ODART'S SPECIALTIES . . 



HIGH CLASS 



- GREAT NOVELTY - 



GOOD PROFIT - 



ODART'S PICKLE -_m_ - ODART'S SAUCE 

ODART & CO.. PARIS, FRANCE, AND LONDON, ENO. 





CLUBBING RATES 



The Dry Goods Review and 
The Canadian Grocer 



TELLS what to buy and how to sell it ; gives a 
regular course of Window Dressing, Store 
Management, Advertising; describes all new 
goods, etc. What more do you want ? One Pointer 
from a single copy should net you at least Two 
Dollars. Twelve copies, or one year, should net you 
Twenty-four Dollars. This is a fact, and the reason 
we have subscribers 



$3.00 



Send tor Samples. 



THE DRY GOODS REVIEW 

TORONTO .... .... MONTREAL 




N.B — The old Standard Brand of HORSESHOE 
Canned Salmon still takes the lead, and afiords the 
greatest satisfaction to both dealer and consumer, and 
for uniform excellence in quality and weight has no 
equal 

EVERY CAN WARRANTED. 

We are also packers of the well and favorably known 
orands ot BEAVER, COLUMBIA and TIGER, all 
guaranteed prime Red fish. 

ALL lIVE GROCERS KEEP THEM. 



J. H. TODD & SON, 

Victoria, B.C., Owners. 

AGENTS— Geo. Stanway, Toronto, 

Agent for Ontario. 
" W. S. Goodhugh & Co,, Montreal. 

" Tees & Persse Winnipeg. 



Walter Baker& Go.Limltefl, 

The Largest Manufacturers of 

PURE, HICH CRADE 

Gocoasanci Chocolates 

on this continent, have received 

HIGHEST AWARDS 

from the great 

INDUSTRIAL^ FOOD 

EXPOSITIONS 

In Euro pe and A merica. 

C 1 A TT'VTCh ~XT • In view ot tn e manv 
^•"- *~> -LM\SJ-1 . imitations of the label's 
and wrappers on our goods, consumers should 
make sure that our place of manufacture, 
namely Dorchester, Mass.. >s printed 
on each package. 




SOLO BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 



WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 
DORCHESTER, MASS. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Mighty fine weather 




n 

♦* 



for them as is well wrapped up," said 
the polar bear to himself when he was 
practising his skating. 

" Mighty fine weather for the man 
who has seasonable goods " says the 
grocer to himself as he makes out 
change for a pound of 



B.F.P. Cough Drops 



The "GENUINE" 



Is a Chimney full of quality 

See our Registered Trade 

Mark on each one. 





Do not buy any so-called 
Flint Chimney, but insist 
on having the GENUINE 



GOWANS, KENT & CO., Toronto 



COX'S GELATINE 



Always 
Trustworthy. 



ESTABLISHED 1726. 



Agents for Canada : 

C. E. COLSON, Montreal. 

D. MASSON & CO.. Monireal. 
ARTHUR P. TIPPET & CO . 

Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Monti eal 



EDWARD STILL 

Assignee, Accountant, Auditor, etc. 



1 Toronto street. 



TORONTO. 



Commercial Accounts and those of Estates Munici- 
palises, etc , thoroughly audited and investigated. 
Charters obtained for Joint Stock Companies. 
Parties in difficulties can procure prompt settlements 
with creditors, on easy terms, without publicity. 



CHARLES F. CLARK, EDW. P. RANDOLPH 

President. Treasurer. 

ESTABLISHED 1849. 

THE BRADSTREET 

MERCANTILE dQENCY 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY, 

Executive Offices, PROPRIETORS. 

NOS. 279, 281 AND 283 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Offica in the principal d&a of the United Statet 
Canada, the European Continent, Australia and 
in London, England. 
The Bradstreet Company is the oldest and, 
financially, the strongest organization of its 
kind— working in one interest and under < ne 
management — with wider ramifications, with 
more cxpital invested in the business, and it 
expends more money every year for the collec- 
tion and dissemination of information than any 
similar institution in the world. 

...,.„.. «i» W Tr.ii.o36 Front St. East and 

TORONTO OFFICES ^ Wellington gt Eagt 
TH08. C. IRVING. Superintendent. 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

The Original and only Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery. 



John Oakey & Sons, limited, 

Manufacturers of Emery, Black Lead, Emery and 
Glass Cloths and Papers, etc 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Representative in Canada : 
JOHN FORMAN. 650 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 




TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JAN UARY 24, 1896. 



No. 4 




COLMANS MUSTARD 



HAS OBTAINED THE HIGHEST AWARDS AND UNEQUALLED HONOURS AT ALL THE PRINCIPAL 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITIONS 



ONLY COLD MEDAL PARIS 1878 



TWO • GOLD JWEDALS 

INTERNATIONAL HEALTH EXHIBITION LONDON 1554 

On]yT>r\pt\<iAal]ondon.mZ -ok Only SilvkrMcdal ?aris. W& 



Only jvy?dat Dublin. 1S65. W grand (Jold^edal^oscowl&Tg&S 



To Groeers 



The season is on for Marshall's popular Scotch Pickled Herrings. All 
principal wholesalers carry stock. The margin of profit to the dealer 
is good. He should not be without this leading 1 brand. 



"CROWN" 



BRAND 



Marshall's Scotch Herrings 



FROM THE FAMED ABERDEEN FISHERIES 



In Kegs 
Firkins 
Half Barrels 
Barrels 



FULLS and 
MEDIUMS 

SOLE AGENTS : 



N. B. — Marshall & Co., Aberdeen,^own their fishing fleet ; 

pack only the Finest Selected Herrings. Every package 

guaranteed. Their Kippered. Fresh Herrings, Herrings in To- 
mato Sauce, etc., are very superior. 



WALTER R. WONHAM & SONS, 



3 1 5 and 3 1 6 
Board of Trade Building, 



Montreal 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



139 MEDALS AND HIGHEST AWARDS FROM THE WORLD'S EXHIBITIONS. 



Purveyors by special appointment 
t0 Her Majesty 

THE QUEEN 

Empress of India. 




Purveyors by special appointment 
to H. R. H. the 

PRINCE OF WALES 

K.G., K.T., h.P. 



MACONOCHIE 




BROTHERS 



131 Leadenhall Street, London, England 



Manufacturers of First Quality 



Potted Meats 
Fish Delicacies 
Jelly Squares 
Pickles 
Sauces 



Vinegars 



• • • • L^LLs* 



The Best 



The World Produces 



All particulars from agents : — 

SEETON & MITCHELL, Halifax, N.S. 
L1GHTBQUND. RALSTON k CO., Montreal 



Agents for British Columbia : 



& 



Vancouver and Victoria 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Standard Goods ^BesttoHandle 



Pare 

Concentrated 

Cocoa. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Pare 
Chocolate. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Vanilla and 
de Sante 
Chocolate. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Caracas 
Chocolate. 




$ 



Homeopathic 
Cocoa. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Diamond 
Chocolate. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Monogram 
Chocolate. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Gold Medal 

Sweet 

Chocolate. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 

A. P. TIPPET & CO. 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 

F. H. TIPPET & CO. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The Value of 
Strength . . . 




In Wrapping Paper is known and appreciated 
by every wholesale and retail grocer. 

We have special brands for this use — 

MANILLLA, 
BROWN WRAPPING 

ETC., ETC. 

noted for long and strong fibre — and made to 
stand more than ordinary wear and tear. 



ITS SUPERIORITY WILL QUICKLY ASSERT ITSELF. 
WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



THE 



E. B. Eddy Co. 



LTD. 



Hull, C 



319 St. James Street, MONTREAL 



ANADA 



38 Front Street West, TORONTO 



Agents: F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec; A. Powis, Hamilton; J. A. Hendry, Kingston; 
Schofield Bros., St. John ; J. Peters & Co., Halifax ; Tees & Persse, Winnipeg ; James 
Mitchell, Victoria. *. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



These Letters speak f f 

.... the virtues of 



CRAND MOCUL' 



A resident on Palmerston 
Avenue, Toronto, writes 
us as follows: 

Jan'y 8, '96. 
T. B. Escott & Co. 

Sirs,— Enclosed please 
find twenty-five cents and 
postage, for which kindly 
send me at once j£-lb. 
Grand Mogul Tea. I am 
unable to get it here. 
Yours respectfully, 

Wm. 

♦♦♦ 

A resident on Arthur Street 
writes : 

T. B. Escott & Co., 

London. 
Gentlemen, — I tried 
several stores in the vain 
hope of obtaining Grand Mogul Tea, I therefore apply to you and 
will thank you to mail me ^ lb. I enclose 25 cents and postage. 
Yours etc., George 

P. S. — To all enquirers we beg to say that we shall introduce Grand 
Mogul Tea to all the Toronto trade very shortly. 

The above are samples of letters we are receiving 
dally from the Queen City of Ontario. 



DELICIOUS FLAVOUR 



MOGUL 

TEA. 

A Luxury All May Enjoy 

30,40,50,60 0. 

INPKGS. 



Demanded 




By Consumers because it has 
no equal. 



Sold 



T. B. ESCOTT <£ CO. 

Sole Agents for Canada and the United States. 



It has no equal. 
Packed in White 
Opal Jars, 4 sizes. 



By Retailers because no trouble 
to sell. 



Bought 

By every Jobber because his 
trade requires it. 



Prepared and Guaranteed by 



A. F. MacLaren & Co. 



51 COLBORNE ST. 



TORONTO. 



Chyloongs 



. . '95 Crop . . 



Preserved Ginger 



• • • • • • 

• w •• •• 



Just received a consignment direct from Hong Kong, Ex "Empress 
of India" and C. P. R. Cases— Whole Pots, Half Pots, Quarter Pots. 
Also Dry Stem Ginger in yi. and i-lb. Tins. Send for quotations. 



ROSE & LAFLAMME 



Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Laboratory of Inland Revenue, 
Office of Official Analyst, 

Montreal, April 8th, 1895. 

" I hereby certify that I have drawn, by my own hand, ten samples 
of the ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO.'S EXTRA STAND- 
ARD GRANULATED SUGAR, indiscriminately taken from ten lots 
of about 150 bbls. each, I have analysed same, and find them 
uniformly to contain : 

99ioo to 100 per cent, of Pure Cane Sugar 

with no impurities whatever." 

(Signed) JOHN BAKER EDWARDS, Ph.D., D.C.L 

Prof, of Chemistry and Pub. Analyst, 

MONTREAL. 



Do You Sell Crockery ? 

Then we want your business. We manufacture all kinds of Yellow, and Bristol 
Glazed goods, also Rockingham Ware, which we guarantee fully equal to any on 
the market, either of home or foreign production. Catalogues, prices or travelers' 
attendance, if you drop us a card. 



Brantford Stoneware Mfg. Co. Ltd. - Brantford. 



OTHER SPECIALTIES. 

NOUGAT 
RAHAT LAKUHM 
ALMOND ROCK 
EL MAHNA 



B^^assa 




BUTTER SCOTCH k 

^^ (The Celebrated Sweet for Children). Jk 



MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS. 

PARIS 

SYDNEY 

MELBOURNE 



CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., Toronto. ff%, <%aaj**"*«*-, ^f rose 4 LAfLAMME, Montreal. 



WORKS : LONDON. W.C. 



■ 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Open Pan 
Salt 



This is superior to any modern 
method of manufacture. It has 
stood the test of years, and to-day 
stands at the head. 

WE DO NOT NEED TO SAY 
OUR SALT IS 
PURE AND SALTY 

Thousands of cheese and butter- 
makers know what our Salt can do. 
They have TRIED it, and many 
are using a MEDIUM GRAIN, 
Open Pan Salt in preference to 
any other. All first-class grocers 
and dairy supply stores keep our 
Salt. Samples and quotations for- 
warded on application. 



The Canada 
Salt Association 



CLINTON, ONTARIO 



OUR BRANDS 



BROOMS . . . 

R 

O 

O 

M 

S 



Imperial Gold Medal Victoria 

Bamboo Carpet Standard Leader 

A variety of sizes in each line. Give us a trial order. 

Freight allowed to Ontario points in 5 doz. lots. 



CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers. TORONTO, ONT. 



Swx/a 



z&g&reptfizsss&ri 



f,2$3& 



CONFIDENCE 

in the merits of the goods you sell is an important element of success. 

JOHNSTON'S 

FliUlD BEEF 

can always be sold with the most absolute guarantee that it is the best beef 
preparation. We will back you up in this statement to the fullest extent. 

THE JOHNSTON FLUID BEEF GO. MONTREAL, 







A 600D THING 




To suit eyery taste. 



4 CRAPES MANUFACTURED 

No. 1. Pure Mocha and Java 

" 2. Pure Java 

" 3. Pure Jamaica 

" 4. Pure West Indian Coffees 
with a small propor- 
tion of chicory. 



BUY IN SMALL LOTS 
AND OFTEN 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




Where Good Tea 



Is appreciated, a Reputation has been 
established for our 



Standard Blacks . . 



The 400 Select 
Dalu Kola Congou 



mperial Congou 
Russian Congou 



IN THESE DAYS of Keen Business Rivalry, when the mar- 
ket is flooded with brands of tea of all descriptions, (some of them shelf- 
warmers) we feel gratified that our honest endeavors to supply the Trade 
with a Pure, Rich, Full-Flavored Tea at a fair price, have been rewarded 
by an unprecedented demand for the above sterling lines. 

WE WANT YOU to prove their excellence for yourselves. We 
are at all times glad to send samples and quotations. 

LASTLY. Your profit is a goodly one. 



W. H. Gillard & Co. 



Wholesalers 
Only 



Hamilton 



JOHN MOUAT, Northwest Representative, WINNIPEG. 



t 

i 

» 



t " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " 0ii0i'0 n 0iil 




LOW 



If you delay, our goods may not grace your establishment, but if you want to 
be convinced of their sterling value, just order a single case from your jobber. 
We do this so you may make some money in '96 in your Canned Goods. 



Picton 

Toronto 



W. BOULTER & SONS, D „ vllle . 

ii0ii#ii0ii0ii 0ii0ii0ti ii0ii0ii0ii0ii0ii0ii0ii 0n n n 0ii0ii0ii0 



" n II0II0II0II0II0II0II0 H 0II0II0II0II0II0II0 H 0II0II00I 



'IS^'lll' ll^l 'MliKtlfJlHHIHIUit'SNIMIIIII^aHtl:: SKU :;;"HaST!' ^» ; :. FSB!'!':' !"9« Nl!!lll«ffiii '^KiliUMIiieSii..',: «» 



f 






mm 



Condensed Mince Meat 



Guaranteed 

First-class. 



PURE 

WHOLESOME 

DELICIOUS 

For sale by all wholesalers, and put up by 



MIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIWillllllHIIIIIIIIIAlllllllHIIIIIIIIHII 



J. H. WETHEY, 



*#■ *«*».»*.« * 



f 
I 

i 



1 
I 

i 



St. Catharines | 



HIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIII 



IIHIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIlri 



This journal has the largest circulation and the largest advertising 

patronage of any grocery paper in the world. We prove it. 




Vol. X. (Published Weekly) 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 24, 1896 



(S2.00 per Year) No. 4 



DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. enjoying the after-business social hour which 



Success is the successor of solid succes- 
sive effort. 

" T " stands for the tactician that sells 
with tact tea. 

Men who can't work can grunt all day 
doing nothing. 

Poor policy is it to lie about soap, because 
there is lie in soap. 

He who cannot keep a stiff upper lip can- 
not keep his reputation. 

Man maketh the advertisement and the 
advertisement the business. 

An indolent clerk, like a neglected tree, is 
not likely to bear much fruit. 

Send for the " ad " doctor for a tonic if 
your business exhibits lethargy. 

Young men launching out into life should 
be as ambitious to do Right as to be Great. 

If it were not for the days of grace, some 
men there are that would now have been in 
disgrace. 

Dead men and men dead to business have 
both one thing in common : they are un- 
attractive. 

Genius, like a beautiful piece of machin- 
ery, has not much utility until motive power 
is put into it. 

All other things being equal, the slower a 
merchant is to give credit the faster does he 
become affluent. 

Grocers and provision dealers to the num- 
ber of 988 bit the dust, financially speaking, 
in the United Kingdom last year. 

Binding themselves together in cords of 
unity are the members of the Retail Gro- 
cers' Association of Toronto while they are 



they inaugurated at the last meeting. 

A counterfeit of a man is he who know- 
ingly sells a counterfeit for the real article. 

The dead business man can console him- 
self with the thought that he will not be 
bothered by too many customers. 

Business may not be a key with which to 
open the pearly gates ; but it is a bar to the 
gates that lead to the nether world. 

The word " advertisement " is synony- 
mous with "influence." And, like it, is one 
of the greatest forces in the world to-day. 

When it is announced that Parliament has 
settled down to business it means ordinarily 
that the House has settled down to politics. 

A bird in the hand is worth two in the 
bush, but there is no reason why one should 
not go into the bush in search of the other 
two. 

The impression of an advertisement is not 
only made upon a piece of paper, but upon 
all into whose hands that piece of paper 
falls. 

The six bolters that returned came back, 
not like dogs to guard the country's interests, 
but, like cats, for the meat there was in 
office. 

He who steps on a banana is likely to slip 
down, and he who buys bananas from ped- 
lars on frosty days is likely to get " slipped 
up." 

A fair mede of competition maketh a 
business man, but a superfluity unmaketh 
him, and brings him into sore financial 
straits. 

Many of the evils that confront us as a 
country would soon be prostrate behind us 
were we to strike a few vigorous blows and 
walk on. 

'Tis men of individuality and fools that 
attract the most attention in the world. But 



born with common sense it depends upon a 
man's own energy what he shall be. There 
are more men bred than born fools. 

"What are profits?" asks a centemporary. 
Ah, that's the rub. But go thou not to the 
"cutter" forsooth for an answer to the 
question. 

One thing to be regretted is that in the 
recent Cabinet shuffle at Ottawa a business 
man was not shuffled into the Controllership 
of Customs. 

It is by reading, marking, learning and in- 
wardly digesting everything appertaining 
thereto that the details of a business are 
mastered. 

The traveler has more ups and downs 
than most men, but he is always jolly. His 
" ups " are over hills and his " downs" 
across valleys. 

Emperor William declares he will no 
visit England again. 'Tis too bad. The 
Prince of Wales will have one playmate less 
in his mother's back yard. 

People inside the counter who do not 
recognize the rights of those outside the 
counter will ultimately be left behind the 
counter without anyone to recognize them. 

It is because they scorned to perform the 
small duties, that many a man is to-day do- 
ing the little things, while others who began 
life doing the chores are now their em- 
ployers. 

Although business men's associations are 
formed primarily with the object of remedy- 
ing trade evils, small indeed is the progress 
made if the social side is overshadowed alto- 
gether by the practical. 

While friction between employes or be- 
tween employes and employer will not warm 
the store these wintry days, it will if con- 
tinued make the place too hot for all the 
dissentients to remain therein. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE RIGHT KIND OF A SENATOR. 

THE Dominion Government sometimes 
makes a judicious appointment, and 
the Senate sometimes receives an ad- 
dition that cannot be dubbed an old fogey 
or that is lacking in business qualifications. 
We must all acknowledge this, whatever 
may be our attitude toward either the Gov- 
ernment or the Senate. 

The Canadian Grocer is inspired to 
these remarks by the appointment of Mr. J. 
O. Villeneuve to the Senate. 

The appointment is one of the most judi- 
cious that has been made in 
a decade at least, for Sena- 
tor Villeneuve possesses the 
rare qualification of being 
both a practical and success- 
ful business man and a poli- 
tician. Would that we had 
more such men, not only in 
the Senate, but in Parlia- 
ment and in the Cabinet. 
Had we, farther advanced 
would Canada be to-day, 
and spared would the coun- 
try have been the disgrace- 
ful circumstances and scenes 
which have been enacted 
the past few weeks in the 
Cabinet and in the House. 

Politician and all as Mr. 
Villeneuve may be, he is 
above all a business man. 
He is head of the firm of 
J. O. Villeneuve & Co., 
wholesale grocers, wine and 
spirit merchants, and started 
into business away back in 
1862 at 1260 St. Lawrence 
street, Montreal, at which 
place the firm is still to be 
found. 

Harp as pessimists may 
regarding the difficulty of 
doing a strictly honest busi- 
ness, the world has a warm 
spot in its affections for the 
honest man, the man of back- 
bone and principle. Mr. 
Villeneuve is of this kind, 
and the fact that he is one of the most 
popular men in the Province of Quebec, as 
well as the recipient of many public honors, 
demonstrates that he has not gone unre- 
warded, whilst of the coin of the realm he is 
said to have accumulated several hundred 
thousand dollars. Senator Villeneuve is a 
man whom the youths of Canada may do 
well to emulate. 

His public life has been as successful as 
his business life. In 1886 he was elected to 
represent Hochelaga in the Quebec Legis- 
lature, and he is still its honored representa- 
tive. For seventeen years he was councillor 
and Mayor of St. Jean Baptiste village. 



When that village became part of Montreal 
he became one of the aldermen of the com- 
mercial metropolis. He is still a member of 
the City Council, and in 1894 was elected 
to fill the Mayor's chair. " He is one of the 
best men that has sat at the Montreal Coun- 
cil Board," remarked a gentleman to The 
Canadian Grocer. 

Besides looking after his business and 
performing the duties appertaining to the 
municipality and the state, Mr. Villeneuve 
manages to find time to lend his assistance 
to other institutions : He is a director of 
the Dominion Cotton Mills and the Banque 




LINE BETWEEN CASH AND CREDIT. 

"The country merchant now finds it 
necessary for him to draw a sharp line be- 
tween cash and credit on the boot question," 
says a writer in The Shoe and Leather 
Facts. " I do not say it is policy to sell 
boots on a cash basis exclusively. I say it 
is an absolute necessity. Even if you sell 
your other goods on credit you must make 
it an imperative rule that boots and shoes 
shall not go out of the store in that way. 
Even if they are paid for after a time you 
cannot afford to wait. The amount involved 
is, in the aggregate, entirely too much, and 
money is worth 6 per cent, 
any day, and much more 
when it comes to calculating 
the discount on a bill. A 
merchant with a pressing 
need of ready cash to settle 
'a little bill,' and whose re- 
sources are represented by 
the balances, good, bad or 
indifferent, on his books, is 
in about as enviable a posi- 
tion as a courtier afflicted 
with a white elephant on 
which he is not able to rea- 
lize. It requires the man- 
agement of a veritable ' Na- 
poleon of finance ' to make 
money when handicapped in 
this manner, and so men 
who are conscious of being 
possessed of less extensive 
capabilities should, or rather 
must, try to invent some way 
to escape the affliction, es- 
pecially since the best way 
for us is also the simplest, 
the simple ' No.' " 



Senator Villeneuve 

Nationale, and a member of the Harbor 
Commission and the Board of Trade. 

The country is to be congratulated even 
more than Mr. Villeneuve on his elevation to 
the Senate. He is the class of man the 
Senate needs badly. The Government is to 
be commended for the wisdom of its choice. 
We urge it to go and do likewise in regard 
to the other vacancies, and the Senate will 
then soon become as noted for its efficiency 
as it now is for its inefficiency. 

The Canadian Grocer has long advo- 
cated the appointment of business men to 
the Senate, and we are in a congratulatory 
mood over the selection of Mr. Villeneuve. 



SALMON. 

The ship Silverhow, from 
Seattle, with 15,847 cases of 
salmon and 3,619 centals of 
wheat, has arrived to com- 
plete her cargo at Victoria 
with salmon and oil for 
Liverpool. The Ardmore 
loading on the Fraser will 
complete her cargo shortly, 
and then the pack of B. C. for last season 
will be out of first hands. 

Calculations place the total pack of the 
Pacific coast canneries for the past year at 
2,321,611 cases, which is some 437,400 cases 
greater than the pack of 1894. The British 
Columbia pack, 600,978 cases, is the 
largest ever put up. In 1894 the pack 
was 494,371 cases, and in 1893, 590,229 
cases. 

According to the U. S. Customs returns 
the value of sockeye salmon taken in Wash- 
ington waters, principally at Port Roberts, 
and sold to B. C. cannerymen, was $27,575. 
— B. C. Commercial Journal. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



YOU CAN DEPEND UPON THEM 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



L. P. & Co. Coffees . 
Diamond Crystal Salt 



HILLWATTEE j L P & O o. Sp ,c e8 . 

Hppj A I Roberts' Jellies . . . . 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, agents Hamilton 



Two Extremes 



■> 



J 






RAM 



LAL'S 
PURE 



INDIAN 
TEA 



Never Fails to Please. 



The tea jobbers who are crowding 
the advertising mediums to attract 
public attention from brands that are 
considered as staple as gold have very 
successfully imitated the external ap- 
pearance of one of the choicest 
beverages to be found on the tables 
of the poor and rich alike, namely, 
Ram Lai's Pure Indian Package 
Tea ; but they are just as unsuccessful 
in imitating the quality of the goods 
as they have been successful in imi- 
tating the label. 



JAMES TURNER & CO. TXtr* Hamilton 



TEAS 



We will offer during January exceptional 
values to clear out short lines. See our 
samples before buying. 



BALFOUR & CO. 



Wholesale 



Grocers HamiltOIl, Ollt. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



^&£2a&2^2^aa2^£&£3^@&gS!^$@^^ 




CALIFORNIA FRUITS 



RUBY PRUNES 
FRENCH PRUNES 
SILVER PRUNES 
EGG PLUMS 



PEACHES— Fancy, Ex. Choice, Choice, 25-lb. boxes. 
APRICOTS — Fancy, Ex. Choice, Choice, 25-lb. boxes. 
PEARS — In 40-lb. boxes. 
PEACHES and APRICOTS -In 80-lb. bags 




H. P. ECKARDT & CO. ffiS55 ,e TORONTO 




TRADE CHAT. 

MR. ED. WINNET, of Petroha, struck 
a thirty-barrel oil well in the rear of 
his boiler shop the other day. 

H. A. Rutherford, of Bolton, Ont., will 
open up a butcher shop in Fisher & Co.'s 
storehouse. 

The Otonabee mills and the Peterboro 
mills have been acquired by a new company 
called the Consolidated Milling Company. 

The large general store and stock of H. 
Roberts & Co., Strathclair, Ont., were totally 
destroyed by fire the other night. The in- 
surance is $2,500, and the loss much more. 

The council of the Board of Trade, Win- 
nipeg, have perfected arrangements for the 
annual banquet, which takes place at the 
Manitoba Hotel on February 4. 

John Leitch, of Glencoe, last week bought 
the October make of cheese from the Gala- 
bank, Vyner, Uttoxeter and Forest factories, 
over 400 boxes, for 8#c. per lb. 

Says the St. John Sun: W. C. Archibald, 
of Wolfville, returned yesterday from Mon- 
treal, where he placed a few hundred cases 
of canned fruits, put up in the land of 
Evangeline. 

Batchelor's Maple Grove cheese factory 
has changed hands, having been purchased 
by Mr. S. P. Brown, an experienced dairy- 
man from Ontario County. The price is 
reported to be $2,000. 

S. Allen has decided to rebuild at Norwich 
his vinegar works which were recently 
burned down. The village council have ex- 
empted him from taxation for ten years and 
the Norwich people are exceedingly jubilant 
that their efforts to retain this important in- 
dustry have proved successful. 

The confectionery store recently occupied 
by G. E. Elstone, Ingersoll, Ont., who went 
away from town unceremoniously, leaving 
behind many creditors, and which is now in 
in possession of the bailiff, was burglarized 
some time during Thursday night and some 
seventy-five cigars and six briar root pipes 
appropriated. 

The Halifax Chronicle correspondent at 
Amherst has been informed that Messrs. 



Black & Page, of that town, have lately 
made two large shipments of hay from St. 
John to Liverpool, England, and that they 
have also contracted for a quantity for each 
fortnight during the next four months. This 
firm has already made several shipments 
from Halifax this season. 

The Charlottetown Examiner says that 
during the past week 4,970 pounds of butter 
were churned at the Central Creamery in 
Charlottetown, valued at about $1,000. On 
Monday morning 15,000 pounds of butter 
were shipped on the Stanley for the Liver- 
pool markets. It was expected that another 
shipment of 2,000 pounds would be made on 
Wednesday. 

The aggregate landings of tea at the port 
of London during last month were no less 
than 26,291,800 lbs., in comparison with 23,- 
262,600 lbs. in December, 1894 ; and al- 
though the clearances in the same interval 
of time were heavier by over 1,000,000 lbs. 
— extending to 18,782,100 lbs., in place of 
17,749,400 lbs. in the year just named — the 
general stock was considerably augmented, 
presenting on the 31st ult. a surplus of 2,324,- 
1 <;o lbs. 

The Hamilton Iron and Steel Co. have 
had their furnaces going since the 31st 
December drying the brick work, etc., and 
expect to make their first cast this week. 
They have an immense quantity of material 
on hand, and are feceiving about fifty car- 
loads a day. The anxious time will be to see 
the quality of their product. The plant is 
strictly up to date, and nothing more com- 
plete can be found on the Continent. 

At the first annual session of the Ontario 
Beekeepers' Association on Wednesday last 
the president referred to the fact that the 
sale of Canadian honey was increasing in 
Europe, and he hoped that in 1896 the crop 
sent there would be largely increased. He 
found that the Canadian honey gave satis- 
faction to their British friends, and he urged 
upon the members that they should put up 
and sell only first-class goods. The pure 
honey legislation should be pushed as much 
as possible. That alone would give them a 
position as honey producers second to none 



in the world. The goods would have the 
guarantee of the stamp of the Government of 
Canada as regards purity, and that would go 
a long way with British consumers. 

The Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Rail- 
way are running trains regularly now on the 
Welland branch. The rolling stock is ex- 
ceptionally fine, and their engines superior 
to anything that has been seen in Ontario 
heretofore. The retaining walls of the tun- 
nel are completed, and the arch is ex 
pected to be finished by the end of this 
month, when nothing remains to be done 
but filling in over the arch and beautifying 
the street. With the exception of two or 
three blocks, no damage whatever has been 
done to the residential or business portion 
of the city. 

The itinerant dealer is of no earthly use 
to a town. He gives nothing to churches or 
public expenses. He has nothing in com- 
mon with our people. He can swindle you, 
and often he does. He can cheat with im- 
punity. The home merchant has a reput- 
ation to sustain. He bears his share of the 
expenses of the town. When a subscription 
is passed he is the first to be approached. 
He builds a house and makes other perman- 
ent improvements that enhance the value of 
our property. He helps pay for the churches 
in which we worship and the schools to 
which we send our children. He cannot 
afford to misrepresent his goods or swindle 
his customers. Self-interest alone prevents 
this. It is not difficult to decide which of 
the two classes of dealers should receive the 
patronage of the people. — Pictou, N.S., 
Advocate. 



NOT TO LEAVE AYLMER. 

By an article in The Journal of Saturday, 
under the caption of " Want to go to Hamil- 
ton," several people of Aylmer thought it the 
intention of Messrs. Marshall & Nairn to re- 
move their canning factory to Hamilton. 
Such, however, is not the case. The Finance 
Committee of the city of Hamilton was 
asked by Mr. D. Marshall to exempt from 
taxation a new factory that he had bought 
and which is to be run at its full capacity this 
year in tomatoes and fruits. The matter was 
left over for the new Finance Committee to 
settle. However settled, it will not affect 
the parent factory in Aylmer. — Aylmer Sun. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



11 



| 1 AJD-LiJy EBENR. ROBERTS' 

Hi "PI Unequalled for Purity and Flavor 

i Jellies 



ALL FLAVORS 

Quarts, Pints and Half-Pints. 



| DAVIDSON & HAY, S^ST Toronto, Ont. | 




Aiming High 

. Is usually a good way to aim, but aiming to hit the mark is better. We are 
constantly studying to hit the popular idea of QUALITY, ASSORTMENT 
and PRICE, and it is this thoughtful care that makes our 

Buckwheat Flour 



1 



SCORE A HIT EVERY TIME 



\ THE TILLSON COMPANY, Ltd. iW-»<fo. 1 



4 
4 
4 

t 



We could write a book 



about Salmon and Salmon Packing, but if we did you might not have 
time to read it. Our knowledge takes form in our goods. The best 
evidence of our ability to pack a first-class article is the article itself — 
Flag-Ship Salmon. Have you got it ? 



; 

t 

I 

t 

! 

t 



i 



ROBERT WARD & CO., Ltd. 

9 Sole Agents 

VICTORIA, B.C. 



L 



: Canadian Pacific Packing Co. 

LULU ISLAND, B.C. 



? 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HINTS TO BUYERS 

SMITH & KEIGHLEY are in receipt 
of a shipment of Sultana raisins in 
various qualities. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., report large 
sales of Bensdorp's cocoa. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. are in receipt of a 
shipment of California navel oranges. 

James Turner & Co. are offering cheap 
California dried fruits, especially in sack 
peaches. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. have the following 
lake fish, fall catch : Whitefish, trout and 
herring. 

Assorted jams and marmalade, in 7-lb. 
pails, are offered at a cut figure by Lucas, 
Steele & Bristol. 

H. P. Eckardt & Co. have the following 
brands of Atlas prunes in cases : " A." " B." 
" D.," new goods. 

The Nova Scotia turkey offering by Lucas, 
Steele & Bristol is meeting with ready sale. 
Quality is unsurpassed. 

A nice assortment of Valencia raisins is 
being shewn by W. H. Gillard & Co., and 
offered at below market prices. 

John Sloan & Co., of Toronto, are in re- 
ceipt of a shipment of West Indian arrow- 
root and Albert sardines in J^'s. 

The Snow Drift Co. are closing out a lot 
of z l /z and 5 lb. packages of their self-rising 



buckwheat flour. This is to finish up their 
stock in that line for the year. " If you want 
any, drop a card, or see the men about it 
when theycajl," advise the firm. 

W. H. Gillard & Co. are shewing excep- 
tional value in Rio coffees. Intending pur- 
chasers should drop them a line. 

Another shipment of shredded codfish, put 
up by J. W. Beardsley's Sons, New York, 
arrived this week for the Eby, Blain Co., 
Ltd. 

May pickings Japan teas are scarce. 
James Turner & Co.'s travelers are showing 
an elegant invoice, grading from fine to 
choicest. 

"•Ram Lai's' tea keeps moving along," 
advise James Turner & Co. " Majority of 
good grocers handle same. They say it is 
never dead stock." 

This week some choice values in Gun- 
powders are being shown by Lucas, Steele 
& Bristol. A Garden Flower Oolong is also 
among their samples. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., are in receipt 
of a large shipment of their " Orient " brand 
of pure Indian and Ceylon tea, their trade 
for which is increasing steadily. 

" Harvest Brand " California prunes are 
being stocked by Warren Bros. & Boomer. 
They are put up in 25-lb. boxes, and in 
quality and appearance are much similar to 
the Imperial French plums that formerly 



came to this country in bottles. The fruit 
is handsome and delicious. 

" We have," say Lucas, Steele & Bristol, 
" a fine assortment of California raisins, 
plums, apricots and peaches. We never 
offered them so cheap." 

The " Mecca ■ brand of coffee is getting a 
solid hold on those that handle same. "When 
once a pound is taken buyer is back for 
another," write James Turner & Co., of 
Hamilton. 

W. H. Gillard & Co. have a large stock of 
Imperial plums in 25-lb. boxes, which they 
state shew splendid value, and they direct 
the attention of the trade to their advertise- 
ment on another page. 



LITIGATION OVER "BIRD BREAD." 

In the Single Court at Toronto, before 
Judge Meredith, a decision has been given 
in the case of Cottam (London) vs. Nichol- 
son & Brock (Toronto). Motion for in- 
terim injunction turned by consent into 
motion for judgment, and judgment granted 
in terms minutes as follows : Defendants 
not to use the words " Bird Bread " in their 
business. Defendants admit the validity of 
plaintiff's patent, and consent to cancella- 
tion of defendant Brock's patent; defendants 
to beat liberty to use 1,500 copies of the 
label complained of, at present on their 
packages, leaving out the words " Bird 
Bread '' — balance of defendants' labels to be 
destroyed. 



Do you wish 

THE 

Best 
Gelatine 

In the world q 
To-day ... ■ 



/Gjyutvis/iTCDMoyiGEl 



^cpARKLlNg 

EelatinE 



C.BKNO^ 



THEN BUY 



Knox's 

SPARKLING CALVES FOOT 

Gelatine 

IT IS THE PUREST MADE 

MAKES 2 QUARTS JELLY 



It is the only Gelatine used and endorsed by the 
LEADING TEACHERS of COOKERY in the United 
States. 

Received the only MEDAL at the WORLD'S FAIR 

for its 

Strength, Purity and Good Flavor. 

The New Granulated Package dissolves in two m 
ittes; other brands take one hour. 



WE GUARANTEE EVERY PACKAGE 

SEND VS A TRIAL ORDER 



HAVE YOU TRIED 



Knox's 
Crystallized 
Fruit *\ 
Gelatine • 



It is in dpy powder form, already 
flavored, simply needs dissolving in 
boiling" water and set aside to COOl. 

MAKES ONE QUART DELICIOUS JELLY 

It is packed 3 dozen assorted 
flavors in a case. 

LET US SEND YOU A * 



SAMPLE ORDER- 



It is a good Profit Maker. 



We sell all the KNOX GELATINES, 
for they are THE BEST. 



YOU SHOULD TRY 

Knox's 

Acidulated 

Gelatine 

Is in PowdeP form. Requires 
no lemons or other fruit. 

♦ ♦ 

ONLY ONE TEASPOONFUL 

of any extract you may desire. 

sugar, and water, makes 

two quarts Jelly. 

♦ ♦ 

The package for the 
busy housekeeper 



Ask your Wholesale Grocer 
for Knox Gelatines; ff he 
will not get them for you, 
write us and we will see 
that your order is filled. 



A, E. RICHARDS & CO. 



Agents for Canada 



CALEDONIA, ONT. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



ADD to your POPULARITY and PROSPERITY by handling only STRAIGHT GOODS 

IN THE FRONT RANK ARE 

CARR & CO.'S 




English Biscuits 

Are exported to all parts of the world. 

Established 1831. 

The original manufacturers of 
Fancy Biscuits by Machinery. 

Appointed Biscuit Manufactur- 
ers to H. M. the Queen by special 
warrant, dated May 8th, 1841. 

CARR & CO. Ltd. 



CARLISLE, ENGLAND. 



Agents for Canada 



Robert Grelg & Co,, 



456 St. Paul St. 
MONTREAL 



A combination of Purity, Strength 



Rowntree's Elect Cocoa anTnavor. 
Craven's English Confectionery fi™D? u r ^ 

JU_I/_ * 1/^1 ~ i^^-f^ A delicious blending of Kola, Coffee 

/WcKay s Kola-Cate and chicory. 



Union Produce Co. 



BRANDS : 

NEUFCHATEL BEAVER 

ROYAL ARMS MANITOBA 

FANCY CREAM 



FINK 

CREAM 

CHEESE 





CROWN BRAND EXTRACTS 

Strength and Quality considered are the cheapest. 

ROBERT GREIG & CO. 



456 St, Pftul Street 



REGISTERED 



Manufacturers and Sole 
Agents for Canada. 



, . . Montreal 



14 THE CANADIAN GROCER 



FULL RANGE. 



FANCY GROCERIES 



TABLE 
RAISINS 



London Layers Imperial Clusters 
Fancy Clusters London Layers 

2 K " Cartoons. 

Dehesa Clusters Loose Muscatels 



All varieties California Evaporated Fruits 

Franco American Plum Pudding, pound tins 
Glace Lemon, Orange and Citron Peels 

Batger's Nonpareil and Compote Jellies 

New Nuts, Tarragona S. S. Almonds 

Valencia Shelled Almonds, Barcelona and 
Sicily Filberts, Grenoble Walnuts. 



Turner, Mackeand & Co. - - Winnipeg 



WHO URGES YOU TO SELL 

Snow Drift Baking Powder ? 

The public. By giving you always an article that is 
exactly as represented we have made all your cus- 
tomers want only our goods. 




The Snow Drift Co. - Brantford. 



Effectual Sweepings 



Are only ) The DAISY 

to be made THIST 

by using ) ROSE 



BROOflS 



The best value, retailing at Lots of 5 dozen assorted freight allowed. 

20, 25 and 30 cents. 

H. A. NELSON & SONS - Toronto and Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 




j. a. nacLHAN, 

President. 



HUGH C. MacLEAN, 

Sec.-TreaSm 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

LIMITED 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

and 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 



TORONTO : 
MONTREAL j 



26 Front St. W. 
146 St. James St. 



EUROPEAN BRANCH : 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

John Cameron. General Subscription Agent. 



CANADIAN VEGETABLE PACK. 

MORE than usual interest was wrapped 
around the pack of vegetables in 
Canada last year. The chief reason 
for this was the peculiar weather conditions 
of last spring. 

It wiil be remembered that the tomato 
plants that were put out early in the spring 
were destroyed by the heavy frosts which ap- 
peared shortly afterwards. Fortunately, the 
plants had been put out earlier than was 
wont, and thedamsge was partially repaired 
be re-plan ing. But, of course, the maturing 
of the crop was deterred materially. As 
a result, speculation was rife as to its 
ultimate outcome ; and in spite of the 
drouth of the early summer the ciop turned 
out well, and rather better in quantity and 
quality than usual. This being the fact, a 
large pack was anticipated. Although this 
anticipation was to some extent realized, yet 
it was not to the full, for the tomato crop, 
being late in maturing, packers, towards 
the latter end of the season, required their 
factories for putting up other vegetables and 
fruits which were demanding their attention. 
As it was, however, they put up a larger 
pack than the year before, as will be seen 
from the subjoined table. 

Regarding peas, everyone in the trade is 
aware that the drouth prevented anything 
but a small pack of these. The weather was 
favorable to corn — during the latter part of 
the season, at any rate — and the result was 
a good pack, although from the figures ad- 
duced it does not appear to be as large as 
some thought it would be. 

The following table has been furnished us 
by the secretary of the Packers' Association, 
W. C. Breckenridge : 

1895. 1894. 189-,. 

tomatoes, cases 110.000 106,944 110,496 

gallons 833 903 

Corn, cases 99.000 106,427 81,524 

Peas, " 27,000 34,5:4 61,300 

The figures f jr 1895 were collated from the 
reports submitted by ten packers at the meet- 



ing of the association held last mon.h.and are 
estimated to represent two-thirds of the total 
pack of the different lines. 

The pack of gallon apples by the same ten 
packers aggregated 444,000, or 73,000 cases. 
We have not the figures for 1894, but in 1893 
they were 25,642 cases. The largeness of 
the pack has been considerably discounted 
by the fact that a large quantity has been 
expor ed to Great Britain. 



AN ABSURD STAND. 

THE floor of " Exchange Hall," in the 
Montreal Board of Trade, was the 
scene of many wordy battles last 
week. 

The matter in dispute was the address 
which Sir Charles Tupper was to deliver to 
the members. Those with Liberal leanings 
spoke strongly against a Minister of the 
Crown speaking at all to the Board, and 
seemed to fear that Sir Charles would take 
advantage of the opportunity to make a po- 
litical address. The others held that if in- 
formation of commercial value could be 
obtained from anyone, no matter whether 
he was a leader of a political party or not, 
the members of the Board should be per- 
mitted to receive it. They held that it would 
be treating a distinguished gentleman, whom 
their Executive had invited to address the 
Board, with scant courtesy if they imputed 
to him without cause a desire to make 
political capital out of a matter which was 
entirely removed from the domain of poli- 
tics. 

The Board is to be congratulated that it 
did not allow the narrow views of some of 
the members to sway it in the wrong direc- 
tion. The late High Commiss oner occupied 
a position that gave him exceptional facili- 
ties for acquiring information on that im- 
portant subject, in:er-imperial tradj, and it 
was unwise to argue that because he had 
lately been taken into the Cabinet he 
should be prevented from imparting any- 
thing that he had learned regarding it to 
members of the Board of Trade of the chief 
city and commercial centre of the country. 



CONSUMERS WANT CREAMERY 
BUTTER. 

THE introduction of winter creameries 
for the production of butter, and the 
steady growth of the creamery method 
of bjtter manufacture has had one visible 
and important result. This at least is the 
case so far as the Montreal butter market 
is concerned, and no doubt it applies else- 
where with the same force. 

It is not quite two years ago when to get 
a choice, tasty, palatable table butter during 
the fall and winter was an impossibility in 
Montreal, unless a very high price was paid. 
Indeed, as the season progressed the stock 
of butter got stronger and stronger, until it 



was absolutely too strong for anything ex- 
cept a diseased axle or something of a 
similar nature. 

Nowadays matters are entirely different, 
the best evidence of the fact this fall being 
the positive scarcity of western dairy rolls. 

These goods in former yeirs were a great 
factor of supplies during the winter, as was 
also Townships. 

Receipts of both of these have been so 
light since the summer as to be inappreci- 
able, and creamery butter has entirely taken 
their place. In fact, it seems to be only a 
question of time when it will entirely oust 
dairy butter from central and western Can- 
ada. 

The only demand for dairy stock now 
comes from some of the lumbering regions 
and the fishing sections down on the coast. 

Consumers in big cities like Montreal and 
Toronto have been educated to want cream- 
ery, and they will have no other. Butter 
makers recognize this fact, for the Montreal 
market has been supplied with fresh, or at 
least comparatively fresh, butter throughout 
the entire fall without cessation. 



FIG-GROWING IN ONTARIO. 

IN the Fall Trade Number of The Can- 
adian GROCER, as our readers well 
know, there appeared an editorial on the 
culture of figs in Canada. The successful 
efforts of Mr. Henry Pafford, of Niagara- 
on-the-Lake, Ont., to raise and ripen the 
luscious fruit were noted in detail, and the 
possibility of the semi-tropical article being 
grown and handled in this country as a 
commercial commodity was commented 
upon. 

Since the publication of this contribution, 
Mr. Pafford has received letters from all 
quarters of Canada asking for further infor- 
mation upon the subject. Mr. Pafford has, 
as far as his time allowed, replied to the 
inquiries thus put to him, and we would not 
be surprised to see the culture of the fig 
attempted with considerable success in those 
districts which are known as " peach belts," 
and even in localities which have not so 
salubrious climatic conditions. 

Mr. Pafford himself is fully satisfied of the 
practicability of successfully cultivating figs, 
in the Niagara peninsula at any rate. None 
of the trees in his garden have failed to bear 
abundant fruit every season since they were 
four years old ; they are wonderfully prolific, 
bearing two or three bushels of fruit every 
summer. Moreover, the figs come to matur- 
ity in relays, as it were, so that the branches 
are burdened with ripe fruit continuously 
from Tulv to October. 

So far Mr. Pafford's attention to fig-grow- 
ing has only been a hobby with him, and he 
has not made any effort to ascertain what 
could be done with the fruit on the Canadian 
market. He does not seem to entertain very 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



serious doubts, however, as to the possibility 
of Canadian-grown figs becoming a remun- 
erative article of commerce. 

He likens them to tomatoes, which a few 
years ago, though even then grown in abun- 
dance in this country, were, because con- 
sidered unfit for human food, not offered in 
our markets at all. A like change, he thinks, 
may come over public opinion as regards 
figs ; when once the people know they can 
be grown here, figs may be widely cultivated 
and distributed about our markets through- 
out the length and breadth of the land. 

If this ever comes to pass, to Mr. Pafford 
will be due all thanks, for he is the 
pioneer, he the savant, who, assisted by 
nature, has discovered what Canada could 
do in this line. 



ADOPTING THE CASH SYSTEM. 

GR. ASHWELL & SONS, general 
merchants, Chilliwack, B.C., write 
• as follows : 
" Since writing you some time ago things 
have taken a decided turn for the worse. 
Collections are getting tighter all the time. 
Prices in the way of farm produce never 
seem to get to the bottom, and the farmers 
(like a drowning man hanging to a straw) 
are holding on for better prices. However, 
we have fully made up our minds to launch 
our boat on the cold, icy waters of a cash 
business. We have done a credit business 
for over a quarter of a century, but, to tell 
you the honest fact, there is no money in it, 
neither for us nor our customers. Whilst 
we may make less profits, our good custom- 
ers (which we could do better by giving 
them credit, but they do not make up for 
the bad ones) will not have to pay for the 
dead beats." The same firm also furnishes 
The Canadian Grocer with the follow- 
ing prices of farm produce ruling at Chilli- 
wack : 

Hogs, live, on foot, fat, per lb. . . $ 4% 

Dressed hogs, per lb ^% 

Hay, baled, per ton 6 00 

Oats, sacked, per ton 15 00 

Peas, " " $16 00 to 20 00 

Barley, " " '5 "> 

Wheat, " " 20 00 to 22 00 

Potatoes," " 5 00 to 600 

Eggs, per dozen 25 

Fat cattle, per lb 2% to 2!., 



ANOTHER ADVANCE IN SUGAR. 

" You will see refined granulated sugar at 
5c. per lb. before long," said a Montreal 
sugar broker to The Canadian Grocer 
this week. 

Whether this pred'ction will be verified or 
not is difficult to say, but one thing is cer- 
tain : the tone of the sugar market at the 
chief Canadian producing centre is firm. 

As grocers know, Montreal refiners put 
up their prices a fortnight ago in conse- 
quence of firmness in New York. Since 
that time the latter market has exhibited ir- 
regularity and decline in the price of refined 



sugar. The developments did not influence 
Montreal refiners a particle. They knew 
that it was due to the manipulations of the 
trust with a view of affecting the price of the 
raw article, and have manifested a firm tone 
all along. This culminated on Monday last 
in an advance at the refineries of y /%c. per 
pound all round: granulated, 250 barrel lots 
and over, 4>£c. ; 100-barrel lots, 4 916c, 
and smaller quantities, 4Kc, and yellows, 
2H to 4/^c., as to grade at the factory. 

It may be noted in this connection that 
stocks in refiners' hands are light. This is 
especially true in regard to yellows, one re- 
finery being about cleaned out of these at 
the close of the previous week. The same 
establishment is not in operation, and won't 
be for two or three weeks yet, owing to some 
alterations being in progress. 



TO GRADE FINEST CHEESE. 

The Montreal Butter and Cheese Asso- 
ciation at its meeting held last week con- 
sidered a very important report. The report 
was in support of the adoption of a standard 
and uniform basis for grading finest cheese. 

The details are altogether too technical in 
their nature for reproduction here, but every 
reader of this paper interested in, or ac- 
quainted with, the cheese trade will com- 
mend the idea. 

The frequent difficulties that arise owing 
to conflicting opinions as to what is " finest 
cheese" are notorious. 

If any method can be devised for obviat- 
ing them and the injurious effects they entail 
in the shape of bad feelings, etc., every 
honest dealer in the trade will metaphori- 
cally pat himself on the back. 

The Montreal association have instructed 
their secretary to communicate the details 
of the report to the dairy commissioner and 
the secretaries of the different country cheese 
boards. 

The Canadian Grocer sincerely trusts 
that the latter will give the project their 
hearty co-operation. 



THE MATTER OF INVOICES. 

Complaints have reached The Canadian 
Grocer from time to time that certain 
wholesale merchants do not send customers 
invoices same day as goods are forwarded ; 
in fact, that goods are in some instances in 
stock nearly a week before invoices are re- 
ceived. As a result they are not in a position 
to satisfactorily check goods on arrival. 

We have found on enquiry that many 
wholesalers have a stringent rule to the 
effect that invoices must, in every case, be 
mailed same day as goods are shipped. 
This being the case, it is fair to assume that 
the trouble rests with the clerk having 
charge of the invoice work. 

A letter to the firm who is negligent in 
this matter should have the desired effect. 



If the trouble continues a change of account 
is the only alternative in order to be relieved 
of trouble and worry which must be the in- 
evitable result of continued omissions of this 

kind. 

Wholesalers who are so negligent in an 
important matter such as this certainly can- 
not have their business managed in an " up- 
to-date" style. 



AFTER THE DEPARTMENT STORES. 

The departmental store is still being 
agitated against in Montreal. 

The latest organization to take up the 
battle against them is " The Retail Dry 
Goods Merchants' Society." 

At a meeting held last week, that body 
discussed the advisability of asking the Cor- 
poration to impose a tax on each variety of 
goods carried in the department stores. It 
was the general opinion that some measure 
should be adopted to break up the existing 
monopoly which they declared several large 
establishments now possessed. It was con- 
sidered a great injustice to the smaller retail 
stores. It was stated that in the larger 
cities of the United States, such as Chicago 
and New York, a special tax was levied on 
these department stores. 

It was decided to appoint a committee to 
consider the matter and make a report. The 
following gentlemen were named : Dry 
goods, Mr. C. P. Chagnon ; grocers, Mr. 
Ovide Corbeil ; boots and shoes, T. L. 
O'Brien ; proprietors, Messrs. Patrick 
Wright, Aid. J. R. Savignac, L. E. Beau- 
champ, Arthur Gagnon ; toys and fancy 
goods, J. D. Couture;druggists,S. Lachance; 
tobacco, T. Martineau ; journalists, S. Cote. 



A FRUIT MAN MARRIES. 

Mr. A. Edwy Clemes, junior partner of 
Clemes Bros., Toronto, has taken a partner 
unto himself — a life partner. The ceremony 
took place on the 15th inst. The bride was 
Miss Sarah E. Cleland, daughter of Rev. J. 
Cleland, 105 Winchester street, Toronto, 
who tied the nuptial knot. Mr. Walter 
Clemes was best man and Miss Kerr sup- 
ported the bride. The happy couple left on 
the evening train for Montreal and the East- 
ern States. 



FAILURES IN UNITED KINGDOM. 

The failures in the United Kingdom dur 
ing 1895 numbered 9,458, of which 1,013 
were in the financial, wholesale and manu- 
facturing branches of trade, and 8,445 > n the 
retail trades or among professional and non- 
trading classes. These totals compare with 
the figures for previous years thus : 

Number of failures. 

Wholesale. Retail. Total. 

1895 '.0'3 8,445 9.458 

1894 1,093 9,4'4 10,507 

1893 1,099 9.558 10,657 

1892 1,139 8.470 9,609 

1891 1,113 7.4*0 a .533 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



OVER-PRODUCTION OF CHEESE. 

LAST week, it will be remembered, The 
Canadian Grocer incidentally ex- 
pressed the opinion that it was possible 
that the Canadian cheese industry had reach- 
ed a point where there was an over-produc- 
tion. Mr. Andrew Pattullo, last year's presi- 
dent of the Western Dairymen's Association, 
is even more emphatic, as is evident from the 
following excerpt from his recent address be- 
fo e that body. He said : 

" Three years ago at a meeting of dairy- 
men in this county, almost as large as this 
convention is likely to be, I ventured to 
warn you of the danger of over-production, 
urging that all our efforts in this country 
should be directed to improvement in quality 
and not to the extension of cheese making 
into new and enlarged areas. Men eminent 
in the industry then thought otherwise. Last 
year at Stratford I also took occasion to 
say : 

" ' It is just possible that the unusual interest —not 
quite yet a craze — excited in this and other countries by 
the success of our dairymen may lead to an expansion 
of the point ot danger ; and that from influences already 
in motion here and elsewhere we may see a marked fall 
in the price of cheese as in other products of the farm— a 
contingency which our dairymen should not lose sight 
of. However this may be, it is clear that all our efforts, 
especially all governmental efforts, should now be 
directed to raising the standard of quality, to the holding 
and improvement of the position we already have in the 
markets of the world, rather than to an extension of the 
area of cheese making operations.' 

"The danger has come sooner even than 
anticipated. We are now suffering from over- 
production. The world is making more 
cheese than our solitary market. Great Brit- 
ain, will consume at such prices as have 
prevailed in the past. Still, we have been 
using the resources of the country to force 
production in many directions. And in this 
connection it is worth reminding you that 
the situation might have been much worse. 
It would have been, for instance, if U.S. ex- 
ports of cheese had continued normal instead 
of declining. Then, again, the production of 
cheese in the Antipodes has suffered a check 
through more than usually severe droughts. 
These two dangers have thus been minimized 
during the past year. But still we have suf 
fered and found profits vanishing for the first 
time in almost a generation. We too have 
suffered a check, and have got to low prices, 
which may continue. The lesson is obvious. 
Let expansion cease, and let all our efforts, 
official and other, be directed solely to the 
improvement of quality. We cannot change 
outside conditions. We can neither stop 
production abroad nor raise prices in Great 
Britain. But we can defeat competition by 
superior' quality, and thus minimize, if not 
remove, the effects of increased or over-pro- 
duction. 

"Some other advice given you last year 
seems also to be even more important than 
it was then. I refer to the obvious advant- 
ages of selling cheese at our markets 
promptly when ready to ship. The experi- 
ence of last year, as of the year before — and, 
indeed, of almost every year in the history 
of the trade — proves that by following this 
rule the producer will be the gainer, and 
that all the interests of the trade will be 
promoted. Failure on the part of salesmen 
to act on so obviously a common-sense 
policy has had an injurious effect on our 
markets, while it has frequently caused seri- 
ous loss to the producer. The fact is, that 
the 'Call Board' system is becoming some- 
thing like a farce. What are called our 
cheese markets seem to exist no longer for 
the sale of cheese, but to avoid their public 
sale. The time of buyers and salesmen is 



wasted by the system into which we hive 
drifted ; and the producer pays for it in the 
end. The condition of our cheese markets 
and the practices which are growing up 
should receive your serious consideration. 
The one thing always to be borne in mind by 
salesmen is the absolute necessity in their 
own interests of getting their cheese, especi- 
ally their early cheese, into consumption as 
quickly as possible." 



THE SALMON PACK. 

THE following is the official statement 
of the salmon pack by the Fraser 
River canneries for the year 1895 : 

Cases. 
Anglo-Canadian Canning Co. (eight canneries)... 119,647 

Victoria Canning Co. (five canneries) 67,625 

Sea Island Cannery 20,017 

Ewen&Co 27,000 

Canadian Pacific Packing Co 19,416 

Short & Squair 12,500 

F. Boutilier & Co 8,104 

Lulu Island Canning Co 13,000 

Terra Nova Canning Co 9.45 1 

Pacific Coast Canning Co n,47° 

Fishermen's Canning Co 11,786 

Beaver Cannery (J. H. Todd & Son) ^.no 

Richmond Cannery (J. H. Todd & Son) 11,700 

British Columbia Canning Co 7i°25 

Malcolm-Windsor Canning Co. 17,010 

Brunswick Canning Co 12,527 

Federation Canning Co 16,000 

Dinsmore Island Canning Co 9,600 

Costello & McMorran 16,040 

Alliance Canning Co 3,800 

Atlas Canning Co 4,000 

Fraser River, total for 1895 432,828 

Northern pack, 1895 168,061 

Grand Total for 1895 600,889 

The northern salmon pack is about 28, 
000 cases more than last year, which is due 
largely to the increased output of the Rivers 
Inlet canneries. 

Following is the value of the Provincial 
salmon fisheries for the past six years : 

1890 81,989,599 

1891 1,517,060 

1892 1,148,860 

1893 j 2,916,990 

1894 2,362,714 

1895 3,103,80c, 

The Fraser River pack for 1895 w ^s con- 
siderably larger than it was expected to be, 
last year being one of the "off" years, the 
runs of fish in the past having occurred in a 
four-year series. Thus 1893 having been the 
"high level" season, the years 1894 and 
1895 were expected, as has been the case in 
the past, to show a reduction each vear in the 
run of fish and the consequent pack, until in 
1897 the heavy run would take place. Can- 
ners, therefore, not expecting a large run in 
1895, were not prepared to handle all the fish 
which was available. Otherwise it is pro- 
bable that the pack of 1893 might have been 
equalled and perhaps exceeded. 

The opinion is gaining ground, remarks 
Statistic News-Advertiser, that this improve- 
ment in the run of fish, and the nearer 
approach of an equality between one year 
and another, is in a great measure, if not 
entirely, due to the fish hatchery's opera- 
tions and the replenishment of the river with 
the young salmon. Should this year also 
prove to be another exception to the rule 
which has prevailed, and the run of fish ap- 
proach anything like those of the last three 
years, the belief in the successful operations 
of the hatchery will be still stronger. In 
that case the Dominion Government will be 
asked to establish a second hatchery at a 
point further up the river than the site of the 
present one. 



A POPULAR CANDIDATE. 

THAT Mr. H. Laporte, of Laporte, 
Martin & Cie., is the popular candi- 
date in the Centre Ward, Montreal, is 
evidenced by the following interviews with 
prominent citizens and voters in that dis- 
trict : 

Mr. J. Dunlop, sr., when asked by a re- 
porter to express his opinion of Mr. H. 
Laporte as an alderman, replied that he was 
all that could be desired, an admirable man 
in every respect. A better man the electors 
would never have another opportunity to 
support, for he was making a great sacrifice 
in coming out. Mr. Dunlop was quite sure 
that he would make things warm for the 
boodlers if elected. 

Mr. Chas. Chaput, of L. Chaput, Fils & 
Cie., considers Mr. H. Laporte, being a busi- 
ness man and having taken an active part in 
all public matters, thoroughly qualified to 
represent the Centre Ward, which is the 
most important business ward in the city. 

Mr. C. P. Hebert, of Hudon, Hebert & 
Co., expresses himself strongly in favor of 
Mr. Laporte, " Mr. Laporte being a first- 
class candidate in every respect and thor- 
oughly competent." 

" A most excellent choice," said Mr. J. C. 
Beauchamp, manager of the estate of the 
late Hon. Charles Wilson, when asked a 
similar question. " The only thing to be re- 
gretted is that the Council are not all men of 
the same kind. Mr. Laporte is a man of 
unimpeachable character, a successful busi- 
ness man and a good citizen. He is what 
we would call a self-made man. He will 
advocate good government in all depart- 
ments, and is just the man to inaugurate 
such a change as is wanted in the Council, 
and carry it to a successful issue. He is 
none of your ' penny wise and pound foolish' 
people." 

" He is just the kind of a man we want 
in the Council; the more of them the better." 
Such were the words of Mr. L. E. Morin, 
sr., ex-Mayor of Longueuil, and late presi- 
dent of the Chambre de Commerce. 

Continuing, Mr. Morin said : " He is a 
most intelligent man and progressive man, 
of exceedingly sound judgment. I have 
done business with him for years, and have 
always found him to be honest and straight- 
forward, and not in the slightest way nar- 
row-minded; one who is held in the highest 
esteem by all with whom he has come in 
contact." 

Mr. G. Lamothe, of the firm of Lamothe 
& Trudel, advocates, was very enthusiastic 
in his praise of Mr. Laporte. " He is the 
right man in the right place. I have known 
him many years, and always found him to 
be a very honest man of high character, and 
we would have to look a long time before 
we would find a better man." If elected he 
will look after the best interests of the city 
and keep a watchful eye on the finances. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TOBACCO CULTURE. 

WITHIN the last few months we have, 
on several occasions, says Statistic 
News Advertiser, called attention 
to the efforts being made, of a more or less 
experimental character, to bring tobacco into 
the list of agricultural products of the pro- 
vince. In the Okanagan district these 
attempts appear to have been successful. 
Another and still more notable proof that 
tobacco can be successfully cultivated has 
just been given in a letter which we publish 
below. While the Okanagan people were 
experimenting, Mr. Sharpe, manager of the 
Dominion experimental farm at Agassiz, was 
doing the same, and a short time ago he 
sent sample leaves, grown from Havana 
seed, to the Department of the Interior for 
expert report. The sample was sent to J. 
R. Gordon, an expert, of Portland, Middle- 
sex county, Connecticut, who has returned 
the following highly favorable report, bear- 
ing out the assertion made in these columns 
some months ago, that tobacco cultivation 
can be made one of the leading industries of 
the province : 

" The Agassiz sample of tobacco leaf was 
received in good condition, and, after moist- 
ening, I was able to examine it very 
minutely. It is clear to my mind that for 
this sample the best leaves were picked from 
several different plants, as they are of excel- 
lent quality. Of the leaves enclosed in this 



Agassiz package, four would certainly pass 
as Ai wrappers, although not so fine as the 
others. The beauty of the leaf I find con- 
sists in the "silky texture ; it is free from 
blemish, and it has very fine veins. The color 
is also good, but it would have been better 
had the plant been allowed to ripen more. 
Because the leaf is small is no fault. Hav- 
ana cannot rank with the other varieties 
for size and weight, and a fine leaf rather 
than a large one is the point at which 
Connecticut Valley growers of thirty years' 
experience are now striving for. It has 
been proved that the smaller varieties 
of tobacco are the most profitable, in that 
they find a quicker market, and sell at a 
price sufficiently high to offset the greater 
weight of the coarser varieties, which must 
wait for a market, and then be disposed of 
at a low figure. To make myself plain, I 
might put it in this way : That while, from 
a certain acreage where two tons of the 
coarser varieties were produced, of the finer 
varieties the yield might be only one and 
one-half tons, and this one and one-half 
tons of fine tobacco would bring a greater 
return of money than the two tons of coarse 
tobacco. But to sum up the matter, I don't 
think the Agassiz people have any reason to 
be dissatisfied with the experiment, and it 
is proved to my mind that, in certain dis- 
tricts of British Columbia, tobacco can be 
raised to rank with any produced in the 
States. Of course, it must have careful 
treatment to ensure success." 



TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS. 

We want our subscribers to let us know if 
they do not receive their copy of The 
Canadian Grocer regularly every week. 
Every Thursday evening of every week of 
every month of every year, without excep- 
tion, this paper has been mailed, but not- 
withstanding great care on our part, we are 
frequently in receipt of complaints regard- 
ing its non-delivery. The publishers are not 
to blame, and unless subscribers notify them 
promptly, errors cannot be rectified. 



C. T. A. MUTUAL BENEFIT. 

The 15th annual meeting of the Commer- 
cial Travelers' Mutual Benefit Society was 
held on Saturday night at the C.T.A. rooms, 
Toronto. The Board of Management pre- 
sented a report, which showed the society to 
be in a more prosperous condition than ever 
before. Aher paying all death claims for 
the year the sum of $9,389. 10 has been car- 
ried to the reserve, in addition to $1,510.69 
from general expense account. The reserve 
is now $32,44048. The number of members 
is 22,253, which will probably be much in- 
creased, since the organization will hence- 
forth admit merchants, their clerks and 
salesmen. 

" How do you pronounce the last syllable 
of that word * butterine' ?" asked the cus- 
tomer. 

"The last syllable is silent," stiffly replied 
the grocer's clerk. 



*>WW% 



IMPERIAL PLUMS 



In 25-pound 
boxes . . . 



Choice Goods 



In Prime Condition 



We have a Snap n these. o ur s toC k 1S 

large, all bought before the heavy advances in the 
Prune Market. 

QUALITY is excellent. The best trade cannot but 
be pleased. 

. WE CAN SELL at prices that will enable you to 
make a good margin. 

NOWADAYS good things are scarce. 








.Write Us. 



W. H. GILLARD & CO., 



WHOLESALERS ONLY. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




ONTARIO MARKETS. 
GROCERIES. 

SUGAR has been the cynosure of the 
sugar market during the week, on 
account of a further advance of one- 
eighth of a cent per pound, and continued 
firmness at the higher prices. Teas are 
attracting a little more attention, and can- 
ned vegetables continue in fairly active de- 
mand. Dried fruits are in fairly good 
request, with last week's prices still ruling. 
New Orleans molasses is still strong and 
active, and syrup is firm in sympathy. 
Cream of tanar has taken another jump in 
price in the primary markets. Generally 
speaking trade is fair for the season, although 
the interest in sugar overshadows nearly 
everything else. 

CANNED GOODS. 
No new features have developed during 
the week. Tomatoes and peas, the latter 
particularly, are in good demand at firm 
prices. Fruits are neglected and there is 
very little salmon going out. We quote 
as before : Tomatoes, 77 'A to 85c; corn, 
75 to 85c; peas, 90 to 95c. for ordinary ; 
sifted select, $1.05 to $1.10; extra sifted, $1.45 
to $1.50; peaches, $2.90 to $3 for 3's, $1.90 to 
$2 for 2's; raspberries, $1.40 to $2.00; straw- 
berries, $1. 80 to $2.4$, according to brand and 
quality; blackberries, $1.90 to $2.20; cherries, 
$2.40 to $2.45 ; apples, 3's, 85 to 90c; 
gallons, $1.90 to 2.25; salmon, "Horseshoe," 
$1.35 to $1.40; "Maple Leaf," $1.35; "Lion," 
$1.35 to $1.40; Lowe Inlet, $1.27 to $1.30, in 
tall tins ; cohoes, $1.10 to $1.20 ; canned 
mackerel, $1.10 to $1.20; lobsters, $1.80 to 
$2.10, for tall tins; flats, $2.35 to$2.65; half 
tins, $1.45 to $1.50; Canadian canned beef, 
i's, $1.35 to $1.45; 2's, $2.25 to $2.35; 6's, 
7.50 to $8; 14's, $15 to $16.50. 

COFFEE. 

The situation locally is much as before. 
The primary markets are quiet and listless. 
We quote green in bags : Rio, 19 to 21c; 
East Indian, 27 to 30c; South American, 
21 to 23c; Santos, 19 to 22j£c; Java, 30 
to 33c; Mocha, 33 to 35c; Maracaibo, 21 
to 23c; Jamaica, 21 to 25c. 

SYRUPS. 

The tone is firmer, in sympathy with the 
molasses market, but there is not much busi- 
ness passing. We quote: Dark, 30 to 32c; 
medium, 33 to 35c; bright, 40 to 42c. 

MOLASSES. 

The market continues strong and the de- 
mind good. We quote : New Orleans, 
barrels, 28 to 35c. ; half-barrels, 30 to 
55c; Barbadoes, barrels, 31 to 35c; half- 
barrels, 33 to 35c. 

SUGAR. 

Another all-round advance of l /%z. per lb. 
is to be noted in sugars of all kinds. It 
began with the Lower Province refiners, and 
was followed bv the Montreal men. The 
tone is strong at the advance, and higher 
prices are looked for. The demand is fairly 
brisk. One jobbing house in ToroDto sold 
nine carloads in a day and a half. The idea 



for granulated is now 4% to 4j*c, and 3.70 
to 3.80c. appears to be about the lowest idea 
for dark yellows, while extra bright yellows 
run uo as high as 4%c. 

SPICES. 

There has been another jump in cream 
of tartar equal to about 1%. to 2c. per lb. 
The situation in spices remains much as 
before. We quote : Pure black pepper, 
10 to 12c. ; pure white, 18 to 25c. ; pure 
Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c; cloves, 15 to 
20c; pure mixed spire, 25 to 30c; cream of 
tartar, French, 25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 
30c. per lb ; allspice, 14 to 18c. 
NUTS. 

Trade is quiet and featureless. We quote 
as follows : Brazil nuts, 14 to 15c; Sicily 
shelled almonds, 25 to 26c. ; Tarragona 
almonds, 14 to I4j£c; peanuts, 10 to 
12c. for roasterl, and 7 to 10c. for 
green; cocoanuts, $4.50 to $5 per sack; 
Grenoble walnuts, 12 to i2}4c. Marbot 
walnuts, 11 to 12c; Bordeaux walnuts, 9c. ; 
Sicily filberts, 8 to 10c. for sacks and 
10 '4 to lie. for small lots ; pecans, 10 'A 
to lie. 

TEAS. 

Retailers are beginning to buy more 
freely, as is their custom at this time of the 
year. Most interest is being taken in In- 
dian and Ceylon growths, although a good 
many Japan teas are goina out on country 
account. Tea brokers report that Indian 
and Ceylon teas are the kinds most being 
picked up by the wholesale houses. We 
quote ruling prices to retailers as follows: 
Young Hysons, 12 to 18c. for low grades, 24 
to 27c. for mediums, and 30 to 45c. for 
high grades ; China Congous, 14 to 18c. 
for mediums, and 25 to 55c. for high 
grades; Japans, 15 to 20c. for mediums, 
28 to 35c. for high grades; Indians and 
Ceylons, 18 to 22c. for mediums, and 30 to 
65c. for high grades. 

DRIED FRUITS. 

Currants are still in good demand for the 
season, with prices steady. We quote as 
follows: Provincials, 3^ to 4c. in bbls.; 
Fine Filiatras, in bbls., 4^ to 4'Ac; ditto, 
half-bbls., 4X to 4^c; ditto, half-cases, \% 
to 5c; Casalinas, cases, 5 to 5X c -> Vostizzas, 
cases, 6 to 6^c. ; ditto, half-cases, 6j£ to 
6^"c; ditto, extra fine, 6^ to 7%c; ditto, 
half-cases, 7]i to 7%c; Panaretas, in cases, 
9c. 

Valencia raisins continue in fairly good 
demand. We quote: Off-stalk, 4% to 4^c ; 
fine off-stalk, 5 to 5#c. ; selected, 6 to 6#c; 
layers, 6j£c. 

Demand continues fairly active for prunes 
at unchanged prices. We quote prunes: Bos- 
nias, " Sphinx " brand, " A," 65 to lb.. 
9c; "B," 75 to lb. 7M"c, "U," 102 to lb., 
b'A to o^c. ; California prunes, 4050, 10 
to ioj^c. per lb.; 50-60, q'Ac. per lb ; 60-70, 
9c ; 70 80, ZAc. per lb.; French, 5 to 6c. 

Cal.fornia fruits are quiet and unchanged. 
We quote : Apricots, 15 to 16c; peaches, 
8c, in bags, and 10 to 15c. in boxes ; pears, 
\o'A to I2j4c; plums, 6J4c. forunpitted, and 
12'Ac. for pitted ; nectarines, 11 to 13c; 
loose muscatels, 5K to 6j£c. per lb. 

Trade is beginning to open up a little bet- 
ter in Sultana raisins at from 5K to 6c. 



Eleme fi«s are quiet and unchanged. 
We quote : Eleme, 14 oz., 9 to io^c. ; 10 
lb, g'A to I2j£c; 12 lb., I2>£c; 28 lb., 15c 

GREEN FRUIT. 

Trade is moderate only. The feature of 
the market is a marked decline in the price 
of oranges. California navel oranges have 
dropped as much as 75c. in some instances. 
The decline in this particular kind of orange 
is due to the way in which shipments were 
hurried forward to escape the threatened 
frost, thus causing the market to be over 
supplied. In other kinds of oranges the sup- 
ply has also exceeded the demand. We quote: 
Lemons — Messina, $2. 50 to $350 for 36o's 
and 300's respectively per box ; Oranges — 
Jamaicas, $3 50 to $4; fancy, $4.25 to $4.75 ; 
Ca'ifornia navels, $4 to $4 75; Valencias, 
420's, $375 to $425; Jumbo's* 420's, $5 to 
$5.5o;ditto, 7i4's,$475 to $5; Mexicans,$3 50 
to $4 per box. Bananas, $1.25 to $1.75 ; 
cocoanuts, $3.50 to $4 a sack; apples, $1.50 
to $3 a barrel ; Malaga grapes, $5 to $7 
per keg ; domestic onions, 60 to 65c. 
per bag ; Spanish onions, 40 to 50c. per 
small crate ; sweet potatoes, $3 to $3.25 
per bbl. ; cranberries, $9. 50 to $10 per bbl. 
for first class, and $7 to $8 for ordinary, and 
$3 to $3.75 per case; hickory nuts, $1.50 to 
$1.75 per bush. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

Receipts of large rolls have continued 
liberal. Tubs of good dairy butter have 
been coming forward in light supply ; but 
there is a great deal of poor and medium 
quality coming forward. The demand for 
fresh dairy butter is good, but other kinds 
are not wanted. Creamery butter is in fair 
demand with prices easier. We quote : Early 
summer dairy store packed, 7 to 8c ; good 
to choice fresh packed, 15c. ; large rolls, 
fresh. 13 to 15c; dairy pound prins, 15 to 
17c. Fresh creamery — Tubs, 19 to 20c; do., 
pound prints, 21 to 22c. 

Cheese— Prices continue firm owing to 
theimproved condition of the British market. 



The Largest Sale. 

The Finest Flavored. 

The Best Friend of the 
Grocer. 

The Worst Enemy of the 
Pedlar. 

"SALADA" 

CEYLON TEA 



P. C. LARKIN & CO. 

25 Front St. East, 
and TORONTO 

318 St. Paul St., MONTREAL 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Don't overlook the name 

SURPRISE 



That's the name of the Soap your cus- 
tomers find to be economical — to be worth 
its price. 



BRANCHES- 
MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO: Wright 4 Copp, 51 Colborn* St. 
WINNIPEG: E. W. Ashley. 



THE ST. GROIX SOAP MFG. GO. 



ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



There is an active enquiry from exporters. 
We quote : Summer make, 9c; Sept. and 
Oct., f) l / 2 to ioc. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — There are a few going out at $1 
to $1.10. for prime medium, but business is 
practically at a standstill. 

Dried Apples — There is practically no- 
thing doing and 4c. is about the idea as to 
price. 

Evaporated Apples — Dulness is still 
the characteristic of this market. We quote 
byi to 7c. nominally. 

Eggs — Receipts of new laid have increas- 
ed a little, and prices are easier. Stocks of 
pickled eggs are light and prices steady. 
Held fresh and cold stored are easy. We 
quote: New laid, 19 to 20c; pickled, I4^c; 
held fresh and cold stored, 14 to 17c, ac- 
cording to quality 

Honey — Demand continues fair and 
prices unchanged. We quote : Strained, 
clover, 10 to \o%z.; dark, 5c. ; comb, clover, 
$1.80 per dozen ; dark, 84c. per dozen. 

Potatoes — Prices are weak at 22c. on 
track and 25 to 30c. out of store. 

Poultry — The quality of recent receipts 
of poultry has not been satisfactory, and low 
prices have ruled as a result. The market, 
has been pretty well cleaned up, and a better 
feeling obtains as a result. We quote : 
Geese, 5 to 6c. per lb.; turkeys, 7 to 8c. per 
lb.; chickens, 35 to 50c. per pair ; ducks, 60 
to 80c. per pair. 
PROVISIONS AND DRESSED HOGS. 

There has been a much better demand 
for hog products with the tone of the market 
stronger. Lard is active and shows in- 



creased firmness. Dressed hogs are also 
firmer at $4.75 to $4.80 for selects, and $4.40 
to $4.50 for heavy weights. 

Dry Salted Meats — Long clear bacon, 
6#c. for carload lots, and 6>i to b%c. for 
small lots ; backs, T%.c. 

Smoked Meats — Breakfast bacon, 
ioc; rolls, 7 to 7%c; hams, large, 22 lbs. 
and over, 9c; medium, 15 to 20 lbs., ioc; 
small hams, ioc; backs, 9 to g'4c; pic- 
nic hams, 7c; all meats out of pickle, ic. 
less than above. 

Lard — Pure Canadian, tierces, 7^ to 
8c; tubs, 8# to S'Ac. ; pails, 8}4 to 8^c. 

Barrel Pork — Canadian heavy mess, 
$14 00 ; Canadian short-cut, 14 to $14.50 ; 
clear shoulder mess, $12 ; shoulder mess, 
$11.50. 

DRESSED BEEF, VEAL, MUTTON, ETC. 

There is a great deal of dressed meat 
coming forward. Business is fair, with prices 
somewhat inclined to be easy. We quote : 
Forequarters, $2 to $4 per 100 lbs. ; hind- 
quarters, $5 to $7, according to quality ; 
lamb, \Yz to 7c; mutton, 4 to S% c -'< vea '> 
S% to 7c- 

FISH. 

Thefish tradecontinues quiet at unchanged 
prices. For oysters the demand is moderate. 
We quote oysters: Standards at $1.30 to 
$1.35, and selects $1.60. Fish are quoted as 
follows : Skinned and boned codfish, 6^c; 
boneless fish, ■$%. to 4c; haddock, 5 to 
6c ; Labrador herring, $3.25 to $3 50 per 
half barrel and $5.50 to $5.75 per barrel ; 
Newfoundland herring, $2.50 per half bar- 
rel, and $4 50 to $4.75 per barrel ; fresh 
water salt herring, $3 per barrel ; blue- 



back herring, 3c; pike, 6 to 7c per lb.; 
flitched cod, 5c; finnan haddies, 6#c; 
Digby herring, in bundles of 5 boxes, lie; 
ditto, lengthwise, ioc; large halibut, 12 to 
15c ; Restigouche salmon, 20 to 25c; 
British Columbia salmon, 13 to 14c; mack- 
erel, 20 to 25c; steak cod, b% to 7c: 
haddock, 5c; black bass, 9 to \o%r. Fresh 
Lake Erie herring, $4 per 100 ; whitefish, 
8 to 9c; salmon trout, 7% to 8c; Lake Sup- 
erior whitefish, 8c; Lake Winnipeg white- 
fish, 7Yz to 8c 



FliOUR AND FEED, HAY, ETC 



for 



Wheat— Is firmer, at 74 to 74^0 
white, 72c for red, and 56c for goose. 
Barley— Steady, at 40 to 44^c 
Peas— Steady, at 53 to 54c 
Oats— Steady, at 27 to 28^c 

Baled Hay — With larger receipts the 
firm feeling has slackened off. Car lots on 
the track are quoted at $15 to $15.25 for No. 
1 and $14 25 to $14 50 for No. 2. 

Baled Straw— The market is steady at 
$8.50 to $8 75 for car lots. For extra good 
bales $9 is asked. 

FLOUR — Wheat is scarce, and there is 
not much doing in flour. We quote: Straight 
roller, $3.50.; Manitoba patents, $3.70; 
bakers', $3.50. 

Breakfast Foods— Business is just 
moderate. The only change we have to 
note in prices is slightly lower figures on oat- 
meal. We quote: Oatmeal, cornmeal and pot 
barley from 10 to 15c lower ; Standard oat- 
meal and rolled oats, $3; rolled wheat, $2.10 
in 100 lb. barrels; cornmeal, $2.75; split 
peas, $3.25; pot barley, $3 25. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 



THE TORONTO 



All information from W. H. LECKIE, Manager. 



COLD STORAGE WAREHOUSE 



THE TORONTO COLD STORAGE 
CO., LTD., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN TOMATO CHUTNEE 

For Soups, Gravies, Curries, Fish, Game, etc. 
Used fot lunch and breakfast as sandwiches. 
Highly recommended by H. R. H. Princess 
Louise and by the late Sir John A. Macdonald. 
For sale by leading wholesalers. 

Prepared by M. P. CARD, Guelph, Ont. 

Ask the Wholesale Houses for 

Rossiter's Household Brushes 

THE BEST. 

GEO. ROSSITER - TORONTO 

io to 14 Pape Avenue. 



Telephone No. 471. 



Established 1870. 



JOHN HAWLEY 

Provision and Commission Merchant 



Butter 
Eggs 



Lard 
Apples 



Cheese 
Etc. 



Raspberry Jam in 1, 5 and 30 lb. Pkgs. 

88 Front Street East, Toronto 



FISH . . 

We have now in stock the following fresh frozen hsh. 

FROZEN SEA HERRING 
CODFISH 
HADDOCK 
PIKE 

PICKEREL 
WHITEFISH 
TOMCODS 
SMELTS 
LOBSTERS 

Also full line pure Boneless Cod, Finnan Haddies, etc. 
Write us for prices. 

LEONARD BROTHERS 

MONTREAL. 



IUST RECEIVED 

Evaporated Peaches 
Evaporated Apricots 
Evaporated Apples 

Prices Low. Stock Fancy. 

Write us for Quotations. 



CLEMES BROS., TORONTO 



SALT. 

Business continues to improve, particularly 
on packers' accounts. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote at Toronto : In carload lots, 
$1 per barrel, and 60c. per sack; in less 
than carload lots, $1.05 per barrel and 65c. 
per sack. At the wells we quote : F.O.B. 
barrels, 70c; sacks 50c. for points west of 
Toronto, and 45c. for Toronto and points east 
of Toronto. 

HIDES, SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — Steady, with demand fair. Deal- 
ers pay 5c. for No. 1, 4c. for No. 2, and 3c. 
for No. 3. Cured hides quoted at 6 to btfc. 

Calfskins— 6c. for No. i, and 5c. for 
No. 2. Sheepskins unchanged at 80c. 

Wool— Trade quiet. Fleece, combing, 
is quoted at 23 to 24c. ; clothing, 23c. , supers., 
21 to 22c; extras, 23 to 23j£c. 
PETROLEUM. 

There has been a slight decline in Ameri- 
can oil. Demand is seasonably fair. We 
quote in 1 to 10 bbl. lots, imperial gallon, 
Toronto : Canadian, 16c; carbon safety, 
18c; Canadian water white, 18c; American 
water white, 21 %c; Pratt's Astral, 23c. 

MARKET NOTES. 

Lard is still gathering strength. 

Sugar is l /%z. per lb. dearer at 4% to 4^c. 
for granulated. 

Cream of tartar is from 1% to 2c. per lb. 
dearer in the primary markets. 

Eggs are a little easier at 19 to 20c. for 
new laid. 

There has been a sharp decline in 
oranges. 

A good demand for pure " Maple Leaf " 
lard is reported by D. Gunn, Flavelle & Co. 

A representative of The Canadian 
Grocer dropped in the other day on J. H. 
Wethey, of St. Catharines, whose condensed 
mince meat is now so well known to the 
trade. Mr. Wethey had just been " striking 
a balance," and the increase of sales for 1895 
over those of 1894 spoke in no undecided 
manner of the growing demand for his tasty 
article. 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 23, 1896. 

GROCERIES. 

THE grocery market exhibits no strik- 
ing features aside from the advance in 
sugar. Trade is not active in any 
particular line, and the rise in the staple 
mentioned has as yet failed in inducing any 
improvement in the demand. In teas the 
poor country roads are seriously interfering 



Graham, McLean & Co. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
77 Golborne St. TORONTO. 

We solicit consignments of Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Poul- 
try and all kinds of 

FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCE 

Send us a trial shipment. 

We handle a special line of kettle-rendered Lard. 

COTTAM'S BIRD SEED 



(And Celebrated Bird Bread; 

BELL'S SPICED SEASONING 

(The Favorite Poultry Dressing) 

William H. Dunn, 394 st. Paul st„ Montreal 

Commission Merchant. 



& Co. 



Wholesale Produce and 
Commission Merchants 



62 FRONT ST. EAST, - TORONTO. 



Correspondence Invited. 

Consignments Solicited. 

EGG CASES SUPPLIED 

Liberal advances made 
on consignments. 

Bankers : Canadian Bank of Commerce. 



W. N. LAZIER 

Box 341, VICTORIA. B C. 

Agent tor . . . 

R emington machine go. 

Refrigerating and Ice Machines. 

Complete Plants Installed foi all Purposes. 

Robb Engineering Co. Economic Boilers. 

High Speed and Corliss Engines. 

Complete Plants Erected. All work 

guaranteed. 

COWAN'S 
OCOAS 
OFFEES 
HOCOLATES 

and ICINGS 

are absolutely pure. 
All orders promptly attended to. 



THE COWAN CO., Ltd. 



470 King St. West, 

Toronto, Canada. 



HAMS, BACON, SHOULDERS, SIDES All guaranteed finest on the market 

L^iRID t. r. f. case, - SEAFORTH, ont. 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



S3? PEAGH JELLY WAFERS 



Have a tin included in your next 
biscuit order. 



JAS. M C LAUCHLAN & SONS Biscuit Manufacturers OWEN SOUND 



with the distributing trade, and the same 
drawback applies to other staple lines of 
groceries. In dried fruit business is quiet, 
but new features during the week have been 
advices of sharp advances at primary mar- 
kets on Bosnia prunes and California raisins. 
(Xher lines furnish no change of moment. 
SUGAR. 

The firm tone outside has resulted in an- 
other advance by Montreal refiners who 
quote prices Y%c. higher this week at the fac- 
tory. Jobbers at this writing have not 
quoted their rise, but will certainly do so be- 
fore this leaves the press. We quote accord- 
ingly i,% to 4^c. for granulated, and 3^ to 
4#c. for yellows, as to grade, in ordinary job- 
bing lots. Demand, however, is only fair, 
and it remains to be seen whether the further 
advance will lead to an increased enquiry. 
One thing seems to be generally admitted, 
however, and that is that stocks through- 
out the country are not heavy. 

SYRUPS. 

There has been little change in the syrup 
market, business ruling quiet. With light 
stock, both at the factories and in jobbers' 
hands, the tone is distinctly firm at i^c. for 
ordinary, and2>£ to 3c. for bright stock. 

MOLASSES. 

The molasses market is strong in its tone, 
especially on New Orleans stock, which is 
quoted at an advance on some grades of 6 
to 8c. per gallon at primary markets. Porto 
Rico has also been firmer in New York. 
S'ocks are not heavy here, N.O. selling at 
25 to 35c, as to grade ; Porto Rico, 35c, 
and Barbadoes, 37c. 

RICE. 

The rice market continues quiet and 
steady. We quote : Japan standard, $4.25 
to $4.40 ; crystal Japan, $4.75 to $5 ; stand- 
ard B., $3.45 ; English style, $3.30 ; Patna 
$4.25 to $5, and Carolina, $6.50 to $7.50. 

SPICES. 

The spice market is steady, with a fair de- 
mand for pepper, cloves, etc. Cream of tartar 
firm at primary points, latest cables quoting 
94s. We quote : Pure black pepper, 
10 to 12c; pure white, 15 to 22c; pure 
Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c. ; cloves, 1 5 to 20c. ; 
pure mixed spice, 25 to 30c; cream of tar- 
tar, French, 25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 30c. 
per lb. ; allspice, 12 to 15c. 

TEAS. 

No activity is to note in the tea market in 
a large way, aside from some transactions in 



low-grade Japans at 11c, the low price of 
which tempted some western jobbing houses 
to operate. Indian, Ceylons and greens have 
scarcely had any enquiry at all. The dis- 
tributing trade is equally dull, for the same 
reason as noted last week — difficulty of com 
munication at country points. We quote 
Japans : Low grades, 14c; medium, 15 to 
18c. ; fine, 20 to 22c, and choice, 25 to 32c. 

COFFEE. 

There is little change in this market. We 
quote green in bags : Maracaibo, 20 to 
21c; Rio, 19 to 20c; Java, 28c; Jamaica, 
20 to 21c, and Mocha, 32c. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

There is a moderate request for Valencia 
raisins locally, and values continue firm. No 
large business has been put through at all 
from first_to second hands. We quote : Or- 
dinary ort-stalk, 4 to 4Xc; fine, 4,% t0 4^"c ; 
selected, 5 to 5#c, and layers, 6>£ to 7c. 

The tenor of advices from the Coast is 
firm on 3 crown fruit, and it would cost job- 
bers y&c. more per lb. to lay down fresh 
supplies than previous rates. We quote 
values firm at %%. to 6c. for 3-crown, and 
b% to 7c. tor 4-crown fruit. 

Table fruit is "without change, prices being 
unchanged. We quote Malagas as follows : 
Extra loose muscatels, $1.40; Imperial Lon- 
don layers, $1.75 ; Imperial cabinets, $1.90; 
Connoisseur clusters, $2 20 ; extra dessert 
clusters, $3 ; Royal Buckingham clusters, 
$3.50. 

Sultana raisins are a very light stock, and 
are nominal at 6% to 6j^c. 

Currants continue moderately active for 
actual necessities. Prices are unchanged. We 
quote : 3^c. in barrels, 4 to 4#c. in half- 
barrels, and 4J(£ to 4^c. in cases. 

The prune market is quiet and steady 
locally, with no change in values to report. 
Advices from Austria, however, cite a fur- 
ther advance of6d., making is. in the last 
ten days. We quote : French, 5c; Bosnia, 
6 to 6Xc, and California 7 to 10c, as to. 
grade. 

Figs continue quiet and unchanged. We 
quote: Bags, 4c; ordinary boxes, %% to 
9c, and fancy, 12 to 14c. 

No change has been noted in the date 
market, which rules quiet at 4^ to 5c. 

NUTS. 
Without any special feature, trade being 
quiet. We quote : Grenoble walnuts, 11 J£ 
to i2%c; filberts, 7 l A to 8c. ; Tarragona 
almonds, \\ x /i. to I2j4c; new pecans, 9 
to 12c, and new shelled walnuts, 18 to 20c. 



CANNED GOODS. 
There is a moderate demand for some 
lines of staple canned vegetables. It is 
confined to supplying actual wants, however, 
with no desire to operate abroad. We 
quote: Lobsters, tails, $8 per case; flats,$9to 
$9.50; sardines, ordinary brands, $7 to $8.50; 
best brands, $9.50 tp $10.50 ; salmon, $1.25 
to $1.30 per doz.; tomatoes, 75 to 80c; 
peaches, $2 to $2.25; corn, 85 to 90c; mar- 
rowfat peas, 95c. to$i; strawberries, $2 to 
$2.25; raspberries, $1.75 to $2; greengages, 
$1.75 to $2; blue plums or damsons, $1.50 
to $1.75; pineapples, $2 to $2.25 and 3-lb. 
apples, 80 to 85c. 

WINES AND SPIB1T8. 

Business in this branch is confined to a 
very small sorting trade. Outside of a few 
orders for Scotch and Irish whiskies for 
spring account little has been done in an 
import way. 

(.It KEN FRUIT. 

There is a fair seasonable demand for 
fruit of all kinds, and few changes are to 
note. Grape fruit, which are scarce and firm, 
furnish the only new feature. We quote : 
Oranges — Jamaicas, $8 to $9 per barrel, and 
$4 to $4.50 per box ; Valencias, 420's, $37"; 
to $4, and 7i4's, $4.50 to $5. Lemons, $2.50 
to $3. Grapes, $5 to $6 per keg ; grape fruit, 
$5 to $6 per box. Cranberries, $8.50 to $10 
per barrel. Apples, $2 to $3. 50 per barrel. 
Dried do. 4 to 4^c. Evaporated do. 6 to 
t'/zd. Spanish onions, 40c. per crate. 
FISH. 

There is a good steady trade doing in 
fresh fish of all kinds, but pickled fish are 
hardly enquired for at all, and herrings and 
green cod are easy in tone. We quote: 
Fresh haddock, 3 to 4c. per lb.; cod, 3^ ; 
steak cod, 4^c. ; smelts, 5 to 6c; iresh 
frozen B. C. salmon, 10c ; Manitoba white- 
fish, 7c; pickerel, 6j£c. ; dore, 6,54 c. ; pike, 
4 to a, l /zc.\ trout, 7c; tommycods, $1.50 per 
barrel. Choice pickled Labrador herrings, 
55.25; No. 1 N.S. $3 50 to $4; No. 1 green 
cod, $4.10 to $4.50; No. 2, $2.75 ; No. 1 
haddock, S3 ; No. 1 large codfish, $5 ; No. 1 
lake trout, $4 to $4 25; B. C. salmon, $10.50; 
No. 2 Labrador salmon, $12.50 to $13 ; No. 
1 mackerel, $19.50' Lock Fyne herrings, 85c. 
per keg, and $11 per barrel; tongues and 
sounds, $9; No. 1 sardines, $4 50 ; No. 1 
dried cod, $4.25 to $4.50 ; boneless cod, 6c. 
per lb. ; boneless fish, 3Xc; boneless had- 
dock, 5c. ; shredded, lie ; haddies, 6)4 to 7c. 
per lb; bloaters, 90c. per box, and smoked 
herrings, 8 to 10c. per box. 

PROVISIONS. 

There was little change in the situation of 
the local provision matket, business being 



WE ARE 



PAYING 
GASft 



FOR 




W. B. BAYLEY & CO. 

EXPORT BROKERS 
42 FRONT ST. E. TOTOfltO 



We do not claim to own All the Virtues 



in the commercial world, 



But we do maintain 
that our 




. . . possesses 
all the virtues of 
first class, pure, whole- 
some, healthy teas. It 
is one of the finest blended 
teas ever offered to the trade. 
Every package guaranteed. Put 
up in leaded packages only, j^-lb. and 
i -lb., Straight Black or Mixed. 



. 



Eby, Blain Company 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

TORONTO - - ONTARIO 






24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



reported quiet and prices steady. We quote : 
Canadian short cut, clear, $13.50; Canadian 
short cut, mess, $14 ; hams, city cured, per 
lb., 9*to ioc. ; lard, Canadian, in pails, 8c; 
bacon, per lb., 9 to ioc; lard, com. refined, 
per lb., 6X<- 

The demand for dressed hogs was good, 
and the market is active and firm. Car lots 
of fresh stock sold at $4.80 to $4.90 
per 100 lbs., and in a jobbing way $5.25 to 
$5.50 was paid. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Eggs— A fairly active trade was trans- 
acted in eggs, there being a good demand 
for small lots at steady prices. We quote : 
Boiling stock, 18 to 20c; Montreal limed, 14 
to i5c.;western limed, i^'A to 14c, and held 
fresh, 13^ to 14c. per dozen. 

Beans — There was no change in beans, 
business being quiet at quotations. We 
quote : Car lots of choice hand-picked at 
$1 to $1.05, and small quantities at $1.10 
to $1.20. 

Poultry — There continues to be a good 
demand lor poultry, and all fresh arrivals 
met with a ready sale at steady prices. 
Turkeys sold at 7X to 8c, chickens, 6 to 
6yic; ducks, 7 to 7j£c, and geese at 5 to 
5>£c. per lb. 

Potatoes — Car lots of potatoes on track 
sell at 35c, and jobbing lots, 40 to 45c, 
according to quality. 

Onions — Red onions are quoted here at 
$2.50 per bbl., and yellows, $2 to $2.25. 

FLOUR, FEED AND MEAL.. 

The demand for flour has been fair, and 
the market was moderately active and 
steady. We quote : Winter wheat, $3.60 to 
$3.80 ; spring wheat, patents, $3 75 to $3.85; 
straight roller, $330 to $340; straight roller, 
bags, $1.60 to $1.65 ; extra, bags, $1.40 to 
$1.45 ; Manitoba strong bakers', $3 40 to 
$3-65. 

A fair business was done in feed at quo- 
tations. We quote : Bran, $14 to $15; shorts, 
$15 to $16; mouillie, $19 to $20. 

Oatmeal ranges from $2.90 to $3 accord- 
ing to grade, demand being very dull. 
CHEESE AND BUTTER. 

The cheese market maintains its firm 
tone, and enquiry continues of an encourag- 
ing character. It is satisfactory to note in 
this connection, that, though holders are not 
u-g'.ng sales, they show no desire to force 
prices to such an extent as to check the de- 
mand. For this reason, a good, healthy 
movement is anticipated, as the Britisher 
finds that supplies ate wanted. For finest 
goods 9^c is confidently asked for western, 
and a fraction less for eastern makes. There 
is enquiry for summer goods at a range of 
&'A to 8^c. 

The butter market continues steady, with 
a good demand from local jobbers. We noted 
sales of parcels of creamery at 21c, and 
some lots down to 20^c, but for anything 
choice, the outside hgure would have to be 
paid. 

HAY. 

The feature of the hay trade has been the 
decline of 50c to $1 per ton in sympathy 
with weak advices from American mar- 
kets. The demand here has been good, 
and considerable business is reported in car 
lots on track at $14 for No. 1 and $13 for 
No. 2. At country points No. 1 is quoted at 
$13 and No. 2 at $12 per ton. 
ASHES. 

This market has ruled quiet and about 
steady, The receipts are small, for which 



the demand is limited. We quote : Firsts, 
$3 60 and seconds $3.40 per 100 lbs. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

Cables from Buda-Pesth to Rose & La- 
flamme last Friday advised an advance of 
6d. per cwt. in Bosnia prunes. 

Cable advices to A. P. Tippet & Co. state 
that cream of tartar is very strong, the most 
recent quotation being 94s. per cwt. 

During the past month it is worthy of re- 
cord that Porto Rico molasses have ad- 
vanced in New York 2 to 3c. per gallon. 

Rose & Laflimme have just received 
quotations from Batger & Co., London, for 
new marmalade, which are the same as last 
season. 

Laporte, Martin & Cie. call attention to 
the fact that stocks of molasses in Montreal 
are light. They turned into stock last week 
a fresh lot of these goods. 

Advices to A. P. Tippet & Co. from 
Griffin & Skelley note a firmer feeling on 
California taisins, especially 3-crown, which 
will cost fully Y&z. per lb. more. 

Rose & Laflamme are in receipt of a 
consignment of Chyloongs preserved ginger, 
1895 crop. This is the first consignment of 
new ginger received into Canada this 
season. 

N. W. Taussig & Co. advise their Mon- 
treal agents that the crop of molasses at 
New Orleans is 50 per cent, short of last 
year, and that some grades are 6 to 8c. per 
gallon higher. 



NEW BRUNSWICK MARKETS. 

Office of The Canadian Grocer. 
St. John, N.B., Jan. 23, 1896. 

BUSINESS is still dull. Not only is 
this the quiet season, but the lack of 
snow tends to make it much more 
quiet than usual. Not only in the city 
have we no snow, but there is none through 
the province. The lumbermen feel the want 
more from week to week, as logs are now 
yarded and want to be hauled. The win- 
ter port business continues to increase. 
There were four Atlantic steamers loading 
with general cargo for England and one for 
the West Indies this week. And four steam- 
ers are on their way here from England to 
take freight. They get full cargoes. The 
merchants are much displeased at the ar- 
bitrary actions of the ship laborers, who are 
working against their own interests. If 
things go on as they are now it will either 
mean the loss of this business to St. John, 
for which we have been working so long, 
and which would mean a loss to everyone 
in the city, or the steamers will have to bring 
men here to work for them, a thing which 
we would not like to see, a thing that would 
mean a great loss to our laborers, but which 
we could not blame the steamship compan- 
ies for doing under the circumstances. In 
markets the feeling is upward, particularly 
pork, sugar, flour and oatmeal. 

SALT — There is but little demand. The 
last steamer from Liverpool landed some 



three thousand sacks. The larger part was 
put in store. There are now fairly large 
stocks held here. Prices though eisy show 
no change. We quote : Coarse, 50 to 
55c. ; fine factory-filled, $1.10; 5-lb. bags, 
$3.25 per bbl.; 10-lb. bags, $3 per bbl.; 20 lb. 
boxes, 20c; 10-lb boxes, 12c; cartoons, $2 
per doz. ; salt, bulk, $2.70 to $2 80 per bbl. 

Oil — The heivy business in burning oil 
is over, though there is good steady demand. 
Agents for lubricating are becoming more 
active and are booking spring orders. Low 
prices are being quoted. We quote : 
American burning oil, 23#c; best Canadian, 
2i>£ to 2i^c; prime, 19c. ; no charge for 
barrel. 

Canned Goods — The only activity this 
week was caused by the seizure of a car of 
canned goods, obtained by a broker under 
false pretences, by the canner. About a hun- 
dred cases were missing; the broker was also 
missing. The goods were resold to a grocer 
here, so the manufacturer returned home 
rather better satisfied with results than he 
expected, and a lesson, we trust, learned. 
Canners quote corn, peas, and tomatoes 
rather higher, peas showing an advance of 
from 10 to 20c Corned beef tends higher. 
Prices are easy. We quote: Corn, 85 to 90c; 
peas, 90 to 95c. ; tomatoes, 90 to 95c ; gallon 
apples, $2.15 to $2.25; corned beef, 2-lb. tins, 
$2.50 to $2.65; i-lb. tins, $1.60 to $1.65; 
oysters, 2's, $2 to $2.25; i's, $1.60 to $1.65; 
peaches, 3 : s, $2.75 to $2.85; 2's, $1.90 to $2 ; 
pineapple, Canadian pack, $2.35; salmon, 
$1.40 to $1.50; lobsters, $1.75 to $2; haddies, 
Si. 30; clams, $5 for 4 doz. ; chowder, $2 75 
for 2 doz. ; scallops, $ 5. 50 for 4 doz. ; Digby 
chickens, $1; kippered herring, $1.10. 

Green Frdit — There is fair movement, 
oranges and lemons being in good supply. 
But few West Indies arrived by last steamer, 
and Valencia and California are supplying 
the trade. Very few Floridas are seen. 
Cheap apples are also out of the market, and 
a better demand is noted. We quote: 
Apples, $2 to $275 ; oranges, $5 to $6 per 
bbl., $3. S° to $4 per box ; Lemons, $3 to 
$3.50 ; keg grapes, $5 to $6.50 ; Valencia 
oranges, $3.50 to $4; pineapples, $2.50 to 
$3 per doz.; cranberries, $11 per barrel. 

Dried Fruit — Movement is limited, and 
there is little to report. A shipment of Cali- 
fornia prunes which have arrived are giving 
splendid satisfaction. Evaporated apples 
are held firm, while dried are quiet. Quite 
a quantity of Nova Scotia dried are being 
offered ; the stock is good, but buyers are 
offish. Peanuts are again advanced at Nor- 
folk, and are held firm ; advance so far is 
about y z c. California 4 crown loose mus- 
catels are scarce. We quote : Valencias, 
i,Y% to 5c. ; layers, 6 to 6^c. ; California L. M. 
4-crown, 6 to 7c. ; 3-crown, 5 to 6c; London 
layers, $1.65 to $1.75. Currants, bbls., 3^ to 
4c;cases,4X to 5c; cartoins, cleaned, 7'Ac; 



A light and easily digested food for dys- 
pep ics. The only genuine article 
manufactured in Canada is put up by 

J AS. WILSON 



Manufacturer of 

Celebrated brands of 



Monkland Mills 



ROLLED 
STANDARD and 
GRANULATED 



OATMEAL 



Fergus, 
Ont. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



TRADE 



BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH 



MARK 



Ready for the table in 10 minutes. 
No Soaking. No Boiling. No Odor. 



Selling ( J. Harley Brown, London ; R. Thomson, Hamilton Chambers, 17 St. John St., Montreal ; I E. Huxley, Winnipeg : 
Agents: 1 W. M. P. McLaughlin, St. John, N.B.; WM. BREWSTER, Palmer House, Toronto, Canadian Selling Agent. 

J. W. BEARDSLEY'S SONS, New York, U.S.A. 



Co^\<S^|^ 




WIDE-AWAKE grocers know well that as a Bird 
Food, and the most profitable to handle, 

COTTAM'S POPULAR BIRD SEED 

" beats them all." The people will have it, from 
one store or another. No stock is complete with- 
out it. Every packet contains BIRD BREAD, of 
which we are Inventors, Patentees and sole 
Manufacturers. 

BART. COTTAM & CO. - London, Ont. 

Dawson & O- 

FRUIT 

PRODUCE 

and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

32 West Market Street 

TORONTO. 



Consignments 
Solicited 



George McWilliam. 



Frank Everist. 



GENERAL 



TELEPHONE 645. 

MCWILLIAM & EVERIST 

FRUIT 

Commission Merchants 

25 and 27 Church street, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Consignments of FRUIT and PRODUCE SOLI- 
CITED. Ample Storage. 

All orders will receive our best attention. 



FOR 



SMOKED MEATS 

LONG CLEARS 
MESS PORK 
SHORT CUT PORK 
PURE LARD 
COMPOUND LARD 

Write for Prices. Send your ORDERS by mail. 
Careful Attention. Prompt Shipment. 



F. W. FEARMAN 

HAMILTON 



bulk.cleaned, 6%c: prunes, kegs, 4c; boxes 
A/4, to 5c; half-boxes, 6 to 8c; dates, 4^ to 
5c; dried apples, 5c. j evaporated apples, 
T]/z to7^c; California evaporated peaches, 
12 to 13c; apricots, 12 to 14c; pears, 12 to 
14c. Canadian onions, $2.25 to $2.30; cocoa- 
nuts, $3 to $4 per 100 lbs.; figs, 10 to 12c; 
Sultana raisins, 7 to 8c. 

Dairy Produce — There is little of inter- 
est. Large numbers of cheese are being 
shipped to Liverpool via St. John from the 
west. Local demand is slow. In butter, 
market is still overstocked with medium 
grades, good being hard to obtain, but 
prices of it are kept low by the stock of poor 
held. Eggs in cases are dull. Fresh in small 
lots freely bring 25c. and over. We quote : 
Common dairy butter, 15 to 16c; dairy, 17 
to 18c. ; new creamery prints, 23 to 24c; 
cheese, %'/i to 9c; creamery, tubs, 20 to 
21c; eggs, 17 to 19c. by case. 

Sugar — Markets though strong advance 
slowly. As noted, merchants are well sup- 
plied. There is little local movement. We 
quote: Granulated, 4.60 to 4^c; yellow, 3^ 
to 4c. ; Paris lump, 5X to 5>£c.; powdered, 
S l A to s'^c. 

Molasses — Market seems well supplied 
and movement light. Quantity of best 
quality is, however, light, and prices held 
firm. In syrup demand continues good. 
Price of New Orleans in barrels is 
firmer, as is syrup. We quote : Barba- 
does, 30 to 33c; Trinidad, 32 to 34c; Porto 
Rico, 34 to 36c, bbls. ; New Orleans, 34 to 
35c; St. Croix, 31 to 32c. ; syrup, 36 to 38c. 

Fish — There has been good demand for 
frozen, but supply has baen light and dealers 
have to hold orders. In dry, pickled and salt 
there is little movement, and prices show no 
change. Fair shipments were made lo 
West Indies by steamer this week. Some 
herring were also shipped to the English 
market bv direct steamer. Smelt, which for 
a time were taken in such large quantities, 
are now scarce. Smoked herring continue 
dull; some 10,000 to 12,000 boxes arrived 
in this market this week. We quote as 
follows : Fresh haddock, 2 to 2Xc. 
per lb.; dry, $1.50; large cod, $360 to 
$3,715 ; medium, $3.35 to $3.50 ; pollock, 
$1.50 ; bay herring, $1.25 to $1.30 per half- 
bbl.; Ripplings, $1.65 ; Wolves, $1.85 to $2; 
smoked herring, old, 4 to 5c; new smoked, 
5 to 6c; Canso, $5 to $5.50 per bbl.; shad, 
half-bbl., $5 to $6; Grand Manan herring, 
half-bbl., $1.25 to $1.35; Shelburne, $3.7$ 
bbl., $1.65 half-bbl.; boneless, 2% to 8c; 
oysters, $3 to $3.50 per bbl.; small cod, 
$2.50; trozen herring, 60 to 70c per 100. 

Provisions — Though reports are for 
rather higher prices there has been on 
change this week ; prices are held firm. 
Some good orders for hams and rolls have 
been given for future delivery. Demand for 
these goods at present is very light. In beef, 
markets show less change. In fresh beef 
some very nice Ontario is seen in the market. 



ONIONS 



Just received 
a carload of 



quotations. 



H. F. PRICE 



102 Foundling 
Street 

MONTREAL 




When Your Customers ask for Bird 
Seed, be sure to give them 

BROCK'S BIRD SEED 

and they will certainly call again. 
In each i-lb. packet there is a cake of Bird Treat. 
much appreciated by Bird Fanciers. 

NICHOLSON & BROCK - TORONTO 



W* RYAN 

PORK PACKER, 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

AND COMMISSION MERCHANT 

70—?2 FrontSt.East.Toronto 

Liberal Advances 

made on Consignments. 

Egg Cases Supplied. 



S.R. 




1 



(ONlMlSSlON NjEiKHANT 

vVholesale Dealer in . . . 

Oysters, Finnan Haddies, Fresh and 
Frozen Fish, Oranges, Lemons, Al- 
meria Grapes, Cranberries and Dates 

76 COLBORNE ST., 

TORONTO, ONT. 

. . USE . . 

"Maple Leaf" Brand 

Pure Lard 
Hams, Backs 
Breakfast Bacon 



D.Gunn,Flavelle&Co\ 



Pork Packers and . . Trt^^r,+r> 
Commission Merchants lOlOiliO 



We have 
in stock 



FANCY 



Sweet Jamaica Oranges ♦ 
Valencia Oranges ♦ 

Messina Lemons ♦ 



All Much Lower In Prices. 
Send Us Your Orders. 

HUGH WALKER & SON 

Guelph, Ont. 



26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



We quote: Clear pork, $15 to $115.50; 
mess, $14 to $14 50 ; beef, $13 to $14 ; 
domestic mess pork, $14 to $14.50 ; hams, 
10 to 11c; rolls, 8c; pure lard, 9 to 9}4c.; 
compound, 7^ to 8c. 

Flour, Feed and Meal— Large sales 
of flour are reported by millers' agents dur- 
ing the past week. Not that there is any 
particular movement here, but our mer- 
chants found when prices of Ontario flours 
began to advance they had little or no stock. 
A large part of that bought is for later ship- 
ment. Best Ontario grades are now quoted 
well up to Manitoba. In oatmeal the above 
report answers. Some millers have advanced 
quite freely. There is quite a range in prices 
quoted, also in grade of goods offered. Oats 
do not seem as firm as oatmeal. Cornmeal 
continues low. Feed is rather higher. Hay 
is firm at the high price, with rather less 
movement. Buckwheat meal quiet. A fairly 
large quantity of domestic yellow-eye beans 
are offering. We quote as follows : Mani- 
toba, $44c to $4.53 ; best Ontario, $4.15 to 
$4.25 ; medium, $390 to $4; oatmeal, $3.50 
to $3.65 ; cornmeal, $2 30 to $2.35 ; middlings, 
$19 to $20 on track ; bran, $18 to $19; hand- 
picked beans, $1.25; prime, $1.20; oats, 33 
to 35c; hay, $12.25 t0 $ r 3 ; P ot barley, $4 ; 
round peas, $3 65 to $3.75; split peas, $3. 70 
to $3.80 ; yellow-eye beans, $1.85 ; buck- 
wheat meal, $1.30 to $1.35. 



ST. JOHN NOTES. 

It has been decided to hold an exhibition 
during the fall of this year. 

B. Rautenberg, representing Park, Black- 
well & Co., Toronto, was in the city during 
the week. 

The shipment of produce from Florence- 
ville, Carleton county, in 1895 WJS 4°° cars, 
representing earnings to the C.P.R. of up- 
wards of $30,000. 

M. R. Mackenzie, of the Beaver Oil Co., 
Montreal, called on The Grocer this week. 
He reports a good trade in lubrication oils 
for later shipment. 

The Board of Trade, Charlottetown, 
P.E.I. , has affiliated with the Maritime 
Board, and elected as their representative 
Hon. Donald Farquharson. 

Although rather out of season, C. & £. 
Macmichael are finding a steadily growing 
demand for the product of the Sussex 
mineral spring, for which they are city 
agents. 

J. Hunter White has been appointed agent 
for Knox's gelatines for this market. These 
are goods which have made a name for 
themselves in the west owing to extra quality 
and low price. 

Even in the face of low prices shipments 
of hay are going forward to Liverpool. With 
anything like a fair price in the English 
market a large trade would be the result. 
Black & Page, of Amherst, sent forward 200 
tons by the Beaver Line steamer Lake Win- 
nipeg. 

The Cnatham Board of Trade elected at 
their last meeting the following officers : 
W. S. Loggie, president ; R. Flanagan, vice- 
president ; J. D. B. F. Mackenzie, secretary. 



It was resolved to ask for a further subsidy 
for the s.s. Miramichi, as otherwise she 
would have to be taken off. 

Reports from Fredericton state that, owing 
largely to no snow, business is unusually 
quiet, even for this season. Hay is a bright 
spot, and sells quickly at $12 per ton. Butter 
dull at 17 to 19c. Pork still low, offering 
freely at 5c. 

When John Sealy first put his pure cod 
in 3-lb. packages, without a bone, on the 
market, the extra price he required to 
charge caused the venture to be somewhat 
doubtful, but the old truth that a good thing 
pays is again shown, and these goods are 
filling a long felt want. 

Through New Brunswick there is an un- 
fortunate opposition to eastern standard 
time, and both St. John and Fredericton 
are in the unsatisfactory position of running 
both. A moment's thought must show the 
advantage ol one time, and the same might 
be said of eastern standard. After once 
making the change, we will soon forget it, 
and much confusion will be avoided. 



HE IS INTRODUCING DELICATESSE 

Mr. A. E. Richards, of A. E. Richards & 
Co., of Caledonia, is in Toronto this week 
for the purpose of introducing " La Deh- 
catesse" cream cheese to the trade. This 
cheese is manufactured in the celebrated 
Herkimer County, New York, which is well- 
known as the best cheese making district in 
the United States. 

It is prepared with the greatest care with 
a view of making it popular with the best 
class of trade, and has a fine delicate flavor 
found only in goods so carefully prepared. 

The cheese is put up in neat packages 
which present an exceedingly attractive ap- 
pearance on the counter or in the show case. 



CANNING FACTORY WANTED. 

A public meeting of the Board of Trade 
was held in the Council chamber, Tilsonburg, 
Thutsday last, for the purpose of discussing 
topics pertaining to the welfare of the town. 
It was decided to invite the Western Dairy- 
men's Association to hold one of their meet- 
ings there next season. A committee con- 
sisting of Messrs. Brasher, Wilkins, Tillson, 
Thomson and Dawler were appointed to 
wait upon the directors and urge the accept- 
ance of the invitation. 

The question of better market accommo- 
dation and the building of a canning factory 
were also freely discussed, but nothing defi- 
nite arrived at. 

The following gentlemen were elected 
officers for the present year : President, 
Geo. Brasher ; vice-president, Tohn Mcln- 
tyre ; secretary, F. Biette ; treasurer, J. C. 
Ross ; committee to draft constitution, 
Messrs. Brasher, Ross, Wilkins, Mclntyre 
and Dumler. 



E. T. STURDEE 

Mercantile Broker, 
Manufacturers' Agent, 

ST, JOHN, N.B. Etc - Et c- 

Wholesale trade only. 

Cleaver's Toilet Soaps. 
Bensdorp's Royal Dutch Cocoa. 
Pyle's Pearline. 

C. & E. MACMICHAEL, 

40 Dock St., St. John, N.B. 

FPPS'S COCOA 

1 d 1-4 lb. Packets. 14 lb. Boxes 

secured in tin. 

Special Agent for the Dominion 

G. E. COLSON - MONTREAL 

"Always a Best" 

. . In Everything 

We have the BEST in the canned fish line. 

GOLDEN FINNAN MIDDIES 

Are the best. They are Delicate, De- 
licious and Appetising. If you sell the 
GOLDEN brand Haddies, it will be the 
finest drawing card you can get. 

Every can guaranteed or money refunded. 

NORTHRUP & CO. 

Packers' Agents. ST. JOHN, N. B 

FISH* 

WIT HOUT A BONE. 

Ordinary Boneless Fish have some 
bones in them, but we now put up pure 
Codfish in 3-pound boxes 

WITHOUT A BONE. 

This is the best Fish packed in Can- 
ada, and very much superior to Fib- 
red or Shredded Fish. . . . 



JOHN SEALY - St. John, N.B. 



<* 



^ oTT 's - 
DIAMOND 
JCH0COLATE. 



JOHN.P.MOTT&Co 

SS^ MALIFAX,NS.^S 



ASK FOR 



& 



MOTT'S 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



Does it pay 



Yc 



^—'■■■rr^ 


1 


tel 


BUCKWHEAT 

53 FLOUR (39 




|aLV.A1S RtftOV FOR U5£ 


V 



ERTAINLY IT DOES 

Take no chances. The quality is of the very best. The manufacturers guarantee the 
quality of 

Dalley's Royal Hygienic Self-Rising Flour 

to all customers. There is no trouble in selling these flours — Tea, Graham, Pancake 
and Buckwheat. Once your customers have tried them they will not take any other. 
Order at once from your wholesale house 

THE F. F. DALLEY CO., Ltd., Hamilton.ICanada. 



Manufactured by- 



Only the best fruit, thoroughly cleaned 
and picked, is used in making 

♦♦t ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ < t 

X ' CLARK'S t 

| ENGLISH MINGE MEAT | 

♦ ♦♦♦»♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ +♦+♦♦■»♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦+■» 

Au Article fit for a 
King's Table. 

Every package guaranteed to be as 
represented. 



W. CLARK 



MONTREAL 



PURE 



Maple Syrup 

Finest quality. Write for quotations. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO. 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 
TORONTO 




S^'ft^iSftcsSfeS; 



DON'T DELAY 




Order at once. The stock 
now on hand is limited. 
You want our goods. You 
may send in your order after 
the more wide-awake man 
has ordered ahead of you. 
Be first. The 






"KENT" 



Canning and 
Pickling Co. 



1 



§ CHATHAM, ONT 




&nmnmnmnirvv¥Vininrv 






! 



A straight line 



Is the shortest distance between two points. 
The shortest, best and most profitable way of 
securing your customers' confidence and esteem 
(to say nothing of their actual business) is by sell- 
ing them reliable canned goods at right prices. 
'Maple Leaf Brand is always reliable and the 
price is always right too. 



DELHI CANNING CO. 



DELHI, ONT. 



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28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HALIFAX TRADE GOSSIP. 

THE severe cold weather and a fairly 
good downfall of snow have come at 
a time when they were badly needed. 
The result on trade throughout the province 
has in consequence been very marked, and 
the month of January, as far as it has gone, 
has shown a big improvement over Decem- 
ber. 

We hear of advances in flour of from 15 to 
25c. per barrel in the west, but dealers here 
manage to sell at the old prices ; the flour 
market is steady, with an upward tendency. 
Feeds of all kinds are low. Cornmeal is in 
large consumption, as are also oatmeals. 

The refinery reports the market strong 
with an advance in yellows of y$c. since 
last week. Raw sugar remains unchanged. 

The provision market is quiet, but firm. 
There is no change in prices. Mr. Rauten- 
burg, representing a Toronto house, is here 
pushing Ontario beef, and he is disposing of 
quite a lot of it at fair prices. Ontario beef is 
becoming more general in this market. 
Dealers consider it superior to the local 
product, but have to contend with a local 
prejudice. It looks as if in time the west 
will supply this market with provisions and 
poultry. Reports from Newfoundland are 
to the effect that an unlooked for soft spell at 
St. John's has had a bad effect on some re- 
cent shipments of beef, mutton and poultry. 

Our dealers are still working off Christmas 
and New Year's stocks of poultry. There are 
considerable stocks in the market yet and 
dealers will do no ordering until they are 
disposed of. Turkeys retail at 8c. per lb., 
which is a losing figure. 

P.E.I, produce remains low. There are 
several vessels in port with full cargoes, and 
they are waiting for a rise in the market 
before opening their hatches. All the avail- 
able warehouse-room (frost proof) is taken 
up, and thus the Island dealers have turned 
their vessels into warehouses. They can 
afford to do this, as there is nothing for the 
vessels to do in the winter months. 

There is no change in the fish market. 

The green fruit market is quiet. There 
is a good supply of Valencia and Cali- 
fornia oranges of extra good quality and at 
low price. The same can be said of lemons. 

There are a few grapes on the market, 
which bring from $6 to $8 per keg. 

Good apples are scarce on account of the 
cold weather. Stocks will be replenished as 
soon as the weather moderates enough to 
allow shipping. 

Canned goods are in good demand, partic- 
ularly vegetables. 

Figs, prunes and dates, and all dried fruits 
remain strong in price. 

The supply of onions is limited and prices 
are higher. 

Walker, Hanson & Rogers is the name 
of a new grocery and hardware store at 



Middleton. Mr. Rogers is manager of the 
business. The firm was formerly Walker & 
Hanson. 

Moore &^Ioore was the name and style 
of a wholesale tea house which opened up 
business here less than a year ago. There 
was only one member of the firm, F. S. 
Moore, who formerly did business in Am- 
herst. On Saturday last the firm assigned 
to F. Wiltshire and Frank McKenzie, the 
latter being the firm's bookkeeper. The 
firm assigned their book debts to Joseph 
Travers & Sons, London, for $2,296, but 
subsequently Messrs. Moore & Moore made 
a general assignment, with only one pre- 
ference for $297, to Appleton, Machin & 
Smiley, London. The liabilities are about 
$5,000, mostly in England. The sheriff has 
taken possession of the office furniture at 
the instance of Gordon & Keith, of this city, 
who supplied it. 



WHEN MEN WERE HONEST. 

At one time in the highlands of Scotland 
to ask for a receipt or promissory note was 
considered an insult, and such a thing as a 
breach of contiact was rarely heard of, so 
strictly did the people regard their honor. 
The Presbyterian Witness tells a story of a 
farmer who had been to the lowlands and 
had there acquired worldly wisdom. 

After returning to his native place he 
needed some money and requested a loan 
from a gentleman in the neighborhood. The 
latter, Mr. Stewart, complied and counted 
out the gold, when the farmer immediately 
wrote out a receipt. 

"And what is this note, man?" asked Mr. 
Stewart on receiving the slip of papei. 

" This is a receipt, sir, binding me to give 
ye back your gold at the right time," replied 
Donald. 

" Binding ye, indeed ! Well, my man, if 
ye canna trust yourself I'm sure I'll na 
trust ye ! Such as ye canna hae my gold." 
And gathering it up he returned it to his 
desk and locked it up. 

" But, sir, I might die," replied the needy 
Scot, unwilling to surrender his hope of the 
loan, "and perhaps my sons might refuse it 
ye, but the bit of paper would compel them." 

" Compel them to sustain their dead 
father's honor ! " cried the enraged Celt. 
"They'll need compelling to do right if this 
is the road ye're leading them. Ye can gang 
elsewhere for money, I tell ye, but ye'll find 
nane about here that'll put more faith in a 
bit of paper than a neighbor's word of honor 
and his love of right." 



THE CANADIAN OIL FIELD. 

The normal well in the Petrolea field is 
about 465 feet deep, made up of 104 feet of 
surface clay, 296 feet of Hamilton shale and 
limestone, and 65 feet of Corniferous lime. 

The Oil Springs wells are sunk 370 feet 
deep — 60 feet of surface, 250 feet Hamilton 
shale and 60 feet of Corniferous lime. 

The Corniferous lime appears to contain 
oil throughout, but the petroleum can only 
be obtained in paying quantities in certain 
porous strata which occur in it. 

A well was sunk 1,505 feet, north of the 
town, the lower 250 feet of which were bored 
through rock containing salt crystal, which 
is not used for commercial purposes at pre- 
sent. 

The rock strata in which the Pennsylvania 
oil is found are considerably higher than the 
Petrolea strata, but lie 1,800 feet below the 
surface, being overlapped by other rock for- 
mations. 

The Petrolea wells are " shot ;" that is, a 
charge of 8 to 10 quarts of nitro-glycerine is 
exploded in them, to clean out the hole and 
shatter the rock. In Pennsylvania far larger 
" shots " are used, as much as 80 and 90 
quarts being exploded in a well. 

All the way from 1 to 10 wells are sunk to 
the acre, according to location and produc- 
tiveness. It would be safe to say, however, 
that where less than four wells per acre have 
been sunk, the territory has not been thor- 
oughly exploited, and there is any amount of 
room for the drill yet. — Petrolea Topic. 



BOARD OF TRADE OFFICERS. 

At the meeting of the Toronto Board of 
Trade, on Tuesday, for the nomination of 
officers, E. B. Osier was elected president 
by acclamation, Edward Gurney, first vice- 
president, and D. W. Alexander, treasurer. 
For second vice-president, A. A. Allan, Jas. 
Carruthers and John Flett were nominated. 



FEED AND PORK GO UP IN SMOKE. 

Fire on Wednesday morning destroyed 
the flour and feed establishment of P. Mc- 
intosh & Son and partially destroyed the 
pork-packing establishment of Park, Black- 
well & Co., Toronto. The loss of the former 
firm is $20,000 and that of the latter $5,000. 
The Mcintosh firm carried $12,000 insurance 
and Park,- Black well & Co.'s loss is covered 
by insurance. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

E. C. Coleman, of the Seaforth salt wells, 
was in Toronto on Saturday looking up busi- 
ness. 

R. E. Hicks, of Perth, was seen doing the 
wholesales in Toronto last week. 



SEND FOR ONE. 

One of the neatest souvenirs of the season 
is that given away to the grocers by Huyler's, 
manufacturers of cocoas and chocolates, 
New York, which have recently come on 
this market. It is a pocket silver match box, 
with a white enamelled top, on which is 
painted their trade design, a lady drinking 
a cup of their coffee. 

Any subscriber to The Canadian Gro- 
cer who has not received one should write 
to them at the factory, 18th street and Irving 
place, New York. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 



It Took 
Hard Thinking 

to get this package 
right. We have to date 
received two complaints 
of the bottom of the 
package bursting out — 
but there will be no 
more. We thank our 
friends who told us. 




Push these and save 
your yearly bill for lamp 
glasses 

Each contains i lb. 
net of first-class Baking 
Powder. . . . 



PUT UP l DOZEN IN CASE 



You can guarantee it. 



Write us. 

See our travelers 



PURE GOLD H'F'G. CO 



3I&33 FRONT ST. EAST. 
TORONTO. 



A GROCER IN POLITICS. 

THE GROCER is delighted to find its 
policy so strongly supported by one 
of its subscribers, Alex. D. Fraser, of 
Fraser, Viger & Co., one of the leading 
merchants in Montreal. 

We have been continually impressing 
upon our readers, if they wanted public 
offices filled with good men, they must 
support the right kind of business men at 
the municipal and parliamentary elections. 
The right kind of men are those who have 
made a success of their own business, and 
who have established a reputation for 
honestv and reliability — men who can be 
depended upon to do their duty. The man 
who would go into politics before he was so 
well off or so firmly established that his ab- 
sence from his business would not materi- 
ally affect it, should be discouraged. He 
generally fails, bringing disas'.er upon him- 
self and trouble for his competitors and the 
wholesale houses and manufacturers who 
supply him. 

Let us encourage, regardless of politics, 
such men as Mr. Connaughton, who showed 
from the success he made of his own busi- 
ness that he is capable of directing the 
larger affairs of a city. It is a noble aim for 
capable men to look forward to the time 



when they will have made enough on which 
to retire and devote themselves to muni- 
cipal and parliamentary politics. 

Mr. Fraser in writing to The Star here 
says : " I was much pleased to read your 
editorial in last night's issue of The Star, 
commending the re-election of Aid. Con- 
naughton. The Star evidently believes in 
speaking of a man as you find him. I have 
much pleasure in endorsing every word you 
sav in favor of that gentleman. I made Mr. 
Conniughton's acquaintance eleven years 
ago, meeting him fi r st at the meetings of 
the Grocers' Association of Montreal. In 
the various offices I filled in that body, 
as secretary, vice-president and presi- 
dent, and during all these years a di- 
rector, I had occasion to come in con- 
tact with Mr. Connaughton regularly — 
served with him on committees, and worked 
by his side on many a ques'.ion, with many 
an object in view. If there is one thing more 
than another that struck me in his character 
it was his perfect reliability. Whoever might 
come and go, ' Barney ' Connaughton, as 
we called him, could always be relied upon. 
Night after night he would trudge for miles 
to our meetings, when others living within a 
stone's throw of our hall would be conspicu- 
ous by their absence. He was always to be 
found on the side of right, firm and uncom- 
promising, while always a maker for peace. 

" I mention these facts, Mr. Editor, simply 
because a man's public conduct in a public 
position may be gauged from his private 
character and career. I know nothing what- 
ever regarding Mr. Connauxhton's opponent 



beyond the fact that he was defeated by that 
gentleman only a few short months ago. 
Since then Mr. Connaughton's conduct as 
an alderman is before us — the electors of St. 
Ann's Ward — and The S ar but voices the 
sentiment of every right-thinking man in the 
community who has watched Mr. Connaugh- 
ton's short term in the Council when it 
states that he is the right man in the right 
place, and beyond all doubt has established 
his claim to re-election." 



CHANGE IN FREIGHTS. 

By a new agreement between Canadian 
railway freight agents regarding parcels 
known as " smalls," the business of the ex- 
press companies is likely to be considerably 
increased. 

For instance, parce's heretofore delivered 
by freight for 35c. will now cost 45c. if called 
for by the company's carter, and if called 
for here and delivered, say Peterboro', the 
charge will be 55c. 

As the express company collects and de- 
livers parcels free, the saving will be 
apparent and real. 



A SURPRISED SPICE MAN. 

" I am more than surprised," said Mr. 
Fullerton, manager of the Snow Drift, " at 
the outcome of this year's business. I knew 
we were not going behind, but did not think 
(as the results have proved) that we were 
getting in the biggest year's work since our 
commencement ten years ago." 






30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Pinna ye hear the Slogan? 

If you drink Whisky, drink 



JOHN DEWAR'S SCOTCH 



HONORS AWARDED 



Purveyors by Royal Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Under competition the only Scotch drawn at the Bars of the 
largest Caterers in the World, viz. : Spiers & Pond, Ltd. Diploma 
of Honor and Gold Medal, Edinburgh, 1890 (Highest Award). 



Better Whisky cannot be had 



Edinburgh t S86 

Antwerp ,887 

Anglo-Danish 1888 

Cookery ,888 

Brussels 1888 

London [889 

Melbourne 1889 

Food (London) . 1889 

Sportsman 1889 

P"ris ,889 

Dunedin ,880 

Military 



MEDALS 



Edinburgh 

London 

[amaica 

Food 

Tasmania 

Dublin 

Brussels 

Chicago 

Fisheries 

Manchester 

Brewers' Show, Manchester, 



National Trades and Industrial Exhibition, 1894, etc., etc. 



890 
890 
891 



Boa 
893 
893 

i9, 



THE ART OF GETTING THERE. 

ABOUT a dozen years ago, says 
Results, a man walked into the office 
of one of the great Chicago packers 
and asked for employment. Scores of men 
had called before him on similar missions, 
and all were told what he was told, that 
there were no vacancies. This man expect- 
ed to be told that, but he brought an old coat 
with him. He had selected the business in 
which he had desired to work, and he came 
determined to go to work in it. When told 
that there was no room for him, he calmly 
removed his coat and put on the old one. He 
replied that he was willing to do anything ; 
that there must be something in that great 
business which a determined man could find 
to do. He cared not what the work was. He 
was willing to begin anywhere. 

The president of the concern smiled at the 
man's determination. He had come to 
Chicago himself years before with that same 
idea, and everybody had told him that there 
was no room for him. He had proved that 
there was by just such stamina as this young 
man was showing. The applicant's deter- 
mination won, and the packer told him that 
he could go out and handle meat in the 
slaughter-house if he wished to. The young 
man started, but the packer called him back. 
Such energy and ambition were too valu- 
able for the slaughter-house. He was placed 
in the office, told to learn the business, and 



from that day to this he has been one of the 
chief aids in the business, holding to-day one 
of the highest positions in the greatly en- 
larged concern. 

Qualities like these have won everything 
worth getting in this world. Business men 
admire pluck. They are quick enough to 
recognize the qualities which won their own 
success Ability without determination is 
like a locomotive without steam. 

The best positions open to young men are 
the opportunities to secure results. There is 
always room for men who can do this. There 
is scarce a concern which is not looking for 
them. Such positions are not to be attained 
by influence. Friendship counts for nothing 
where business is at stake. Men can secure 
clerical positions through good will, or by 
mild applications, but the positions which 
are worthy of ambition can only be secured 
by a display of the qualities required to fill 
them. 

The majority of men are unsuccessful 
chiefly because they are timid. They enter 
the world as if they were afraid of it. They 
are careful not to run against other people. 
They keep out of the way. They go after 
success with the constant fear that they are 
liable to be rash. The world about them is 
unfathomable, and they do not know what 
might happen if they should chance to crowd 
somebody else. 

The fact is, the world about us is just as 



timid as we are. Other people are conceal- 
ing that fact as we do. They are as fearful 
of us as we are of them. Let one man assert 
himself as a leader, and all those imperturb- 
able peop'e will turn in and follow him. The 
few strong men like himself are the only ones 
waiting to fight him. 

The men who start after their object as if 
they were determined to have it are the men 
who succeed. The world is not offering 
success to anybody. The millions who 
mingle with other millions, and shrink when 
anyone frowns on them, can never rise above 
the level of mediocrity. 

Successful men are not generally examples 
of great ability We all know men whom 
the world looks up to, as it always looks up 
to success, who were evidently not nearly as 
well qualified to succeed as we are. They 
are more generally men of tireless energy 
and fearless determination. They are men 
who have asserted themselves, and have 
made better but more timid men yield to 
them. They have made themselves leaders. 
The men whom they have cowed serve 
them. 



According to Dun, the number of failures 
for the calendar year 1895 ' n Canada were 
1,891, against 1,856 in 1894. According to 
Bradstreet, the figures were 1,923 in 1895, 
against 1,873 > n 1894. The gross receipts 
of the C. P. R. for the year 1895 were $18,- 
937,000, against $18,7^2,000 in 1894. The 
gross receipts of the Grand Trunk were 
$18,001,000, against $18,037,000 in 1894. 



CRESCENT BRAND 




BRUNNER, MOND & CO., Ltd, 

NOETHWICH:, EnSTGr-L^-ITZD 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



, .BICARBONATE of SODA 

^ADE NlAfl^' REFINED and RECRYSTALIZED--The Purest 1 

SODA CRYSTALS 



REFINED and RECRYSTALIZED— The Purest and Cheapest in the Market. 



Of the Finest Quality. 

In Barrels and Drums. 
Orders for direct importation from 
the Wholesale Trade only. 

^TIILvriT & HOLLA3STD nVCOlSTTI^E^elj 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 




IF YOU CANNOT SATISFY 



Customers from the stock of Baking Powders you carry 
— and this is a very general complaint with the trade — 
the remedy is simple. Get a supply of JERSEY 

CREAM BAKINGPOWDER. Pure 
and Sure. 



Lumsden Bros., Hamilton, Ontario 



EWIIG. HEM 1 CO. 

Have Tons 

OF GARRAWAYS 

Recleaned and double sifted. Samples 
and quotations sent on enquiry. 

Trade Mills - - 



GASPE DRY CODFISH, GREEN COD- 
FISH, N.S. AND C.B. HERRING 

B.C. Salmon, Canned Lobsters, Mackerel and 
Blueberries, Nfld. and Gaspe Cod Oil 

CLARETS 

Alex. Andreae Kraay & Co 's very fine old Clarets 

BASS' ALE 

The Bugle Brand is the best imported 

GUINNESS' STOUT 

Bulldog Brand, the highest grade bottled 

Cockburn <S Co.'s Very Old Highland Whisky 

SPECIAL LIQUEUR WHI8KY 



J, & R. McLEA, 23 Common St. 



MONTREAL 



t 



jTEAS 

i 



New Ceylons and Assams 
in store and arriving. Also 
good values in Japans, Young 
Hysons and Congous. 



JOHN SLOAN & CO. 



Wholesale Grocer* 



TORONTO 



BEE BRAND 
CEYLON 

Awarded Two Gold Medals 
Grown on Virgin Soil 

Packed and shipped direct from the 
Gardens. 



Warren Bros. & Boomer t 

W WHOLESALE GROCERS A 

ft 35 and 37 Front St. East, Toronto. A 




m&fitt-f 



YOU MAK 

O 



40% Profit 



If you sell our soaps and they sell at 
sight 



Write for prices. 




P. M. LAWRASON | 

London, Ont. 



®W@W©4^S5K^is^sS5^4^!^oi® 



NOW IN STORE 



Excelsior Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 

Perfecto Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 
London Layers. Black Baskets. 

A full and complete stock of Christmas Fruits. 



T. KINNEAR & GO. 

49 Front St. E., TORONTO. 

Teas 



Sailor Boy— the best value offered 
in Canada. Also some 

CHOICE SITTINGS 

Shipments of above just to hand. 



Perkins, Inge & Go. 



TORONTO. 



J. W. Lang & Co. 



Have in stock 



Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Extra." 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Fine." 

Curtice Bros.' " Monroe Brand " 

Strawberries. 
Shredded Codfish, " pkges." 

Very fine. 

J. W. Lang & Co. 



59, 61 and 63 Front 

Street East 



Toronto. 



We are offering this weekjsome 
excellent values in . . . 

Sultana Raisins 
Vostizza Currants 
and Sphinx Prunes 



SMITH <£ KEIGHLEY 

9 Front St. E, TORONTO. 



82 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PREFERENTIAL TRADE. 

SIR CHARLES TUPPER delivered an 
address before the Montreal Board 
of Trade on Monday, on the subject of 
preferential trade between Great Britain and 
the Colonies. 

Sir Charles said that there were some 
questions in this country outside the domain 
of politics, and this was one of them. 
(Cheers). In Canada there were no two 
opinions on the subject, and he believed that 
the cause was making rapid headway at the 
heart of the Empire. 

He read statistics to prove that the export 
trade of Britain was on the decline, and that 
it was her bounden duty to promote a closer 
trade relationship with the self-governing 
colonies. He read from Lord Salisbury's 
address at Hastings, as well as remarks from 
other public men in the old land, to show 
that a radical change had taken place in 
public opinion on the other side, and that 
the task of winning the people to the ad- 
vocacy of a preferential tariff was far from 
being a hopeless one. 

Sir Charles said that the resolutions 
adopted at the Ottawa conference had cre- 
ated a deep impression on the public mind 
of England, and he quoted from a paper read 
before the Colonial Institute showing the 
advantages England and the colonies would 
gain if a preferential duty of ten per cent, 
were imposed. The Secretary of State be- 
lieved that trade followed the flag, and said 
that six self-governing colonies of the Empire 
took eleven times more British goods than 
the United States, Germany, France, Spain, 
B^l and Russia. 

Continuing, Sir Charles said that if Eng- 
land wished to expand her trade she must 
expand her colonial possessions, for there 
would be her future market, and not in those 
foreign countries that were surrounding 
themselves with a protective wall. He had 
never witnessed so great a change as that 
operated in the public mind of England dui- 
ing the last six years, and Sir Charles was 
convinced that as soon as public opinion was 
ripe for the change there would be no ob- 
stacles placed in the way by Lord Salisbury 
or his Government. (Cheers.) 

If the London Congress adopts this policy 
it will have won important influence in the 
Government of Great Britain, and he was 
glad to say that in adopting the resolution 
of 18Q2 the Parliament of Canada had done 
its duty. The London Times had said, in 
fact, that if all the colonies adopted these 
resolutions it would be the duty of Her 
Majesty's Government to see that they were 
carried out. 

Sir Charles referred to what he called the 
lion in the path — the unfortunate treaties 
with Germany and Belgium. These treaties, 
he said, were now deplored by the public 
men of England, and he believed that a 
firm stand on the part of the Imperial 



authorities would bring about their modifi- 
cation. He strongly criticised the speech 
on the question by the Marquis of Ripon, 
and showed that it was more profitable to 
cultivate the trade of the colonies than that 
of the two foreign nations, just named. He 
was also of the opinion that such a policy 
would have the effect of lowering the hostile 
tariff of foreign nations and he cited the un- 
generous treatment meted out to England 
and the blow dealt at Canada by the Mc- 
Kinley tariff of the United States. 



A NEW BROKER IN LONDON. 

London, Ont., is rapidly coming to the 
front as a grocery centre, and, what is con- 
comitant of it, a centre for brokers and com- 
mission men allied to the grocery trade. 
Among the latest additions in the latter re- 
spect is A. T. Cleghorn. He has an exten- 
sive and varied experience in the grocery 
business, a valuable acquisition for a com- 
mission agent. For some years he has been 
with Edward Adams & Co. He has already 
secured agencies for several of the best 
firms and manufacturers connected with the 
trade, but, like all wide-awake business men, 
he is open to secure a few more. Any of 
our readers in outside points who desire to 
be represented in London, we have pleasure 
in recommending them to Mr. A. T. Cleg- 
horn. 



THE MANAGEMENT OF CLERKS. 

The Boot and Shoe Recorder is now print- 
ing a series of articles upon the above sub- 
ject. Mr. N. C. Fowler, Jr., expresses his 
views in about three lines. He says : 
" Treat your clerk as you would have your 
clerk treat you if you were his clerk. Don't 
let your clerk boss you. Don't keep a clerk 
who needs bossing." Another contributor 
upon the same subject, Mr. I. A Lewis, 
writes as follows : 

" Cultivate the friendship and good will 
of your clerks." He then gives these rules 
which he attempts to follow in creating an 
interest among his clerks in their work. 
These are : 

First : By trying to treat them as I 
should like to be treated were I in their 
position myself. 

Second : By paying them sufficient to 
keep them anxious to please and retain their 
positions, and making them feel that I am 
not " the boss," but simply the proprietor. 

Third : By taking an interest in both 
their sorrows and their joys, and trying to 
make them feel that they are entitled to 
their pleasures, and they are human as well 
as I. 

Fourth : By granting cheerfully, so far as 
in my power, any favors or concessions asked 
of me. 

Fifth : By never deducting any salaries 
for either forced absence, sickness, or vaca- 
tions of few days. 



VINTAGE IN ITALY. 

The Gazzetta Ufficiale gives the complete 
figures of the vintage in Italy, where the total 
production last year was 476,326, 500 gallons, 
or about 102,000,000 gallons less than in 
1894 There was an increase in two of the 
twelve provinces, these being Lombardy 
and Emilia ; but the souihern provinces, 
especially on the Mediterranean coast, suf- 
fered severely from hailstorms and disease; 
while in Sicily and Sardinia the phylloxera 
did much damage. Notwithstanding this, 
Sicily, with over 94,000,000 gallons, pro- 
duced more wine than any other province, 
Piedmont coming second with about 83,- 
000,000 gallons, followed by Emilia, the 
Southern Adriatic and the Southern Medi- 
terranean regions, the production of which 
ranged from 58,000,000 gallons to 44,000,000 
gallons. 

REDUCTION IN TANGLEFOOT. 

The annual revision of the price of Tangle- 
foot has again been mide, and the manufac- 
turers announce a reduction of 75 cents per 
case in " Regular," and 40 cents per case in 
" Little. The prices to rule for 1896 will 
be: "Regular" size, less than one case, 
45c. per box ; one to five cases, $4 per case : 
five cases $3-7 S per case. " Little " Tangle- 
foot, less than one case, 18c. per box ; one 
case, $2.10 per case. There is probably 
now no small article so profitable to the re- 
tailer as Tanglefoot, and hardly one other 
which receives a more hearty support from 
the retailer. 

A. T. CLEGHORN 

General 
Commission Agent 

LONDON, CAN. 



Correspondence 
solicited. 



THE NEW WOMAN 



WON T HAVE OLD TAPIOCAS 



SHE . . 
WANTS 



New York Fancy Brand. Have a good light. Use 




Bo IjJokeJ 
Samuel Rogers & Co. Toronto. 



Every Oil known to trade and industry — wholesale. 



W 



ITCHKLOTH 



The latest and best for cleaning Gold, 
Silver, Brass, Nickel. Copper, Bicyclts, 
etc. Retails at 15c. Send small 
sample order. 

Sole Agency tor Canada 
TEMPLE BUILDING, 113a, MONTREAL 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



MARINE INSURANCE 

The Mannheim Insurance Company 

Grant Open Policies to Wholesale Gro- 
cers and Importers at specially favor- 
able rates. 



Further particulars obtainable by applying 
to Local Agent, or to 

JAMES J. RILEY & SONS 

Managers for Oanada Montreal 






Notice 



TO THE WHOLESALE 
TRADE ONLY . . . 
Vnn fan ftliv Plug tobaccos duty paid. 

1 UU l»dll DUJ Sweet Navy Chewing, all sizes, 
25c. to 35c. per lb. Bright Honey Chewing, all sizes, 33c. 
to 43c. per lb. All kinds of Cut Tobaccos, 20c. to 55c. per 
lb., put up in any kind of package or style required. 

CIGARETTE^ 

All kinds of Cigarettes from $2.50 per i t ooo 
to #10 per 1,000. 

CIGARS 



All kinds of Cigars from $13.50 per 1,000 to 
$100 per 1,000. 
Write for sampler and prices. Correspondence solicited. 
See price current. 



. 



J. M. FORTIER 

MANUFACTURER 

Montreal 



141 to 151 
t. Maurice Street 



JAPAN TEAS 



• • 



New 
Season's" 



FROM 13^ CTS. UP. 

Best value in Canada to-day. See our travellers or write for samples. 



J. F. RAMSAY & CO. 



WHOLESALE TEA IMPORTERS 



14 and 16 Mincing Lane 



Toronto. 




BOISSEUER'S 



One Tablet makes an excellent Cup of Cocoa. 




A perfectly pure 
compressed . 
Cocoa . . . 
Extract 



I n boxes 

of one dozen 

20-cent tubes, each 

tube containing rS 

tablets 



ALL LEADING GROCERS KEEP IT. 



EVERY GROCER 
SELLS MATCHES 



VICTORIA" 



We expect in a few ^^ 

days a carload of our 

brand Matches, warranted equal to any other brands. 

We will sell them at a price giving you a fair profit. 



TRY THEM. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



LA PORTE, MARTIN d CIE. 



Wholesale Grocers 



Montreal 






34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



ey(5X 



You will find that 
these packets are the 
most attractive you 
have ever seen and that 
their contents make the 
most delicious TEA 
you have ever tasted — 

TAKE 
THEM 

ON 

and they will make a 

TRADE 
FOR 
YOU!! 



-x^X 



tfppieton '4 Sndta fc Peyton Tea4 

THE "TAPIR" BRAND. 

SOLD IN LEAD PACKETS 




Agents 



MONTREAL— FRANK MAGOR & Co., 16, St. John Street. 
TORONTO— THOMPSON & THOMPSON, 18, Front Street East. 



S&* 



71/ 



PUREST & BEST 




Variety of Packages 

We take a pride in the large variety of our Table Salt packages 
and in the neatness of their design. 

Our Cotton bags are made in 5 sizes, of the best material and 
the printing is the neatest. We put up 3 sizes o( Terra Cotta 
cardboard packages and a 4 lb. round cardboard package that is |J 
handsomely lithographed for shelf display. When ordering Table 
Salt from your wholesale house always order 






WINDSOR 

TABLE SALT \ 

r**«,TT-yjr,T n.T!tT-*.-T.Ttr-y ; 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 




" h^HAT delicious tea you always have, Maud ! What kind of tea do 
you use ? " 

" Thank you, my dear. I use the Ceylon Tea or the India Tea, but 
this, I believe, is a blend of the two. 1 tell my grocer that 1 don*t mind 
which one he sends me, so long as it is not some of those hand-rolled 
teas.*' 

" What do you mean by hand-rolled teas ? ** 

" Why, in China and Japan the native laborers roll the tea leaves by 
hand, and ever since a friend of mine visited those countries and told 
me what he saw, I have preferred to drink Ceylon and India teas, which 
are rolled entirely by machinery, and 1 am sure they have a much finer 
flavor.** 



The above Is a copy of an advertisement being run by a number of retailers In the States 
who are making a specialty of their tea department. ) 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



DRIED FRUITS IN BRITAIN. 

A COMPARISON of the duty pay- 
ments of the principal kinds of dried 
fruits during last year with those of 
1894, shows that there has been an increase 
in each description. So far as it goes, this 
is satisfactory ; but, on the other hand, the 
improvement is not very much to boast of, 
and is indeed less than might have been 
expected, when it is taken into account that 
we have had a prolonged period of low 
prices, during which it might fairly have 
been expected the increase, as a whole, 
would have been in a heavier ratio. For the 
purposes of a more extended comparison, we 
give below the figures for 1893 a ' so : 

1895. 1894. 1893. 

Currants 271440 26,035 29,760 

Valencias 8,571 8,332 7.778 

Sultanas 7,926 7,644 6,038 

Muscatels 925 784 613 

Totals 44,862 42,795 44,199 

From these it will be seen that the duty 
payments of currants have not, eithei in 
1894 or 1895, reached the unusual total of 
1893. This is to be accounted by the fact 
that the season of the latter year saw the first 
of the abnormally low prices ; and from the 
light of later events there can be no doubt 
that the grocers throughout the country, 
tempted by the previously unheard-of values, 
went heavily into stock at that period ; and 
that the duty payments did not represent 
actual consumption so much as a heavy in- 
crease in the floating stocks throughout the 
country. In the case of Valencias, Sultanas 
and Muscatels it will be seen that the de- 
liveries of the past year showed an improve- 
ment on 1894, and that, in its turn, this was 
an improvement upon 1893. These figures 
give some little hope to those eDgaged in 
the trade ; and although it is not quite satis- 
factory that with all kinds at such moderate 
prices the increase should not have been 
greater, it is something to feel assured that 
in spite of the many articles which directly 
compete with dried fruit, the consumption is 
not suffering any actual decline. 

The market has been steady for all de- 
scriptions, and a distinct improvement has 
taken place in the demand from the grocers. 
The outlook for the two kinds which are of 
the most importance during the spring and 
summer months, viz., currants and Sultanas, 
is very favorable ; and there is every pros- 
pect of a good market for both kinds" ; in- 
deed, so far as can be judged, some en- 
hancement in values seems likely. — Produce 
Markets' Review, London. 



SUGAR STATISTICS. 

A summary of the statistical position of 
sugar shows stocks in the United States and 
Cuba together of 215,924 tons, against 
229,400 tons last week, and 180,3150 tons last 
year. Stocks in Europe of 2,171,100 tons, 
against 2,179,900 tons last week, and 
1,690,100 tons last year, Total stocks of 



2,493,874 tons, against 2,516,100 tons last 
week, and 1,925,475 tons last year at same 
uneven dates, or 2,233,874 tons at the even 
date last year of fanuary 1st. This year's 
even date figures not yet received. The 
surplus of stocks is now 568,417 tons, 
against 580,637 tons last week, and 758,248 
tons December 28th. The beet crops re- 
main 662,520 tons deficiency by Mr. Licht, 
and Cuba 731,000 tons deficiency. — Willett 
& Gray. 

THE WIDE-AWAKE TONE. 

To the doubting few who have not yet 
subscribed for either or both of these papers, 
we submit the following letter : 

Di. ah Sirs,— -When The Dry Goods Revie w com 

next month, if you choose, make a draft for both, H 
$3, or I will remit. 

I congratulate you on the wide-awake ton< 

Review ami Tin' Canadian i ind read 

them with a great deal of pleasure and profit. We 
are doing business strictly for cash or produce, and, after 
doing business for several years on credit, find the change 
a splendid success, :an\ now find it a pleasure to do bi 
1 remain, yours truly, 

11. Rehdbr. 



BASIS OF FOREIGN DISTRUST. 

European investors are believed to be very 
wary and suspicious of American securiiies 
and it is generally supposed that this distrust 
is caused by the unsettled condition of the 
monetary standard in America. In speak- 
ing of this matter The London Financial 
News says : 

" We do not well see how any boom in 
America can be successfully engineered so 
long as the unsettled state of the currency 
problem renders the financial position a 
constant source of anxiety. The Treasury 
has not yet solved the problem of keeping 
its gold, nor will it do so until the proposal 
to retire the greenbacks is taken firmly in 
hand. The fear of gold exports must of 
necessity keep the speculative market in a 
constant state of nervousness, in which any 
external trouble would exercise an exagger- 
ated effect. The experience of the past three 
weeks has been a striking illustration of the 
way in which the exchange is affected by the 
adverse financial or political symptoms of 
the foreign bourses. Wall street was shaken 
a? with a spasm, not because a European 
war would have been injurious to the United 
States in a commercial sense — on the con- 
trary, it would have benefited them — or 
because a breakdown in mining speculation 
in England or on the Continent would have 
made American rails any less desirable as 
investments, but solely because the unsound 
currency aggravates every political tension 
abroad, and magnifies the consequences of 
speculative trouble, however remote. Some 
part of the disturbance in American secur- 
ities was, no doubt, caused by their forced 
sale on account of crippled operators in min- 
ing and other securities, but the greater 
part of the mischief was due to the sensitive- 
ness of the financial situation arising from 
the currency question." 



SITUATION VACANT. 

\A/ANTF.D AN EXPERIENCED GROCERY 
»» salesman of good address. Apply to Strome & 

WhyteBros. Co., Ltd., Brandon, Man., giving rel 

and stating salary expected. ( 4 ; 



BUSINESS CHANCES 

C-OR SAI.E-GROCKRY WITH LEASE OF PRE- 
1 mises, live business, long established, best stand in 
town, good family trade in fine staple and fancy grocer- 
ies, stock full and in first-class condition, good reasons 
given for selling. Personal inspection invited, or refer- 
ences given Montreal or Toronto D. E. Scott, Port 
Hope, C^pt. ( 5 ) 

AGENTS WANTED. 

NARROWS MUSTARD, MUSHROOM KETCHUP 

» and Sauces. Wain,-, I in the Mates, purchasing i 

for these goods, which are of the highest quality. Mustard 

packed in everj description "I package, including 

ill 1.' i from ',-ll..; als,, with customers' names on 

labels. Firms of undoubted respect- 

ability who would take up the agency of these goods would 

lie liberally In i lods f.o.b. London. For samples 

and pa lai applj to Farrow & Co., Boston En 

l -"" 1 - (6) 

WANTED. 

IOB LINES OF SOAPS, BLACKINGS, BATH 
*»Brick, Watches, Grocers' Sundries, Crockery, Glass- 
Hardware for spot cash. Russill's IN 
1 ur MARKB1 (St. Lawrence) Toronto. (,() 



.4. ___.*.* 



WANT 
ADVERTISEMENTS 

1 111 this paper at the rate of 

1 1 sen ion, pay- 
able strictly in advance. A<1- 

eplies address- 
ed in our care free of 1 harge, bul must 
send stamps foi re-addressed Inters. 

The Canadian Grocer, Toronto 



»+i« 



• ♦♦« 



•4*« 



»♦♦-« 



•4*« 



»K 





E 




TAPIOCA 

PLEASES! SELLS! 

PILMKTOI'S POWDERED PERFUMED LYE 



"BELL BRAND' 



III lib. tills 



Dillon & Co/s Baking Soda 

" BELL BRAND " in .lb. packages. 

Ask your wholesale grocer for them. 

BEATTY, BLACKSTOCK, NESBITT, 
CHADWICK & RIDDELL 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, NOTARIES, ETC. 

Offices— Bank of Toronto, cor. of Wellington and 
Church Streets, 



TORONTO, 



ONTARIO. 



Solicitors tor Bank of Toronto, Board of Trade, Toronto 
R. G. Dun & Co., (Mercantile Agency,) etc. 



CHARLES H. RICHES 



Solicitor 
of 



PATENTS 



Canada Life Bldg , King St. W., Toronto 

marl pro id in Canada and foreign 

countries. Handbook relating to patents free on application. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



THE USEFUL BANANA. 

IN the West Indies, explains an exchange, 
the dried leaves and prepared portions 
of the banana stem are used au packing 
materials. Fresh leaves are used to shade 
young coffee or cacao seedlings in nursery 
beds, and to cover cacao beans during fer- 
mentation. The young unopened leaves are 
so smooth and soft that they are used as 
" dressing " for blisters. In India the dried 
stalk of the plantain leaf is used as a rough 
kind of twine, and the larger parts are made 
into small boxes for holding snuff, drugs, etc. 
In the Malay Peninsula the ash of the leaf 
and leafstalk is used instead of soap or fuller's 
earth in washing clothes, and a solution of the 
ash is often used as salt in cooking. In the 
Dutch Indies the skin of the plantain is used 
for blackening shoes. The juice which 
flows from all cut parts of the banana is rich 
in tannin, and of so blackening a nature 
that it may be used as an indelible marking 
ink. In Java the leaves of the " wax 
banana " are covered on the underside with 
a white powder, which yields a valuable 
wax, clear, hard and whitish, forming an 
important article of trade. The ashes of the 
leaves, stem and fruit rind are employed in 
Bengal in many dyeing processes. In Siam 
a cigarette wrapper is made from the leaves. 
Fibre is got from the stems, and is the 
" Manila hemp " of commerce, which holds 
the chief place for making white ropes and 
cordage. Old ropes made of it form an ex- 
cellent paper-making material, much used 
in the United States for stout packing 
papers. The Manila hemp industry is a 
large one. About 50,000 tons of fibre, valued 
at ,£3,000,000, are annually exported from 
the Philippine Islands. The Manila hemp 
plant is grown exclusively in the southeast- 
ern part of the Philippines, and all attempts 
to grow it elsewhere have failed. Many 
articles are made from Manila hemp— mats, 
cords, hats, plaited work, lace handkerchiefs 
of the finest texture, and various qualities 
of paper. At Wohlau, in Switzerland, an 
industry has been started for making lace 
and materials for ladies' hats from it. By a 
simple process it is made into straw exactly 
resembling the finest wheat straw for plait- 
ing. 



Forest Council for 1896 will consist of two 
grain dealers, two undertakers, one banker, 
one cattle dealer, one contractor, one saw 
mill owner, one pump maker, one agent and 
one merchant. 



N 



ORTHERN 

ASSURANCE COMPANY 



Established 1836. 



OF LONDON. 



Capital and Funds, $36,465,000. 
Revenue, $5,545,000. 

Dominion Deposit, $200,000. 



Canadian Branch Office. 1724 Notre Dame St., Montreal. 



ROBERT W. TYRE - Manager. 

G. E. MOBERLEY, Inspector. 

Central 

Business 

College 

TORONTO AND STRATFORD. 

Two great business schools under one management. 
Students admitted at any time. Free circulars. 

SHAW & ELLIOTT, Principals. 



Incorporated 



The Peoples 
Building and Loan 
Association of london, ont. 



Authorized Capital, 
Subscribed Capital, - 
Accumulated Capital 



$5,000,000 

1,500,000 

135,000 



PERMANENT STOCK. 

The first issue of $100,000,00 of this class of stock has 
been authorized, and applications for allotment of shares 
will be received until the 31st of March, 1896. Cost of eacli 
share; $100.00. Shares issued at par. Dividends will be paid 
semi-annually. 

As this issue is limited, intending investors should apply 
immediately, stating the amount required. The next issue 
will undoubtedly sell at a premium as was the case with our 
prepaid stock, which sold at a premium of >*10 per share of 
.$65 before being retired. 

For further particulars and forms of application address : 

Tbe Peoples Building and Loan Association 

Molsons Bank Buildings, LONDON, ONT. 



RICE FROM 



The 



Mount Royal 

Co. , . 



g 



Is sure to be fresh milled, more palatable, and 
in neater packages than the imported article, 

D, W. Ross Co., Montreal, Agents 



Delicious 
Coffee 



IT SETS THE 
PEOPLE TALKING 




NOVA 



SbonA FIBRED CODFISH 



REPRESENTS the highest achievement in 
the art of curing and preparing Codfish ready 
for cooking. 

NOTHING is used in this product but the 
finest of shore Codfish especially cured and 
dried for it. 



EVERY particle of skin and bone being re- 
moved and the water evaporated, there is 
absolutely no waste. The contents of each 
package, therefore, is worth to the house- 
keeper about three times its weight in Cod- 
fish as ordinarily sold. 



THE disagreeable odor usually considered 
to be a necessary evil to be endured while 
cooking Codfish will be found to be entirely 
lacking in this. 

DADIfCD CAVIUQ 9 Pfl Curers and Dealers in Fish 
rAUfXCn, tAMHO 0£ UU. for Home and Export Trade 



PUT UP in half-pound cartons, 3 doz. car- 
tons to the case, and sold by the wholesale 
and retail grocers throughout Canada. 



YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 



is Honest Goods and just 

the Thing on Which to 

make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 



McLAREN'S 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



88 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS.COMPROMISES 

WJ . MACKLEM, tea and spice mer- 
chant, Yonge street, Toronto, has 
• assigned to H. J. Keighley, of the 
Royal Dandelion Coffee Co. Liabilities, 
$1,500. 

E. Groves, a merchant of Maryboro', has 
assigned. 

D. Clement, general merchant, Alfred, 
Ont., has assigned. 

J. Armstrong & Co., grocers, Peterboro', 
have assigned to R. R. Hall. 

R. M. Coombs & Co., general merchants, 
Elkhotn, Man., have assigned. 

The liabilities of L. MrKelvey, general 
merchant, Minden, Ont., are $4,000 

Simon Charron, grocer, St. Cunegonde, 
Que., meets his creditors on Saturday. 

Daniel McBride, Hamilton, dealer in fuel 
and coal oil, has assigned to C. S. Scott. 

D. Charron, grocer, Hull, Que., is offering 
to compromise at 10c. on the dollar, cash. 

Gannon Bros., general merchants, North 
Sydney, N S., have assigned to John Carey. 

Thomas Deery, poultry, Montreal, is 
offering to compromise at 25c. on the dollar, 
cash. 

David Ballentyne, general merchant, 
Bristol, Que., has compromised at 40c. on 
the dollar. 

C. A. Lavigne, grocer, Montreal, is offer- 
ing to compromise at 30c. on the dollar, 
cash. 

P. Digna'd & Co., manufacturers aerated 
water, Quebec, are offering to compromise at 
25c. on the dollar, cash. 

The creditors of J. J. McCrae, general 
store, Sarnia, will meet on the 25th in the 
office of Richard Tew, Toronto. 

R. L. Rolls, general merchant, Centreton, 
who assigned to R. Tew recently, is offering 
to compromise with his creditors at 50 cents 
on the dollar. 

John Pratt, general merchant, Bloomfield, 
P. E.I. , and Louis Bennie, in the same line 
at Elmsdale, P.E.I., have both assigned to 
John A. Matheson. 

Danford Roche & Co., general mer- 
chants, Newmarket and Woodstock, are 
offering their creditors 30c. on the dollar. 
The statement presented showed ordinary 
claims against the firm of $34,195.16, and 
preferred claims of $1,245.50. The assets, 
consisting almost entirely of stocks in the 
Woodstock and Newmarket houses, are 
valued at $23,003.69. Ten years ago Dan- 
ford Roche & Co. were doing business in 
Newmarket, and leaving that place started 
in Toronto, with an estimated capital of 
$20,000. In two years they incurred liabili- 
ties of $100,000, and compromising at 60 per 
cent, on the dollar, removed to Barrie. 
From Barrie the firm transferred its busi- 
ness to Collingwood, but making another 



change, returned to Newmarket, where it 
assigned in February, 1890. Then Mrs. 
Roche, the mother of Danford Roche, pur- 
chased the stock, and continued the business 
till the present assignment. 
CHANGES. 

Pierre Blondeau, grocer, Quebec, is giving 
up business. 

Mills Bros., general merchants, Eganville, 
have been succeeded by Alex. Mills. 

Miller & Co., groceries and crockery, 
Pembroke, have discontinued business. 

I. E. De Wolf & Co., groceries and flour, 
Kentville, have been succeeded by R. H. 
Lamont. 

Wm. Birch is starting in the grocery busi- 
ness in Delta. S. Gilbert, in the same line 
of business in the same place, has sold out. 

S. V. Bray, lumber and general store, 
Wellesley, has removed to Toronto. Lumber 
and furniture business continued by Magee 
Bros. & Co. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The assets of O. Melancon, grocer, Mon- 
treat, are to be sold. 

Auguste Germain, grocer, Montreal, has 
sold out to P. Desormiers. 

Joseph Dupont, grocer, Montreal, has 
been sold out by the bailiff. 

Howell & Beckwith, grocers, Victoria, 
stock is advertised for sale. 

The general stock of L. Weinstein & Co., 
St. Jovite, Que., has been sold. 

Mary A. Wildgen, fruits, etc., Chatham, 
has sold out to John McDonald. 

B. Grennan, general merchant, Orillia, is 
advertising his business for sale. 

The stock of F. H. Martellock, grocer and 
baker, Ottawa, is to be sold by auction. 

The plant of the Ridgetown Canning and 
Preserving Co., Ltd., is advertised for sale. 

The stock of E. E. Laurent, " Boston 
Store," has been sold at 49#c. on the dollar. 

The stock of the estate of P. J Haffey, the 
insolvent Toronto grocer, 15 to be sold by 
tender. 

The stock of P. Pilon, grocer, St. Cune- 
gonde, Que., has been sold at 42c. on the 
dollar. 

The assets of Mott & Robeson, general 
merchants, Athens, are advertised for sale 
by tender. 

The general stock of A. Donville, St. Jean 
de Chaillons, Que., has been sold at 65c. on 
the dollar. 

The general stock of J. Rougie, St. Louis 
de Gonzague, Que., has been sold at 55c. 
on the dollar. 

The stock of the estate of John Saunders, 
grocer, Harnston, is to be sold by auction 
on the 28th inst. 

The assets of Remi Racicot, general mer- 
chant, Windsor Mills, Que., are to be sold at 
auction on Saturday. 



The assets of Langelier & Decelles, 
liquors, St. John's, Que., are to be sold at 
auction on 29. h inst. 

The stock of the estate of Samuel Foster, 
general merchant, Chatsworth, is to be sold 
by auction on the 30th inst. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Darche & Co., general merchants, Sher- 
brooke, Que., have dissolved. 

Barclay Bros., general merchants, Wawa- 
nesa, have dissolved. F. D. Barclay con- 
tinues. 

Dansereau & Frappier, grocers, Montreal, 
have dissolved, and Dansereau & Co. of the 
same place are beginning business as gro- 
cers. 

DEATHS. 

George Duncan, dealer in honey, Embro, 
is dead. 

F. X. Devillers, general merchant, Mont- 
real, is dead. 

Wm. Mara, wines and liquors, Toronto, is 
dead. His death was sudden. 

Jas. Davis, boot and shoe merchant, 
Kingston, a resident of that city for nearly 
fifty years, is dead, aged 79 years. 

FIRES. 

Thomas Hargreave, general merchant, 
Newmarket, has been burned out. 

The stock of John Mansfield, grocer, 
Montreal, has been damaged by fire. 

Dodge & Dennison, and S. S. Strong, 
both grocers, of Kentville, N.S., have been 
burned out ; insurance $500 and $1,200 
respectively. 

TEA RECEIPTS AND CONSUMPTION. 

According to the British Board of Trade 
returns the total deliveries of tea for 1895 
were 252,000,000 lbs., an increase of 6,000,- 
000 lbs. upon 1894. The home consumption 
was 7,500,000 lbs. more than previous year, 
viz., 220,000,000, against 214,500,000 lb?., 
and was nearly 14,000,000 lbs. heavier than 
in 1893. The export trade continues to di- 
minish at the rate of about 2,000,000 lbs. 
per annum. The home consumption last 
year was in the following proportions : In- 
dian, 52^ per cent.; Ceylon, 33^ ; China 
and Java, 14. 



44 



SILICO" 



THE UP-TO-DATE 



CLEANING SOAP. 

Cleans quickly and . . , 

DOES NOT SCRATCH 

Try a Three-Dozen Case for $2.26. 
For Sale by Grocers and Druggists. 

BLAIKLOCK BROTHERS 

Customs Brokers 

Forwarders 

Warehousemen 

41 Common St. - Montreal 

Correspondence Solicited. 




THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 



NEW DEPARTURE 



of much importance 
to the . ... 



GROCERY TRADE 




The LAING PACKING AND PROVISION CO. w 

. . OF MONTREAL . . 

Have added a Canned Meat Department to their General 
Packing Business, and will in future have a full line of Canned Meat 
Goods, Soups and Sundries of the very finest quality, every can be- 
ing guaranteed. These Anchor Brand Goods are put up in all 
the convenient sizes and newest shapes, with patent key- 
openers, and are not surpassed by any other goods on the market. 

WRITE FOR PRICE LIST 



I 



CAUSES OF FAILURE 

In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. 

As long as there are failures, subjects that furnish 
information how to prevent them will always be 
timely. We have published, in pamphlet form, 
three admirable papers on the above topic, in which 
Over-Stocking, Expense, Capital, Credit, Dis- 
counts, Buying, etc., etc., are ably discussed. We 
will mail the whole three essays -jc + 

to any address on receipt of ^D CCfllS 

HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto 



Onion Mutual Life Insurance Go, 

OF PORTLAND, MAINE 



Only Company whose Policy Contracts 
are governed by the statutes of the . . . 

MAINE NONFORFEITURE LAW 



WALTER I. JOSEPH, Manager 



Room 2, 162 St. James Street, Montreal 



25^S§SS^S2JSZ35K2JS5CiHS 



It's 
Natural 

to suppose, when we are mak- 
ing satisfactory shipments to 
our present customers, that we 
can do the same for you ; isn't 
it ? It's also natural that we 
should wish to increase our 
business, and would like to 
have your trade. We sell Salt in 
car lots. When you want any- 
thing in salt write US. 



I The Toronto Salt Works 

H 128 Adelaide Street East 

TORONTO, ONT. 

g) Toronto Agents for the Windsor Salt Works. 




THE . . . . 



Sydenham Glass Co. of Wallaceburg 

Limited 




WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Prescription Ware 

Flasks and Liquor Bottles 
Celebrated Beaver 

Fruit Jars, Jelly Jars 



PRIVATE MOULDS A SPECIALTY 



OILS 
OVALS 
SALADS 
SAUCE 



BOTTLES 



PICKLES 
PANELS 
BEER and 
MINERAL 



We make bottles of extra weight to order. We invite inquiry 
relative to lettered ware and bottles from private moulds 
Prompt attention to orders and inquiries. 
Mention this journal. 



Toronto Representative : G. A. McCANN, 208 Dundas St. 
Tees & Persse Winnipeg, Martin & Robertson, Vancouver and Victoria, 

Agents for Manitoba and Northwest Territories. 



Agents for British Columbia . 



Fine Fruit Tablets 




ENGLISH FORMULA 
TABLETS 

Have been our specialty 
and have been a success. 
Packed in elegant Flint 
Glass Jars, large glass 
stopper, tbe finest pack- 
age in the Dominion. 
Also in round jars, similar 
to English, but made two 
inches shorter to fit the 
ordinary shelf. A large 
variety. List of flavors 
and prices on application. 



6. J. HAMILTON 
& SONS 

PIOTOU, N.S. 




40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




C 



THE OLD 

RELIABLE 



iiillilillll H LONDON 

llMllEiiilliulfhlh'4jfcl.to3M 




Keen's D. S. F. Mustard 



IN SQUARE TINS 



When you Buy KEEN'S 

You Buy the Best Mustard Made 



y 



^> 




Toronto, Jan. 23, 1896. 

This list is corrected every Thursday. The 
prices are solicited for publication, and are 
for such qualities and quantities as are usually 
ordered by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of oredlt. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt pay are 
generally obtainable at lower prices. 

All quotations in this department arc under 
i he direct control of the Editor, and are not 
paid for or doctored by any manufacturing o» 
jobbing house unless given under their name, 
the right being reserved to exclude such firms 
as do not furnish reliable information. 

BAKING POWDEK. 

Snow Drill 
', 11. tins, l.loz. 
% " ?, 
1 " 2 
3 " 1 
5 " '/ 2 
10 lb. boxis 
30 lb. pails 

fionnr 
\\ lb. tins, 4 doz. 
% ■• 3 
1 " 2 

10 lb. boxes 

30 lb. pails 



iu case per doz. JO 75 



2 00 

6 SO 

10 00 

16 

16 



per lb. 

in case per doz. 

per lb. 



i**§g>to 



>/v C po^ 



4 oz. cans. 4 and 
10 cent can 



1 00 

1 75 

3 00 

20 

20 

PUKE GOLD, per doz 

5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

doz. in 

16 00 

2'/? lb. cans, 1 and 2 

doz. in case 10 SO 

ins, 1, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 4 60 

12 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 60 

8 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 2 40 

..ns, 2 and 4 
doz. in case 1 80 

6 doz. in case 1 25 

090 



Cook's Friend- 
Size 1, in 2 and 4 doz. boxes $ 2 40 

" 10, in 4 doz. boxes 2 10 

" 2. in 6 " 80 

" 12, in 6 doz. boxes 7C 

" 3, in 4 " 45 

Pound tins. 3 doz. in case 3 00 

oz. tins, 3 doz. in case 2 40 

oz. tins, 4 " 1 10 

lb. tins, % doz. in case 14 00 

w. a. SH.LABS & en., PROPRIETORS. 

Diamond— 

1 | lli. tins, 4 oz. cases 6714 

% 11. tins, 3 doz. cases 1 17 

lib. I ins, 2 doz. cases 1 98 

U1MSHKA BROS 

Boston Baking Powder, 1-11). I, ins.. *1 2") 

Standard Baking Powder, t-lb. tins.. 1 50 

Jersey Cream B'kg Powder, '4-lbs... 75 

'/.-lbs.. 1 25 

1-lbs.. 2 25 



BLACKING. 

DAY & MARTINS BLACKING. 

Paste (Boxes of 3 doz. each, i 

No. 1 size (4 gross to a ease) $ 2 40 

No. 2 Size .1 " " 3 30 

No. 3 size 3 " " 5 00 

No. 4 size 2 " " 6 85 

No. ft size 2 " " 9 00 

Umbos <1 97 1 " " 6 00 

Liquid. per doz. 

Tints, A (6 doz, per bbl) $ 3 30 

% " B 9 " " 2 25 

% " 015 " " 1 25 

Russet Paste. (3 doz. in box) per gross. 

No. 1. In tins $ 3 75 

"2. " 5 65 

"3. " 7 85 

Russet Cream. (1 gross cases) per doz. 
No. 1. In bottles 8080 

2. In bottles 1 60 

3. " 190 

4. 2 60 



No. 1. 
" 2. 



No. 



Polishing Paste. 
(3 doz. in box) per gross. 

In bottles $3 75 

5 65 

7 85 



per doz. 
SO 80 

1 35 

2 25 
1 90 

per doz. 



Polishing Cream. 

(1 gross cases) 

In bottles 



In Metal Tubes 

Ivorine. 
Small. In patent stoppered bottles, 

sponge attached §0 80 

No. 1. " 1 35 

"2. " per gross. 25 00 

P. 0. FRENCH BLACKING, per gross 

'4 No. 4 $4 00 

'4 No. 6 4 50 

% No. 8 7 25 

'4 No. 10 8 25 

r. G. FRENCH dressing. per doz. 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box $2 00 

No. 4, 1 or 2 doz. in box 1 25 

per gross. 

CROWN PARISIAN DRESSING ff 00 

BLACK LEAD. 

Reckitt s Black Lead, per box $1 15 

Each box contains either 1 gross, 1 
oz. , % gro, 2 oz. , or ' , gro. 4 oz. 

per gross. 

Silver Star Stove Paste $9 00 

Dixon's Carburet of Iron Stove 
Polish, 70c doz 7 20 

BLUE. 

KEEN'S OXFORD. per lb. 

1 lb. packets *0 17 

'41b. " 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 12-lb. box 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 5 box lots 16 

CORN BROOMS 

CHAS. ROECKH k sons, per doz. 
Carpet Brooms— net. 

" Imperial," extra fine, 8, 4 strings. . $3 65 
" " 7, 4 strings. . 3 45 

" " 8, 3 strings 3 25 



'Victoria," fine, No. 8, 4 strings. . 
7, 4 strings. . 



"Standard," select, 
' Standard," select 



6, 3 strings. . 
8, 4 strings. . 

7, 4 strings. . 
6. 3 strings . . 
5, 3 strings. . 



CANNED GOODS. 



3 30 
3 10 
2 90 
2 90 

2 75 
2 60 
2 40 



Apples, 3 s 

" gallons 

Blackberries, 2 

Blueberries, 2 

Beans, 2 

Corn, 2's 

Cherries, red pitted, 2 s 

Peas, 2's 

" Sifted select 

" Extra sifted 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 

" 3's 

Pineapple, 2's 

3's 

Peaches, 2's 

3's 

Plums, Green Gages, 2's 

Lombard 

Damson Blue 

Pumpkins, 3's 

gallons 

Raspberries, 2's 

Strawberries, choice, 2's 

Succotash, 2's 

Tomatoes, 3's 

Lobster, tails 

" flats 

Mackerel 

Salmon, Sockeye, tails 

Hats 

Cohoes 

Sardines, Albert, '4 's tins 

Vi's tins 

Sportsmen, '4'8 genu- 
ine French high grade, key 

opener 

SardineB, key opener, '/i's 

:: :: :: :: : x m 

Vis 
Sardines, other brands 9% 11 
P. &C.,'4'stini . 



per doz 
*0 85 $0 95 
2 00 2 25 



1 75 
90 
75 
75 

2 00 

90 

1 05 

165 



1 75 

2 40 

1 90 

2 65 
1 85 
1 60 

1 60 

a5 

2 10 

1 40 
1 90 



80 

1 75 

2 30 
1 10 
1 35 
1 55 
1 15 

6'20 



2 00 

1 10 
95 
95 

2 25 

95 

1 10 
1 .50 

1 75 

2 40 
2 40 
2 50 

2 20 

3 00 
2 00 
1 75 

1 75 

90 

2 25 
2 00 
2 40 

1 15 

95 

2 25 
2 60 

1 20 
1 40 
1 75 
1 20 
13 
21 



12% 

10% 



■»■ 



10% 11 
18% 19 
16 17 
23 016 
33 3S 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



41 



Canada 

Prepared 

Corn. 

Silver Gloss. 

Satin Starch. 

Rice Starch. 



When you buy 



STARCH 



See that you get the 
right thing. You can't 
go wrong if you have any of our lines. 



. 



i Edwardsburg Starch Co. 0* o* 



; 



.-Sardines, Amer., 'A, s " 04% 

'4/s " .... 09 
" Mustard, % size, cases 

.-.0 I ins, per 100 10 00 

MARSHALL & CO., SCOTLAND. 



09 
11 






1 10 
1 65 

1 70 

2 0U 
2 00 



Fresh Herring, 1-lb 

Kippered Herring, 1-lb 

Herrings in Tomato Same. 
Herrings in Shrimp Sauce 
Herrings in Anchovy Sauce 

Herrings a la Sardine 2 40 

Preserved Bloaters 1 85 

Real Findon Haddock . . 1 85 

CANNED MEATS 

(CANADIAN.) 

Comp Corn Beef, 1-lb. cans 

2 •' . 

4 " . 



Minced Gallops 

Lunch Tongue 

English Brawn 
(.'ami) Sausage 

Soups, assorted 

Soups and Boull 



$1 40 
2 40 



1 15 

1 90 
1 90 



1 90 
1 90 



$1 5(1 
2 55 

825 
18 00 
2 60 

2 65 

3 50 
6 00 
2 80 
2 50 

4 00 

1 50 

2 25 
1 80 
4 50 



Acme 
Sliced 
Beef. 

No, 1 tins, 
key, 2 doz., 
per doz. £2.50. 

Beardsley's 
Boneless p Er 
Herring, do/ 

2doz.... 1 4 



7 75 
16 00 



2 60 

3 40 



2 75 




Codfish. 

Beardsley's Shredded, 2 doz. 



CHEWING GCM. 

ADAMS & suns CO. per box 

'I'utti Frutti, 36 5c bars SI 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 23 5o packages . . 75 
Pepsin Tutti Frutti, in glass-covered 

boxes, 23 5c packages 80 

Horehound Tutti-Frutti, glass tops, 36 

5c packages 1 20 

Cash Register, 3905c bars and pkgs . . 15 00 
Tutti Frutti Show Case, 180 5c bars 

and packages 6 50 

Glass Jar with Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 

115 5c packages 3 75 

Tutti Frutti Girl Sign Box, 160 5c 

bars and packages 6 00 

Tutti Frutti Cash Box, 160 5c bars 

and packages 6 00 

Variety Gum (new), 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Orange Blossom, 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Flirtation Gum, 150 lc pieces 65 

Monte Cristo, 180 lc pieces 1 30 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c bars 1 20 

Sappota, 150 lc pieces 90 

Orange Sappota, 160 lc pieces 73 

Black Jack, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Rose, 115 lc pieces 75 

Magic Trick, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Spruce Chico, 200 lc pieces 1 00 

CHOCOLATES & COCOAS. 

OADBURY'B. per doz. 

Cocoa essence, 3 oz. packages si 65 

per lb. 

Mexican chocolate. ' i and ' ■ lb. pkgs. 40 

Rock Chocolate, loose 37 1 /- 

1-lb. tins 40 

Cocoa Nibs, 1Mb. tins 40 

TODHUNTEB, MITCHELL & en. s. 

Chocolate - per lb. 

French, %'a— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Caraccas, %'s— 6 and 12 lbs 35 

Premium, %'a— Band 12 lbs 30 

Sante, <4's— 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond, ' ['a 6 and 12 lbs 22 

Sticks, gross boxes, each 1 00 

Cocoa — 

Homeopathic, l 4's, 8 and 14 lbs. . 30 

Pearl, ..0 25 

London Pearl, 12 and IS " . . 22 

Rock 30 

Bulk, in boxes 18 

per doz. 

Royal Cocoa Essence, packages 1 40 

Cocoa— BPPS'. per lb. 

Case of 112 lbs. each 35 

Smaller quantities 37% 



fky s. 

(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents.) 

i Ihocolate— per lb. 

Caraccas, Vi's, 6-lb. boxes o 42 

Vanilla, %'s 42 

"Gold Medal " Sweet, 6 lb. bxs. . 29 

Pure, unsweetened, '/-j's, b lb. bxs. 42 

Pry's "Diamond," %'a, 61b. bxs. 24 

Fry s " Monogram," %'s, 6 lb. bxs. 24 

per do* 

Concentrated, V-i's, 1 doz. in box. . 2 40 

'/Vs. " 

libs. " 

Homeopathic, '/Is, 14 lb. boxes . . 33 

V 2 lbs. 12 lb. boxes. 33 

JOHN 1>. MOTT & CO.'S. 

(R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto.) 

Mott sBroma per lb. 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott's Homeopathic Cocoa (!4's) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa (in tins) 45 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate 28 

Mot ( s Caraccas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate 22 

Mott's French-Can Chocolate 18 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Chocolate . . 27 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 35 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 05 

Vanilla Sticks, per gross 90 

Mott's Confectionery Chocolate. 21 43 

Mott's Sweet Chocolate Liquors. 19 30 

COWAN COCOA AM) CHOCOLATE CO. 

Hygienic Cocoa, % lb. tins, per doz.. S3 75 

Cocoa Essence, % lb. tins, per doz. . 2 25 

Soluble Cocoa. No. 1 bulk, per lb ... 20 
Diamond Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

1 , lb. cake, per lb 22'4 

Royal Navy Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

% lb cake, per lb 30 

Mexican Vanilla Chocolate, 12 lb. 

boxes, % lb. cake, per lb 35 

WALTER BAKER & CO.'S 

Chocol i 

Premium No. 1. boxes, 12 lbs. each.. 
Baker's Vanilla in boxes, 12 lbs. earl, 

Caraccas Sweet, in boxes, 6 lbs each. 37 

Vanilla Tabids, 416 in box. 24 boxes 

in ease, per box, net ■ 4 20 

German Sweet Chocolate 

boxes, 12 lbs. each, 25 

Grocers' Style, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. . 25 

Eight oak ?s to the lb., in bxs, 6 lbs. e. 25 

Soluble Chocolate- 
In canisters, 1 lb., 4 lb. and 10 lb 50 

Breakfast Cocoa— 

nbxs, ndl21bs, each, % lb., tins. 49 



COFFEE. 

Green. 

per lb. 

Mocha 28 30 

Old Government Java 30 33 

Rio 20 21Vs 

Plantation Ceylon 29 31 

Porto Rico 24 28 

Guatemala 24 26 

Jamaica 21 22 

Maracaibo 21 23 

TODHUNTEB., MITCHELL & CO. s 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey " 30 

Laguaya " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 35 

Maracaibo 28 30 

Santos 25 27 

DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum SO 02 $0 03 

Blue Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstone 03 03'4 

Borax 10 12 " 

Camphor 80 85 

Car h., lie Acid 25 50 

( lastor Oil, 1 oz. bottle, p. gross 4 20 

2 " " '• .... 6 00 

3 " " " .... 8 40 

4 .... io on 

%pint " " .... 12 00 

Olive Oil, 'A pis , 2 doz. to ease, 

per case 1 25 

11 pints, 2 doz. to case, 

per ease 2 50 

Epsom Salts 02 

Extract Logwood, bulk 13 1* 

boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 13 

Glycerine, per lb 17 18 

Hellebore 1116 17 

Iodine 5 50 6 00 

Insect Powder 26 

Saltpetre 08! 2 I) tin 

Soda, Bicarb, per keg 2 75 2 90 

Sal Soda 1 (X» 1 25 

Madder 12'/& .... 

EXTRACTS. 

Dalley s Fine Gold, No. 8, per do/ ... SO 75 

1, 1'/;, oz... 1 25 

2, 2 oz 1 75 

" " " " 3, 3oz 2 00 



42 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Buy Upton's 

■^"^^^^^" SEE _^_ 



AWARDED IHf ltl(illf5T H0H0R5 AT THE WDBlfi) 
WED UNDER SPECIAL ROYAL WARRANT TO 

» fN 'nun 





Over 1,000,000 
Packages sold weekly 

UPTON'S 

Delicious Teas 

possess that most delicate 
flavor and exquisite aroma 
peculiar to the choices! 
growths of Ceylon and 
India. . . . 

They are put up in one 
pound and half-pound air- 
tight package", and retail 

ed at 30. 40. and 50c per 

pound Reasons why yon 
should sell Tjpton's Teas: 
e everybody likes 
them. They have the lar- 
gest sale in the world. 
They will increase your 
trade. You can buy from the 
following wholesale agents : 
Oaverhlll, Hughes Co., Montreal 
H. H. Brehnan & Co., 
W. G. Craig & Co., - 
Balfour & Co., - - 
A. M. Smith & Co., 
T. Kenny & Co., - 



Batty's 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




B 



PICKLES 

and 

SAUCE 



Ottawa 

Kingston 

Hamilton 

- London 

• Sarnia 



Chief Offices: City Road, London, England 
United Stales Offices : 80 Front St., New York 



TEA PLANTER 

CEYLON 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Are unquestionably the finest and 
most enjoyable in the world. Have 
been awarded 



ALL WHOLESALERS 
HAVE THEM. 



EIGHT PRIZE MEDALS 



Canadian Agents 



J. A. GORDON & CO. 

. . . Montreal 




Champion Fire and 
Burglar-Proof Safes . . 

Made with Solid Welded An- 
gle Iron Frame, Iron Inside 
Doors ; 1,000,000 Changes 
Combination Lock. Twelve 
years trial have proven them 
the Best. Fifteen sizes in 
stock. Write for our Price 
List. 

S. S. KIMBALL 
577 Craig St., Montreal, P.Q. 



The Secret of the Canary Breeders 
of the Hartz Mountains 




BIRD MANNA is a great seller. Price si. 80 per frame of 

18 cakes. Order at once from your wholesale house. 

Bird Book Free. 

T. J. COOKE & CO. Montreal 

24 Agents for Canada. 



The Gulf of Georgia Cannery 

MALCOLM & WINDSOR, Ltd. 

Sole Proprietors, and Agents for 

Ice Castle Brand" Canned Salmon 

All salmon packed under the " Ice Castle Brand " are 
guaranteed to be the celebrated Sockeye. 



FACTORY, Steveston, B.C. 



OFFICE, Vancouver, B.C. 




A Crystal Pitcher 

. . . Free 



with 



TUTTI FRUTTI 

Get one from your wholesaler. Send 
postal card for beautiful signs to decor- 
ate your window. 



ADAMS & SONS CO. 

11 & 13 Jar vis Street, Toronto 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



43 



FANCY BUTTER 

Something new in Crackers. Cheap and rapid seller. Don't forget that we make 
the nicest Marshmallow Wafer in Canada. Will not get hard. 



TRY THEM. 



The Toronto Biscuit & Confectionery Co. 



Henry C. Fortier 



7 FRONT STREET EAST, TORONTO. 



Charles J. Peter. 




Crown Brand (Greig & Co.)— 



10 80 

18 00 

21 00 

1 24 00 

4 oz. Glass Stopper doz. 3 50 

8 ' 7 00 

Parisian Essence gross 21 00 

Ketchup, Fluted Bottles . . . .gross 12 00 

Screw Top " 21 00 

S. 4 L." High Grade" 

per doz 3 50 

Pepper Sauce, per gross 15 00 

FLUID BEEF. 

JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL. 

Fluid Beef— No. 1, 2 oz. tins $ 3 00 

No. 2, 4 oz. tins 5 00 

No. 3, 8 oz. tins 8 75 

No. 4, 1 lb. tins 14 25 

No. 5,21b. tins 27 00 

Staminal— 2 oz. bottles 3 00 

4 oz. " 6 00 

8oz. " 9 00 

16 oz. " 12 75 

Fluid Beef Cordial— 20 oz. bottles. . . . 15 00 

Milk Granules, in cases, 4 doz 6 00 

Milk Granules with Cereals, in cases, 

4 doz 5 4 

FRUITS. 



FOREIGN. 

Currants— Provincials, bbls . . 
" %bbls .. 

" Filiatras, bbls 

%bbls .. 

" Patras, bbls 

" %bbls 

" cases 

" Vostizzas, cases 

Panarete, case? 

Dates, Persian, boxes 

Figs— Eleme, 14 oz 

" 101b 

" 181b 

" 281b 

" taps 

Prunes— Bosnia, cases 

" Bordeaux 

Raisins— Valencia, off stalk . . 

Fine, off stalk 

Selected 

Layers 

Sultanas 

Cal. Loose Musca- 
tels 50 lb. boxes . . 
" Malaga— 

" London Layers 

Black Baskets 

Blue Baskets 

" Dehesa Clusters 

Lemons — Messina, boxes 

Malagas, half chest.. 

" boxes 

Oranges— Jamaica, fncy in bxs 
11 Jamaica, choice, boxes 
" Cal. Navels, in boxes. . 

" Mexican, in boxes 

" Jamaica, in bbls 

DOMESTIC. 

Apples, dried, per lb 

" evaporated 



per lb. 
04 04% 
04>/« 04% 
0414 04% 
04% 04% 
04% 05 
04% 05% 
.... 05'/, 
05% 07% 
08 08% 
04% 05% 
09 10% 
09% 12% 
13 15 
16 18 
03% 04 
05% 07 
04% 06% 
04% 04% 
05 05% 
06 OO6/4 
.... 06% 
05% 08 

05% 06% 
per oox. 
2 00 2 20 



2 75 

3 25 

4 25 

3 50 

5 00 
2 50 
5 00 

4 75 

4 25 

5 50 
9 00 

04 
07 



3 20 

3 50 

4 50 

4 00 
6 00 
3 00 

5 50 
5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
9 50 

005 
07% 



FOOD. 

per brl. 

Split Peas $3 50 

Pot Barley 3 75 

Pearl Barley, XXX 6 50 

ROBINSON'S BARLEY AND GROATS. 

per doz. 

Patent Barley, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

Groats, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

HARDWARE, PAINTS AND 
OILS. 

Cut Nails— From Toronto— 

50 to 60 dy basis 2 50 

40 dy 2 55 

dy 2 60 



20 16 and 12 dy 2 65 

10 dy 2 70 

8 and 9 dy 2 75 

6 and 7 dy 2 90 

5 dy 3 10 

4 dy A P 3 10 

3dyAP 350 

4dyCP 3 00 

3dyCP 4 10 

Horse Nails— 

Canadian, dis. 55 per cent. 
Horse Shoes— 

From Toronto, per keg 3 60 

Screws— Wood— 

Flat-head iron, 80 p. c. dis. 
Round-head iron, 75 p. c. dis. 
Flat-head brass, 77% p. c. dis. 
Round-head brass, 72% p. c. dis. 
Window Glass. [To find out what break 
any required size of pane comes under, 
add its length and breadth together. 
Thus in a 7x9 pane the length and breadth 
come to 16 inches, which shows it to be a 
first-break glass, i.e. not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in. and under) 1 15 

2nd " 20 to 40 inches) 130 

3rd " (50 to 60 inches 2 90 

4th " (51 to 60 inches) 3 20 

5th " (61 to 70 inches) 3 50 

Rope— 

Manilla 09% 09% 

Sisal 07 07% 

Per box .* 6 00 12 00 

Shot— 

Canadian, dis, 17% per cent. 

Hinges— 

Heavy T and strap 04% 05 

Screw, hook and strap .... 03% 04 

White Lead— Pure Association guarantee, 
ground in oil. per lb. 

251b.irons 04% 

No. 1 04% 

No. 2 04% 

No. 3 04 

Turpentine— 

Selected packages, per gal. 39 41 

Linseed Oil— 

Raw, per gal 58 

Boiled, " 61 

Glue— 

Common per lb 07% 08 

INDURATED FIBRE "WARE. 

THE E. B. EDDY CO. 

% pail, 6 qt $3 35 

Star Standard, 12 qt 3 80 

Milk, 14 qt 4 75 

Round-bottomed fire pail, 14 qt 4 75 

Tubs, No. 1 13 30 

" 2 11 40 

" 3 9 50 

Fibre Butter Tubs (30 lbs) 3 80 

Nests of 3 2 85 

Keelers No. 4 8 00 

" 5 7 00 

" 6 6 00 

" 7 5 00 

Milk Pans 2 65 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 2 65 

" " round bottoms 2 50 

Handy Dish 2 25 

Water Closet Tanks 17 00 

Dish Pan, No. 1 7 60 

" " 2 6 20 

Barrel Covers and Trays 4 75 

Railroad or Factory Pails 4 75 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

SOUTHWELL'S GOODS. 

per doz. 

Orange Marmalade 1 60 

Clear Jelly Marmalade 2 00 

Strawberry W. F. Jam 2 30 

Raspberry " " 2 20 

Apricot " " 2 00 

Black Currant " 2 00 

Other Jams " " 155 190 

Red Currant Jelly 3 10 

(All the above in 1 lb. cleir glass pots. 

KNOX'S GELATINE. 

Sparkling calves foot 1 20 

Crystalized Fruit, flavored 1 65 

Acidulated 1 50 

(Sold by all wholesale grocers.) 



LICORICE. 

YOUNG & SMYLIES LIST. 

5-lb. boxes, wood or paper, per lb $0 40 

Fancy boxes (36 or 50 sticks) per box . . 1 25 

" Ringed" 5 lb. boxes, per lb 40 

"Acme" Pellets, 5 lb. cans, per can. . 2 00 
"Acme" Pellets, fancy boxes (40) 

per box 1 50 

Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers, 5 lb. 

cans, per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb. glass jars 1 75 

" 5 lb. cans 1 50 

"Purity " Licorice, 200 sticks 1 45 

100 sticks 73 

Dulce, large cent sticks, 100 in box ... 75 

MINCE MEAT. 
Wethey's Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 

MUSTARD. 

COLMAN'S OR KEEN'S. 

Square Tins — per lb 

D. S. F., 1 lb. tins $0 40 

% lb. tins 42 

% lb. tins 45 

Round Tins— 

F. D., % lb. tins 25 

% lb. tins 27% 

" 4 lb. jars, per jar 75 

1 lb. " " 25 

" 4 lb. tins, decorated, p.t. 80 

FRENCH MUSTARD. 

Crown Brand— (Greig & Co.) 

Pony size, per gross 9 00 

Small Med. " 7 80 

Medium " 10 80 

Large " 12 00 

Spoon " 18 00 

Mug " 16 20 

Tumbler " 12 00 

Cream Jug " 2100 

RICE, ETC. 

Rice— per lb. per lb. 

Standard " B " 03% 03% 

Patna 04% 

Japan 05 

Imperial Seeta 05% 

Extra Burmah 03% 04 

Java Extra 06% 06% 

Genuine Carolina 09% 10 

Grand Duke 06% 06% 

Sago 03% 05 

Tapioca 03% 05% 

Goathead (finest imported) 06% 

STARCH. 

EDWARDSBURO STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches— 

No. 1 White or Blue, cartoons 05% 

Canada Laundry 04% 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. draw-lid boxes 

and fancy packages 07 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. tin c >nnisters. . 07 
Edwardsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. 

chromo package 07 

Silver Gloss, large crystals 06% 

No. 1 White, bbls and kegs 04% 

Benson's Enamel, per box 3 00 

Culinary Starch— • 

W. T. Benson & Co.'s Prepared 

Corn 07% 

Canada Pure Corn 06% 

Rice Starch— 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White, 1-lb. 

cartoons 09 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White or 

Blue, 4-lb. lumps 07% 

THE BRANTFORD STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches- 
Canada Laundry, boxes of 40 lbs. . 04% 
Finest Quality White Laundry— 

3 lb. cartoons, cases 36 lbs 05% 

Bbls, 175 lbs 04% 

Kegs, lOOlbs 04% 

Lily White Gloss- 
Kegs, extralargecrystals,1001bs. 06% 
1 lb. fancy cartoons, cases 36 lbs. 07 
6 lb. draw-lid boxes, 8 in crate 

48 bs 07 

6 lb. tin enamelled cannisters, 

8 in crate 48 lbs 07 

Brantford Gloss— 

1 lb. lancy boxes, cases 36 lbs. 07% 
Brantford Cold Water Rice Starch— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases 281bs 09 

Canadian Electric Starch — 

40 packages in case 3 00 



Culinary Starch- 
Challenge Prepared Com — 

1 lb. pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 06% 

No. 1 Pure Prepared Com — 
1 lb. pkgs.. boxes 40 lbs 0T% 

KINOSFORDS OSWEGO STARCH. 




(40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. pkgs., 08% 
SILVER/ 6-lb. boxes, sliding covers 

GLOSS 1 (12-lb. boxes each crate. 08% 

PURE 12-lb. boxes 07% 

OSWEGO 1 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. 

CORNSTARCH! packages 07% 

For puddings, custards, etc. 
ONTARIO 1 38-lb. to 45-lb. boxes, 

STARCH I 6bundles 06% 

STARCH IN 1 Silver Gloss 07% 

BARRELS I Pure 06% 

Brown 4 Polson's Cornflour. 

1-lb packages 07 

40-lb boxes ' . 2 80 

SUGAR. 

<-.,., c - P 9r lb. 

Granulated 04% 04% 

Pans Lump. bbls. and 100-lb. 

boxe 9 W« 

in 501b. boxes 05% 

Extra Ground, bbls. Icing 05% 05% 

Powdered, bbls 05*. 05% 

Extra bright refined 4 00 0»% 

Bright Yellow 3 f5 395 

Dark Yellow 3 70 3 80 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

syrups. per gallon. 

_ . bbls. %bbls. 

?, af k 030 033 

Medium 33 38 

§ r 'f ht :u-.v,- 03 8 "« 

Redpath s Honey 40 

2 gal. pails, i 16 1 15 

3 gal. pails. 1 45 1 50 

SOAP. 

Babbitt's " 1776 " Soap Powder .... $3 50 




1 Box Lot 5 Qo 

5 Box Lot 4 go 

Freight prepaid on 5 box lots, 
p. M. lawrason's soaps. 

Wonderful, 100 bars 84 00 

Supreme, 100 bars , 3 go 

Our Own Electric, 100 bars 2 00 

Sunflower, 100 bars 2 00 

BRANTFORD SOAP WORKS CO. 



»w 



Ivory Bar— per box. 
31bs. and2 6-16 lbs., 60barsinbox $3 30 
13% oz. and 1 lb., 60 bars in box.. 3 30 
12 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 4 00 



44 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



YOU CAN 

PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 




BY 



SELLING 



BRANTFORD STARCH 



10 os cakes, 100 cakes in box 3 60 

Twin cake, 11 % oz., 100 cakes in 

box 3 85 

All wrapped with lithographed wrapper, 
printed with finest alkali proof ink. Quota- 
tions of lower grades of all kinds of soap 
furnished on application. 

GUELPH SOAP CO. 

Pure, 60 bars, 12 oz., per box $3 00 

Silver Star, 100 bars, 12 oz., per box. . 4 00 

Royal City, 3-lb. bar, per lb 05 

Peerless, 2%-lb. bar 04% 

Genuine Electric, 72 bars, per hoi 2 50 

TEAS. 

BLACK. 

Congou— per lb. per lb. 

Half Chests Kaisow,Mon- 

ing, Paking 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow 18 50 
INDIAN. 

Darjeelings 035 055 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 18 25 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

CHINA OREKNS. 

Gunpowder- 
Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half Chests, ordirary 

firsts 022 038 

Tfoung Hyson- 
Cases, sifted, extra firsts. 42 50 
Cases, small leaf, firsts . . 35 40 
Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 022 038 

Half Chests, seconds .... 017 19 

" thirds 15 17 

" common.... 13 14 

PINO 8UEYS. 

Young Hyson- 
Half Chests, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 

JAPAN. 

Half Chests- 
Finest May pickings 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 13% 15 

Nagasaki, % chests Pekoe 16 22 

•' Oolong.... 14 15 

" Gunpowder 16 19 

" Sittings.... 07% 11 



"SALADA " CEYLON. 

per lb. 

Green label, retailed at 30c 22 

Blue " " 40c 30 

Red " " 50c 36 

Gold " " 60c 44 

Terms, 30 days net 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

British Consols, 4's; Twin Gold 

Bar, 8's 59 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8's 57 

Laurel, 3's 49 

Brier, 7's 47 

Index, 7's 44 

Honeysuckle, 8's 56 

Napoleon, 8's 50 

Victoria, 12s 47 

Brunette, 12's 44 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 48 

in 40-lb. boxes 48 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T. ft B., 

3 s 60 

Lily, 7's 47 

Diamond Solace, 12s 50 

Myrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb. tins 70 

%-lb. plug, 6-lb. boxes 70 

oz. plug. 5-lb. boxes 70 

CANADIAN TOBACCO CO., MONTREAL. 

Cut Tobaccos — 

I'fSBHCoinfort, 1-6, 5 lb. box 22 

Champion, l-10,51b.bx 38 

I. OF, 1-10. 51b. box 28% 

Sohmer, 1-10, 5 lb. box 32% 
Imperial Cigarette Tobacco, 1-10, 

5 lb. box 40 

Quesnel Tobacco, all sizes 60 

Crown Cut Plug Mixture, %lb. tin 50 

1 lb. tin 47 

Cigarettes— 

per 1,000 

Sonadora Havana 10 00 

Royal Turkish Egyptian 10 00 

Creme de la Creme 7 50 

Marquise cigarettes, Canadian .... 7 00 
Imperial " " .... 3 50 

Plug tobaccos (sweet chewing)— 

Navy, in caddies 35 

Navy, plug mark 33 35 

Honey, boxes and caddies .... 43 
Spun roll chewing, boxes 55 

Plug smoking (with or without tags) — 

per lb. 
Black Crown smoking, in 

caddies 35 

Crown Rouge smoking 38 

Leaf tobacco, inhales.... 08 20 

Cigars- 
La Sonadora Reina Vic- 
toria Flor Fina, 1-20 £85 00 



La Sonadora R«ina Bou- 
quet, 1-10 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 
Victoria Extra, 1-20 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 
Victoria Special, 1-20 50 00 

Honey moon, Regalia Com- 
me il Fait, 1-40 55 00 

El Caza Culebras, 1-40 55 00 

La Fayette Reina Vic- 
toria, 1-20 32 50 

Noisy Boys, Blue Line, 1-20 .... 25 00 

Princess of Wales. Prin- 
cess, 1-10 25 00 

Ditto, low grades 13 50 20 00 

Cigar*. 

H. DAVIS HON8, MONTREAL. 



Puritan, 1-10 5-lb. boxes 
Athlete, per lb 



83 

1 15 



Plug Tobaccos- 




Sizes. 
Madre E Hijo, Lord Lansdowne . . 

" Panetelas 

" Bouquet 

" Perfectos 

" Longfellow 

" Reina Victoria . . . 

" Pins 

El Padre, Reina Victoria 

" Reina Victoria Especial. 

' ' Conchas de Regalia 

" Bouquet 

Pins 

" Longfellow 

" Perfectos 

Mungo, Nine 

Cable, Conchas 

" Queens 

Cigarettes— All Tobacco — 

Cable 

El Padre 

Mauricio 



PerM. 
.#60 00 
60 00 
60 00 
8500 
85 00 
80 00 
55 00 
55 00 
50 00 
50 00 
55 00 
50 00 
80 00 
80 00 
35 00 
30 00 
29 00 

7 00 
1 00 
15 00 



Old Chum, plug, 4s, Solace, 


6 lbs. 


68 


14 1, 


" 8s, " 


6 


68 


i, i. 


" 8s, R. ft R 


13% 


068 


•i ii 


chew 7s, R. ft R 


M% 


58 


ii ii 


" 7s, Solace, 


14% 


58 


i, «* 


" 8s, R. ft R 


16 


58 


i, ., 


" 8s, Solace, 


15 


58 


O. V. " 


plug 8s, Twist, 


16 


058 


O. V. " 


" 3s, Solace, 


17% 


58 


O. V. " 


" Is. 


17 


55% 


Derby 


" 12s, " 


17% 


51 


Derby 


" 7s, 


17 


51 


Athlete 


" 5s, Twist 


» 


74 


WOODENWABE. 










per doz- 


Pails, 2 hoop, clear. No. 1 




$ 1 60 


.. 3 .. 


... 




1 65 


•• 2 " 


"2.... 




1 40 


ii 3 .. 


"2.... 




1 





painted" 2 




1 


Tubs, No. 






9 


" 1 






7 50 


2 






650 


3 






5 50 


Washboards 


Globe 


1 90 


2 00 


11 


Water Witch .. 




1 40 


11 


Single Crescent 




1 85 


" 


Double " 




2 75 


11 


Jubilee 




2 25 


*• 


Globe Improved 
Quick and Easy 
World 




2 00 


•' 




I 80 


" 




1 75 


•' 


Rattler 




1 30 


Butter Tube 




1 60 


3 60 


Mops and Handles, combined 




1 25 


Butter Bowls, crates assort'd. 




3 60 



DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

Cigarettes— Per M. 

Athlete *7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

8ultana 5 75 

Derby 4 25 

B. C. No. 1 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 75 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

Cut Tobaccos— per lb. 

Puritan, lOths, 5-lb. boxes 70 

Old Chum, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes .... 75 
Old Virginia, 1-10 lb. pkg., 10-lb. 

boxes 62 

Gold Block, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes. ... 73 

Cigarette Tc/bacco — 

B. C. N. 1, 1-10, 5-lb. boxes 83 



THE E. B. EDDY CO. 



Washboards, Planet 

Waverly 

XX 

X 

Electric Duplex 
Special Globe. . 

Per Case. 
Matches— 5-Case Lots, 

Telegraph $3 30 

Telephone 3 10 

Tiger 2 60 

Parlor 1 70 

Red Parlor 1 70 

Safety 4 00 

Favorite 2 25 

Flamers 2 20 



1 60 
1 50 
1 40 

1 25 

2 25 
1 50 



Single Case 

S3 50 
3 30 
2 80 
1 75 

1 75 
420 

2 35 
24* 



Licorice Goods 



SOME OF OUR 
LEADERS ARE : 



*tJ0ORG 5 £mY u,E ' s 



ACffiE 

Licorice 



^Pellets 

SnCKblCORICE 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



Pure Calabria "Y&S" Licorice 

Acme Licorice Pellets 
Tar Licorice and Tola Wafers 
Licorice Lozenges 
"Purity" Penny Licorice 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



♦♦+♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



For 



1 25 cents 






We will mail you a valuable ♦ 
little book on X 



! 



i 



BUYING 
SELLING AND 
HANDLING OF TEA 

This is a complete and use- 
ful work, which every grocer 
should have in his possession. 



t 



t 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 



I 26 Front St. West, Toronto. I 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CANE & SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, OUT, 

The goods are hooped with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and cannot 
possibly (all on*. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADE; 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & 80ns, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



THE 

OakYille Basket Co., 

MANUFACTOBER8 OF 




I, 2, 3 bushel ?rain and root baskets. 
1, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
1, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For sale by all Woodenware Dealers 



Oakville, Ont. 



English 
Malt 



Sii GOLD Medals 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

. .OPART'S SPECIALTIES, . 



HIGH CLASS 



GREAT NOVELTY 



GOOD PROFIT - 



OPART'S PICKLE -_m_ - ODART'S SAUCE 

ODART 5c CO.. PARIS, FRANCE, AND LONDON, ENG. 




& 



J/. 



v. 




CLUBBING RATES 



TELLS what to buy and how to sell it ; gives a 
regular course of Window Dressing, Store 
Management, Advertising; describes all new 
goods, etc. What more do you want ? One Pointer 
from a single copy should net you at least Two 
Dollars. Twelve copies, or one year, should net you 
Twenty-four Dollars. This is a fact, and the reason 
we have subscribers 



The Dry Goods Review and <p 3 aa 
The Canadian Grocer ^J-v/U- 



Send tor Samples. 



THE DRY GOODS REVIEW 

TORONTO .... .... MONTREAL 




Crosse & 
Blackwell 



CELEBRATED FOR 



Wm 



# 



Jams, 

Pickles, 

JSauoes, 

Potted Meats, 
Table Delicacies. 

SOLD BY 



All Grocers in Canada 



ATHLETE" CIGARETTES THE CANADIAN GROCER 



DERBY" CIGARETTES 




B.F.R 
Cough Drops 



SOOTHING AND HEALING 



Convenient in size and shape 
and pleasant to the taste. 
Put up in 5-lb. Glass Front 
Canisters. 

Toronto Biscuit & 
Confectionery Co. 



I/WWVW 




The "GENUINE" 



Is a Chimney full of quality 

See our Registered Trade 

Mark on each one. 




Do not buy any so-called 
Flint Chimney, but insist 
on having the GENUINE 



GOWANS, KENT & CO., Toronto 




Always 
Trustworthy. 



GOX'S GELATINE 

ESTABLISHED 1726. 

Agents for Canada: 

C E. COLSON, Montreal. 
D. MASSON & CO., Montreal. 
ARTHUR P. TIPPET & CO.. 

Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Montieal 



EDWARD STILL 

Assignee, Accountant, Auditor, etc. 

1 Toronto Street, TORONTO. 

Commercial Accounts and those of Estates, Munici- 
palities, etc., thoroughly audited and investigated. 
Charters obtained for Joint Stock Companies. 
Parties in difficulties can procure prompt settlements 
with creditors, on easy terms, without publicity. 



CHARLES F. CLARK, KDW. P. RANDOLPH 

President. Treasurer. 

ESTABLISHED 1849. 

THE BRADSTREET 

nERCdNTILE dQENCY 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY, 

Executive Offices, PROPRIETORS. 

NOS. 279, 281 AND 283 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Officci in the principal citiet of the United Statu 
Canada, the European Continent, Atutratia and 
in London, England. 
The Bradstreet Company is the oldest and, 
financially, the strongest organization of its 
kind— working in one interest and under one 
management — with wider ramifications, with 
more capital invested in the business, and it 
expends more money every year for the collec- 
tion and dissemination of information than any 
similar institution in the world. 

_._„„„ nB^pnoSB Front St. East and 

TORONTO OFFICES 27 Wellington 8t . East 
TH08. O. IRVING. Superintendent. 

OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

Tbe Original and only Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery. 



John Oakey & Sons, limited, 

Manufacturers of Emery, Black Lead, Emery and 
Glass Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Representative in Canada : 
JOHN FORMAN, 650 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



"RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT" CIGARETTES 



SWEET CAPORAL" CIGARETTES 




VOL. X 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 31, 1896. 



No. 5 



| COLMAN'S | 
I flUSTARD I 



/fly 



BEST ON EARTH 3 



TiiUiUiUiUUiiiUMUUiiiiiUiUiUiUiUUiiUiiiiiUUUUiUUiUiUiUiiUUiUiUiUUiUUUiUiiliUiUilUUiU^ 



To Grocers 



The season is on for Marshall's popular Scotch Pickled Herrings. All 
principal wholesalers carry stock. The margin of profit to the dealer 
is good. He should not be without this leading brand. 



"CROWN" 



BRAND 



Marshall's Scotch Herrings 



FROM THE FAMED ABERDEEN FISHERIES 



In Kegs 
Firkins 
Half Barrels 
Barrels 



FULLS and 
MEDIUMS 

30LE AGENTS : 



N. B. — Marshall & Co., Aberdeen, own their fishing fleet ; 
pack only the Finest Selected Herrings. Every package 
guaranteed. Their Kippered, Fresh Herrings, Herrings in To- 
mato Sauce, etc., are very superior. 



WALTER R. WONHAM & SONS 



3 1 5 and 3 1 6 
j Board of Trade Building 



. Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



139 MEDALS AND HIGHEST AWARDS FROM THE WORLD'S EXHIBITIONS. 



Purveyors by special appointment 
to Her Majesty 

THE QUEEN 

Empress of India. 




Purveyors by special appointment 
to H.R.H. the 

PRINCE OF WALES 

K.G., K.T., K.P. 



MACONOCHIE 



131 LeadenhalL Street 



LONDON, ENG. 



BROTHERS 



First Quality. 



Potted Meats and Fish Delicacies 




Fresh Herrings 
Kippered Herrings 
Bloaters and Bloater Paste 
Scotch Findon Haddocks 
Herrings in Shrimp Sauce 
Herrings a la Sardine 



All Herrings prepared by us are pre- 
served at Fraserburgh, Scotland, which is 
the largest fishing station in the world, 
and the quality of the Fraserburgh Her- 
rings is superior to all others. 




i!gi§E7S&33$' 



All particulars from agents : — 

SEETON & MITCHELL, Halifax, N.S. 
LIGHTBOUND, RALSTON & CO., Montreal 



Agents for British Columbia : 



i 



Vancouver and Victoria 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Standard Goods «• Best toHaiidle 



* 



Pare 
Concentrated 



Cocoa. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



Pure 

Chocolate. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



Vanilla and 
de Sante 
Chocolate. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



Caracas 
Chocolate. 







1C 



Cocoa. 



♦ ♦ 4- 



Diamond 
Chocolate. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



Chocolate. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



Gold Medal 

Sveet 

Chocolate. 



$ 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 



A. P. TIPPET & CO. 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 

F. H. TIPPET &LCO. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




The Value of 
Strength . . . 




MANILLLA, 
BROWN WRAPPING 



ETC., ETC. 



noted for long and strong fibre — and made to 
stand more than ordinary wear and tear. 



ITS SUPERIORITY&WILL QUICKLY ASSERT ITSELF. 
WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



E. B. Eddy Co. 



319 St. James Street, MONTREAL 



ANADA 



38 Front Street West, TORONTO 



Agents: F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec; A. Powis, Hamilton; J. A. Hendry, Kingston; 
Schofield Bros., St. John ; J. Peters & Co., Halifax ; Tees & Persse, Winnipeg ; James 
Mitchell, Victoria. 



. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Find their equal if you can . . 





Approved by the highest medical authorities as a Per- 
fect Cheese, being easily digested. It is a soft, rich 
cheese, unexcelled for lunch or dinner in Private Houses, 
Clubs, Restaurants and Hotels. Put up in White 
Opal Pots. It is especially adapted for travelling or 
excursion parties. For sale by all leading Wholesale 
and Retail Grocers. 

A. F. MacLaren & Co., Toronto 



TETLEYS 



Indian and 
Ceylon . . 



TEAS 



"ELEPHANT BRAND" 



New Importation 



TETLEYS MIXED TEA 



(Black and Green) 



LEAD PACKETS OF POUNDS AND HALF POUNDS 

London - - 5, 6 and 7 Fenchurch Street 
Montreal - - 14 Lemoine Street 

Toronto - - 128 Richmond Street West 

Manitoba, Northwest Terri- 
tories and Britisl 



lwest Tern- ) „ , D ~ 
l r- 1 u- r Hudson Bay Co. 
;h Columbia J J 



Chyloongs 



. . '95 Crop . . 



Preserved Ginger 



• • • • • • 

m m •" •* 



Just received a consignment direct from Hong Kong, Ex ''Empress 
of India" and C. P. R. Cases— Whole Pots, Half Pots, Quarter Pots. 
Also Dry Stem Ginger in ]/ 2 and i-lb. Tins. Send for quotations. 



ROSE & LAFLAMME 



Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Laboratory of Inland Revenue, 
Office of Official Analyst, 

Montreal, April 8th, 1895. 

" I hereby certify that I have drawn, by my own hand, ten samples 
of the ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO.'S EXTRA STAND- 
ARD GRANULATED SUGAR, indiscriminately taken from ten lots 
of about 150 bbls. each, I have analysed same, and find them 
uniformly to contain : 

99ioo to 100 per cent, of Pure Cane Sugar 

with no impurities whatever." 

(Signed) JOHN BAKER EDWARDS, Ph.D., D.C.L 

Prof, of Chemistry and Pub. Analyst, 

MONTREAL. 



Do You Sell Crockery ? 

Then we want your business. We manufacture all kinds of Yellow, and Bristol 
Glazed goods, also Rockingham Ware, which we guarantee fully equal to any on 
the market, either of home or foreign production. Catalogues, prices or travelers' 
attendance, if you drop us a card. 



Brantford Stoneware Mfg. Co. Ltd. - Brantford. 



P5>*S&<S 



■c-'S r lV • - - --/a, "J MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS 



NOUGAT 
RAHAT LAKUHM 
ALMOND ROCK 
EL MAHNA 




BUTTER SCOTCH 

1^ (The Celebrated Sweet for Children). Jk 



PARIS 
SYDNEY • 
MELBOURNE 



CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., Toronto. 4 ft , dies* ™**"*-* M°& ROSE 4 LAFLAMME, Montreal. 



"WORKS : LONDON. W.C. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Open Pan 
Salt 



What is it ? It is salt made by the 
OPEN PAN PROCESS. This 
is the method of manufacturing 
salt universally adopted in Eng- 
land, where so much good salt is 
made. 

Open Pan Salt . . . 

Is no experiment. It has been 
tried for years and never found 
wanting. It produces a medium 
grain salt that is far better for all 
ordinary purposes than a very fine 
grain. 






WE HAVE IT. 



The Canada 
Salt Association 

CLINTON, ONTARIO 



OUR BRANDS : 



BROOMS . 

R 

O 

O 

M 

S 



Imperial Gold Medal Victoria 

Bamboo Carpet Standard Leader 

A variety of sizes in each line. Give us a trial order. 

Freight allowed to Ontario points in 5 doz. lots. 



CHAS. BOECKH & SONS 

Manufacturers. TORONTO, ONT. 



CONFIDENCE 

in the merits of the goods you sell is an important element of success. 

JOHNSTON'S 

FIiUlD BEEF 

can always be sold with the most absolute guarantee that it is the best beef 
preparation. We will back you up in this statement to the fullest extent. 




THE JOHNSTON FLUID BEEF GO. 



MONTREAL, I 



A 600D THING 




To suit every taste. 



4 CRAPES MANUFACTURED 

No. i. Pure Mocha and Java 
" 2. Pure Java 
" 3. Pure Jamaica 

" 4. Pure West Indian Coffees 
with a small propor- 
tion of chicory. 



BUY IN SMALL LOTS 
ANP OFTEN 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



WE DON'T 

1/1/ Z\ f\l / IT v J I J ^° ta ^ e k* r S rante< ^ a ^ we sa y regarding Teas ; 

we simply ask a fair, intelligent test of the lines 
we bring before you from week to week. You know a good Tea when you see 
one, and we leave the result with you. 

NOW OUR EYES are open for all the good things the market affords, and 
this week we wish to direct your attention to some really splendid values 
we have secured in 

Japan Teas 

To retail at 25c. You have our statement that they are above the average in 
point of style and liquor. We await your judgment. 

Drop us a card for samples and quotations, or examine standards in the hands 
of our travellers. 




W. H. G1LLARD <Sc CO. 



Wholesalers 
Only 



HAMILTON 



JOHN MOUAT, Northwest Representative, WINNIPEG. 



^ t have Devour^! 

ALL (OMPETITIOrU 







KEEP 

YOUR 

EYE 

ON THIS SPACE 
LATER ON 



IN 1895 



1896. 



S Boulters Goods Sell \ 

\ THEY'RE NOT SLEEPYSTUFF. 5 



sjnmwmmmnmwmi 

I WETHEY S 1 



CONDENSED 




% Mince Meat 



A most delicious preparation, which 
keeps well, and is easily and quickly 
made up into pies, patties, etc. 
All wholesalers have it. . . . 



• I M \l/rTUC\/ Manufacturer, ^ 

g^- J. n. WtlntY, ST. CATHARINES Z^ 



This journal has the largest circulation and the largest advertising 

patronage of any grocery paper in the world. We prove it. 







Vol. X. (Published Weekly) 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, JANUARY 31, 1896 



($2.00 per Year) No. 5 






DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. 

Meanness is Old Nick in essence. 

Quite as much needed as hands and feet 
is a head in business. 

A business is no more capable of naviga- 
ting itself than is an Atlantic liner. 

Attention to business should not allow in- 
attention to the oher duties of life. 

When thou art weighing give justice to 
thyself as well as to thy customer. 

There is one thing burglars cannot steal, 
a":d that is the merchant's good name. 

Leisure hours spent in judicious stuiy 
often result in years of affluence and ease. 

Many a man who takes off his coat to work 
keeps his ideas encased in a straight jacket. 

He who keepeth his store open at night 
should at least see that it is not night in his 
store. 

While a merchant should be gentle in his 
manner it is stiff he should be in his back- 
bone. 

"Push "and " hones.y " will not ryhme, 
but they are the basis of the poetry of 
success. 

The cash system that has not a good 
backbone running through it is a miser- 
able failure. 

Pork is higher, and yet the hogs are squeal- 
ing. But, then, it is just like us human hogs 
— always squealing. 

Where and how a clerk spends his even- 
ings determines where and how he shall 
spend his latter years. 

A contemporary declares that su^ar made 
from corn cobs equals maple sugar. The 
producer of the former may say or think so, 
but what is the opinion of the consumer ? I 



prefer maple syrup — and the syrup that 
cometh from the Canadian maple — on my 
pancakes. 

It is not because they cannot find a mar- 
ket that farmers are holding their wheat ; it 
is for better prices they wheat. 

A dirty face is no more an indication of 
uncleanly habits than is a dirty window dis- 
play an indication of an unclean store. 

If the Almighty Dollar is the business 
man's god it has taught him one good thing, 
and that is to set his face against war. 

A smile is a good thing, but its goodness 
depends on whether you give it from behind 
your counter or take it in front of the bar. 

A young man should consider well whether 
he will fit the business before he jumps into 
it ; if it is too big for him, ten to one he will 
drop through it. 

A merchant may wish till the crack of 
doom to do a good business, but he will 
never secure the desideratum till his wish is 
backed up by works. 

All things come to him who waits ; but it 
is pretty hard sometimes for the merchant 
with inadequate capital to wait for business 
to develop to the paying stage. 

Better any day is it to have a small busi- 
ness than a large inflated one. The one will 
stand a little depression, but to the other a 
little depression means collapse. 

The retail grocers and meat dealers of 
Zanesville, O., have jointly established a 
union. Between the two the union ought to 
be able to carve its way to success. 

The manager of the Kootenay mines reports that there 
are good prospects of gold from the quartz at Skeena River, 
Hudson's Bay. 

The above, from a London, Eng., corres- 
pondent, appeared in a South African paper. 
Between the Skeena River and Hudson's 
Bay stretch the Rocky Mountains and 
1,000 miles of country. But, of course, that 
is nothing to a newspaper man with scan 



knowledge of geography and wide breadth 
of imagination. 

The youth starting out in life who does 
not first of all essay to be a Man will in the 
world be, like chips in broth, a nonentity. 
Manliness is the first essential in man. 

Speaking the other day of Canada, 
Chauncey Depew said : " Political union 
will follow whenever we desire to extend the 
invitation." Now, Chauncey, talk sense. 

Ideas have to be frequently rubbed 
against other ideas before they possess 
value, just as a knife requires to be rubbed 
against a grindstone before it possesses an 
edge. 

The cereal crops in Australia are being 
ruined by drought. This continent might 
spare the Antipodies a few carloads of its 
superfluous snow for the purpose of melting 
down into water. 

As white as was the snow which fell in 
Toronto on Friday last, the day of the big 
storm, no one was heard to call it beautiful. 
It just shows how a good name can be spoilt 
by being too obtrusive. 

Wanamaker, the big departmental store 
man in Philadelphia, has discontinued the 
sale of groceries after a brief experiment. 
Like a good many others, he has probably 
learned that in practice the grocery trade is 
not at all the same thing it'is in theory. 

Prate as we may about the injustice meted 
out in this world, it is the exception and 
not the rule when a man does not at least 
ultimately receive justice in even this world. 
Half the time we are getting our deserts 
when we are ready to take oath and swear 
we are not. 

Merchants should be as attentive to the 
wants of the " lower five " as to those of 
their customers numbered among the " up- 
per ten." The hen is not one whit prouder 
when she is laying eggs for the millionaire 
than she is while doing so for the mendi- 
cant. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HOW PRUNES ARE CURED. 

CONSUMERS of the useful prune, the 
simple fruit that takes the place of 
richer preserves, says a contemporary, 
may not know how the French growers pre- 
pare the fruit for market, and what a process 
of the most primitive kind it goes through 
before packed for exportation. As soon as 
the prunes are harvested they are taken to a 
building called the fruitery, where they re- 
main a few days to complete maturity. The 
fruit is then subjected to not less than three 
and frequently four distinct cookings before 
being pronounced fit for the market. The 
first two preliminary cookings have for 
object evaporation of water contained in the 
fruit : the final cooking, which dries the fruit, 
imparts a certain brilliancy much sought by 
buyers. You know that rich gloss ? The 
sun-dried prunes are most delicious to the 
taste, but the exigencies of the trade do not 
permit of such long preparation. In several 
districts of France the most primitive means 
are practised in curing the fruit. In Pro- 
vence it is plunged in pots of boiling water, 
then placed in baskets and gently shaken 
until cool, when it is put upon long trays ex- 
posed to the sun's heat to complete the 
disiccation. 

At Digne the prunes are not gathered un- 
til ripe. Women feel the fruit with their 
nails to avoid injury to the soft pulp. The 
fruit is strung on small twigs in such fashion 
as not to touch. These sticks of prunes are 
stuck into straw frames, which are sus- 
pended in the sun until the prunes easily de- 
tach from the stick. The pit is then removed 
and the same process of sun-drying is gone 
through, and, when thoroughly desiccated, 
packed for market. The trays used in rural 
districts are quaint affairs, varying in form, 
dimensions and construction according to 
locality. The peasants make them during 
the winter months, and they are clumsy and 
cumbersome, and the only excuse is the 
peasant cannot afford to buy and is not skill- 
ful enough to make better ones. 



COFFEE STATISTICS. 

The total sales of coffee of all kinds in 
the United States during 1895 were 272,506 
tons, against 263,274 tons in 1894, and 
247,717 tons in 1893. The receipts of Bra- 
zilians were 3,311,604 bags, and the distribu- 
tion from the seaports 3,230,660 bags, com- 
paring with 3,169,028 in 1894, and 3,208,042 
in 1893. 

"These figures," remarks N. Y. Journal 
of Commerce, " are significant in showing 
good full average consumption, but in their 
application to present position must be taken 
in conjunction with the fact that on January 
1st the world's visible supply of coffee was 
much in excess of last year ; the quantity 
available for this country was then and has 
since shown an amount very much in ex- 
cess of January, 1895, and the absence of 



any hints of damage to the growing bean is 
strong evidence that previous liberal esti- 
mates of next crop are not now assailable." 

WINNIPEG CITY TRAVELERS. 

The City Travelers of Winnipeg met 
Thursday evening of last week to elect offi- 
cers for the ensuing year and to arrange for 
their annual "At Home." Mr. D. M. 
Home was appointed chairman, Mr. John 
Home, secretary, and J. M. Scott, treasurer. 
A committee was formed to make all neces- 
sary arrangements. After other business of 
a routine character, a vote of thanks was 
moved to the retiring officers : A. Pratt, 
chairman; J. M. Scott, secretary, and K. J. 
Johnstone, treasurer. From the interest 
manifested the coming event is sure to be 
as successful as the previous one. The meet- 
ing then adjourned until next week. 



ers until they make quality the first and only 
consideration as against quantity. The 
pack compares with the previous year as 
follows : 

Cases 2 dz. tins each. 



UNITED STATES CORN PACK. 

THE corn crop of 1895 was the largest 
on record. The yield per acre aver- 
aged unusually large. In Maine it 
was returned at forty-two bushels ; in Ver- 
mont it was over forty-five ; in New York, 
over thirty-five ; In Iowa, over thirty-five ; 
in Missouri, thirty-six ; in Illinois, over 
thirty-seven ; in Indiana, over thirty-two ; 
while in Delaware it was only twenty-one, 
and in Maryland less than twenty-seven. In 
Maine and New York the packing season 
was unusually favorable, and while the acre- 
age for canners' use was reduced in both 
States, the yield turned out so large, and 
the weather was so favorable during canning 
operations, that the total output was but little 
behind that of 1894. It is stated that in 
Maine not a single day was lost during the 
packing season on account of rain. These 
remarks are necessary in order to understand 
fully why the corn pack of 1895 was so little 
behind that of 1894. The total for this year 
is 3,121,164 cases, against 3,414,808 cases in 
1894, showing a reduction of only 293,664 
cases, or about &}4 per cent. 

There was a general disposition on the 
part of the packers to reduce the output, and 
they worked to this end in their conventions 
and among themselves. There was also a 
general conclusion arrived at, that the use 
of chemicals should be avoided, and many 
of the packers who formerly used chloride 
of sodium as a bleacher abandoned the 
practice. Many of them, however, continue 
to use an artificial sweetener. We entertain 
very decided opinions that any chemical 
agent used in the packing of corn tends to 
discredit the article with the consumer. 
Thirty years ago, when Winslow's old yellow 
label corn was the favorite in this and other 
markets, there were no such troubles en- 
countered in its distribution as are now met 
with by almost every distributor. We do not 
believe that corn-packing will become a 
profitable industry for the majority of pack- 



1894. 

Maine 603,116 

Vermont 12,000 

Maryland and Virginia.. . . 450,315 

New York 961,276 

Illinois 5 19,600 

Indiana 123,950 

Iowa 121,639 

Ohio 344,040 

Nebraska 36,800 

Kansas 20,700 

Missouri '5,444 

Michigan 100 

Pennsylvania 30,900 

Delaware 7,042 

Other States 30,821 



1985. 
543,233 
17,000 

281,475 

850,002 

453,668 

63,610 

369.535 

274,400 

33,800 

29,000 

22,700 

6,000 

25.719 



22,022 



1895 3,121,164 

1894 3.414.808 

l8 93 4301,451 

■892 3.351.079 

1891 2889,153 



Total United States,. 3,277,743 2,992,164 

The pack of corn in 1895 compares with 
the output of previous years as follows : 

Cases 2 dz. Cases 2 dz. 

Year— tins each Year - tins each. 

1890 1,588,860 

1889 1,760,300 

'888 3.491,474 

1887 2,311,424 

1886 1,704,735 

Total ten years 27,934,448 

Average per year 2,793,445 

Average per year 1893-95 . 3,612,474 

In addition to the above supply there was 
an enormous carry-over at all points. It is 
evident that our previous estimate of 3,500,- 
000 cases as being the limit of annual re- 
quirements was too large, because if that 
amount were correct there would not be such 
heavy supplies constantly pressed upon the 
market with an average pack for three years 
of a little over 3,600,000 cases. — American 
Grocer. 



WINNIPEG RETAILERS. 

The first regular meeting in the new year 
of the Retailers' Association of Winnipeg 
was held on the evening of the 22nd inst. in 
Sloan's Delmonico hall. There was a large 
attendance of the retail merchants. The 
annual reports show the affairs of the asso- 
ciation to be in a very healthy state. The 
result of the election was as follows. 

President— Gilbert Fowler. 
Vice-President— William Wellband. 
Secretary — J. M. Teichman. 
Treasurer — J. K. Wright. 

A permanent committee to which to refer 
all important subjects for consideration and 
report was also selected, composed of the 
officers-elect and Messrs. William Grundy, 
Geo. Ryan, R. H. Nunn, T. D. Deegan and 
Aid. Geo. Craig. 

A great deal of discussion was occasioned 
by a motion dealing with the business tax, 
and which will come up at next meeting. 

After adjournment, Mr. Geo. Ryan, the 
retiring president, entertained the members 
to a supper in Delmonico dining hall, and a 
most enjoyable time was spent in social con- 
viviality, speech making and singing. 

The association showed its appreciation of 
Mr. Sloan's kindness in granting it the use 
of his parlors free and passed a unanimous 
vote ot thanks, accompanied by a tangible 
token of their appreciation. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



YOU CAN DEPEND UPON THEM 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



! HILLWATTEE ! L . 




L. P. & Co. Coffees . | lllLLfflliiLL L. P. & Co. Spices . 

Diamond Crystal Salt | TPPh A ♦ Roberts' Jellies . . . . 

♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, agents Hamilton 


If you want to be in the swim .... 

If you want to sell the best goods in the market 

If you want to make money, and we know you do, 

SELL THE FOLLOWING BRANDS ONLY, WHICH WE CONTROL 

Ram Lai's Pure Indian Package Tea 

Rannugger Tea, Bulk Blend 

Mascott Tea, Bulk Blend 

Mecca Coffee 

Damascus Coffee 

Bensdorp's Royal Dutch Cocoa 



JAJVIES TUHNEH & CO. - Hamilton 



TEAS 






We will offer during January exceptional 
values to clear out short lines. See our 
samples before buying. 

BALFOUR & CO. Who, S&™ Hamilton, Ont. 






10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



?ga%&reaft® m@ift^^ 



$%s$zsazs$^'z^i&aj^^m$zsam^,%sm 



CALIFORNIA FRUITS 




RUBY PRUNES 
FRENCH PRUNES 
SILVER PRUNES 
EGG PLUMS 



PEACHES— Fancy, Ex. Choice, Choice, 25-lb. boxes. 
APRICOTS— Fancy, Ex. Choice, Choice, 25-lb. boxes. 
PEARS — In 40-lb. boxes. 
PEACHES and APRICOTS-In 8o-lb. bags 



H. P. ECKARDT & CO. 



Wholesale 
Grocers, 



TORONTO 



m&m&^'gy^£$g£E$ez$&i 




WHY FOLKS READ BUSINESS 
PAPERS. 

By Nath l C. Fowler, Jr., Doctor of Publicity. 
Business people read business papers. 
He who can't get business out of the busi- 
ness paper has no business to be in business 
and generally isn't. 

The daily paper has its business depart- 
ment. 

The religious paper recognizes business. 

The business paper is all business, for it 
can contain nothing excepting that directly 
pertaining to the business it represents. 

The business paper is the distributer of 
hard business literature. 

The business paper is the periodical clear- 
ing house in which is made the balance of 
trade. 

The business paper increases trade; regu- 
lates competition; protects industries. 

It is a protective organ, as well as a 
medium for the distribution of unpolitical 
free trade. 

I do not mean to say that all poor busi- 
ness men do not read trade papers, but there 
never was a good business man who did not 
depend upon the paper of his trade. 

Perhaps the trade paper editor may not 
have been drilled in the business he repre- 
sents. 

Perhaps he may have been a failure as a 
business man. 

It is not the business of the business edior 
to be a success in business. 

It is his business to act in the capacity of 
the absorber of business information ; that 
he may the better present, with or without 
argument, the data of business. 

Into the trade pap2r goes the theory and 
practice of business manipulation. 

It is a mirror of business. 

It reflects trade directly. 

It does not allow the rays of business to 
diverge from the straight line of trade. 

The business man may read an hundred 
daily papers, or he may read a dozen maga- 
zines, and from them all he may obtain gen- 



eral information of positive value in the con- 
duct of his business ; but from a good trade 
paper he receives definite, practical informa- 
tion of as much importance to him as the 
counter in his store, or the record book in 
his office. 

Folks read business papers because they 
want to. 

Folks read business papers because they 
have to. 

The first indication of intelligent progres- 
sion in the clerk is when he turns from his 
desk at opportune moments to absorb the 
paper of his trade. 

The intelligent man of business reads his 
trade paper from beginning to end ; adver- 
tisements and all. 

He may not always read it intelligently, 
but he gives to every page at least an eye 
glance. 

The advertisements to him are of the same 
importance as the reading matter. 

In the combination of the two he derives 
information of pertinent necessity to the 
management and development of his busi- 
ness. 

The trade paper is a necessity, and so long 
as it occupies that position it will be read 
conscientiously and intelligently by every 
business man who has proven his right to 
do business. 



THE GROCER ABROAD. 

Tees & Persse, wholesale brokerage and 
commission warehousemen, Winnipeg, in 
renewing their subscription to The Cana- 
dian Grocer, say : 

" The writer, (James Tees), spent a few 
weeks recently in London, Eng., and was 
greatly gra'ified to see how highly The 
Canadian Grocer was thought of among 
the best people there." 

The statements in Mr. Tees' very kind 
letter are further provett by Mr. Wm. 
Mackenzie, of Ceylon, who has been in Lon- 
don and America for some time in the 
interests of the Ceylon Tea Planters' Asso- 
ciation, when he says, "he finds The 
Grocer everywhere in London." 



A WHOLESALE FISH FAILURE. 

THE long established and well-known 
wholesale fish firm of Hunt, Barnes & 
Co., Montreal, assigned last week on 
the demand of W. A. Robertson & Co., St. 
Andrews, N.B. 

The firm has an existence of over fifteen 
years, the two senior partners retiring some 
years ago. Since that time the remaining 
partner, N. W. Smith, has carried on the 
business under the old title. 

The liabilities are about $11,000 and the 
assets consist of stock-in-trade, fixtures, 
book debts, horses, sleighs, express wagons, 
etc. 

At this writing nothing can be said defin- 
itely of how the estate will stand until a 
complete investigation has been made. 

The principal creditors are : Nuttal Bros., 
Rossport, $261 ; Rossport Fish Co., Port 
Arthur, $504 ; Caleb Haley & Co , New 
York, $233 ; J. W. Trefethen, Portland, 
$265 ; A. Alexander, Nepigon, $850 ; C. D. 
Paramellee, Fair Haven, Conn., $261 ; H. 
F. Hemmingway & Co., Norfolk, $235 ; 
Reggin Bros., Crisfeld, Md., $281 ; W. A. 
Robertson & Co., St. Andrews, $554 ; Bell- 
man, Chisholm & Co., Halifax, $750; Behring 
Sea Co., New Whatcomb, $240 ; George 
Tanguay, Quebec, $210 ; Joseph H. Snow, 
Digby, $260 ; J. T. Brock, city, $245 ; John 
Magor & Son, city, $343 ; Bank of Nova 
Scotia, $200 ; T. S. Vipond & Son, city, 
$650; W. Weir & Sons, $1,500; Jesse 
Joseph, rent to 1st May, 1896, $350, and 
Dame Nellie Cherry Smith (under marriage 
contract;, $1,500. 



HALIFAX BOARD OF TRADE. 

The annual meeting of the Halifax Boatd 
of Trade was held on the 21st. inst. James 
Morrow was elected president, and A. M. 
Payne and George Mitche'l vice-presidents. 

The retiring president, M. Dwyer, in his 
address, pointed out that it was useless for 
Halifax to expect the Dominion Government 
to do justice to Halifax in the matter of a fast 
line of steamers, and he recommended 
appealing direct to the Imperial Govern- 
ment. 



. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 11 



I THE TEA OF TEAS I 



£: FOUR QUALITIES: 

B Retails at 30, 40, 50 and 60c. 

%z . . Per Pound. . . 



"Kurma" 



IN LEAD PACKETS ONLY 



| DAVIDSON & HAY, ? c h e n l t e ! ale Toronto, Ont. | 

^UUUiUiUiUiUiUiiUliUiiUlUUiikilkiUJUiiUUiUiiUUiUiUiUUUUiUiUliUUiUiiiiUlUiUiUiilUUUiUiU^ 



1 



// You Don't Like It Send It Back ' 



THAT'S THE WAY WE SELL OUR 



I 



What more can we say for it ? 
What can you say against it ? 



Buckwheat Flour 



THE TILLSON COMPANY, Ltd. Tn**.* Ont 3 

.J 



•4 

4 

4 
4 

i 



We could write a book j 

about Salmon and Salmon Packing, but if we did you might not have f 

time to read it. Our knowledge takes form in our goods. The best ? 

evidence of our ability to pack a first-class article is the article itself — * 

Flag-Ship Salmon. Have you got it ? j 

t bobert wabb* co., l«. : Canadian Pacific Packing Co. ♦ 

A Sole Agents ♦ 

A Victoria, b.o. LULU ISLAND, B.C. f 

4 t 

^9 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HINTS TO BUYERS 

WH. GILLARD & CO. have at the 
present time a large stock of 
• "Levierge" and "Shell" brand 
white castile soap, and report active sales in 
same. 

Davidson & Hay are selling "Ivory" 
liquid blacking. 

W. H. Gillard & Co. say : "Our blends 
are going out faster than ever." 

Davidson & Hay are offering exceptional 
value in a fine broken Ceylon Pekoe. 

The Port Fish Co. are still receiving large 
shipments of Lake Winnipeg white fish. 

A large shipment of " Atlas " prunes 
arrived this week for Davidson & Hay. 

The Eby, Blain Co , Ltd., report a large 
shipment of new Sultana raisins just arrived. 

Sack dried pears are selling rapidly with 
lames Turner & Co., who are offering them 
cheap. 

Clemes Bros, have two carloads of fancy 
bananas and two carloads of lemons arriv- 
ing this week. 

French prunes and plums are scarce. 
James Turner & Co. are showing nice goods 
at catching prices. 

W. H. Gillard & Co. have secured the 
agency for Hamilton of a novelty in the 
shape of a display case for groceries, which 
is a boon to the retail merchant, tending 



as it does to increase the sale of the goods 
shown therein. 

Another shipment of "Orient" tea, for 
which the Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., are whole- 
sale agents, arrived this week. 

The Eby, Blain Co, Ltd., report large 
sales of their Swiss cough drops, which they 
have been pushing this season. 

The Eby, Blain Co., Ltd., are in receipt 
of several shipments of cheap Ceylons, which 
they claim cannot be beaten in value. 

The Eby, Bla<n Co., Ltd., advertise a 
special drive in California evaporated egg 
plums this week. See their ad. for prices. 

Rutherford, Marshall & Co. are in receipt 
of large shipments of choice honey in 5, 10, 
and 6olb. tins, which they are offering at 
10c. per lb. 

Finest selected Valencias are wanted, 
and will be more so as spring comes along. 
James Turner & Co. report carrying a fine 
stock of % and ]A barrels. 



HOW A GROCER WAS "FOOLED." 

I saw one of these "smart" salesmen 
work a poor little grocer in great shape the 
other day, writes " Stroller " in Grocery 
World. It was really the grocer's own 
fault, for he ought to have known more 
about his own business. He didn't take 
any trade paper, I found that out. " Didn't 
need none," he said, and on that salesman's 



visit alone that fellow lost enough, simply 
through ignorance, to pay for almost any 
trade paper several years. 

The salesman wanted to sell the grocer a 
big order of flour — more, probably, than 
he'd sell in a year. 

" My dear sir, said the salesman impres- 
sively, " flour is certain to go up inside of a 
week, probably 50c. a barrel. By buying 
now you'll get the benefit of the low price, 
and can increase your profits when the jump 
comes." 

The grocer didn't know that there was no 
immediate prospect of an advance in flour, 
and that if it came it wouldn't mean over 10 
or 15 cents per barrel. He took no trade 
paper, he had no source of information but 
the salesmen who came into his store, and 
in consequence there he was. If he had 
been informed on the markets, he'd have 
turned that salesman down on the spot. 
But he wasn't, and I didn't feel called on to 
interfere, so he booked a big order of flour. 
As the salesman went out he looked at me 
as if he wanted to wink, but he didn't do it, 
possibly thinking it not safe. 

I calculate that before that flour is gone, 
that grocer will be in more approachable 
shape in regard to the value of a trade 
paper. 

J. Y. Griffin & Co. shipped the other day 
to England 750 tubs of butter via the Can- 
adian Pacific— Free Press, Winnipeg. 



Why not investigate for yourself ? 




DON'T LET OTHERS 
INFLUENCE YOU 



We have the greatest commercial discovery of the Nine- 
teenth Century. It will keep eggs fresh all the year round — 
absolutely safe to use it — cost so little we do not even figure 
down enough. It has been tried and proved of real actual 
value to everyone who wants to put away eggs. 



KNOX'S EGG PRESERVER 



When used on strictly fresh eggs will keep them as good as the day they 
were laid down for one year. We guarantee this or money refunded. 



ASK YOUR WHOLESALE GROCER FOR IT. 



A. E. Richards & Co., 



Sole Agents 
for Canada, 



Caledonia, Out. 



Also Agents for KNOX'S SPARKLING CALVES FOOT GELATINE. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



ADD to your POPULARITY and PROSPERITY by handling only STRAIGHT GOODS 

IN THE FRONT RANK ARE 

CARR & CO.'S 








IV 



English Biscuits 

Are exported to all parts of the world. 



Established 1831. 

The original manufacturers of 
Fancy Biscuits by Machinery. 

Appointed Biscuit Manufactur- 
ers to H. M. the Queen by special 
warrant, dated May 8th, 1841. 

CARR & CO. Ltd. 



CARLISLE, ENGLAND. 



Agents for Canada 



Robert Greig k Co, 



456 St. Paul St. 
, MONTREAL 



A combination of Purity, Strength 



Rowntree's Elect Cocoa anTnavor. 
Craven's English Confectionery LT^^ 

Jl/I^I/~*r'^ Ksvln rr%4s* A delicious blending of Kola, Coffee 

AflcKay s Rola-t/ate and chicory. 
Union Produce Co. 



BRANDS : 

NEUFCHATEL BEAVER 
ROYAL ARMS MANITOBA 
FANCY CREAM 



FINK 

CREAM 

CHEESE 





CROWN BRAND EXTRACTS 

Strength and Quality considered are the cheapest. 

ROBERT GREIG & CO. 



REGISTERED 



Manufacturers and Sole 
Agentsjfor Canada. 



456 St, Paul Street 

. . . Montreal 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



All the difference 
in the world . . 
between a . . . 




E AND A BLEND 



it 



The old style formula of mixing half a dozen teas together and at- 
tempting to disguise their dissimilar qualities with a liberal dose of 
Scented Orange Pekoe, only resulted at best in a nauseating mix- 
ture seldom twice alike in varying degrees of disappointment. 



HOW DIFFERENT THE RESULTS 

IN THE USE OF OUR 



PURE BLENDED TEAS 



INingpori 

Balikanda 
Coolipur 



Blended to infinitesmal niceties by Experts on the estate where 
grown ! The absolutely unvarying high standard excellence of these 
goods is the basis on which they have not only won but kept their 
reputation as the most satisfactory goods on the market. 



SOLE WHOLESALE SELLING AGENTS 



Turner, Mackeand & Co. 



WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 



Winnipeg 



SnowOrif? 



WHO URGES YOU TO SELL 

Snow Drift Baking Powder ? 



wSnow Drift C? 

+~ Brantforo. Ont.-^ 



The public. By giving you always an article that is 
exactly as represented we have made all your cus- 
tomers want only our goods. 



The Snow Drift Co. - Brantford. 



CAN BEAT OVR 



No Sulphur Match 

on Earth * s overeign qrand 

We guarantee them to be Al. 

Freight charges allowed on 5-case lots. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 



TORONTO 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 




j. b. ma;LEAN, 

President. 



HUGH C. MacLEAN, 

Sec.-Trcas. 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

LIMITED 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

and 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

TORONTO : ... 26 Front St. W. 

MONTREAL: . - 146 St. James St. 

EUROPEAN BRANCH: 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
' R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

John Cameron. General Subscription Agent. 



PREFERENTIAL TRADE WITH 
BRITAIN. 

JUDGING from the tenor of the political 
press, preferential trade with Great 
Britain will be the most prominent 
question at the next general election. 

The question is one regarding which pol- 
itical lines are not so sharply drawn as be- 
tween Protection and Free Trade : Liberal 
as well as Conservative desires trade exten- 
sion with the Motherland. Differences of 
opinion only arise when ways and means of 
securing the desideratum are discussed. 

Canada has made marked development in 
a commercial sense during the past couple 
of decades. But our manufacturing and 
mercantile industries have developed rela- 
tively much more rapidly than has our popu- 
lation. And to-day we are face to face with 
the fact that we must either quickly enlarge 
our population or expand our outside trade 
— we want to do both. Neither can be ac- 
complished in a day. But it is possible to 
develop the latter much quicker than the 
former. 

It is an axiom that all will subscribe to, 
that the freer trade is the better. But un- 
fortunately this axiom has not always been 
followed in practice. Some nations, actuated 
by false economic tenets or selfishness, have 
wrapped themselves up within themselves, 
practically saying to other countries, " You 
shall not trade with us." Others, in obedience 
to the law of self-preservation, have been 
compelled to imitate these exclusive coun- 
tries. Canada is one of them, but even in 
her tariff there are many vulnerab'e points. 

It is all very well to plead that two wrongs 
do not make a right. But there is a war in 
commerce as well as a war in which guns 
and bayonets figure ; and self-protection is 
as natural in one as in the other instance. 

On the principle that the less carriage 
that is entailed the better, the expansion of 
trade with the United States is something 



much to be desired. But the high tariff 
policy of that country is in some in- 
stances specially designed to injure the 
Dominion. That our trade would be 
benefitted by the lowering of the tariff 
barrier in the United States is clearly 
demonstrated by the increase of our exports 
to that country under the Wilson law, which 
dealt more kindly with Canadian products 
than did the law fathered by McKinley. 
But the tendency appears to be rather an 
undoing than the extension of the Wilson 
law. There does not, therefore, at the 
moment appear to be much prospect of 
extending trade in that direction, much as 
we may desire it. 

But what seems at the moment impossible 
with the United States is possible with the 
United Kingdom. That country has no 
tariffagainst our products; and, furthermore, 
it is a consumer of our natural products. 
Under the existing conditions it is our natu- 
ral market. Although our exports to the 
United States last ye»r were valued at 
about four million dollars more than 
in 1894, they were nearly a million dol- 
lars less than in 1873. Our exports to 
Great Britain, on the other hand, were 37.70 
per cent, greater in 1895 than in 1873, not- 
withstanding that the exports of last year 
were nearly seven millions less than in 1894 
In other words, while our export trade to the 
United Kingdom has steadily developed that 
with the United States has practically re- 
mained stationary. 

Although last year we sent less to the 
United Kingdom and more to the United 
States than we did in 1894, still in spite of 
this our exports to the former country ex- 
ceeded those to the latter by some twenty 
and a-half millions. 

The relative importance of our export 
trade to the two countries may be gather- 
ed from the fact that in 1895 our exports to 
the United Kingdom were 54 per cent, and 
that to the United States 35.39 per cent, of 
the total exports to all countries. 

With fewer barriers in the way results 
would undoubtedly be different ; indeed, the 
very fact that nearly 40 per cent, of our total 
exports now go to the United States in the 
face of a hostile tariff forces us to no other 
conclusion. But we are dealing with condi- 
tions as they are, not as they might or 
should be. 

In the matter of imports from these two 
countries, however, quite a different tale is 
to be told : Those from the United King- 
dom have steadily decreased, while those 
from ihe United States have just as steadily 
increased. Last year our imports fro 11 the 
United States were the second largest on 
record, being exceeded in 1893, when the 
Americans were so badly in need of money 
that they were glad to unload their merchan- 
dise upon us at any price. 

While our aggregate trade (imports and 
exports) decreased with the United King- 



dom and increased with the United States, 
it is learned by grouping the past five years 
and comparing them with the preceding 
similar period that the results are favorable 
to our trade with the former country. For 
instance, the aggregate trade of the Do- 
minion with the Motherland for the five 
years ending 1890 was valued at $423,228,- 
062, and with the United States in the same 
period it was $442,182,613. The figures for 
the five years ending 1895 were $505,057,124 
and $473,871,174 respectively. 

In other words, an increase of 16 per cent, 
with the United Kingdom and 6.55 per cent, 
with the United States. 

It is natural we should turn our face to 
the door which promises to give us the best 
welcome. 



THE PROPOSED DUTY ON TEA. 

THE agitation in the United States for 
a duty on tea has become a live one. 
The trade and financial press, as far 
as The Canadian Grocer can gather, are 
unanimously in favor of the innovation, and 
there are apparently but few dissentients 
among the tea dealers. Someone, in fact, 
has said that the men who opposed the duty 
were crockery men who handled tea for the 
purpose of working off their crockery. 

The proposition is to place a specific duty 
of ioc. per pound, and it is held that by 
this means the Government will not only be 
able to materially increase its receipts, but 
that the poorest grades of tea will be kept 
out of the country, and that, as a further 
corollary, the tendency would be to reba'e 
the pedlar nuisance. 

The inference is that a duty will be levied 
on tea, and particularly in view of the fact 
that the United States is sadly in need of an 
additional revenue producing factor. 

It is some twenty years since the Uni.ed 
States removed the duty on tea ; and the 
duty on coffee went out with it. 

The latest figures we have to hand regard- 
ing the imports of tea into the United States 
are for the year 1894, and they give the im- 
ports at nearly 92,000,000 pounds, the aver- 
age price of which was 15.1 cents. As the 
imports of tea are not likely to decrease, it 
is safe to estimate that a revenue of at least 
$9,000,000 would be raised by the proposed 
duty. 

Much interest is being taken by the tea 
men of Canada in the movement, and, as 
far as The Canadian Grocer can gather, 
they look upon it with favor, for there is a 
corresponding feeling among importers in 
this country that the Canadian Government 
would soon follow suit. 

At the same time, however, this must not 
be forgotten : Canada has of late years been 
exporting an increasing quantity of tea to 
the United States, and as a goodly portion 
of that which is sent there is of low and 
medium grades, our trade in this respect 






16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



would in all probability feel the effects of a 
specific duty. The exports of tea from Can- 
ada to the United States from 1890 down to 
the end of the last fiscal year are as follows : 

lbs. Value. 

J890 189,323 $34,990 

1801 207,291 40,856 

1892 1,103,819 202,203 

1893 461,260 7J,586 

'894 565,946 94,194 

1895 882,057 120,566 

The countries which impose a duty on tea 
are as follows : Great Britain, 8c. per 
pound ; Germany, 11c. per pound ; Austria- 
Hungary, 20c. per pound ; Portugal, 48c. per 
pound ; Norway, 24c. per pound. Canada 
imposes a duty of 10c. per pound on teas not 
imported direct from country of production, 
or that have not been purchased in bond in 
a country which does not impose a duty. 

SCARCITY OF COCO AN UTS. 

Toronto is at the moment practically 
without a bag of really good cocoanuts. 

On account of the cold weather it has not 
been possible to bring them in. 

As a result an improved enquiry is heard, 
but, so far, it has not affected quotations, 
our figures being as before, namely $3 50 to 
$4 per sack. 



AN EXPLANATION. 

AN article appeared in The Canadian 
Grocer of October 18th, 1895, 
under the heading of " A Computing 
Scale and a Dishonest Grocer." At first 
sight this may be misleading to those who 
are interested and who use scales. The fact 
is that the Computing Scale Co., of Dayton, 
Ohio, who have been for a long time ex- 
porting their scales into Canada, have ar- 
ranged with the Inland Revenue Depart- 
ment to make a special scale for the Can • 
adian merchant to use, and the statement in 
the article above referred to, that the scales 
sent into Canada were practically in a 
maimed condition, is entirely incorrect and 
erroneous. 

The special scale prepared for the Can- 
adian Government is in every respect equal 
to the scales prepared for the dealers and 
merchants in their own country, but it is 
prepared to conform fully to the laws of the 
Dominion, and, in reality, costs the manu- 
facturers more to make than the scales they 
make for their own country. 

Those inspectors who have examined 
them think they are very far in advance of 
the scales made for use in the United States 
by the above named firm. Anyone inter- 
ested, who has hesitated to look into the 
computing scale business, on account of the 
publication of the article above referred to, 
may be set right by writing to the Hon. E. 
Miall, Commissioner of Inland Revenne, 
Ottawa, Ont., enclosing stamped envelope 
for reply, and we have no doubt he will 
write them, giving the facts as above stated, 
which facts were obtained from the manu- 
facturers themselves. 



EXPORTERS BUYING BUTTER AND 
CHEESE. 

EXPORTERS in Montreal have com- 
menced a regular hunt this week for 
both creamery butter and cheese. 
They have advanced their bids on both 
products within the past eight days over 
three-quarters of a cent. Ten days ago they 
laughed at the idea of paying more than 
20c. for creamery butter. 

On Monday two of the big shippers were 
foraging the market and offering 21c. This 
demand, and the fact that the local con- 
sumptive demand for butter is almost equal 
to the supply, points to still higher prices on 
butter. 

Local jobbers are always prepared to pay 
from l /z to ic. per pound more than ex- 
porters, and, as they evidently want sup- 
plies, the competition between them and the 
exporters is almost certain to send up the 
price above where it is at present. 

With regard to cheese, The Canadian 
Grocer has all along this fall taken a strong 
position on the article. The course of events 
at present goes to prove that its advice to 
holders not to be in a hurry to sell meant 
bigger profits to such as followed it. 

To-day in Montreal exporters are bidding 
9 'A to 9t^c. for finest fall makes, against 9c. 
ten days ago. 

This change of opinion has come ab >ut 
since the clearance off the market of the large 
block of 23,000 P.E I. cheese held in Mont- 
real on factorymen's account.. 

The reasons for a stronger cheese market 
have been pointed out so frequently in these 
columns that it would be tedious to repeat 
them. Suffice it to say, that it will not be 
surprising if we see 10c. cheese shortly. 



SUGAR BOOMING. 

" I was not far out," said a Montreal 
broker, " when I predicted 5c. granulated 
sugar in the near future." 

The advance of fully one half cent per 
pound in the manufacturers' price of the re- 
fined article inside of a fortnight goes to 
bear out this assertion, coupled, as it is, 
with the exceptionally strong position of the 
raw article in outside markets. 

On Monday last the Montreal refiners ad- 
vanced their prices an i. her yic. per pound, 
their range now being : Granulated, 250- 
bbl. lots and over, 4>ic; 100-bbl. lots 
4 ii-i6c, and smaller quantities, 4^c ; yel- 
lows, ■}>% to 4#c, as to quality. 

The second jump led to an increased de- 
mand from jobbers, who are by no means 
plentifully supplied with the staple. 

Refiners, however, refuse to book orders 
ahead for any large quantity, and as their 
stock of refined immediately available is 
light, the volume of trade has not been ma- 
terially increased by the better enquiry in- 
duced by the advance. At this writing the 



combination jobbing prices on granulated in 
Montreal is 4jic, and we do not hear of as 
much cutting on sugar as usual, while job- 
bers will not sell low grade yellows under 
3K"c. at the very inside, and prices range 
from that up to 4H C - 

SALMON EXPORTS TO BRITAIN. 

Another vessel of the salmon fleet destined 
for Great Britain sailed for Liverpool on the 
18th inst. from Victoria, B.C. Her cargo con- 
sisted of 26,785 cases. The vessel in ques- 
tion was the sixth for the season ; and the 
total number of cases comprising six cargoes 
were 290,152, valued at $1,484,734. 

As the total pack last season was 600,000 
cases, it will be seen that over 48 per cent, 
of it has been exported bv sailing vessels to 
the British market. And there is still an- 
other vessel to load. 

The exports to Great Britain, in pounds 
and value during the last five years, were as 
follows : 

Pounds. Value. 

• 89' 13,576,108 $1,520,536 

1892 11,325,165 1,156,062 

'893 7,985,652 847,449 

'894 23,359,484 2,327,602 

1895 19,771,686 1.934,642 

The above table it must be remembered, 
includes shipments from Atlantic ports as 
well as by vessels direct from British 
Columbia, and as the value of what has 
already gone by the six steamers alone 
aggregates nearly $1,500,000, it is quite like- 
ly that the exports to Great Britain for the 
fiscal year of 1895-6 will be at least equal to 
those of last year. 

ORANGES WILL BE DEARER. 

If present indications are any criterion, 
the orange market promises to be interest- 
ing ere long. The situation in California is 
the factor which conduces to this. And the 
situation in California is due in turn to a 
variety of circumstances. 

Since the 1st of January the fruit sections 
of that State have been visited in turn with 
severe frosts, two weeks of rain and terrible 
wind storms, which have caused the orange 
trees to shed their fruit in showers. 

A private letter received in Toronto this 
week declares that at least 50 per cent, of 
the crop is ruined. 

The market at the moment contains fairly 
good storks, but when these are exhausted 
it is a foregone conclusion that prices will 
be higher, and, in all likelihood, materially 
so. 

A BRIGHT GUELPH GROCERY. 

Scott & Millman, of Guelph. have one of 
the most attractive and convenient grocery 
stores in Western Ontario. This firm some 
months ago bought out Fielding & Mc- 
Laren, and they were not long in possession 
till they began to transform what was al- 
ready an attractive store. Inside and out- 
side the place has been repainted and deco- 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



1? 



rated. The inside of the store has been 
painted a bright carmonette. Besides the 
decorations, ingenuity has been exercised 
in calling into use modern conveniences, 
whereby increased facilities may be obtained 
for expediting business, Scott & Millman 
doing one of the largest trades west of To- 
ronto. And as it is a high-class trade, a 
large stock of fancy groceries are carried ; 
also fancy china and glassware. The store 
is 90 by 25 feet, with a 16-foot ceiling, and 
is well lighted both day and night. 



BOARD OF TRADE MEETINGS. 

Toronto. 

THE annaul meeting of the Toronto 
Board of Trade was held on Tuesday. 
The retiring president, Mr. Stapleton 
Caldecott, occupied the chair. As the pre- 
sident, first vice-president, and treasurer 
had been elected by acclamation, the 
elections were confined to second vice-pre- 
sident, and the various committees, etc. 
The officers for the ensuing year are : 

President— Mr. E. B. Osier. 

First Vice - president — Mr. Edward 
Gurney. 

Second Vice-president — Mr. James Car- 
ruthers. 

Treasurer — Mr. D. W. Alexander. 

Secretary— Mr. Edgar A. Wills. 

Council (in order of election) — Messrs. D. 
R. Wilkie, William Christie, W. D. Mat- 
thews, H. N. Baird, Stapleton Caldecott, W. 
G. Gooderham, Edward W. Cox, M. C. Ellis, 
J. L. Spink, F. L. Phillips, John Macdonald, 
Elias Rogers, J. H. G. Hagarty, W. D. 
Beardmore and J. Herbert Mason. 

Board of Arbitration (in order of election) 
— Messrs. fohn Carrick, Thos. Flynn, Wm. 
Badenach, R. S. Baird, Thomas McLaugh- 
lin, J. H. Sproule, C. W. Band, Wm. Gal- 
braith, Noel Marshall, John Keith, Thos. 
Davies and C. S. Boon. 

Representatives on the Harbor Commis- 
sion — Capt. Hall and Mr. W. A. Geddes. 

Representatives on the Industrial Exhibi- 
tion — Messis. D. Gunn, W. B. Hamilton 
and Joseph Oliver. 

Mr. Secretary Wills presented his annual 
report, which was solely of a statistical 
nature, and showed that the present mem- 
bership of the board was 909, viz., 709 resi- 
dent members and 200 non-resident; of these 
849 were subscribers to the gratuity fund, 
and 93 were life members. Forty-five mem- 
bers had been elected during the year, and 
eleven had been removed by death. 

In presenting his annual report the 
treasurer, Mr. D. W. Alexander, stated that 
while the balance to the credit of the board 
was not, perhaps, as large as they would 
like to see, still it was satisfactory consider- 
ing the hard times. Rentals lately had 
fallen very much, and the Board of Trade 
had suffered in this. Some steps, Mr. 
Alexander thought, would have to be taken 
to offset this loss of revenue. The council 
thought that this must be met by an in- 
crease in the membership, and they looked 
to the members to accomplish this. Mr. 
Alexinder's statement showed a revenue of 
$40,393.25, and a contra account of $39,- 
298.27, leaving a balance of $1,094.98. An- 
nual subscriptions were $15,521 ; rents for 
1895, $24,831.25, and transfer fees, $41, this 
making up the revenue account. The re- 



ceipts from all sources were $55,755-21, and 
the expsnditure amounted to $63,784.19, 
leaving a deficit of $6,828.98, which was met 
by an overdraft en the bank. 

The reports were adopted. 

President Caldecott's report was a volu- 
minous and interesting document. In his 
opening remarks he said : 

"In harmony with the traditions of the past, 
in returning into your hands the important 
trust with which you honored me a year ago, 
I beg permission to lay before you a short 
notice of some of the questions which have 
occupied the attention of the council, and of 
other subjects which to-day are of deep 
interest to the welfare and progress of the 
country. The year 1895 has been for the 
most part a year of quiet recovery from the 
depression of 1893 and 1894. The restora- 
tion of trade has not been quick, but it has 
evidently been gradually getting better. 
Raw materials, which had fallen during 1894 
to the lowest point known for many years, 
have risen considerably. Manufacturers in 
most branches of trade are fairly well occu- 
pied with orders, and bank returns indicate 
that the country is slowly, yet surely, getting 
over the long depression that for the last few 
years has overshadowed every commercial 
interest. What is particularly wanted now 
is confidence in the future of our country, a 
belief in its naturally great resources, and a 
determination to develop every legitimate 
industry to the fullest extent." 

Referring to the question of a bankruptcy 
law he said : 

"Through a judicial decision which showed 
that under the Ontario Act for the equitable 
distribution of insolvent debtors' estates it 
was possible for a debtor to assign a portion 
only of his estate, a deputation waited upon 
the Hon. Attorney-General to point out the 
mischief that might thus be caused, and it is 
gratifying to know that immediately Sir 
Oliver Mowat's attention was called to the 
point he promised to make the needful 
amendment, which has since been carried 
into effect, and is now working very satisfac- 
torily. But though the Ontario Act for the 
equitable distribution of insolvent debtors' 
estates is much better than nothing, it 
is far from meeting the wants of the 
commercial community. What is required 
and what this board has been incessantly 
calling for year by year, since 1882, is an 
equitable Dominion Bankruptcy Act for the 
whole Confederation of Canada, which, while 
giving the creditors the full control of an es- 
tate that is evidently insolvent, will prevent 
fraudulent preferences, punish reckless sell- 
ing, compel proper bookkeeping and yet give 
a discharge to the man who has honestly 
given up his estate to his creditors, and not 
been guilty of either reckless selling, fraud- 
ulent buying, or extravagant living. Such a 
bill as this was drafted by a united com- 
mittee of the Boards of Trade of Canada, 
and brought before the notice of the late 
lamented Sir John Thompson, who pro- 
mised to give this important subject his early 
attention, but unfortunately for Canada, 
the angel of death cruelly and suddenly 
snatched him away from what promised to 
be a long career of usefulness. The present 
Premier, however, consented to take up the 
matter, but it is to be regretted that, so far, 
though a bill has been prepared that largely 
fills the wants of the trading community, this 
much- needed legislation has not been pre- 
sented to the notice of the House of Com- 
mons. 

" Meantime the need of a sound bank- 



ruptcy bill is deeply felt. The passing of 
such a bill will greatly advance that mter- 
provincial trade which every patriotic Cana- 
dian desires to promote, will reduce to a 
minimum fraudulent and reckless trading, 
and will powerfully help forward the com- 
mercial progress of the country. May I not 
ask, how much longer shall the commerce of 
the country call before this needed bill shall 
become the law of the land ?" 



MONTREAL. 

At the annual meeting of the Montreal 
Board of Trade, held on Wednesday, Mr. 
Robert Bickerdike was elected president 
over the late president, Mr. Jas. A. Cantlie, 
by 102 majority. The number of votes cast 
was 867 more than ever before. 

Other officers are : 

First vice-president — Mr. John Torrance, 
shipping, by acclamation. 

Second vice-president] — Mr. John Mc- 
Kerrow, dairy produce, by acclamation. 

Treasurer — Mr. Charles F. Smith, boots 
and shoes, by acclamation. 

Members of the council — Messrs. Charles 
Chaput, groceries, 504 ; James Crathern, 
hardware, 734 ; Henry Miles, importer, 527 ; 
David MacFarlane, paper, 633 ; Robert Mc- 
Kay, dry goods, 553 ; Charles McLean, ship- 
ping, 479 ; William McNally, cements and 
builders' supplies, 516 ; William Niven, dairy 
produce, 592 ; J. E. Rendell, Newfoundland 
trade, 535 ; G. F. C. Smith, fire insurance, 
492 ; F. Wolferstan Thomas, general man- 
ager of Molsons Bank, 679 ; David G. Thom- 
son, grain forwarder, 640. 

Mr. Robert Meighen declared that the 
board did not do itself nor the city justice. 
If they would turn their attention and energy 
to the great Northwest it would be worthy 
of the board and its mission in Canada. 
What was needed was enterprise and the 
development of the port of Montreal, and 
the best way that the exports of the North- 
west could be deflected to this port. With the 
notable exception of the Ogilvies, Montreal 
had no firms which figured in the crop pro- 
duct of the Northwest. The trade now went 
from that section to the American ports, and 
it was from these ports that it was shipped 
to Europe. The business which should be 
done by Canada was under a foreign flag 
and going to a foreign port. The fact that 
this great grain product was in the hands of 
a syndicate was more important than bars 
and one cent postage. 

Mr. McFee followed. He said that it was 
owing to the inadequate water facilities and 
to railway discrimination that the grain 
business of Canada was " nil." As a board 
they could make the railways come to time, 
but as individuals they were powerless. The 
Canadian fleet in the great lakes could not 
compete with that of the Americans. The 
tonnage of the different boats was less, and 
as a consequence the grain could not be 
carried at so cheap a rate. What was 
wanted was as good a waterway from Mid- 
land to Montreal, as their neighbors had be- 
tween Buffalo and New York. Deeper 
waterways were an absolute necessity. He 
closed by stating that they would lose the 
entire grain trade if the waterways were not 
deepened between Montreal and Lake On- 
tario. 

It was decided that after the termination 
of the lease of the bar and restaurant in May, 
1897, 't be turned into offices, and hereafter 
the building should have no bar. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HE MADE HIMSELF A MAN. 

WHEN Garfield was asked as a young 
boy, "what he meant to be,' 1 he 
answered : " First of all, I must 
make myself a man ; if I do not succeed in 
that, I can succeed in nothing." 

Montaigne says our work is not to train a 
soul by itself alone, nor a body by itself 
alone, but to train a man. 

One great need of the world to-day is for 
men and women who are good animals. To 
endure the strain of our concentrated civili- 
zation, the coming man and woman must 
have an excess of animal spirts. They 
must have a robustness of health. Mere 
absence of disease is not health. It is the 
overflowing fountain, not the one half full, 
that gives life and beauty to the valley be- 
low. Only he is healthy who exults in mere 
animal existence; whose very life is a luxury; 
who feels a bounding pulse throughout his 
body ; who feels life in every limb, as dogs do 
when scouring over the field, or as boys do 
when gliding over fields of ice. 

Pope, the poet, was with Sir Godfrey Knel- 
ler, the artist, one day, when the latter's 
nephew, a Guinea slave-trader, came into 
the room. " Nephew," said Sir Godfrey, 
"you have the honor of seeing the two great- 
est men in the world." " I don't know how 
great men you may be," said the Guinea 
man, "but I don't like your looks. I have 



often bought a much better man than either 
of you, all muscles and bones, for ten 
guineas." 

Sydney Smith said, " I am convinced that 
digestion is the great secret of life, and that 
character, virtue and talents and qualities 
are powerfully affected by beef, mutton, pie 
crust and rich soups. I have often thought 
I could feed or starve men into virtues or 
vices, and affect them more powerfully with 
my instruments of torture than Timotheus 
could do formerly with his lyre." 

What more glorious than a magnificent 
manhood, animated with the bounding spirits 
of overflowing health? 

It is a sad sight to see thousands of stu- 
dents graduated every year from our grand 
institutions, whose object is to make stal- 
wart, independent, self-supporting men, 
turned out into the world saplings instead of 
stalwart oaks, " memory-glands " instead of 
brainy men, helpless instead of self-support- 
ing, sickly instead of robust, weak instead of 
strong, leaning instead of erect. " So many 
promising youths, and never a finished 
man ! " 

The character sympathises with and un- 
consciously takes on the nature of the body. 
A peevish, snarling, ailing man cannot de- 
velop the vigor and strength of character 
which is possible to a healthy, robust, jolly 
man. There is an inherent love in the human 
mind for wholeness, a demand that shall 
come up to the highest standard ; and there 
is an inherent protest or contempt for pre- 
ventable deficiency. Nature, too, demands 
that man be ever at the top of his condition. 
The giant's strength with the imbecile's brain 



will not be characteristic of the coming man. 
The first requisite of all education and 
discipline should be man-timber. Tough 
timber must come from well grown, sturdy 
trees. Such wood can be turned into a 
mast, can be fashioned into a piano or an 
exquisite carving. But it must become tim- 
ber first. Time and patience develop the 
sapling into the tree. So through disci- 
pline, education, experience, the sapling 
child is developed into hardy mental, moral, 
physical timber. 

What an aid to character building would 
be the determination of the young man in 
starting out in life to consider himself his 
own bank ; that his notes will be accepted 
as good or bad, and will pass current every- 
where or be worthless, according to his indi- 
vidual reputation for honor and veracity; 
that if he lets a note go to protest, his bank 
of character will be suspected ; if he lets 
two or three go to protest, public confidence 
will be seriously shaken ; that if they con- 
tinue to go to protest, his reputation will be 
lost and confidence in him ruined. 

If the youth should start out with the fixed 
determination that every statement he makes 
shall be the exact truth ; that every promise 
he makes shall be redeemed to the letter ; 
that every appointment shall be kept with 
the strictest faithfulness and with regard for 
other men's time ; if he should hold his 
reputation as a priceless treasure, teel that 
the eyes of the world are upon him, that he 
must not deviate a hair's breadth from the 
truth and right ; if he should take such a 
stand at the outset, he would, like George 
Peabody. come to have almost unlimited 
credit and the confidence of all, and would 
have developed into noble man-timber. — 
Architects of Fate. 




%*/W> 



WE HAVE THEM 

FINE QUALITY 

TEMPTING PRICES 



RAISINS 

PRUNES 



STICK TO US 



AND YOU'LL 
WEAR DIAMONDS 



u 



W>H. GILLARD & CO., 



WHOLESALERS ONLY. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




ONTARIO MARKETS. 

GROCERIES. 

SUGAR continues to monopolize atten- 
tion on the local market, another ad- 
vance of Y%c. having taken place since 
our last issue. The advance has checked 
the demand slightly, but the market is 
strong, and the general opinion is that a 
further appreciation in values is probable. 
Some increased interest has been awakened 
in foreign dried fruits from the fact that cur- 
rants and Sultana raisins are dearer in the 
primary markets, the latter having advanced 
2s. in Smyrna. Prunes are advised very 
firm. Molasses continue in good demand 
and firm. Pekoe Souchongs are strong in 
England, but otherwise the tea mareet re- 
mains much as before. Payments are fair. 
CANNED GOODS. 

There is no change in the canned goods 
situation, except it be that confidence in can- 
ned tomatoes is gradually gaining strength. 
The demand for tomatoes and peas is good 
for the season, but in other lines there is very 
little doing. We quote: Tomatoes, 77 j£ to 
85c; corn, 75 to 85c; peas, 901095c. forordin- 
ary ; sifted select, $1.10; extra sifted, $1.41; 
to $1.50; peaches, $2.9-5 to $3 for 3's, $1.90 to 
$2 for 2's; raspberries, $1.40 to $2.00; straw- 
berries,$i.8o to'$2.45, according to brand and 
quality; blackberries, $1.90 to $2.20; cherries, 
$240 to $2.45; apples, 3's, 85 to 90c; 
gallons, $1.9010 2.25; salmon, "Horseshoe," 
$1.35 to $1.40; "Maple Leaf," $1.35; "Lion," 
$1.35 to $1 40; Lowe Inlet, $1.27 to $1 30, in 
tall tins ; cohoes, $1.10 to $1.20 ; canned 
mackerel, $1.10 to $1.20; lobsters, $1.80 to 
$2.10, for tall tins; flats, $2.35 to$2.6s; half 
tins, $1.45 to Si. 50; Canadian canned beef, 
i's, $1.35 to $1 45; 2's, $2.25 to $2.35; 6's, 
7.50 to $8; I4's, $15 to $16.50. 
COFFEE. 

There is just an ordinary demand, and 
prices are as before. We quote green in 
bags : Rio, 19 to 21c; East Indian, 27 to 
30c; South American, 21 to 23c; Santos, 
19 to 22>^c.; Java, 30 to 33c; Mocha, 33 to 
35c; Maracaibo, 21 to 23c; Jamaica, 21 to 
25c. 

SYRUPS. 

Trade is quiet and prices steady. We 
quote : Dark, 30 to 32c; medium, 33 to 35c; 
bright, 40 to 42c. 

MOLASSES. 

The demand is fair, but nothing extra. 
Prices continue firm. We quote : New Or- 
leans, barrels, 28 to 35c. ; half-barrels, 30 to 
35c; Barbadoes, barrels, 31 to 35c; half- 
barrels, 33 to 35c. 

SUGAR. 

Another eighth of a cent per pound has 
been placed on the price of sugar by the 
refiners. Refiners' price on granulated is 
now about S^c. net, laid down in Toronto. 
The refiners do not appear to have anything 
in the way of dark sugars under 3^c; 3^c. 
was bid for a round lot, but it was not enter- 
tained. The refiners will not date orders 



even one day ahead. The demand con- 
tinues fair, but it is not as heavy as it was. 
Proportionally there are more carloads mov- 
ing than small lots. The ruling idea for 
granulated is now 4^c, and yellows run 
from 3^c. for dark to 4^c. for very btight. 

SPICES. 
There is nothing special to note regarding 
either the home or foreign market. We 
quote : Pure black pepper, 10 to 12c; 
pure white, 18 to 25c; pure Tamaica ginger, 
23 to 25c; cloves, 15 to 20c; pure mixed 
spice, 25 to 30c; cream of tartar, French, 
25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 30c. per lb; 
allspice, 14 to iSc. 

NUTS. 
Much as before. We quote : Brazil nuts, 
14 to 15c; Sicily shelled almonds, 25 to 26c; 
Tarragona almonds, 14 to i^yic; peanuts, 
10 to 12c. for roasted, and 7 to 10c. for 
green; cocoanuts, $4.50 to $5 per sack; 
Grenoble walnuts, 12 to I2>£c. Marbot 
walnuts, 11 to 12c; Bordeaux walnuts, 9c. ; 
Sicily filberts, 8 to 10c, for sacks and 
io'^ to lie. for small lots ; pecans, ioj£ 
to lie. 

TEAS. 

The market is in much the same position 
as a week ago, beyond the fact that Pekoe 
Souchongs are stronger in London, Eng., 
on account of the season drawing to a close, 
and the package-tea men buying for their 
future wants. Locally, the demand for teas, 
especially Indian and Ceylon growths, 
is moderate. We quote ruling prices 
to retailers as follows : Young Hysons, 
12 to 18c. for low grades, 24 to 27c. 
for mediums, and 30 to 45c. for high 
grades ; China Congous, 14 to 18c. 
for mediums, and 25 to 55c. for high 
grades; Japans, 15 to 20c. for mediums, 
28 to 35c. for high grades; Indians and 
Ceylons, 18 to 22c. for mediums, and 30 to 
65c. for high grades. 

DRIED FRUITS. 

Currants are cabled higher in Patras, but 
these is no change here and the demand is 
light. We quote: Provincials, 3^ to 4c. in 
bbls.; fine Filiatras, in bbls., 4X to 4J^c. ; 
ditto, half-bbls., 4X to 4^c. ; ditto, half-cases, 
4#" to 5c; Casalinas, cases, 5 to ?Xc; Vos- 
tizzas, cases, 6 to d%c.\ ditto, half-case?, 6% 
to 6^c.; ditto, extra fine, 63^ to 7%c; ditto, 
half-cases, 7# to 7^c. ; Panaretas, in cases, 
9c. 

Valencia raisins are in small demand with 
price steady. We quote: Off-stalk, &,% to 
4^c .; fine off- stalk, 5 to s% c - ] selected, 6 to 
6Vc; layers, 6j£c. 

The prune market continues firm at un- 
changed prices. The demand locally has 
hardly yet began. We quote prunes : Bos- 
nias, " Sphinx " brand, " A," 65 to lb. 
9c; "B," 75 to lb. 7Xc, "U," 102 to lb., 
b l A to o^c ; California prunes, 4050, 10 
to io}4c. per lb; 50-60, giic. per lb; 60-70, 
9c; 70 80, 8 'Ac. per lb.; French, 5 to 6c. 

California fruits continue quiet and un- 
changed. We quote : Apricots, 15 to 16c; 
peaches, 8c, in bags, and 10 to 15c. in boxes ; 
pears, 10^ to I2>£c; plums, 6j£c forunpitt 
ed, and I2j£c. for pitted ; nectarines, 11 to 
13c; loose muscatels, 5>£ to6#c. per lb. 



Sultana raisins are advised 2s. higher in 
Smyrna. On the spot they \re quiet and 
unchanged at 5 Ji to 6c. 

Eleme figs are quiet and unchanged. 
We quote : E'eme, 14 oz., 9 to \o%c; 10 
lb., 9^ to I2j£c; 12 lb., I2j£c; 28 lb, 15c. 

GREEN FRUIT. 

The demand for oranges is still light, The 
market contains some good stock at the 
moment, but there is a great deal of frozen 
fruit in existence, especially in oranges of 
California growth, and higher prices are 
looked for shortly. As noted in our editorial 
columns, it is estimated that 50 per cent, of 
the California crop is ruined. We quote: 
Lemons — Messina, $2. 50 to $350 for 360's 
and 300's respectively per box ; Oranges — 
Jamaicas, $3 50 to $4; fancy, $4.25 to $4.75 ; 
Ca'ifornia navels, $4 to $4 75; Valencias, 
420's, $375 to $425; Jumbo's, 420's, $5 to 
$5.5o;ditto, 7i4's,$4.75 to $5; Mexicans,$3 50 
to $4 per box. Bananas, $1.25 to $1.75 ; 
cocoanuts, $3.50 to $4 a sack; apples, $1.50 
to $3 a barrel ; Malaga grapes, $5 to $7 
per keg ; domestic onions, 60 to 65c. 
per bag ; Spanish onions, 40 to 50c. per 
small crate ; sweet potatoes, $3 to $3.25 
perbbl. ; cranberries, $9. 50 to $10 per bbl. 
for first class, and $7 to $8 for ordinary, and 
$3 to $3.75 per case; hickory nuts, $1.50 to 
$1.75 per bush. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 

BUTTER — All the good butter that is com- 
ing forward sells freely, but the greater part 
arriving is poor to medium, and that class 
is accumulating. The deliveries are chiefly 
large rolls, for choice baskets of which as 
high as 15c. is obtainable. We quote: Early 
summer dairy store packed, 7 to 8c ; good 
to choice fresh packed, 15 to 16c. ; large rolls, 
fresh, 13 to 15c; d liry pound prints, 14 to 
16c. Fresh creamery — Tubs, 19 to 20c; do., 
pound prints, 20 to 22c. Creamery butter is 
coming forward ratner faster than desirab'e, 
and dealers are there'ore willing to shade 
prices for large lots. 



ATIONS" 

Packet Teas come in flocks. 

Unfortunately the grocer loads 
himself with them and makes 
the loss 

"SAL AD A" 

CEYLON TEA 

Stands out pre-eminent. 




P. C. LARKIN & CO. 

Wholesale Agents. 

25 Front St. East. 
and TORONTO 

318 St. Pawl St., MONTREAL 



20 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Don't overlook the name 

SURPRISE 



That's the name of the Soap your cus- 
tomers find to be economical — to be worth 
its price. 



Branches — 



MONTREAL : 17 St. Nicholas St. 
TORONTO: Wright & Copp, 51 Colborne St. 
WINNIPEG: E.W.Ashley. 



THE ST. CROIX SOAP MFG. GO. 



ST. STEPHEN, N.B. 



CHEESE -The market keeps firm and busi- 
ness fair. We quote: Summer make, 9c; 
Sept. and Oct., 9^ to 10c. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

Beans — Are still a drug on the market, 
and prices are much as before at$i to $1.10 
per bushel. 

Dried Apples — There is scarcely any- 
thing doing, and quotations are almost 
nominal at 4c. per lb. 

Evaporated Apples — Business is still 
quiet and prices unchanged at byi to 7c. 

Eggs — Receipts of new laid continue to 
increase, and the tendency of prices is rather 
downward. We quote: New laid, 19 to 20c; 
pickled, 14 to \i,%z.; held fresh and cold 
stored, No. 2, 12 to 14c; ditto, No 1, 16 to 
17c. 

HONEY — There is a great deal of white 
honey coming forward, and the feeling is 
easier in consequence. The local demand is 
.light, but there are still a few inquiries from 
the western part of the province. We quote : 
Strained, clover, 10 to io^c; dark, 5c; 
comb, clover, $1.80 per dozen ; dark, 80c. per 
dozen. 

Potatoes — Are still tending downward. 
Carloads on track are now quoted at 19c, 
although we hear of one sale at even less 
than that figure ; out of store, 25 to 30c. is 
the idea. There is very little doing. 

Poultry — Is coming in a little better, but 
the demand has improved and stocks are 
kept well cleaned up. There are no ducks 
on the market and quotations are nominal. 
We quote : Geese, 5 to 6c. per lb.; turkeys, 
7 to 8c. per lb.; chickens, 35 to 50c. per pair; 
ducks, 60 to 80c. per pair. 



PROVISIONS AND DRESSED HOGS. 

There is a firmer feeling in provisions, and 
although quotations are not higher, packers 
will not shade figures as they did a week or 
two ago. Dressed hogs are firmer at $4.90 
to $5. Lard is slightly dearer. 

Dry Salted Meats — Long clear bacon, 
6#c for carload lots, and 6J4 to 6^c. for 
small lots ; backs, 7^c 

Smoked Meats — Breakfast bacon, 
ioc. ; rolls, 7 to 7#c; hams, large, 22 lbs. 
and over, 9c; medium, 15 to 20 lbs., ioc. ; 
small hams, ioc; backs, 9 to 9'^c. ; pic- 
nic hims, 7c; all meats out of pickle, ic. 
less than above. 

Lard — Pure Canadian, tierces, 8 to 
8#c; tubs, Zy 2 to 8^0 ; pails, 8^ to 9c. 

Barrel Pork — Canadian heavy mess, 
$14.00 ; Canadian short-cut, 14 to $14.50 ; 
clear shoulder mess, $12; shoulder mess, 
$11.50. 

FISH AND OYSTER3. 

Trade in fish and oysters continues quiet, 
and no improvement is anticipated till Lent, 
which opens in another week. Prices are 
much as before. We quote oysters: Stand- 
ards at $1.30 to $1.35, and selects $1.60. Fish 
are quoted as follows : Skinned and boned 
codfish, 6>£c; boneless fish, y/ 2 to 4c; had- 
dock, 5 to 6c; Labrador herring, $3.25 to 
$3.50 half barrel and $5.50 to $5.75 per bar- 
rel; Newfoundland herring, $2.50 per half 
barrel, and $4.50 to $4.75 per barrel ; fresh 
water salt herring, $3 per barrel ; blue- 
back herring, 4c; pike, 6 to 7c per lb.; 
flitched cod, 5c; finnan haddies, 6>£c; 
Digby herring, in bundles of 5 boxes, lie; 
ditto, lengthwise, ioc; large halibut, 12 to 
15c ; Restigouche salmon, 20 to 25c; 



British Columbia salmon, 13 t0 T 4 C ■'< mack- 
erel, 20 to 25c; steak cod, t% to 7c: 
haddock, 5c; black bass, 9 to ioj^c; white 
fish, 8 to 9c; salmon trout, 7K to 8c; Lake 
Superior whitefish, 8c. ; Lake Winnipeg 
whitefish, 7^ to 8c 

FLOUR AND FEED, HAY, ETC 

Wheat — Prices are higher, at 80c. for 
white, 72c for red, and 59>£c for goose. 

Barley— Unchanged, at 40 to 44.&C 

Peas — Steady, at 53 to 54c 

Oats— Steady, at 27 to 27>£c 

Baled Hay — Receipts are still large, 
and prices are easier. Car lots on the 
track are quoted at $15 to $15.25 for No. 
1 and $13 to $14 25 for No. 2. 

Baled Straw — Business is quiet, and 
prices easy at $8.50 to $9 for car lots. 

Flour — Business continues quiet. We 
quote both for job and car lots as follows : 
Straight roller, $3.50 to $3.60; Manitoba 
bakers', $3. 50 to $360; Manitoba patents, 
$3 90 to $4; Ontario patents, $3 75 to $3.90. 

Breakfast Foods — Business is much as 
before. We quote: Oatmeal, cornmeal and pot 
barley from 10 to 15c lower ; Standard oat- 
meal and rolled oais, $3; rolled wheat, $2.10 
in 100 lb. barrels; cornmeal, $2.75; split 
peas, $3.25; pot barley, $3 25. 

SALT. 

Demand continues fair, although not as 
active as a week ago, some of the packers 
not cutting as much meat. Prices unchanged. 
We quote at Toronto : In carload lots, 
$1 per barrel, and 60c per sack; in less 
than carload lots, $1.05 per barrel and 65c. 
per sack. At the wells we quote : F.O.B. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



21 



The Toronto Cold Storage Co. 



are prepared to store all kinds of meats, 
produce, etc., at very reasonable rates. 



Addr ess W. H. LECK1E, Manager 



THE TORONTO COLD STORAGE CO., 

13 CHURCH ST., TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN TOMATO CHUTNEE 

For Soups, Gravies, Curries, Fish, Game, etc. 
Used foi lunch and breakfast as sandwiches. 
Highly recommended by H. R. H. Princess 
Louise and by the late Sir John A. Macdonald. 
For sale by leading wholesalers. 

Prepared by M-P. CARD, Guelph, Ont- 

Ask the Wholesale Houses for 

Rossiter's Household Brushes 

THE BEST. 

GEO. ROSSITER - TORONTO 

io to 14 Pape Avenue. 



Telephone No. 471. 



Established X870. 



JOHN HAWLEY 

Provision and Commission Merchant 



Butter 
Eggs 



Lard 
Apples 



Cheese 
Etc. 



Raspberry Jam in 1, 5 and 30 lb. Pkgs. 

88 Front Street East, Toronto 






We have now in stock the following fresh frozen fish. 

FROZEN SEA HERRING 
CODFISH 
HADDOCK 
PIKE 

PICKEREL 
WHITEFISH 
TOMCODS 
SMELTS 
LOBSTERS 

Also full line pure Boneless Cod, Finnan Haddies, etc. 
Write us for prices. 

LEONARD BROTHERS 

MONTREAL. 



JUST RECEIVED 

Evaporated Peaches 
Evaporated Apricots 
Evaporated Apples 

Prices Low. Stock Fancy. 

Write us for Quotations. 



GLEMES BROS., TORONTO 



barrels, 70c; sacks 50c. for points west of 
Toronto, and 45c. for Toronto and points east 
of Toronto. 
HIDES, SKINS, WOOL AND TALLOW. 

The market continues dull all round, and 
there is very little movement in any line. 
Quotations of hides, skins and wool in the 
local market are as follows : 

Hides — No. i green, 5c. per lb.; No. 2, 
4c.; No. 3, -?c; No. 1 cured 6 to 6^c. 

Skins — Calfskins, No. 1 green, 6c. ; No. 
2, 5c; No. 1 cured, each, 75c. to $1. Sheep- 
skins, fresh, 80c, and early, 40 to 60c. 

Deerskins— Green, 8c. per lb.; dried, 
20c. per lb. 

WOOL — Fleece, combing, 24c; tub- washed 
fleece, 22c; rejections, 17 to 18c. Pulled — 
Supers, 21 to 23c; extras, 22 to 23c ; comb- 
ing, 22 to 23c. 

Tallow — Prime rendered, in barrels, 
4%c; do., in cakes, 4#c. Dealers re-sell 
barrel tallow at 5c. and cakes at S%c. 
PETROLEUM. 

Trade is brisk for this time of the year. We 
quote in 1 to 10 bbl. lots, imperial gallon, 
Toronto : Canadian, 16c; carbon safety, 
18c; Canadian water white, 18c; American 
water white, 21c; Pratt's Astral, 22c. 



market notes. 

Sugar has advanced another %c per 
pound. 

Sultana raisins are 2s. higher in Smyrna. 

Eggs and butter are easier on account of 
freer deliveries. 

Potatoes are down to 19c. ner bag on the 
track at Toronto. 

Oranges are expected to advance shortly. 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 30, 1896. 

GROCERIES. 

BUSINESS has not shown much in- 
crease in volume, but the week has 
furnished many interesting features. 
The most prominent point was the con- 
tinued strength of sugar, which jumped 
another %c. per lb. at the refineries. These 
frequent advances recently have made job- 
bers more nervous about supplies, and they 
are free operators, business being moderate, 
simply because refiners will not agree to 
book ahead at current rates, while the stock 
of refined immediately available in first 
hands is smaller than usual at this time of 
the year. The possibility of some develop- 
ment from Ottawa in regard to tea duties 
has also imparted more life to the wholesale 
tea market here, jobbers enquiring more 



Graham, McLean & Co. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
77 Golborne St. TORONTO. 

We solicit consignments of Butter, Eggs, Cheese, Poul- 
try and all kinds of 

FARM AND DAIRY PRODUCE 

Send us a trial shipment. 

We handle a special line of kettle-rendered Lard. 



B. T. Babbitt 

1776 SOAP POWDER, AND "BEST "SOAP 

—■ New York 

WM. H. DUNN, - Representative 

394 St. Paul St., MONTREAL 



k Co. 



Wholesale Produce and 
Commission Merchants 



62 FRONT ST. EAST, - TORONTO. 



Correspondence Invited. 

Consignments Solicited. 

EGG CASES SUPPLIED 

Liberal advances made 
on consignments. 

Bankers : Canadian Bank of Commerce. 



W. N. LAZIER 



Box 341, VICTORIA. B C. 



Agent for . . 



R emington machine go. 

Refrigerating and Ice Machines. 

Complete Plants Installed for all Purposes. 

Robb Engineering Co. Economic Boilers. 

High Speed and Corliss Engines. 

Complete Plants Erected. All work 

guaranteed. 

COWAN'S 
OCOAS 
OFFEES 
HOCOLATES 

and ICINGS 

are absolutely pure. 
All orders promptly attended to. 



THE COWAN CO., Ltd. 

470 King St. West, 

Toronto. Ganada. 



The Finest Shoulders and Hams . . . 

— T. R.F.CASE, - SEAFORTH, ONT. 



Write for 
Prices- 



22 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BB PEACH JELLY WAFERS 



Have a tin included in your next 
biscuit order. 



JAS. MFLAUCHLAN & SONS Biscuit Manufacturers OWEN SOUND 



freely. Strength continues to be shown by 
molasses, while dried fruit and other lines of 
staple groceries furnish no striking feature. 
SUGAR. 
The prediction made last week that granu- 
lated sugar was going to 5c. seems in a fair 
way of being verified, for refiners gave their 
prices another jump of y%z. per lb. all round 
last Monday, and the market is strong at 
the advance. Demand is brisk, for jobbers 
have now made up their minds that if they 
don't book now it is going to cost them 
more money later on. As a result a large 
volume of business has been transacted, 
which possibly would be much larger were 
it not for the fact that refiners' stocks are 
not large, while they refuse to accept orders 
for the forward delivery of any large quan- 
tity at ruling rates. The jobbing price is 
now Y% to X c - P er ' D - above what it was last 
week, granulated being held firm at 4#c. 
per lb. and yellows from 3^ to i,Y%c. per 
lb., as to grade. 

SYRUPS. 
The syrup market continues firm, in tone, 
as stocks are light in first hands. Business, 
however, is quiet, but with sugar and mo- 
lasses firm it is possible that an advance in 
prices may brighten up the demand. At 
this writing values are held firm at i^c. for 
ordinary and 2^ to 3c. for bright stock. 

MOLASSES. 
The molasses market is firm, as noted last 
week, and demand is fair. Stocks of Bar- 
badoes are much reduced, and this fact, with 
the firmness in Porto Rico and New Orleans 
outside, tends to stiffen sellers' ideas,;though 
no actual quotable change is to note this 
week. Porto Rico and Cuba stock, of which 
there is a small quantity on the market, have 
sold in jobbing lots at 35c., and sales of New 
Orleans have ranged from 25^ to 35c, as to 
grade. Barbadoes are nominal, the only 
business noted being in single puncheons, 
which changed hands at 37c. 

RICE. 

There has been little change in the rice 
market, millers noting a fairly satisfactory 
demand for the season. We quote : Japan 
standard, $425 to $4.40 ; crystal Japan, 
$4.75 to $5 ; standard B., $345 ; English 
style, $3.30 ; Patna, $4.25 to $5, and Caro- 
lina, $6.50 to $7.50. 

SPICES. 
There has been a fairly active business in 
spices, and values are strong, especially on 
cream of tartar. In a round way sales of 
black pepper have been made at 9c, and 
nutmegs at 60c. We quote : Pure black pep- 



per, 10 to 12c; pure white , 15 to 22c. ; pure 
Jamaica ginger, 23 to 25c; cloves, 15 to 
20c; pure mixed spire, 25 to 30c; cream of 
tartar, French, 25 to 27c. ; ditto, best, 28 to 
30c. per lb ; allspice, 12 to 15c. 

COFFEE. 

Jobbers and roasters have been operating 
with more freedom during the past week, 
but otherwise the situation is unchanged. 
We quote bean coffee as follows : Mara- 
caibo, 20 to 21c; Rio, 19 to 20c; Java, 28c; 
Jamaica, 20c, and Mocha, 31 to 32c. 

TEAS. 

The tea market is strong, and latterly has 
given signs of more activity. Low grade 
and medium Japans have sold at advances 
of 1 to i^c, and are now unobtainable on 
the market aside from what jobbers have in 
stock and require for their own customers. 
In fact, supplies generally in jobbers' hands 
are lighter than usual, and the fact accounts 
for the better enquiry that tea brokers and 
importing agents have experienced during 
the past ten days. In addition to sales of 
Japans at 15 to I7j^c. to jobbers, the latter 
have been buyers of gunpowders at 18 to 
21c, and have also placed some fair sized 
cable orders for Ceylon?. In a distributive 
way, the market is quiet. 

DRIED FRUIT. 

There is a quiet, steady enquiry for Val- 
encia raisins at unchanged prices. We quote: 
Ordinary off-stalk, 4 to \%c.\ fine, 4'A to 
4^c; selected, 5 to 5Xc-i and layers, 6*4. to 
7C. 

The firm feeling on California fruit, es- 
pecially 3-crown, is fully maintained, and 
we quote 3-crown 5^ to 6c. and 4-crown 
t>% to 7c. 

Sultanas are enquired for in a moderate 
way, prices ruling steady at 6Xc 

There is a good jobbing demand for cur- 
rants, and prices are s'eidy at 3^c in bar- 
rels, 4 to &,%c. in half-barrels, and a,% to 
4^c in cases. 

There is no change in prunes, which are 
held firm on the whole, with the exception 
of some small sizes of French. We quote : 
French, 4% to 5c; Bosnia, 6c, and Cali- 
fornia 7% to 15c, as to grade. Demand for 
the latter is showing a steady expansion, as 
the offerings are exceptionally good value, 
as compared with the European fruit. 

Figs continue quiet and steady as follows : 
Bags, 4c; boxes, ordinary, 8}4 to 9c, and 
fancy, 12 to 14c. 

Dates continue quiet and steady at 4% to 
5C 



NUTS. 

There is a moderate trade in nuts at firm 
prices. We quote: Grenoble walnuts, nj£ 
to I2}4c; filberts, 7 'A to 8c. ; Tarragona 
almonds, n}4 to 12,54c; pecans, 9 to 12c, 
and shelled walnuts, 18 to 20c. 

CANNED GOODS. 

Market entirely without new feature. We 
quote: Lobsters, tails, $8 per case; flats, $9 to 
$9.50; sardines, ordinary brands, $7 to $8.50; 
best brands, $9.50 to $10.50 ; salmon, $1.25 
to $1.30 per doz.; tomatoes, 75 to 80c; 
peaches, $2 to $2.25; corn, 85 to 90c; mar- 
rowfat peas, 95c. to $1; strawberries, $2 to 
$2.25; raspberries, $1.75 to $2; greengages, 
$1.75 to $2; blue plums or damsons, $1.50 
to $1.75; pineapples, $2 to $2.25 and 3-lb. 
apples, 80 to 85c 

WINES AND SPIRITS. 

A fair sorting demand is noted for Scotch 
and Irish whiskies, with an occasional small 
import order. No great activity is looked 
for until the beginning of February. 
GREEN FRUIT. 

It has been another quiet week in the 
green fruit trade, business ruling dull on the 
whole, and prices about the same. We quote: 
Oranges — Jamaicas, $8 to $9 per barrel, and 
$4 to $4.50 per box ; Valencias, 420's, $3.7"; 
to $4, and 714's, $4.50 to $5. Lemons, $2.50 
to $3. Grapes, $5 to $6 per keg ; grape fruit, 
$5 to $6 per box. Cranberries, $8.50 to $10 
per barrel. Apples, $2 to $3. 50 per barrel. 
Dried do. 4 to 4>£c. Evaporated do. 6 to 
6j£c. Spanish onions, 40c. per crate. 
FISH. 

The cold, sharp weather of the past six 
davs has had a beneficial effect on the 
trade in fresh fish, such as tommy cods, 
haddock and cod, etc., supplies of which 
are kept well cleaned up. We quote: 
Fresh haddock, 3 to 4c per lb.; cod, 3X ; 
steak cod, 4)4c.; smelts, 5 to 6c; iresh 
frozen B. C. salmon, 10c. ; Manitoba white- 
fish, 7c; pickerel, 6j£c; dore, 6j4c; pike, 
4 to 4j£c; trout, 7c; tommycods, $1.50 per 
barrel. Choice pickled Labrador herrings, 
$5.25; No. 1 N.S. $3 50 to $4; No. 1 green 
cod, $4.10 to $4.50; No. 2, $2.75 ; No. 1 
haddock, $3 ; No. 1 large codfish, $5 ; No. 1 
lake trout, $4 to $4 25; B. C. salmon, $10. 50; 
No. 2 Labrador salmon, $12.50 to $13 ; No. 
1 mackerel, $19.50- Lock Fyne herrings, 85c 
per keg, and $11 per barrel; tongues and 
sounds, $9; No. 1 sardines, $4 50 ; No. 1 
dried cod, $4.25 to $4.50 ; boneless cod, 6c. 
per lb. ; boneless fish, 3%c.\ boneless had- 
dock, 5c ; shredded, lie; haddies, 6% to 7c 
per lb.; bloaters, 90c per box, and smoked 
herrings, 8 to 10c. per box. 



WE ARE 



PAYING XjEP' D 
GASrt Xt\H X -AP r 



FOR 



D n A 




W. B. BAYLEY & GO. 

EXPORT BROKERS 
42 FRONT ST. E. TOTOtltO 



Special Drives 

FOR THIS WEEK 

PLUMS — California Egg Plums, unpitted (good sample), in 
bags, 4^c. 

RAISINS— California 4 Crown Loose Muscatels (good sound 1894 
fruit), 50-lb. boxes, 4c. 

CANNED GOODS — Sugar Pears — 2's, cases 2 doz., $1.30 doz. 

— Good Sweet- Drawing Oolong in half-chests, 8c. 

Young Hyson Points, half-chests, exceptional value, 23c. 
Special Ceylon Blend, in chests (something choice), 18c. 



BATGERS •?:r reil " 



LONDON, ENG. 



Jellies 



ARE THE FINEST IN THE WORLD 

They retain all the nutritious qualities of the finest Bottled Jellies. 
Price, - - pints, $1.20 doz. 



tbe Eby, Blai/n Company ™ 

WHOLESALE IMPORTING AND MANUFACTURING GROCERS 

TORONTO - - ONTARIO 



24 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



PROVISIONS. 

There has been a fair business in pro- 
visions, there being a good demand for 
small lots. We quote : Canadian short cut, 
clear, $14 ; Canadian short cut, mess, $14.50; 
hams, city cured, per lb., 9 to 10c; lard, 
Canadian, in pails, 8:.; bacon, per lb., 9; 
lard, com. refined, per lb., 6%c. 

A good demand is noted for dressed hogs, 
and the market is active and firm. We 
quote : Car lots, $5 20 to $5.30, and jobbing 
lots at $5.50 per 100 lbs. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

EGGS— The egg market continues steady 
and prices show no change. The demand 
to-day was fair for small lots and a fairly 
active trade was done. We quote : Boil- 
ing stock, 18 to 20c; Montreal limed, 14 to 
15c; western limed, 13^ to 14c, and held 
fresh, 13%, to 14c. per dozen. 

Beans — In beans business is quiet and of 
a small jobbing character at steady prices. 
We quote : Car lots ot choice hand-picked at 
$1 to $1.05, and small quantities at $1.10 
to $[.20. 

Poultry — There was a good demand for 
poultry to-day, and as offerings were not 
large a fairly active trade was done at firm 
prices. We quote: Turkeys, 7^ to 8j£c. ; 
chickens, 7 to 7^c ; ducks, 7 to jyic, and 
geese at 5 io 5^c. per lb. 

Potatoes— The market for potatoes was 
qu et, sales being chiefly in small lots at 40 
to 45c. per bag, while car lots are offering at 
35c. on track. 

Onions — Are unchanged at $2.50 per 
bbl. for red, and $2 to $2.25 for yellow. 

FLOUR, FEED AND MEAL. 

The fljur market has adopted a firmer 
tone since our last report, and prices both 
on Manitoba and Ontario grades have been 
advanced sharply. In fact, enquiry for the 
1 itter has been checked to a certain extent 
by the rise in price. On the other hand 
Manitoba millers report the demand good 
at the recent advance, with a large business 
doing. Cable enquiries were received Mon- 
day from Copenhagen and Glasgow, but 
millers state that, as long as the present de- 
mand continues on spot, they have no flour 
to offer. We quote : Winter wheat, $4 to 
$4.25 ; spring wheat, patents, $4 ; straight 
roller, $3.75 to $4; straight roller, bags, 
$1.80 to $1.85 ; extra, bags, $1.60 to $1.70; 
Manitoba strong bakers', $3 55 to $3.80. 

The demand for oatmeal was slow and 
the market continues quiet and steady. We 
quote : Standard barrels, $2 85 to $2.95 ; 
granulated, barrels, $2.90 to $3; rolled oats, 
barrels, $2 90 to $3. 

There was no change in feed, business be- 
ing quiet. We quote: Bran, $14 to $15; 
shorts, $15 to $16 ; mouillie, $19 to $20. 
CHEESE AND BUTTER. 

There has been an active week's trade in 
cheese, among the large transactions being 
the disposal of the 23,000 P.E.I, cheese at 
8^c. for the lot. This has brightened up 
the market materially, and holders are now 
disposed to ask an advance of %c, 9^c. 
being the inside figure for finest fall, and 
ZYiC. for summer makes. 

Creamery b Jtter is also higher than it was 
a week ago, shippers being active buyers at 
an advance of l / z c. over what they were 
offering a week ago. As the local jobbers 
are paying 21c. and over this week, the 
former are not getting much butter. 
HAY. 

The hay market is quiet at the recent 
decline, sales of No. 1 being noted at $14 
and No. 2 at $13. 



ASHES. 

There is no change in ashes. We quo'e : 
Pots, firsts, $3 60 ; and seconds, $3.40 per 
100 lbs. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 
Offers of shelled walnuts were made this 
week at 15 to 16c. per lb. This is a decline 
of 2C 

The first receipts of bitter oranges are 
expected here this week. They are offering 
to arrive at $3 to $3.50. 

Receipts of Pecan nuts to hand this week 
have lowered the range on these goods a 
trifle, sales being noted at 8c. 

Rose & Laflamme had a cable from Bor- 
deaux this week quoting an advance cf 8s. 
per 100 kilos on prunes, nearly ic. per lb. 
advance. 

Refiners advanced their prices on sugar 
here on Monday an eighth of a cent all 
round. The Wholesale Guild price has 
been marked up in proportion. 

Rose & Laflamme have removed from 
their old premises at the corner of Lemoine 
and McGill streets, to 400 St. Paul street, 
at the corner of Custom House square. 



(MEW BRUNSWICK MARKETS. 

Office of The Canadian Grocer. 
St. John, N.B., Jan. 30, 1896. 

DURING the past week business has 
been rather more active, the strong 
tendency of the market, together with 
an almost general advance, being the cause. 
Country orders, however, continue light, but 
with a little more snow a better business is 
looked for during the coming month. In 
fish, the market is rather dull ; frozen fish, for 
which there is a demand, is in very light sup- 
ply. During the week there has been an 
easier feeling in molasses owing to quite a 
quantity of cheaper grades being on the 
market. Dairy products shows no improve- 
ment. Honey is tight. And although 
paper is reported well met in the banks, 
collecting open accounts is hard work, par- 
ticularly around the city. Candy manufac- 
turers here have made a combination price 
on staple lines ; during the pist few months 
these goods have been cut till no profit re- 
mains. 

Salt — There is no change in price and 
but light demand. We quote : Coarse, 
50 to 55c. ; fine factory-filled, 95c. to 
$1.10 ; 5-lb. bags, $3.25 per bbl.; 10-lb. 
bags, $3 per bbl.; 20-lb. boxes, 20c. ; 
10-lb. boxes, 12c; cartoons, $1.90 to $2 per 
doz. ; dairy, bulk, $2.80 per bbl.; cheese, 
bulk, $2.70 per bbl. 

Oil — As season advanc s sales of burn- 
ing tend to fall off in quantity. Market 
shows no change. A rattier better business 
is noted in lubricating, but largely for future 
delivery. Prices are easy. We quote: Bsst 
American, 23XC ; best Canadian, 2i%c„ ; 
prime, iqc. No charge for barrels. 

Canned Goods — A somewhat better 
feeling is noted, but business is still very 
light. In canned meat some American 
packs are up 10 cents in two-pound size. 
There are now two Canadian houses selling, 
their prices being well under those of the 



A. T. CLE6H0RN 



General 
Commission Agent 



Correspondence 
solicited. 



LONDON. CAIN. 




BY REQUEST 

Time is extended for dis- 
tribution of prizes for best 
five advertisements until 
May 1 st. Some parties 
who wish to compete write 
us they could not get 
Grand Mogul Tea in their 
vicinity. 

As we wish to give every 
person who wishes to com- 
pete for these handsome 
prizes a fair chance we 
have postponed distribu- 
tion as above Five best 
advertisements ( 30 - line 
ads. preferred), setting 
forth the 

Excellence, Purity and 
Healthfulness - ^ 

of this splendid Tea. 
Label of tea must accom- 
pany each ad. 

1 1st $20.00 

rlVF 2nd— $10.00 

n jt-c - 3rd - 10-lbs. Grand Mogul Tea, 50c. 
FKIZEb , 4th _ 5 _ lbs 5Qc 



5th- 3-lbs. 



50c. 



T. B. ESCOTT k CO. 



Sole Agent*, 



.London 



A light and easily digested food for dys- 
pep i< s. The only genuine article 
manufactured in Canada is put up by 

J AS. WILSON 



Manufacturer of 

ated brands of 



Monkland Mills 



ROLLED 
STANDARD and 
GRANULATED 



OATMEAL 



Fergus, 
Ont. 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



25 



TRADE 



BEARDSLEY'S SHREDDED CODFISH 



Ready for the table in 10 minutes. 
No Soaking. No Boiling. No Odor. 



MARK 

Selling ( J. Harley Brown, London ; R. Thomson, Hamilton Chambers, 17 St. John St., Montreal ; J . E. Huxley. Winnipeg ; 
Agents:") W. M. P. McLaughlin, St. John, N.B.; WM. BREWSTER, Palmer House, Toronto, Canadian Selling Agent. 

J. W. BEARDSLEY'S SONS, New York, U.S.A. 



*Cot^^8**2 




WIDE-AWAKE grocers know well that as'a Bird 
Food, and the most profitable to handle, 

COTTAM'S POPULAR BIRD SEED 

"beats them all." The people will have it, from 
one store or another. No stock is complete with- 
out it. Every packet contains BIRD BREAD, of 
which we are Inventors, Patentees and sole 
Manufacturers. 

BART. COTTAM & CO. - London, Ont. 

Dawson & O 

FRUIT 

PRODUCE 

and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

32 West Market Street 

Co i ofici?e e d nts TORONTO. 



George McWilliam. Frank Everist. 

TELEPHONE 645. 

MCWILLIAM & EVERIST 

GENERAL.. FRUIT 

Commission Merchants 



25 and 27 Church street, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Consignments of FRUIT and PRODUCE SOLI- 
CITED. Ample Storage. 

All orders will receive our best attention. 



FOR 



SMOKED MEATS 

LONG CLEARS 
MESS PORK 
SHORT CUT PORK 
PURE LARD 
COMPOUND LARD 

Write for Prices. Send your ORDERS by mail. 
Careful Attention. Prompt Shipment. 



F. W. FEARMAN 



HAMILTON 



Americans. Quite a demand of late has 
been noticed for clams, and as these goods 
become better known the sale is bound to 
increase. With our haddies there is a 
large market to the west, where the 
fresh are not as easy to get as here We 
quote as follows : Corn, 85 to 90c. ; peas, 
90 to 95c. ; tomatoes, 90 to 95c. ; corned 
beef, 2-lb. tins, $2.50 to $2.65 ; i-lb. tins, 
$1.50 to $1.60; oysters, 2's, $2 to $2 25 ; i's, 
$1.60 to $1.65; peaches, 3's,$2.8i; to $2.90; 2's, 
$1.90; lobsters, $1.75 to $2; haddies, 
$1.40; salmon, $135 to $1.50; flat, $175; 
clams, $15.50 for 4 doz.; chowder, $3 for 2 
doz.; scallops, $5. 50 for 4 doz. ; Digby chick- 
ens, $1 ; pineapples, $2 to $2.35 ; kippered 
herring, $1.10; American peaches, $2.40. 

Dried Fruit— There is still but little 
business. There is some demand for Cali- 
fornia evaporated fruit, as peaches, apricots, 
and prunei, and some nice goods are shown, 
but sale is not large. Onions are rather 
higher, peanuts are also up %c. in first 
hands. Large quantities of Nova Scotia 
dried continue to be offered here, but at pre- 
sent prices holders are not inclined to sell. 
Quality is rather better than usual, though 
they are not yet put up in a way to command 
the best price. In loose muscatels a belter 
feeling is noted. Currants are very firm at 
advance; cleaned continue to grow in de- 
mand, though at present, as in other lines, 
movement is light. We quote : New 
Valencias, 5 to 6c. ; new figs, 10 to 12c; 
new 4-crown Cal. L. M. raisins, 6 to 7c. ; 
new 3-crown Cal. L.M. raisins, ^% to 6c; 
keg prunes, 4c; boxes, 4^ to 6c; new Cal. 
L. L. raisins, $1.50 to $1.75; new currants, 
bbls., 4 to i,yic.\ half-cases, &,% \.o &,%c; new 
evaporated apples, 7 to T%z. ; dried apples, 

5 to 6c; dates, 4^ to 5c; California evapo- 
rated peaches, 12 to 13c; do. apricots, 12 to 
14c; do. pears, i2to I3c.;clean currants, bulk 
S/4to6^4c. ; 1 -lb. cartoons,7 to 7 'Ac. ; Canadian 
onions, $2.25 to$2.55 perbbl.;cocoanuts, $4 to 
$4.50 per 100; citron, 15 to 16c ; orange, 13 
to 14c; lemon, 12 to 13:.; Valencia layers, 

6 to 6>£c. 

Green Fruit— There is a fair city busi- 
ness, but during the cold weather country 
business is light. Lemons are marked down 
50c. from last week's price, and are freely 
offered ; quality good. In oranges a few very 
nice Jamaca are on the market. West 
India fruit are but light stock, and California 
and Valencias are supplying the market. A 
few Floridas are seen in the retail stores. 
Prices are quoted rather easier, while quality 
improves from week to week. In grapes 
there are none offering in a wholesale way. 
Apples are held firm, but stock is large 
enough for demand. We quote : Lemons, 
$2.50 to $3 ; West India oranges, $5 to $6 
per bbl.; Valencia oranges, $3,150 to $4.00; 
Pippins and winter fruit, $1.50 to $3 ; na- 
tive cranberries, $8 per bbl.; Cape Cod do., 
$11 to $12 per bbl.; California oranges, $3 
to $3 50. 



ONIONS 



Just received 
a carload of 



Send for 
quotations. 



"Yellow Danvers" 



H. F. PRICE 



102 Foundling 
Street 

MONTREAL 




"The low, sweet singing of a bird" (as the 
poet says) is what is wanted by all your 
customers; they can have it by using 

BROCK'S BIRD SEED 

In each i-Ib. packet there is a cake of Bird Treat. 
much appreciated by the Bird-Loving Public. 

NICHOLSON & BROCK - TORONTO 



W* RYAN 

PORK PACKER, 

WHOLESALE PRODUCE 

AND COMMISSION MERCHANT 

70--7Z FrantSt.East,Toronto 

Liberal Advances 
made on Consignments. 

Egg Cases Supplied. 



S.R. 




(ON|N|lSSlON N|ERCHaNT 



\Vholesale Dealer in 



Oysters, Finnan Haddies, Fresh and 
Frozen Fish, Oranges, Lemons, Al- 
meria Grapes, Cranberries and Dates 

76 COLBORNE ST., 

TORONTO. ONT. 



. . USE . . 

"Maple Leaf" Brand 

Pure Lard 
Hams, Backs 
Breakfast Bacon 



D.Gunn,Flavelle&Co. 

Pork Packers and . . T 1 

Commission Merchants lOlOniO 



We have 
in stock 



FANCY 



Sweet Jamaica Oranges ♦ 
Valencia Oranges ♦ 

Messina Lemons ♦ 



All Much Lower in Prices. 
Send Us Your Orders. 

HUGH WALKER & SON 

Guelph, Ont. 






26 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Dairy Produce— While cheese seems to 
gain sora: firmness there is but little change 
in local markets, owing to light demand. In 
butter, while good is hard to get and brings 
fair price, the general market appears to get 
worse. There is a large quantity of medium, 
and it is hard to move at any price. Eggs 
are quiet with no change in price. We 
quote : Cheese, 9 to 9/^c; butter, 17 to 18c; 
eggs, 17 to 19c; fresh creamery prints, 23 
to 24c; tubs, 21 to 22c. 

Molasses — During the season there has 
been a considerable stock of but fair quality 
goods upon the market, and as the season 
advances holders are more anxious to sell, 
and this tends to keep the market easy. The 
best molasses here is some Porto Rico, 
which is held firm, stock being light. New 
Orleans in barrels continues to gain in favor. 
Market is advancing. Syrups also show 
good demand. We quote : Barbadoes, 30 
to 33c; St. Croix, 28 to 30c; Porto Rico, 34 
to 36c; syrup,"? 5 to 38c; New Orleans, bbls., 
35 to 36c. 

Sugar — Market during the past week 
has gained in strength, and an advance is 
noted. There is rather better local de- 
mand. Our merchants are well supplied. 
Total stocks said to be about 16,000 barrels. 
We quote : Granulated, 4%" to 5c. ; yellow, 
4X to 4>£c. ; Pans lump, <>% to 5^c. ; 
powdered, ^% to VAc. 

Fish— There is no change in price. The 
particular feature of the market is the small 
quantity of frozen to hand, and dealers can- 
not supply demand. But few dried are 
arriving, but stocks are ample. Smoked re- 
main very dull. Large quantities of smelt 
(frozen) continue to be shipped west from 
the north shore. This is a very large busi- 
ness, and brings in a great deal of money. 
The fishermen get \% to 2c. per lb. cash 
right on the ice when caught. A few lobsters 
are coming in; they are small. We quote as 
follows: Lobsters, 4c. each; frozen herring, 
60 to 70c. per 100; frozen cod and haddock, 
2)4. to 2>2C.; bloaters, 60c. ; haddies, 4^c; 
Medium cod, $3.35 to $3.50; large, 
$3.65 to $3.75; small, $2.25 to $2.50; 
pollock, $1.50; bay herring, $1.25 to $1.30; 
Grand Manan, $1.30 to $1.40; ripplings, $1.65 
to $1.70; wolves, $1.90 to $2; Quoddy River, 
$2,715 to $3 ; smoked, 5 to "} V 2 c. ; shad, half- 
bbl., pickled, $4.50 to $5; Canso, $5;halfs, 
$2.75; Shelburne, $2.75 to $3 per bbl. 

Provisions — Movement is not large, 
and market is well supplied in pork and 
lard at low price. Prices are firm. It is 
surprising how much less smoked meat is 
handled by our wholesale grocers from year 
to year. They say loss in weight and trouble 
about quality is too much for the profit. 
We quote : Domestic mess pork, $14 to 
$14.25 ; American, $14 to $14.50 ; clear 
pork, $15.50 to $16; beef, $13 to $14 ; pure 
lard, 8%" to 9c; compound lard, 8c; rolls, 
8c; hams, io>£ to 12c. 

Flour, Meal and Feed— In flour 
market is very aciive. The chief advance 
is still in Ontario brands. Our merchants 
have bought freely, and are selling at mill 
price*. Oats are quoted higher with fair 
demind. Oitmeal is also up; there is al 
ways a steady demand here. In cornmeal 
though prices have ruled so low they are 
again mirked off this week. Beans do not 
advance as was expected, but market is 
firm. There continues to be but light move- 
ment here in hay, but prices are very firm, 
and higher prices are looked for. Buck- 
wheat meah show light demand. We 
quote : Manitoba. $4.60 to $4.75 ; best On- 
tario, $4 25 to $4.50; medium, $4.25 to $4.50; 



oatmeal, $3 60 to $3 70 ; cornmeal, $2.25 to 
$2.30 ; hand picked beans, $1.20 to $1 25; 
prime, $1.10 to $1.15 ; split peas, $370 ; poc 
barley, $4.10 to $4.25; hay, $12 to $13; oats, 
34 to 36c. ;» middlings, $19 to $20 on track ; 
bran, $18.; buckwheat meal, domestic, $1.25 
to $1.30 ; western, $1.75 to $2. 



ST. JOHN NOTES. 

A direct steamer to New York is to be 
put on this spring. 

Cream of tartar shows a steady advance 
during the month, the advance being up- 
wards of 4c 

Quite a quantity of Ontario Iresh beef is 
being received here, three cars coming in 
during the week. A car has about 40 car- 
casses. The beef is being sold at about 7c. 

The following company is being formed to 
carry on a wholesale grocery and coal busi- 
ness at St. Stephen : Almond J. Teed, 
Frank Todd, David N. Bates, Charles W. 
Young and Geo. Murray. It is to be known 
as the A. ]. Teed Co. Capital stock, $100, 
000; shares, $100 each. 

C. H. Peters, of Baird & Peters, and G. 
Wetmore Merritt, of Merritt Bros. & Co., 
are again at their desks, after a short holi- 
day. Not only were their trips much enjoyed, 
but the fact that large stocks at home were 
daily becoming more valuable, added much 
to their pleasure. 

As noted in a late number of The Can- 
adian Grocer, St. John is to have a direct 
steamer to Porto Rico. She will call at San 
Juan, Pouce and Mayaguez. Tne first 
steamer, the Spero, 5,091 tons register, will 
be here on February 3. Upper Canadian 
shippers and importers would do we 1 to 
note the date. Monthly trips will be made. 

The Canadian Grocer regrets to have 
to report the death of Hon. James Fellows, 
Agent-General far New Brunswick in Lon- 
don. He was well known and greatly re- 
spected here. This city was for many years 
his home, he carrying on a drug business 
here. He was closely connected with its 
public interests at that time. 

The present mail service across the bay is 
a matter of much dissatisfaction to our mer- 
chants. There is a daily steamer going over 
and back, but from a false idea of economy 
she carries a mail but twice a week, Tues- 
day and Saturday. A large business is done 
by our merchants through the Annapolis 
Valley, and where a letter should only take 
one day in coming from Valley points here, 
it now takes two or even more 



WOODSTOCK, N.B., MARKETS. 

Business is dull owing to lack of snow- 
but at time of writing there seems a good 
prospect of this cause being removed. Price 
of produce is low, and maoy farmers are 
holding goods back. Hay is bringing a fa ; r 
price, and shows more movement than other 
lines. Oats are in but fair demand, the 
quality being the drawback. People are im- 
porting Ontario oats. Butter is plentiful and 



E. T. STURDEE 

Mercantile Broker, 
Manufacturers' Agent, 

ST. JOHN, N.B. Et c-, Etc. 

Wholesale trade only. 



Cleaver's Toilet Soaps. 
Bensdorp's Royal Dutch Cocoa. 
Pyle's Pearline. 

C. & E. MACMICHAEL, 

40 Dock St., St. John, N.B. 



FPPS'S COCOA 

K d 1-4 lb. Packets. 14 lb. Boxes 

secured In tin. 

Special Agent for the Dominion 

C. E. COLSON - MONTREAL 



"Always a Best" 

. . In Everything 

We have the BEST in the canned fish line. 

Golden Finnan Haddies 

Are the best. They are Delicate, De- 
licious and Appetising. If you sell the 
GOLDEN brand Haddies, it will be the 
finest drawing CARD you can get. 

Every can guaranteed or money refunded. 

NORTHRUP & CO. 

Packers' Agents. ST. JOHN, N. B 

FISH* 

WIT HOUT A BONE. 

Ordinary Boneless Fish have some 
bones in them, but we now put up pure 
Codfish in 3-pound boxes 

WITHOUT A BONE. 

This is the best Fish packed in Can- 
ada, and very much superior to Fib- 
red or Shredded Fish. . . . 



JOHN SEALY - St. John, N.B. 



<* 



DIAMOND" 

^JOHN.P.MOTT&C°^ 

N. HALIFAX, HS.s< 

Z*«S. EST* BUS M [&.<><« 



ASK FOR 



MOTT'S 






THE CANADIAN GROCER 



27 



You Can Make Things Lively 



Around your store if you go the best way about it. We have something that will draw 
crowds to your counters, who will come again and again and tell all their neighbors. 
Pure, Clean, Strong and Healthy. 

Tea, Pancake 
Graham and 
Buckwheat Flour 



Dalley's Royal Hygienic 
Self-Rising Flour 




HYGIENIC 

BUCKWHEAT 
^ FLOUR |— 



ALWAYS REAOV FOR USE 



V 



Sells at sight and always pleases 



Manufactured by 



For sale by all wholesale 
grocers 



The F. F. DALLEY CO. Ltd., Hamilton, Canada 



Only the best fruit, thoroughly cleaned 
and picked, is used in making 

▼▼TV ▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ "▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ T ▼ 

J CLARK'S I 

I ENGLISH MINCE MEAT j 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼ 

Ad Article fit for n 
King's Table. 






Every package guaranteed to be as 
represented. 



W. CLARK 



MONTREAL 



PURE 



Maple Syrup 

Finest quality. Write for quotations. 

T. A. LYTLE & CO. 

Vinegar Manufacturers, 
TORONTO 



i&gsssa&ssgs, 




Our 
Reputation 

For always manufacturing and selling 
the best goods makes the sale of 

"KENT" 



canned goods easy and safe. They 
never fail in quality. 



THE . 



KENT" CANNING AND PICKLING CO. 

CHATHAM, ONT. 



Manufacturers by appointment to Her Majesty the Queen, 
H.R.H. The Prince of Wales and the Army and Navy. 




150 

Years' 

Record 







MARTIN & ROBERTSON, 
Victoria and Vancouver, 

for British Columbia 



Liquid Kste Blacking 

Black and White Cream fr r Patent Leather. 

Russet Cream 

For Brown Boots, Saddlery, Etc 

DAY & MARTIN ltd. Lond £ v a e ^ 001 



E. T. STURDEE, St. John, N.B., for Maritime Provinces. CHAS. OYDE, Montreal, for Ontario and Quebec. 

TEES & PERS8E, Winnipeg, for Manitoba and North- West Territory, 



28 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



aw»¥¥WW¥¥W¥¥¥imnnf¥WWW¥¥W¥W 

i 



f¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥» 



Fast and furious 




Ij&Hu 



Is the race for business, but the right goods and honest 
dealing invariably win in the long run. Cheap and in- 
ferior goods must find their place some time or other, 
and finally drop out altogether. Maple Leaf Brand 
has won its laurels honestly and is always in the front. 



Delhi Canning Co. 



DELHI. 



£ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^/^ ^^^^^^-^^^^-^^^^^^^^-^^-^^^^-^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^.^^-^^^^^^^^.^^ ^^^H,^^ ^^ ^Rr^^^^ ^H, ^^,^R* ^^^^ ^^^vW^^^^%^^-^^-^^^^^^W-W ^^"^Rfc 4 



low. The following company is ask- 
ing for incorporation : H. Paxton Baird, 
Sperry L. Shea, Chipman Hartlay, Char- 
les A. Munroe, Edward W. Mair. The 
company is to be known as the Baird 
Co., Ltd., and it is to do a wholesale 
and retail drug business, as well as control 
a number of proprietary medicines owned by 
H. Paxton Baird. Capital stock, $8o,ooo, in 
shares of $50. Produce is quoted as follows: 
Hay, $8 to $9; oats, 26 to 28c; butter, 16 
to 17c; eggs, 18 to 20c; pork, 5 to 5>£c .; 
hard wood, $.3 ; green, $2.50. 



HALIFAX TRADE GOSSIP. 

OUTSIDE the general routine of the 
markets there is very little to note 
just now. The leading confection- 
ers of the Maritime Provinces assembled 
here last week and formed an association, 
the object of which is to secure a reduction 
in the duties imposed on glucose and other 
raw materials which are used in the manu- 
facture of confectionery. With a reduction of 
the duty the manufacturers hope to be able 



to sucessfully compete with the Americans. 
St. John, St. Stephen and Halifax are inter- 
ested. 

We hear of rapid and marked advances in 
flour elsewhere, but the advance here is not 
in sympathy. In fact, dealers advertise to 
sell at old figures. It is thought, however, 
that we have seen the lowest prices for this 
year's crop. 

Corn and oats are also stiffening, which 
will have a tendency to advance the price of 
feeds somewhat. 

Beans and peas remain low. 

Hay is firm at $12 and $12.50. Sales 
were made this week by the carload at 
$12.50. 

There is a general boom in fishstuffs, in 
almost every branch of the business. The 
Uniied States markets are fully $1.50 to $2 
per bbl. stronger in both mackerel and sal- 
mon, and the effect here is decidedly pleas- 
ing. Herrings are moving lively. Two 
cargoes of frozen herrings arrived this week, 
and are meeting with ready sales. Grocery 
cod is scarce. Smoked herrings are plenti- 
ful. The market is bare of green cod, and 
boneless fish is in demand. 



There does not appear to be anything 
wrong with sugar. The tendency seems to 
be up, up, up. There is another advance 
this week of Y%z. and the Halifax market is 
decidedly firm. Prices at the refinery for 
lots are : Granulated, 4^0; yellows, 3^ 
to 4#c. The refineries' advices are that 
the Cuban crop will not be more than 100,- 
000 tons. 

The provision market is dull, with no 
change of prices. 

There is very little doing in poultry. There 
is no call for chickens or ducks, and turkeys 
and geese are selling low, retailing as low as 
8c. per lb. 

P. E. Island potatoes are selling from 
store at 20c. per bushel, which is about half 
the price realized this time last year. 

The green fruit trade is fairly good this 
week, and supplies are plentiful. Valencia 
oranges arriving show very nice, sweet fruit, 
and sell at $4 per crate. Lemons are low, 
although of splendid quality, the quotations 
being $2.50 to $3 50 per box. Good apples 
are scarce. 

There is little or nothing doing in cheese. 
Aniigonish September is quoted at io,J4c. 

Butter is fairly brisk. Dairy tubs sell at 



Package Goods 
Trade 



With us beats all 
previous years. Never 
had such a demand 
for fine goods before. 
All varieties selling 
with the most gratify- 
ing success. Can't we 
make you up an order 
out of the following 
choice assortment ? 

DESICCATED ROLLED OATS 

DESICCATED ROLLED WHEAT 

DESICCATED ROLLED BARLEY 
BREAKFAST HOMINY 

BUCKWHEAT FLOUR (Seif-Raising) 



Write us for 
Price List. 



^ IRELAND NATIONAL FOOD CO. ud. 



ftPTSP ATT WO The Largest and Most Complete Breakfast 
yrnanixau Cm*\ Food Mills in the Dominion. 



Toronto, Canada. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



29 




THE LARGEST COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS 
UNDER THE BRITISH FLAG. 



MANUFACTURERS Oh' 



Pure Gold Baking Powder 

AND 

Pure Gold Flavoring Extracts 



Baking Powders 
Coffees 
Flavoring Extracts 
Spices 



Mustard 
Soaps 

Washing Compound 
Icings 



Blacking 
Pure Gold Tomato Catsup Pure Gold Sweet Tomato Catsup 

Etc. Etc. Etc. 



PURE GOLD H'FG.CO 



31 §33 FRONT ST. EAST.: 
TORONTO. 



17 and 18c, and creamery in tubs, 22 to 
23c. Dairy rolls are worth 18c. 

Eggs have gone down ; good stocks are 
retailing this week at 15c. 

Molasses remains quiet and unchanged. 
There have been no late arrivals. 

The demand for canned goods remains 
good. Prices have not changed. 



the clerks are working year in and year out 
14 to 18 hours a day without getting even 
one night for recreation or improvement. 



GIVE THEM YOUR VOTES. 

THE Retail Clerks' Association of Mont- 
real are putting up a splendid fight for 
early closing in that city. 

They are most thoroughly organized, and 
are doing great work in the municipal cam- 
paign now in progress. Of the fifteen alder- 
men elected by acclamation twelve are favor- 
able, two uncertain, and one against early 
closing. 

The big contest takes place to-morrow in 
several of the wards. In some wards all the 
candidates are favorable, and the clerks are 
not interfering. In St. Louis Messrs. Savag- 
nac and Renault are receiving the united 
support of the friends of earling closing. In 
St. Jean Biptiste it is Mr. Ouimet ; in St. 
Ann's, Messrs. Kinsella and our old friend 
"Barney " Connaughton, and in St. Gabriel 
there is another old and tried friend in 
Richard Turner. 

We feel sure that every one of our readers 
will support the clerks by voting for these 
gentlemen. They should remember that 



TO MAKE BEET-ROOT SUGAR. 

APPLICATION will be made to the 
Legislative Assembly of Ontario at 
its next session for an Act to incor- 
porate "The Leamington Beet Sugar Co., 
Ltd.," with power to procure and acquire 
from the municipal corporation of the town 
of Leamington, or other corporation, the ne- 
cessary lands for said enterprise, and acquire 
the necessary machinery and raw materials 
and otherarticles required for manufacturing 
beet sugar and products thereof; to pur- 
chase cattle, sheep and hogs, to be fed or 
fattened on the pu'p, molasses, or other 
residue of the beets, and to purchase such 
other additional food for animals as may 
be required for this purpose, or to make 
arrangement with owners of cattle, sheep 
or hogs for feeding or fattening the same ; 
to lease or acquire lands for growing sugar 
beets and to enter into contracts with 
farmers and others for growing and sup- 
plying beets, to issue debentures of the 
company ; to receive and procure muni- 
cipal or private aid by way of subscrip- 
tion for stock, gift, bonus, loan or guarantee 
of loans, and to secure instalments thereon 
in such manner as may be agreed upon, to 



expend such proportion of the proceeds, 
thereof, as may be incurred in the prelimin- 
ary expenses attending incorporation, obtain- 
ing contracts for stock or supplies, and pro- 
curing subscriptions for stock and aid to the 
company, with power to the municipalities 
benefited and interested to take stock in said 
company, or to otherwise assist by gift, bonus, 
loan or guarantee of any loan, with power to 
the municipal corporation of the town of 
Leamington, in which the beet sugar factory 
is proposed to be erected, and in which the 
head office of the company is to be establish- 
ed and maintained, to grant to the said com- 
pany, free of cost, the lands required for the 
company's works, yards, etc., and to grant, 
free of cost, the gas and water required for 
carrying on the company's operations with 
power to the company of laying pipe lines for 
gas to the factory for fuel, and also to grant 
exemption from taxes for ten years on all the 
lands, buildings, and personal property of 
the company, but not on any property occu- 
pied or used otherwise than for the business 
uses of the company. 

According to Dun, the number of failures 
for the calendar year 1895 m Canada were 
1,891, against 1,856 in 1894. According to 
Bradstreet, the figures were 1,923 in 1895, 
against 1,873 >n 1894. The gross receipts 
of the C. P. R. for the year 1895 were $18,- 
937,000, against $18,752,000 in 1894. The 
gross receipts of the Grand Trunk were 
$18,001,000, against $18,037,000 in 1894. 



30 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Pinna ye hear the Slogan ? 

If you drink Whisky, drink 



JOHN DEWAR'S SCOTCH 



HONORS AWARDED 



Purveyors by Royal Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Victoria. 
Under competition the only Scotch drawn at the Bars of the 
largest Caterers in the World, viz. : Spiers & Pond, Ltd. Diploma 
of Honor and Gold Medal, Edinburgh, 1890 (Highest Award). 



MEDALS 



Better Whisky cannot be had 



Edinburgh 
Antwerp . . . 
Anglo-Danish , 

Cookery 

Brussels 

London 

Melbourne 
Food (London) 
Sportsman 

Paris 

Dunedin .... 
Military 



B90 



Edinburgh 1890 

London 1890 

Jamaica 1891 

Food 1891 

Tasmania 1892 

Dublin 1892 

Brussels 1893 

Chicago 1S93 

Fisheries 1893 

Manchester 1893 

Brewers' Show, Manchester. 1894 



National Trades and Industrial Exhibition, 1894, etc., etc. 



TRADE CHAT. 

MRS. CARTHER, general store- 
keeper, Lambton Mills, who has 
recently been married to a Mr. 
Palmer, has given up the business and left 
that place. 

The Birr cheese factory was burned to the 
ground on the 25th inst. 

The Whyte Packing Co., of Mitchell, 
shipped 30 tons of pork to the lumber camps 
a few days ago. 

The fall cheese of the Mayfair cheese fac- 
tory was shipped from the factory last week. 
Price realized 9c per lb. 

The Vienna factory made more than 48^ 
tons of cheese last year, an increase of %% 
tons over the previous year's make. 

Thompson's joint stock cheese factory, 
Warwick, shipped 500 boxes of cheese last 
week ; 35,182 pounds sold forge, a pound. 

The death is announced of William G. 
Hay, grain merchant, Listowel, Ont., on the 
27th inst. Deceased was for forty-four years 
a resident of that town. 

The Newtonville cheese factory has been 
closed for good, J. G. Honey having bought 
out the stockholders. The patronage of the 
factory will be transferred to the Kendall 
factory. 

The damage to the storehouse of Monk- 
land mills, Fergus, is more serious than first 



estimated. There were about 80,000 bushels 
of oats in the storehouse, and the collapse of 
the end of the building resulted in about 
30,000 bushels pouring out on to the ground 
and into the river. 

A $300 note was offered for sale on the 
Toronto market, a few days ago, by Auc- 
tioneer George Nunn. Five dollars was bid, 
and the note was withdrawn until next 
Saturday. 

H. E. Wilson, of St. Mary's, traveler of 
Warren Bros. & Boomer, grocers, Toronto, 
while in town last night, received a telegram 
announcing the death of his eleven-year-old 
daughter from consumption. — Sentinel-Re- 
view, Woodstock. 

A number of the members of the Toronto 
Board of Trade will interview the Ontario 
Cabinet on Thursday next, and propose that 
some amendments be made in the law of 
libel and slander. A number of the busi- 
ness men have been troubled by lawyers 
who bring actions against them, merely to 
obtain costs. An effort will be made to have 
restrictions placed on this system of black- 
mail action. 

D. Chalmers, of Poole, Ont., writes to The 
Woodstock Sentinel- Review of what he 
calls an important discovery in the dairy 
industry. The discovery is, that butter fit 
for table use has been made from whey 
which has hitherto been going to waste, and 



if properly handled should be worth millions 
to the country. The butter is churned from 
the drippings of the curd sinks, which is 
gathered from the time the curd is cut till it 
is salted. 

In the House, on Fiiday, Mr. Prior, in 
answer to Mr. Jeannotte, said 12,422,326 
pounds of raw leaf tobacco entered Canada 
in 1895, and 178,167 pounds of manufactured 
tobacco, which included cigars, cigarettes, 
snuff, etc. Excise duty amounting to 
$2,974,025 had been collected from foreign 
leaf manufactured in Canada for the year 
1894-5. The Government had collected 
duty on the manufactured product to the 
amount of 544,244 pounds, the amount of 
duty being $28,896. 



GROWING ORANGES IN MANITOBA. 

On such a day as this, when even the 
most ardent temperance man will confess 
that the thermometer has taken a drop too 
much, it is pleasing to think that such a 
thing as an orange can be grown in Mani- 
toba. The shivering reporter would not 
have believed such a statement had it not 
been for the production of a fully developed 
orange with bona fide leaf attachment 
which made any doubt impossible. The 
fruit was grown by Mrs. J. G. Hendry, of 
Portage la Prairie. It was grown in a din- 
ing room and is still flourishing. The 
orange is on exhibition at the M. & N. W. 
Railway offices. — Free Press, Winnipeg. 



S. Sc H. HARRIS'S HOUSEHOLD REQUISITES. 



HARRIS'S 

BRITISH 

Polishing 
Paste. 

Th,» Competition ..fetk&mt «■ ««lKiwg«ioicorTo4v 

Brass Copper, Tin, Peu/ter,Metalh 
Plate. Coach C lasses iV/indow; >' 



Ebonite Blacking 



( WATERPROOF.) 

FOR BOOTS AND SHOES. 



Does not 
Injure the 
Leather 




Requires 
No. . 
Brushing 



Trade Mark. 

.A-SIEC FOE 



SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



IT.. 
MANUFACTORY : LONDON, 



[xanthoscute; 



(BROWN LEATHERl 
RESTORER, 

For Cleaning and Pr< serving 

BROWN BOOTS AND SHOES 

And all kinds of Russet 
Leather. 



gttttnhrtorr : -jS* 1 . 



, T?c-"" , V!ff 



ENGLAND. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



31 



Unexcelled 
for 



Quality 
Flavor 
Purity 
Strength 



and 




JERSEY CREAM 
BAKING 
POWDER 

Manufactured by 

Lumsden Bros. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



WHIG, HERRON i CO. 

Have Tons 

OF CARRAWAYS 

Recleaned and double sifted. Samples 
and quotations sent on enquiry. 

Trade Mills - - 



WESTERN 



incorporated 
1861. 



ASSURANCE COMPANY 



Fire and Marine 



Capital - - 
Assets, over - 
Annual Income 



$2,000,000.00 
2,375,000.00 
2,200,000.00 



Head Office: TORONTO, ONT. 



Geo. A. Cox, President. J. J. Kenny, Vice-President 

C. C. Foster, Secretary. 



TEAS 



New Ceylons and Assams 
in store and arriving. Also 
good values in Japans, Young 
Hysons and Congous. 



JOHN SLOAN & 00. 



Wholesale Grocert 



TORONTO 



! BEE BRAND \ 



J 

t 
t 



; 



CEYLON 



; 



Awarded Two Gold Medals J 
Grown on Virgin Soil t 

Packed and shipped direct from the I 

Gardens. ■ 






Warren Bros. & Boomer J 

wholesale grocers ■ 

36 and 37 Front St. East, Toronto. A 




>SSSStfBSSfi& 




LAWRASON'S 
WONDERFUL and 
SUPREME 
SOAPS 

And the very best household soaps made. 
They sell and you make 

40/ Profit 



P. M. LAWRASON 




London, Ont. || 

!£^^^^^5^5S37ASg 



NOW IN STORE 



Excelsior Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 

Perfecto Vostizza Currants 

Cases and Half-cases. 
London Layers. Black Baskets. 

A full and complete stock of Christmas Fruits. 



T. KINNEAR & GO. 

49 Front St. E., TORONTO. 

Currants 



"Crescent" Brand 
Casalina Patras 

A shipment of above just to hand. 



Perkins, Inge & Go. 



TORONTO. 



J. W. Lang & Co, 

Have in stock . . . 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Extra." 

Martin Wagner's Pineapples 
eyeless and coreless " Fine." 

Curtice Bros.' " Monroe Brand " 

Strawberries. 
Shredded Codfish, " pkges." 

Very fine. 

J. W. Lang & Co. 



59, 61 and 63 Front 
Street East 



Toronto. 



We are offering this week some 



excellent values in 



Sultana Raisins 
Vostizza Currants 
and Sphinx Prunes 



SMITH & KEIGHLEY 

9 Front St. E. TORONTO. 



32 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRAVELERS FEAST THEIR 
FRIENDS. 

THE members of the City Travelers' 
Association, Toronto, entertained 
their friends on Friday night at their 
rooms in St. George's Hall, Elm street. And 
a right royal entertainment it was. It was 
a sort of "At Home," smoking concert, 
oyster supper and good fellowship meeting 
all combined. Into the lodge room were 
crowded a score or more of tables, and at 
these tables sat card players, checker play- 
ers, and other kinds of players, while a sub- 
stantial cloud of smoke from the good cigars 
that had been provided encircled all. 

About 10 o'clock supper was announced, 
and about seventy-five sat down to this. And 
here again the host had well provided for 
the guests, " substantials " and delicacies 
being present in abundance. 

After the feasting came the speech-mak- 
ing, singing and recitations. The new pre- 
sident of the association, R (Muat) Corrie, 
sat at the head of the table with a smile so 
broad that the large epergne in front of him 
was not large enough to cover it. 

There was no prepared toast list, those 
present speaking as the spirit moved them, 
or as the chairman commanded them. Like 
an experience meeting, everybody spoke 
briefly and to the point. 

F. S. Roberts, ex-president of the Retail 
Grocers' Association, said he did not begin 
to speak early enough in life to be a speaker, 
but all the same I noticed he was speaker 
enough to animadvert upon the mutual bene- 
fits to be derived from such gatherings. 

James Owen tried to advance the same 
excuse as Mr. Roberts, but like Noah's dove 
it did not find a resting place. He had to 
say something, and so he became congratu- 
latory, the new president coming in for the 
lion's share. 

J. G. Gibson said the trouble with him 
was that he talked too much. " I hope," he 
said, addressing the travelers, " that you will 
go on in the good work, and call upon me 
often." 

Robert Maxwell was greeted with "He's 
a jolly good fellow," when he arose He 
congratulated and pointed out that the 
chairman was trying to avoid making a 
speech. 

" It is a good thing for us to be here " re- 
marked Frank Gallow, " and I would like to 
see us here at least once a year. It is a 
good thing to meet, in this way, those who 
we are calling upon all the time " (Hear, 
hear.) 

" He's a daisy " and " See him smiling," 
were the salutations that met D. W. Clark 
when he got on his feet. He too was in a 
congratulatory mood, and, as a member of 
the Grocers' Association, would favor the 
grocers getting up a similar entertainment. 
T. Holman (jocularly)—" I am like most 
people ; I can say something when I speak. 



Speaking is good for the stomach if it is not 
for the ears." 

Frank Johnston favored the grocers re- 
ciprocating. * 

President Corrie was at last persuaded to 
speak. He thanked his fellow members for 
the honor they had conferred upon him. He 
said he was very poor at making promises. 
He would, however, like the worthy men 
who had preceded him in the chair, endea- 
vor to do his best. 

C. M. Webb expressed himself in favor of 
these mutual entertainments between travel- 
lers and merchants. 

A. G. Marmion ventured the remark that 
if merchants and travelers did not work to- 
gether, who should ? Some travelers may 
think that because this and that merchant 
did not buy from him that it was because of 
some dislike. Such was not the case, and 
social hours spent together would prove 
that it was not. 

Vice-President Bond, of the Grocers' 
Association, said he was glad to be present 
and meet so many travelers that he did not 
know. 

A voice : And some you don't want to 
know. (Laughter). 

Mr. Bond : If they are as good as the 
ones I know, I want to know them. 

During the evening recitations were given 
by Mr. Howitt and Mr. McGraw, and songs 
by Messrs. Young, Padget, Owen, Camp- 
bell, Muldrew, Panter, etc. 



CONCERNING RETAILERS. 

W. H. Benson, of Picton, has sold out to 
A. Harrison. 

T. H. Harding, grocer, Picton, is ill with 
fever. At latest accounts he was doing 
nicely. 

Marr & Ostic, of Walkerton, have added 
very much to the appearance of their store 
by putting in a new plate-glass window. 

George Hausenflug, of Waterloo, has 
added much to the appearance of his store 
by interior decorations. 

James Whitehead, Walkerton, is experi- 
encing a good trade, and finds that business 
compares well with former years. 

James Philip, known as " The Grocer," 
Fergus, has recovered from his recent short 
illness. 

Robertson & Son, grocers, of Drayton, 
have been experimenting with the cash sys- 
tem, and they pronounce it a success. 

Thos. Sell & Co., grocers, etc., Harriston, 
adopted the cash system about eight months 
ago, and now they never will from it depart. 

Andrew Davey, jr., has started a grocery 
store in Quebec street, Guelph. 



A meeting of confectionery manufacturers 
was held in the city on Wednesday. Re- 
presentatives from St. John and also of a 
big St. Stephen (N.B.) house, together with 
some city manufacturers, met, and it is 
understood the object of the meeting was to 
form a combine. — Chronicle, Halifax. 



A ST. STEPHEN GROCER'S DEATH. 

Robert Johnson, grocer, St. Stephen, N.B., 
was found in an unconscious condition in his 
store on the 15th inst, the victim of a fit of 
apoplexy, and passed away a week later at the 
age of 67. He was in his young days " one 
of the boys," and was prominent in many 
stirring adventures at that time, being one of 
the 49 gold hunters who left for California 
gold fields in a body. He also played a 
prominent part at the time of the Fenian 
scare. Ol late years he has been a victim 
of rheumatism and has been a great sufferer. 
His nearest relatives are resident in Chicago 
and California, and the news of his illness 
did not reach them until it was too late for 
their assistance to be of any avail. Messrs. 
C. N. Vroom, L. A. Mills, and David Simp- 
son are executors. 

BUSINESS CHANCES 



FOR SALE— A FIRST-CLASS CONFECTIONERY 
and Ice Cream Parlor. Store fixtures, including Soda 
Fountain, first-class. Good residence attached. A fortune 
in this for right man. Box 868 Manitou, Man. (7) 

FOR SALE— GROCERY WITH LEASE OF PRE- 
mises, live business, long established, best stand in 
town, good family trade in fine staple and fancy grocer- 
ies, stock full and in first-class condition, good reasons 
given for selling. Personal inspection invited, or refer- 
ences given Montreal or Toronto D. E. Scott, Port 
Hope, Ont. (5) 

AGENTS WANTED. 



FARROWS MUSTARD, MUSHROOM KETCHUP 
and Sauces. Wanted in the States, purchasing agents 
for these goods, which are of the highest quality. Mustard 
packed in every description of package, including fancy 
tins, all sizes from J^-lt>. ; also with customers' names on 
labels or with firm's labels. Firms of undoubted respect- 
ability who would take up the agency of these goods would 
be liberally treated. Goods f.o b. London. For samples 
and particulars apply to Farrow & Co., Boston, Eng- 
land. (6) 



fr g ■ 11 ■ n ■■■ 11 1 ■ 11 M i ■ K 

WANT 
ADVERTISEMENTS 

Are inserted in this paper at the rate of 
two cents per word each insertion, pay- 
able Strictly in advance. Ad- 
vertisers may have their replies address- 
ed in our care free of charge, but must 
send stamps for re-addressed letters. 

The Canadian Grocer, Toronto 
K ll M ■■! II '■■ M 11 ■■■K 

THE NEW WOMAN 

WON'T HAVE OLD TAPIOCAS 



SHE . . 
WANTS 



JUST OUT 

Book on 

WINDOW DRESSING 
FOR GROCERS 

Price . . 57 ILLUSTRATIONS 

Post-paid, $1.00 go PAGES 

Arranged by Harry Harman, publisher of The Journal of 
Window Dressing. Each illustration fully explained, and 
how to make the fixtures. 

HARRY HARMAN 
125 S. Clark St. CHICAGO 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



33 



Delicious 
Coffee 




JAPAN TEAS1 



ew 
Season's" 



FROM 13 CTS. UP. 

Best value in Canada to-day. See our travellers or write for samples. 



J. F. RAMSAY & CO. 



WHOLESALE TEA IMPORTERS 



14 and 16 Mincing Lane 



Toronto. 




BOISSEUER'S 




A perfectly pure 
compressed . 
Cocoa . . 
Extract 



One Tablet makes an excellent Cup of Cocoa. 

ALL LEADING GROCERS KEEP IT. 



In boxes 

of one dozen 

20-cent tubes, each 

tube containing 18 

tablets 



1 VICTORIA 



IS THE TRADE MARK OF 
OUR MATCHES 



•immiummawiuuimuimmmuiuuumm* 



HAVE YOU O 

TRIED THEM Z 



II 



THE 



44 



Victoria Matches 



Are warranted equal in quality to any 
other brands on the market. 



Write for prices to 



LAPORTE, MARTIN & GIE. 

Montreal 



Wholesale Grocers 



34 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



eX5X 



You will find that 
these packets are the 
most attractive you 
have ever seen and that 
their contents make the 
most delicious TEA 
you have ever tasted — 

TAKE 
THEM 

ON 

and they will make a 

TRADE 
FOR 
YOU!! 



<r xsx 



J&ppieton '4 Sndia fc *€eyion 9ea4 

THE "TAPIR" BRAND. 

SOLD IN LEAD PACKETS 




Agents 



(MONTREAL— FRANK MAGOR & Co., 16, St. John Street. 
(TORONTO— THOMPSON & THOMPSON, 18, Front Street East. 



PUREST & BEST 



Windsor Fine Salt 




In Barrels, 2oolb. Sacks and 50ID. Sacks is shipped in car lots 

to all parts of Canada. The Salt is the 
finest made and the best for general farm 
use. Our barrels are machinery made and 
one end carries a neat paper label. The 
sacks are made of superior bleached Jute, 
and will stand more handling than the 
ordinary salt sacks. A glance at the cut 
will convince you that the appearance of 
our barrels and sacks is a great help in 
selling the salt. Write us or our agents 
for prices or samples. 

The WINDSOR SALT WORKS, WINDSOR, ONT. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



35 




Every Wide-Awake Grocer 



is buying The Wonderful Teas of 
CEYLON 



The Purest 
Cleanest 
Healthiest 
Most Delicious 

TEAS 



ARE 



ant 



YOU? 



36 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



HOW TWO CLERKS LIVED. 

A power over a man's substance amounts to a power 
over his will.— Alex. Hamilton. 
To him that wills ways are not wanting. 

A SINGULAR and, we might say, ex- 
ceptional illustration of Hamilton's 
statement came to our observation 
recently in connection with the daily life of 
two city clerks, the one receiving nine dol- 
lars per week the other six. The former has 
in London a wife and two children, and 
sends them every week five dollars of his 
earnings ; the other has a wife to whom he 
sends two dollars per week. The two live 
together, not far from Washington square, 
within short walking distance of their place 
of employment, and each has four dollars 
per week for maintenance. Both have good 
shelter, spend fifty dollais per year for cloth- 
ing, and both put away money, and thus be- 
long to the capitalists of New York. 

They hire a room at a price which in- 
cludes light and fuel, and, noting our inter- 
est in their plan of life, kindly consented to 
keep an account and give the writer a state- 
ment of their subsistence and rent for one 
week, in demonstration of how cheaply one 
may live in a great city on a small sum and 
save money. Their account for one week is 
as follows : 

Room rent. Including gas, Fuel and tight 82 SO 

Bread and rolls 43 

Oatmeal 8 

Tea IS 

.'> 

Butter l.~> 

Steak 15 

Soup and Meat 20 

Kggs 5 

( tondenaod Milk 10 

5 



Total expense for two 

Rem 

Oosl of food per week for two 

nf each per week for food 

Expense of each for rent and subsistence. 
Margin for clothing andsaving 



S3 91 

2 .~)U 
1 41 

70% 
1 95% 

■J 04'.. 

The menu and expenses for each day for 

one week were as follows : 

Sunday— 

Breakfast— Tea, rolls, bread, butter, porrid 

Dinner — Soup, soupmeat, bread, butter. 
Supper— Tea, bread, butter. 

UOSt for day 27 

Monday— 

Breakfast -Bread, butter, porridge, Lea. 

Dinner— Bolls, tea, 

Supper— Meat left from Sunday and balance of 

soup, bread, butter, tea. 
t lost for day 26 

It K^HAV - 

Breakfast Tea, Bread, butter. 
Dinnei — Porridge, tea, bread, butter. 
Supper— Steak, bread, butter. 

Cost for day 18 

Wednesday— 

Breakfast— Oatmeal gruel, tea, bread, butter. 
Dinner— Rolls, tea. 

Supper— Balance of steak from Tuesday, bread. 
butter. 

Cost for day 18 

Tin ksiiay— 

Breakfast— Bread, butter, tea 
Dinner— Rolls, egg dumplings. 
Supper— Oatmeal pudding, tea, bread, butter. 

Cost for day 19 

Friday 

Breakfast— Bread, butter, tea. 

Dinner— Rolls, tea. 

Supper— Oatmeal gruel, tea, bread, butter. 

Cost for day 14 

Saturday— 

Breakfast— Rolls, tea. 
Dinner— Bread, butter, tea. 
Supper— Bread pudding. 

Cost for day 19 

Total (seven days) for tWO $1 41 

Total (seven days) for one 70 l /2 

We believe that the amount allotted for 
food admits of a more generous diet than 
that recorded above. There is an absence 
of food rich 10 nutritive material and inex- 



pensive, as beans, lentils, buckwheat flour, 
corn meal and rice. Mrs. Abel, in her prize 
essay, presented a bill of fare for a family of 
six, at an average price of 78c. per day, or 
13c. per person, which is but T%c per day 
more than the cost of subsistence to the two 
clerks mentioned. Evidently our young 
friends have yet to learn the art of living 
well on a small sum. The childless clerk 
puts away $2 per week. It is apparent from 
the above that each may clothe himself 
neatly and well, and both may, if they 
choose, enjoy some of the amusements of 
city life. An all-wool suit of clothes may be 
bought for S7.50 to $12.50, so that either of 
the clerks may have two new suits annually, 
sufficient underclothing, boots and shoes, 
and have money left for books and amuse- 
ment, in addition to something for the sav- 
ings bank. These two hard-working men 
meet all expenses on $4 per week, and save 
money. Probably there are many who 
manage to support a family on as snail or 
smaller sum. A boot-black with wife and 
three children states that he can get along 
very nicely on five dollars per week. Such 
economy does not preclude intellectual or 
spiritual development and growth, for the 
church has open doors ; the libraries are 
many and free ; entertainments of a high 
order are to be had free, while picture gal- 
leries and museums are open to all without 
cost. The street windows and the inter- 
course of men with men are educational, so 
that life to its fulness may be enjoyed on 
small income, provided the individual has 
power over his will. 

We would impress upon aspiring youth — 
the boys who are getting from $4 to $12 per 
week, and who incessantly grumble that 
their salary is too small — the incident nar- 
rated, for therein lies the secret of wealth 
and power. When there's a will, there's a 
way. — American Grocer. 



BRITISH TEA IN NORTH AMERICA. 

The consumption of Indian and Ceylon 
tea on the continent of North America, says 
a London letter, appears to be making 
satisfactory progress. The figures given 
below show the increase which has taken 
place in the re-export of Indian and Ceylon 
tea direct from the United Kingdom. A 
large quantity of Indian tea has been tran- 
shipped which does not appear in these 
figures ; in addition to which, exports direct 
both from India and Ceylon during 1891; 
were considerably in excess of those in 1894. 

Everything points to a steady develop- 
ment of this important market, and shows 
the wisdom exhibited by Indian and Ceylon 
tea planters in providing a fund for the pro- 
motion of the use of British grown tea in the 
Colonies and abroad. 

INDIAN TEA. 
I894. 

U. S A 898,619 701,643 818,356 

Canada 821,195 098,479 681,407 

fLOM MA. 

1895 [894. 1893. 1892. 

U. S. A 1,420,262 803,708 705,567 710,365 

Canada 1,113,165 949,175 731,760 613,817 



A GOOD THING TO HAVE. 

Molasses appears to be a good thing to 
have in stock, and even at the advance in 
cost not a bad purchase where anything in 
way of strictly straight and attractive goods 
can be reached. Everything of that kind 
has been taken up at New Orleans, and is 
now held above a parity of what a majority of 
buyers appear willing to bid, although a little 
custom has been found appreciative enough 
to undertake some investment, and a few 
very good-sized sales have been made here 
this week. The top grade of centrifugal has 
received considerable attention from mixers, 
who expect to have plenty of custom before 
the season is over. Some parcels of sugar 
syrups came upon sale, but found very 
prompt custom, in some cases at i to 2c. per 
gallon over what could have been obtained 
for similar goods one month ago. Glucose 
is better managed and turns steadily upward 
in price. — N.Y. Journal of Commerce. 



A TOO CLEAN GROCER. 

We knew a grocer once, says Brains, in a 
recent issue, out in Ohio who killed himself 
by being too cleanly. He had a bad habit 
of staying out a trifle too late with the boys, 
and a worse habit of taking a cold bath 
when he got home. He thought that the 
colder the bath the better ; so he used to 
take it out in the creek behind his store, 
even going so far as to break a hole in the 
ice in the winter in order to get the nice 
cold bath which he thought he needed. As 
we said, it killed him. 

We know another grocer, swarms of him, 
who thinks that he cannot properly conduct 
his business without about a sixteenth of an 
inch of dust on the brim of his hat and a full 
line of samples of his meats and over-ripe 
vegetables displayed on his apron. We can- 
not fully indorse either the former grocer or 
the latter swarm. Neither do we wish to sug- 
gest any startling innovations in the grocery 
business. But we do want to suggest a happy 
medium of cleanliness in grocers, their clerks 
and their stores that will make a man think 
more of the things he would like to eat 
and less of the things he wishes he had not 
eaten. 

A man may have to eat a peck of dirt be- 
fore he dies, but he doesn't want to think, 
every time he goes to the grocery, that at 
the present rate his time will come within 
the next few weeks. 

As the grocer deals in things to eat, of 
course these remarks apply especially to 
him, but there are others. Stores in every 
line need, in many instances, to remember 
what it is that lives next door to godliness. 
Many merchants seem to think that clean, 
newly-dressed windows are something in the 
nature of a luxury, and that scrupulous neat- 
ness inside the store isn't needed in order 
to sell goods. Isn't it? Think it over again. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



37 



MARINE INSURANCE 

The Mannheim Insurance Company 

Grant Open Policies to Wholesale Gro- 
cers and Importers at specially favor- 
able rates. 



Further particulars obtainable by applying 
to Local Agent, or to 

JAMES J. RILEY & SONS 

Managers for Canada {yi/tj^troa I 



The 



RICE FROM 

Mount Royal Milling 
Co, . , , 



Is sure to be fresh milled, mure palatable, and 
in neater packages than the imported article, 

D. W. Ross Co,, Montreal, Agents 



Notice 



TO THE WHOLESALE 
TRADE ONLY . . . 
Vnii Pin Riiv plug tobaccos duty paid. 

IUU V^dXl £>Uj Sweet Navy Chewing, all sizes, 
25c. to 35c. per lb. Bright Honey Chewing, all sizes, 33c. 
to 43c. per 1b. All kinds of Cut Tobaccos, 20c. to 55c. per 
lb., put up in any kind of package or style required. 

CIGARETTES 

Alt kinds of Cigarettes from $2.50 per i,coo 
to $10 per 1,000. 

CIGARS 

All kinds of Cigars from $13.50 per 1,000 to 
$joo per 1,000. 
Write for samples and prices. Correspondence solicited. 
See price current. 



J. M. FORTIER 



MANUFACTURER 
141 to 151 
St. Maurice Street 



Montreal 



NORTHERN 
ASSURANCE COMPANY 



Established 1836. 



OF LONDON. 



Capital and Funds, $36,465,000. 
Revenue, $5,545,000. 

Dominion Deposit, $200,000. 

Canadian Branch Office. 1724 Notre Dame St., Montreal. 



ROBERT W. TYRE - Manager. 

G. E. MOBERLEY, Inspector. 



illllll»ll!IIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIil 



A 
GOOD 



1 



Paying j 

Investment. 1 



$34.00 per annum invested at 4 per cent, 
compound interest for twenty-five years, 
yields $1,475.00, while the same sum ap- 
plied to an insurance policy yields, with 
estimated profits, about $1,775.00 in the 
same time. The gain, therefore, would 
be $300.00. besides the protection given 
during the period, one premium securing 
payment of the sum assured, even if death 
takes place the day the holder receives 
his policy. Write for information in re- 
gard to the Unconditional Accumulative 
Policy to 



i 



Confederation 
Life 
Association, 



NOVA 



SCOTIA 



FIBRED CODFISH 



REPRESENTS the highest achievement in 

the art of curing and preparing Codfish ready 

for cooking. 

NOTHING is used in this product but the 

finest of shore Codfish especially cured and 

dried for it. 

THE disagreeable odor usually considered 

to be a necessary evil to be endured while 

looking Codfish will be found to be entirely 



EVERY particle of skin and bone being re- 
moved and the water evaporated, there is 
absolutely no waste. The contents of each 
package, therefore, is worth to the house- 
keeper about three times its weight in Cod- 
fish as ordinarily sold. 

PUT UP in half-pound cartons, 3 doz. car- 
tons to the case, and sold by the wholesale 
and retail grocers throughout Canada. 



lacking in this. 

PARKER, EAKINS & CO. 



Cun-rs and Dealers in Fish 
for Home and Export Trade 



YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 




TAPIOCA 

PLEASES! SELLS! 

PILUKTOI'S POWDERED PERFUMED LIE 

"BELL BRAND" in ■ -lb. tins. 

Dillon & Co.'s- Baking Soda 

" BELL BRAND " in 1 lb. packages. 
Ask your wholesale grocer for them. 

New York Fancy Brand. Have a good light. Use 



BURNINGS 




OIL 



m 



Samuel Rogers & Go. Toronto. 



N0 !ti 



NO s£°KE, 



Every Oil known to trade and industry — wholesale. 



ITCHKLOTH 




W ! _ 

fg f[ Silver, Brass, Nickel, Copper, Bic>cles, 
etc. Retails at 15c. Send small 
sample order. 
Sole Agency tor Canada 

TEMPLE BUILDING, 113a, MONTREAL 



Champion Fire and 
Burglar-Proof Safes . . 

Made with Solid Welded An- 
gle Iron Frame, Iron Inside 
Doors; 1,000,000 Changes 
Combination Lock. Twelve 
years trial have proven them 
the Best. Fifteen sizes in 
stock. Write for our Price 
List. 

S. S. KIMBALL 
577 Craig St., Montreal, P.Q. 



' fJl/IUP -TO-PAY "fH2rJ, ' 

*\ ^SrrJOrJG AtlP SlSt{£, 

Wl-fH A fig?/*? A-NP 

VO YOlf? 

frdi/ecttsemeei t 

! *\ -.h • •&• trt the *f» 

f|ecoRD, 

Tof^OfslfO 
will bring you, 
tenders/ rem tht 
best contractors 





McLAREN'S 



is Honest Goods and just 
the Thing on Which to 
make or Extend a Busi- 
ness. 




The Best Grocers Make 
a point of Keeping it al- 
ways in Stock. 



38 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS.COMPROMISES 

BL. MOOREHOUSE, general mer- 
chant, Newbury, is offering to com- 
• promise at 6oc. on the dollar. 

J. B. Dickson, general merchant, Castle- 
ford, has assigned. 

Nathaniel Martel, grocer, North Sydney, 
N.S., has assigned. 

R. R. Cranfield, general merchant, Wal- 
lace, N.S. has assigned. 

J. Rheault, general merchant, Stanfold, 
has assigned to A. Quesnel. 

A. C. Bowrassa, grocer, Montreal, is to 
meet his creditors on Feb. 4. 

James Daly, general store, Chinguacousy, 
has assigned to R. Crawford. 

Thos. Wilkinson, general merchant, 
Alberton, is asking an extension. 

Mrs. Hunter, grocer, Chalk River, has 
compromised with her creditors. 

C. C. Lee, general store, AUiston, has 
called a meeting of his creditors. 

John Casey, grocer, Ottawa, is offering to 
compromise at 25c. on the dollar. 

Geo. Lambert, grocer, Bienville, Que., has 
compromised at 20c. on the dollar. 

The stock of Galipeau Btos., grocers, 
Montreal, has been seized for rent. 

A. Daveluy. general merchant, Madding- 
ton, Que., is financially embarrassed. 

G. H. Larivee, shoe dealer, Arnprior, is 
offering his creditors 60c. on the dollar. 

A. J. Pinard, general merchant, St. 
Monique, has assigned to A. Lamarche. 

L. Price & Co. and Louis Rosseau, both 
Montreal grocery firms, have assigned. 

The Independent Match Co., Louiseville, 
Que., have compromised at 65c. on the dollar. 

Moore & Moore, wholesale teas, Halifax, 
have assigned their book debts valued at 
$2,396. 

P. P. Tachereau, grocer, St. Mane, is 
offering to compromise at 25c. on the 
dollar. 

Oswald, Murdoff & Co., wholesale boots 
and shoes, Toronto, have assigned to E. R. 
C. Clarkson. 

J. B. Montanbeau, general merchant, 
Batiscan, Que., is offering to compromise at 
30c. on the dollar. 

John Cunningham, general merchant, 
Pembroke, is trying to settle with his credi- 
tors at 45c. on the dollar. 

Albert Bigaoutte, groceries, Montreal, 
having failed to compromise at 30c. on the 
dollar, cash, has assigned. 

F. Patrie, grocer, Quebec, has assigned. 
Another Quebec grocery firm, P. St. Michel 
& Co., have been compelled to do the same 
thing. 

James Irwin, general dealer, at Brussels, 
has assigned to E. R. C. Clarkson, Toronto. 



The liabilities are $2,400, with assets nomi- 
nally the same. 

Bonnar & Co., general merchants, at Mer- 
ritton, have assigned to E. R. C. Clark- 
son. The business is a small one, the 
liabilities aggregating $1,500. 

Mowat Brothers & Baxter, grocers and 
ranchers, at Regina, are offering to compro- 
mise with their creditors. The firm is rated 
at between $5,000 and $10,000. 

CHANGES. 

M. C. Davidson, grocer, Vernon, B.C., 
has sold out. 

L. A. Brule, grocer, Montreal, has sold 
out to G. H. Schneider. 

John Scuitto, a Vancouver grocer, is re- 
ported to have left town. 

Mrs. G. Grenier is starting a grocery 
store at Buckingham, Que. 

James S. Hill, teas and crockery, St. John, 
N.B., has sold out to A. P. Torrens. 

NapoleoD Paquette, has started into busi- 
ness at Terrebonne, Que ., as a grocer. 

H. R. Shaw, grocer, Bridgetown, N.S., 
has been succeeded by Crowe & Parker. 

Wm. Tilden, general merchant, Blvthes- 
wood, is advertising his business for sale. 

Irwin & Co., general merchants, Brussels, 
have assigned to E. R. C. Clarkson, To- 
ronto. 

The stock of C. Turgeon, general mer- 
chant, St. David, Que., has been sold at 
37 '/£c. on the dollar. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Blairs & Fleming, grocers, Vancouver, 
have dissolved. R. Fleming continues. 

Gardner & Brown, general merchants, 
Arnprior, are dissolving. W. A. Brown 
continues. 

Pierre Carnere & Son, general merchants, 
St. Phillipe (Argenteuil Co.), are dissolving. 
A. Carriere continues. 

Janet Robertson, wife of F. E. Wand, has 
been registered proprietress of the grocery 
business of J. Robertson. 

J. B. Bourcier and Marie Perrault have 
registered a partnership to carry on business 
as grocers, under the style of J. B. Bouicier 
& Cie., at St. Cunegonde, Que. 

Mongenais, Boivin & Co., wholesale wines, 
Montreal, have dissolved. J. B. A. Mon- 
genais and J. M. Dufresne have retired. L. 
J. Boivin and J. M. Wilson will continue 
under style of Boivin, Wilson & Co. 
SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The assets of Wm. Johnston, general 
merchant, Westplain, Ont., have been sold. 

The grocery stock of F. H. Martellock, 
Ottawa, has been sold at 57c. on the dollar. 

The stock of Malcolm MacDonald, grocer, 
Montreal, has been sold at 52c. on the dol- 
lar. 

The general stock of Mott & Robson, 
Athens, Ont., has been sold at 66c. on the 
dollar. 



The assets of J. J. M. Marchand, grocer, 
Pont de Maskinonge, are to be sold Feb- 
ruary 4. 

The assets of J. W. Baker, general mer- 
chant, Lake Edward, Que., are to be sold 
February 5. 

The stock of Remi Racicot, general mer- 
chant, Windsor Mills, Que., has been sold 
at 71c. on the dollar. 

The grocery stock of the estate of John 
Armstrong & Co., Peterboro', is advertised 
to be sold by auction on the 4th prox. 

These stocks were last week sold at 
Suckling's : The general stock of John 
Burke, of Thornton, amounting to $4,348, 
was sold to E. C. Ardill for 69 cents on the 
dollas. The gents' furnishing stock of W. 
M. Codlington, of Woodstock, amounting to 
$4,179, was bought by W. J. Waugh lor 56 
cents on the dollar. The grocery stock of 
William Hutcheson, Gerrard street east, 
Toronto, invoiced at $1,936, was sold to A. 
Ballantyne for 47X cents on the dollar. 
Drug stock of S. M. Green, Toronto, amount- 
ing to $1,169, was s0 'd at 15 cents on the 
dollar to G. S. Riches, and a drug stock in 
Aurora, amounting to $1,810, was sold at 
15^ cents on the dollar to J. L. Fenn, of 
Bracebridge. The grocery stock of C. 
Schmidt, Toronto, invoiced at $2,036, was 
sold to E. R. B. Hayward, of Whitby, at 37 
cents on the dollar. 

FIRES. 
H. Robertson & Co., general merchant, 
Strathclair Station, Man., has been burned 
out ; insurance, $2,800. 

DEATHS. 
Richard Bennett, grocer, Spring Hill, 
N.S., is dead. 



DEPARTMENT STORE IN BRANDON. 

Departmental stores are growing in the 
Northwest. On February 1, one of these 
establishments will be started in Brandon 
by I. R. Sirome, dry goods merchant, and 
White Bros., general merchants. It will be 
the largest departmental establishment in the 
wes f , carrying groceries, crockery, dry goois, 
house furnishings, gents' furnishings, cloth- 
ing, boots and shoes. The business will be 
done on a cash basis. 



44 



SILICO " 



THE UP-TO-DATE 
CLEANING SOAP. 

Cleans quickly and , . , 

DOES NOT SCRATCH 

Try a Three-Dozen Case for $2.26. 

For Sale by Grocers and Druggists. 

BLAIKLOCK BROTHERS 

Customs Brokers 

Forwarders 

Warehousemen 

41 Common St. Montreal 

Cor. espondence Solicited. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



39 



A NEW DEPARTURE 



The L 



of much importance 
to the ... . 




GROCERY TRADE 



CO. LH. 



OF MONTREAL 



Have added a Canned Meat Department to their General 
Packing Business, and will in future have a full line of Canned Meat 
Goods, Soups and Sundries of the very finest quality, every can be- 
ing guaranteed. These Anchor Brand Goods are put up in all 
the convenient sizes and newest shapes, with patent key- 
openers, and are not surpassed by any other goods on the market. 

WRITE FOR PRICE LIST 



CAUSES OF FAILURE 

In the Hardware Trade and How Avoided. 

As long as there are failures, subjects that furnish 
information how to prevent them will always be 
timely. We have published, in pamphlet form, 
three admirable papers on the above topic, in which \ 
Over-Stocking, Expense, Capital, Credit. Dis- 9 
counts, Buying, etc., etc. , are ably discussed. We i 
will mail the whole three essays *\c 4- ^ 

to any address on receipt of 2. .J CCIltS i 

HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto I 



Onion Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

OF PORTLAND, MAINE 



Only Company whose Policy Contracts 
are governed by the statutes of the . . . 

MAINE NONFORFEITURE LAW 



WALTER I. JOSEPH, Manager 



Room 2, 162 St. James Street, Montreal 




Natural 



to suppose, when we are mak- 
ing satisfactory shipments to 
our present customers, that we 
can do the same for you ; isn't 
it ? It's also natural that we 
should wish to increase our 
business, and would like to 
have your trade. We sell Salt in 
car lots. When you want any- 
thing in salt write US. 



The Toronto Salt Works 

128 Adelaide Street East 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Toronto Agents for the Windsor Salt Works. 



&) Toronto 




THE 



Sydenham Glass Co. of Wallaceburg 

Limited 




WALLACEBURG, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Prescription Ware 

Flasks and Liquor Bottles 
Celebrated Beaver 

Fruit Jars, Jelly Jars 

PRIVATE MOULDS A SPECIALTY 



OILS 
OVALS 
SALADS 
SAUCE 



BOTTLES 



PICKLES 
PANELS 
BEER and 
MINERAL 



We make bottles of extra weight to order. We invite inquiry 
relative to lettered ware and bottles from private moulds' 
Prompt attention to orders and inquiries. 
Mention this journal. 

Toronto Representative : G. A. McCANN, 208 Dundas St. 
Tees & Persse, Winnipeg, Martin & Robertson, Vancouver and Victoria, 

Agents for Manitoba and Northwest Territories. Agents for British Columbia . 



Fine Fruit Tablets 



ENGLISH FORMULA 
TABLETS 

Have been our specialty 
and have been a success. 
Packed in elegant Flint 
Glass Jars, large glass 
stopper, the finest pack- 
age in the Dominion. 
Also in round jars, similar 
to English, but made two 
inches shorter to fit the 
ordinary shelf. A large 
variety. List of flavors 
and prices on application. 




6. J. HAMILTON 
& SONS 

PICTOU, N.S. 




40 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



For Excellence of Quality SOUTHWELL'S 




For Purity SOUttlWell'S 

For Price SOUttlWelVS 
For Alt Purposes SOUt/lWeH'S 




Jams, Jellies 
and Marmalades 



ARE THE BEST 




Toronto, Jan. 30, 1896. 

This list is corrected every Thursday. The 
prices are solicited for publication, and are 
for such qualities and quantities as are usually 
ordered by retail dealers on the usual terms 
of credit. 

Goods in large lots and for prompt pay are 
generally obtainable at lower prices. 

All quotations in this department are under 
the direct control of the Editor, and are not 
paid for or doctored by any manufacturing oi 
jobbing house unless given under their name, 
the right being reserved to exclude such firms 
as do not furnish reliable information. 

BAKING POWDER. 

Snow Drift— 

'4 lb. tins, 4 doz. in case per doz. SO 75 

V* " 3 " " 

1 " 2 " " 2 00 

3 " 1 " " 6 50 

5 " '/» " " 10 00 

10 lb. boxes per lb. 16 

301b. pails " 16 

Dominion— 

Vi lb. tins, 4 doz. in case per doz. 1 00 

% " 3 " " 175 

1 " 2 " " 3 00 

10 lb. boxes per lb. 20 

301b. pails " 20 

pure oold. per doz 
i 5 lb. cans, 1 doz. in 

case 19 80 

[4 lb. cans, doz. in 

case 16 00 

1 2% lb. cans, 1 and 2 

I doz. in case 10 50 

1 16 oz. cans, 1, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 4 60 

1 12 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. in case 3 60 

1 8 oz. cans, 2 and 4 

doz. ir- case 2 40 

H^ ' 6 ° z - «?"<>• 2 and 4 
^ msiiin^ doz. in case 1 8q 

4 oz. cans. 4 and 6 doz. in case 1 25 

10 cent can 90 




Cook's Friend- 
Size 1, in 2 and 4 doz. boxes 


$ 2 40 

2 10 

80 


" 3, in 4 " 


7C 
45 




... 3 00 




. . . 2 40 




. . . 1 10 




. 14 00 


W. H. GILLARD & CO., PROPRIETORS. 
Diamond — 




1 17 




1 98 


LUMSDEN BROS. 

Boston Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins. . . SI 25 

Standard Baking Powder, 1-lb. tins.. 1 50 

Jersey Cream B'kg Powder, %-lbs... 75 

V„-lbs.. 1 25 

f-lbs.. 2 25 

BLACKING. 

DAT & MARTIN'S BLACKING 

Paste. (Boxes of 3 doz. each, per gross. 

No. 1 size (4 gross to a case) S 2 40 

No. 2 size 3 " " 3 30 

No. 3 size 3 " " 5 00 

No. 4 size 2 " " 6 85 

No. 5 size 2 " " 9 00 

Embos'd97 4 " " 6 00 

Liquid. per doz. 

Pints, A (6 doz, per bbl) $330 

% " B 9 " " 2 25 

Vi " C15 " " 


Russet Paste. (3 doz. in box) 


per gross. 
S 3 75 


" 2. " 


5 65 


" 3. " 


. 7 85 


Russet Cream. (1 gross cases) 
No. 1. In bottles 


per doz. 
9 80 


2. In bottles 

3. " 


1 60 
1 90 




2 60 



Polishing Paste. 
(3 doz. in box) pet gross. 

No. 1. In bottles §3 75 

"2. " 5 65 

"3. '• 7 85 

Polishing Cream. 

(1 gross cases) per doz. 

No. 1. In bottles §0 80 

"2. " 1 35 

" 3. " 2 25 

In Metal Tubes ..'.....'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 190 

Ivorine. per doz. 

Small. In patent stoppered bottles, 

sponge attached $0 80 

No. 1. " 1 35 

" 2. " per gross. 25 00 

P. o. FRENCH BLACKING. per gross 

'4 No. 4 84 00 

% No. 6 4 50 

% No. 8 7 25 

'4 No. 10 8 25 

P. O. FRENCH DRESSING. per doz. 

No. 7, 1 or 2 doz. in box *2 00 

No 4, 1 or 2 doz. in box 1 25 

per gross. 

. ROWN PARISIAN DRESSING 9 00 

BLACK LEAD. 

Keokitt s Black Lead, per box >1 IS 

Each box contains either 1 gross, 1 
oz., % gro, 2 oz., or '4 gro. 4 oz. 

per gross. 

Silver Star Stove Paste $9 00 

Dixon's Carburet of Iron Stove 
Polish, 70c doz 7 20 

BLUE. 

KEEN'S OXFORD. per lb. 

1 lb. packets SO 17 

■4 lb. " 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 12-lb. box .... 17 

Reckitt's Square Blue, 5 box lots — 16 

CORN BROOMS 

CHAS. BOECKH & SONS, per do/. 
Carpet Brooms— net. 

" Imperial," extra fine, 8, 4 strings. . S3 65 
" " 7, 4 strings. . 3 45 

" " 6. 3 strings 3 25 



"Victoria," fine, No. 8, 4 strings.. 3 30 

7, 4 strings.. 3 10 

" " 6, 3 strings.. 2 90 

"Standard," select, 8, 4 strings. . 2 90 

'Standard," select 7, 4 strings.. 2 75 

6. 3 strings.. 2 60 

" 5, 3 strings. . 2 40 

CANNED GOODS. 

per doz. 

AppleB, 3 s *0 85 $0 95 

" gallons 200 225 

Blackberries, 2 1 75 2 00 

Blueberries, 2 90 1 10 

Beans. 2 75 95 

Corn, 2's 75 95 

Cherries, red pitted, 2s 200 225 

Peas, 2 s 90 95 

" Sifted select 110 

' ' Extra sifted 1 45 1 50 

Pears, Bartlett, 2's 1 65 1 75 

" 3s 2 40 

Pineapple, 2's 175 2 40 

3's 2 40 2 50 

Peaches, 2 s 1 90 2 20 

3's 2 65 3 0) 

Plums, Green Gages, 2's 185 2 00 

" Lombard.... 1 60 1 75 

" Damson Blue 160 175 

Pumpkins, 3's 085 090 

'' gallons 2 10 2 25 

Raspberries, 2's 1 40 2 00 

Strawberries, choice, 2's 1 90 2 40 

Succotash, 2's 1 15 

Tomatoes, 3's 080 095 

Lobster, tails 175 2 25 

flats 2 30 2 60 

Mackerel 1 10 1 20 

Salmon, Sockeye, tails 1 35 1 40 

fiats 1 55 1 To 

Cohoes 1 15 1 20 

Sardines, Albert, JA's tins 13 

Vis tins .... 20 21 
Sportsmen, '4'sgenu- 
ine French high grade, key 

opener 12% 

Sardines, key opener, '4's 10y 5 

'• >4» o i°y» ° " 

%s 18'4 19 

Sardines, other brands 9% 11 16 17 

P. fcC, y/stins .... 23 25 

^'l " ,... 3J 35 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



41 






Canada 
Prepared 
Corn. 

Silver Gloss. 
Satin Starch. 
Rice Starch. 



When you buy 





STARCH 




See that you get the 
right thing. You can't 
go wrong if you have any of our lines. 



Edwardsburg Starch Co. c— , on. 



i 
i 

i 

t 
t 
t 

I 



Sardines, Amer. , '4.8 " 
%'b " 

" Mustard, % size, cases 
50 tins, per 100 10 00 

MARSHALL & CO., SCOTLAND 

Fresh Herring, 1-lb 1 10 

Kippered Herring, 1-lb 1 65 

Herrings in Tomato Sauce — 1 70 

Herrings in Shrimp Sauce 2 01) 

Herrings iu Anchovy Sauce . . 2 00 

Herrings a la Sardine 2 40 

Preserved Bloaters 1 85 

Real P'indon Haddock 1 85 

CANNED MEATS. 

(CANADIAN.) 

Comp Corn Beef, 1-lb. cans 

2 " ■ 

4 " . 

6 " . 

14 " • 

2 

2 " . 

1 " • 

2 

2 

1 

2 

1 

2 



04'/ 2 09 
09 11 



1 15 
1 90 

1 90 



1 90 
1 90 



Minced Callops 

Lunch Tongue 

English Brawn 
Camb Sausage 

Soups, assorted 



Soups and Boull. 2 
6 



1 40 .«1 50 

2 40 2 55 



7 75 
16 00 



2 60 

3 40 



2 75 



8 25 
18 00 
2 60 

2 65 

3 50 
6 00 
2 80 
2 50 

4 00 

1 50 

2 25 
1 80 
i 50 




Acme 

Sliced 
Beef. 

No, 1 tins, 
key, 2doz., 
perdoz. B2.50. 

Beardsley's 
Boneless per 
Herring. do 7 

2doz.... 1 4 



Codfish. 
Beardsley's Shredded, 2doz. pkgs. 




CHEWING GUM. 

ADAMS & SONS co. per box 

Tutti Frutti, 36 5c bars $1 20 

Pepsin Tutti Frutti, 23 5c packages . . 75 
Pepsin Tutti Frutti, in glass-covered 

boxes, 23 5c packages 80 

Horehound Tutti Frutti, glass tops, 36 

5c packages 1 20 

Cash Register, 3905c bars and pkgs . . 15 00 
Tutti Frutti Show Case, 180 5c bars 

and packages 50 

Glass Jar with Pepsin Tutti Frutti. 

115 5c packages 3 75 

Tutti Frutti Girl Sign Box, 160 5c 

bars and packages 6 00 

Tutti Frutti Cash Box, 160 5c bars 

and packages 6 00 

Variety Gum (new), 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Orange Blossom, 150 lc pieces 1 00 

Flirtation Gum, 150 lc pieces 65 

Monte Cristo, 180 lc pieces 1 30 

Mexican Fruit, 36 5c bars 1 20 

Sappota, 150 lc pieces 90 

Orange Sappota, 160 lc pieces 75 

Black Jack, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Rose, 115 lc pieces 75 

Magic Trick, 115 lc pieces 75 

Red Spruce Chico, 200 lc pieces 1 00 

CHOCOLATES & COCOAS. 

CADBUBY'S. per ('oz 

Cocoa essence, 3 oz. packages $1 65 

per lb, 
Mexican chocolate, Vt and y. lb. pkgs. 40 

Rock Chocolate, loose 37'/ 2 

1-lb. tins 40 

Cocoa Nibs, 1Mb. tins 40 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO.'S. 

Chocolate— per lb. 

French, >4's— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Caraccas, Vt's— 6 and 12 lbs 35 

Premium, '/.'s— 6 and 12 lbs 30 

Sante, ] 4's— 6 and 12 lbs 26 

Diamond. >4 a— 6 and 12 lbs 22 

Sticks, gross boxes, each 1 00 

Cncoa— 

Homeopathic, '4's, 8 and 14 lbs. . 30 

Pearl, ' " . . 25 

London Pearl, 12 and 18 " . . 22 

Rock 30 

Bulk, in boxes 18 

per doz. 

Royal Cocoa Fissence, packages 1 40 

Cocoa— EPPS . per lb. 

Case of 112 lbs. each 35 

Smaller quantities 37% 



(A. P. Tippet & Co., Agents.) 

Chocolate— per lb. 

Caraccas, '4'b, 6-lb. boxes 42 

Vanilla, %'s 42 

"Gold Medal" Sweet, 61b. bxs.. 29 

Pure, unsweetened, %'s, G lb. bxs. 42 

Fry's "Diamond," Vi'B, 61b. bxs. 24 

Fry's " Monogram, " Vi's, 6 lb. bxs. 24 
( !oooa — per do/ 

Concentrated, '4's, 1 doz. in box. . 2 40 

Wb, " 

libs. " 

Homeopathic, 'A's, 14 lb. boxes . . 33 

% lbs. 12 lb. boxes. 33 

JOHN P. MOTT & CO.'S. 

(R. S. Mclndoe, Agent, Toronto. ) 

Mott's Broma per lb. 30 

Mott's Prepared Cocoa 28 

Mott '8 Homeopathic Cocoa (Vi's) 32 

Mott's Breakfast Cocoa (in tins) 45 

Mott's No. 1 Chocolate 30 

Mott's Breakfast Chocolate 28 

Mott s Caraccas Chocolate 40 

Mott's Diamond Chocolate 22 

Mott's French-Can Chocolate 18 

Mott's Navy or Cooking Chocolate . . 27 

Mott's Cocoa Nibbs 35 

Mott's Cocoa Shells 05 

Vanilla Sticks, per gross 90 

Mott's Confectionery Chocolate. 21 43 

Mott's Sweet Chocolate Liquors. 19 30 

COWAN COCOA AND CHOCOLATE CO. 

Hygienic Cocoa, y 2 lb. tins, per doz. . $3 75 

Cocoa Essence, % lb. tins, per doz. . 2 25 

Soluble Cocoa. No. 1 bulk, per lb ... 20 
Diamond Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

14 lb. cake, per lb 22'/ 2 

Royal Navy Chocolate, 12 lb. boxes, 

V 2 lb. cake, per lb 30 

Mexican Vanilla Chocolate, 12 lb. 

boxes, ] 4 lb. cake, per lb 35 

WALTER BA.KER & CO.'S 

Chocolate- 
Premium No. 1, boxes, 12 lbs. each . . 42 
Baker's Vanilla in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 50 
Caraccas Sweet, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. 37 
Vanilla Tablets, 416 in box, 24 boxes 

in case, per box, net 4 20 

German Sweet Chocolate — 

Grocers' Style, in boxes, 12 lbs. each. 25 

Grocers' Style, in boxes, 6 lbs. each. . 25 

Eight cakes to the lb., in bxs, 6 lbs. e. 25 

Soluble Chocolate— 

tn canisters, 1 lb. , 4 lb. and 101b 50 

Breakfast Cocoa — 

nbxs, nd 12 lbs. each, % lb. , tins. 49 



COFFEE. 

Green. 

per lb. 

Mocha 28 30 

Old Government Java 30 33 

Rio 20 21'-, 

Plantation Ceylon 29 SI 

Porto Rico 24 28 

Guatemala 24 26 

Jamaica 21 22 

Maracaibo 21 23 

TODHUNTER, MITCHELL & CO. S 

Excelsior Blend 34 

Our Own " 32 

Jersey " 30 

Laguaya " 28 

Mocha and Java 35 

Old Government Java 30 32 36 

Arabian Mocha 36 

Maracaibo 28 30 

Santos 25 27 



DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Alum SO 02 SO 03 

Blue Vitriol 06 07 

Brimstone 03 03V 2 

Borax 10 12 

Camphor 80 85 

Carbolic Acid 25 50 

Castor Oil, 1 oz. bottle, p. gross 4 20 

2 " " '■ .... 6 00 

3 " " " .... 8 40 

4 .... 10 00 

'/ 2 pint " " .... 12 00 

Olive Oil, y 2 pts. , 2 doz. tocasp, 

per case 1 25 

pints, 2 doz. to case, 

per case 2 50 

Epsom Salts 02 02 1 4 

Extract Logwood, bulk 13 14 ' 

" " boxes 15 17 

Gentian 10 13 

Glycerine, per lb 17 18 

Hellebore 16 17 

Iodine 5 50 6 00 

Insect Eowder 26 30 

Saltpetre 08'/ 2 09 

Soda, Bicarb, per keg 2 75 2 90 

Sal Soda 1 00 1 25 

Madder 12'/ 2 .... 

EXTRACTS. 

Dalley's Fine Gold. No. 8, per doz . (0 75 

' 1, Hi oz... 1 25 

2. 2oz 1 75 

" ' 3. 3 oz 2 00 



RECKITT'S Blue and Black Lead 



[ALWAYS CIVE YOUR 
[CUSTOMERS SATISFACTION. 



42 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



BUY IlPTON 5 



AWARDED IHf HI»T H0N0R5AT THE IWRltoFAIH/T^ 
3UgpUNKR SPECIAL ROYAL WARRANT TO Z 
SjKNUfi 




Batty's 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ 




PICKLES ! 

and.... 

SAUCE 



♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦•»+♦♦♦♦ 



Are unquestionably the finest and 
most enjoyable in the world. Have 
been awarded 



ALL WHOLESALERS 
HAVE THEM. 



. . EIGHT PRIZE MEDALS 



Canadian Agents 



J. A. GORDON & CO. 

. . . Montreal 



Siamese Twins 




are debt and difficulty, difficulty and 
debt — they are inseparable. We need 
not discuss their causes here, either. 
What we want to point out is that no 
man with a family, or with large 
business interests at stake, should 
neglect life insurance. Stick to the 
policy you have, and when you want 
more insurance see one of our agents 
about it, or call in at Head Office. 
No medical examination is required 
for our pension. 
Bond policy and rates are away down. 

MANUFACTURERS' LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

Head Office, Toronto, Can. 



ii 



The Gulf of Georgia Cannery 

MALCOLM & WINDSOR, Ltd. 

Sole Proprietors, and Agents for 

t 

Ice Castle Brand" Canned Salmon 

All salmon packed under the " Ice Castle Brand " are 
guaranteed to be the celebrated Sockeye. 



FACTORY, Steveston, B.C. 



OFFICE, Vancouver, B.C. 




A Crystal Pitcher 

. . . Fret 



with 



TUTTI FRUTTI 

Get one from your wholesaler. Send 
postal card for beautiful signs to decor- 
ate your window. 



ADAMS & SONS CO. 

11 & 13 Jar vis Street, Toronto 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



43 



FANCY BUTTER 

Something new in Crackers. Cheap and rapid seller. Don't forget that we make 
the nicest Marshmallow Wafer in Canada. Will not get hard. 



TRY THEM. 



The Toronto Biscuit <£ Confectionery Co. 



Henry C. Fortier. 



7 FRONT STREET EAST, TORONTO. 



Charles J. Peter. 




Crown JBrand (Greig & Co.)— 

1 oz. London gross 6 00 

1 2 " Anchor.... " 12 00 

1 " Flat Crown " 10 80 

2 " " " " 18 00 
2 " Square .... " 21 00 
2%" Round .... " 24 00 

4 oz. Glass Stopper doz. 3 50 

8 " " •' ' 7 00 

Parisian Essence gross 21 00 

Ketchup, Fluted Bottles . . . .gross 12 00 

Screw Top " 21 00 

S.&L. "High Grade" 

per doz 3 50 

Pepper Sauce, per gross 15 00 

FLUID BEEF. 

JOHNSTON'S, MONTREAL. 

Fluid Beef— No. 1, 2 oz. tins $ 3 00 

No. 2, 4 oz. tins 5 00 

No. 3, 8 oz. tins 8 75 

No. 4, 1 lb. tins 14 25 

No. 5. 2 lb. tins 27 00 

Staminal— 2 oz. bottles 3 00 

4 oz. " 6 00 

8 oz. " 9 00 

16oz. " 12 75 

Fluid Beef Cordial— 20 oz. bottles. ... 15 00 

Milk Granules, in cases, 4 doz 6 00 

Milk Granules with Cereals, in cases, 

4 doz 5 B 

FRUITS. 

FOREIGN. 

per lb. 

Currants— Provincials, bbls . . 04 04% 

" %bbls .. 04% 04% 

Filiatras, bbls 04% 04% 

% bbls . . 04k 04% 

Patras, bbls 04% 05 

" %bbls 04% 05% 

" cases 05% 

" Vostizzas, cases 05% 07% 

Panarete, cases 08 08% 

Dates, Persian, boxes 04% 05% 

Figs— Eleme, 14 oz 09 10% 

" 101b 09% 12% 

" 181b 13 15 

" 281b 16 18 

" taps 03% 04 

Prunes— Bosnia, cases 05% 07 

Bordeaux 04% 06% 

Raisins— Valencia, off stalk.. 04% 04% 

Fine, off stalk 05 05% 

Selected 06 06 a 

Layers 06% 

Sultanas 05% 08 

Cal. Loose Musca- 
tels 5\) lb. boxes . . 05% 06% 
" Malaga— per oox. 

London Layers 2 00 2 20 

Black Baskets 2 75 3 20 

Blue Baskets 3 25 3 50 

Dehesa Clusters 4 25 4 50 

Lemons — Messina, boxes 3 50 4 00 

Malagas, half chest.. 5 00 6 00 

boxes 2 50 3 00 

Oranges— Jamaica, fncy in bxs 4 25 4 75 

11 Jamaica, ordinary, bxs 3 50 4 00 

Cal. Navels, in boxes.. 3 25 4 00 

" Mexican, in boxes 3 50 4 00 

DOMESTIC. 

Apples, dried, per lb 04 05 

evaporated 07 07% 

FOOD. 

per brl. 

Split Peas $3 50 

Pot Barley 3 75 

Pearl Barley, XXX 6 50 

ROBINSONS BARLEY AND GROATS. 

per doz. 

Patent Barley, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

Groats, % lb. tins 1 25 

lib. tins 2 25 

HARDWARE, PAINTS AXD 
OILS. 

Cut Nails— From Toronto— 

50 to 60 dy basis 2 50 

40 dy 2 55 

Ody 2 60 



20 16 and 12 dy 2 65 

lOdy 2 70 

8 and 9 dy 2 75 

6 and 7 dy 2 90 

5 dy 3 10 

4 dy A P 3 10 

3dyAP 3 50 

4dyCP 300 

3 dy C P 4 10 

Horse Nails— 

Canadian, dis. 55 per cent. 
Horse Shoes— 

From Toronto, per keg 3 60 

Screws— Wood— 

Flat-head iron, 80 p. c. dis. 
Round-head iron, 75 p. c. dis. 
Flat-head brass, 77% p. c. dis. 
Round-head brass, 72% p. c. dis. 
Window Glass. [To find out what break 
any required size of pane comes under, 
add its length and breadth together. 
Thus in a 7x9 pane the length and breadth 
come to 16 inches, which shows it to be a 
first-break glass, i.e. not over 25 inches in 
the sum of its length and breadth.] 

1st break (25 in. and under) 1 30 

2nd " (20 to 40 inches 145 

3rd " (50 to 60 inches 3 10 

4th " (51 to 60 inches 3 40 

5th " (61 to 70 inches) 3 80 

Rope— 

Manilla 09% 09% 

Sisal 07 07% 

Per box 6 00 12 00 

Shot— 

Canadian, dis, 17% per cent. 

Hinges— 

Heavy T and strap 04% 05 

Screw, hook and strap .... 03*4 04 

White Lead— Pure Association guarantee, 
ground in oil. per lb. 

25 lb. irons 04% 

No. 1 04% 

No. 2 04% 

No. 3 04 

Turpentine— 

Selected packages, per gal. 39 41 

Linseed Oil— 

Raw, per gal 58 

Boiled, " 61 

Glue— 

Common per lb 07% 08 

INDURATED FIBRE WARE. 

the e. b. EDDY CO. 

% pail, 6 qt S3 35 

Star Standard, 12 qt 3 80 

Milk, 14 qt 4 75 

Round-bottomed fire pail, 14 qt 4 75 

Tubs, No. 1 13 30 

" 2 11 40 

" 3 9 50 

Fibre Butter Tubs (30 lbs) 3 80 

Nests of 3 2 85 

KeelersNo. 4 8 00 

" 5 7 00 

" 6 6 00 

" 7 5 00 

Milk Pans 2 65 

Wash Basins, flat bottoms 2 65 

" " round bottoms 2 50 

Handy Dish 2 25 

Water Closet Tanks 17 00 

Dish Pan, No. 1 7 60 

' 2 6 20 

Barrel Covers and Trays 4 75 

Railroad or Factory Pails 4 75 

JAMS AND JELLIES. 

SOUTHWELL'S GOODS. 

per doz. 

Orange Marmalade 1 60 

Clear Jelly Marmalade 2 00 

Strawberry W. F. Jam 2 30 

Raspberry " " 2 20 

Apricot " " 2 00 

Blackcurrant " 2 00 

Other Jams " " 155 190 

Red Currant Jelly 3 10 

(All the above in 1 lb. clear glass pot*. 

KNOX'S GELATINE. 

Sparkling calves foot 1 20 

Crystalized Fruit, flavored 1 65 

Acidulated 1 50 

(Sold by all wholesale grocers.) 



LICORICE. 

YOUNG & SMYLIE'S LIST. 

5-lb. boxes, wood or paper, per lb $0 40 

Fancy boxes (36 or 50 sticks) per box. . 1 25 

"Ringed" 5 lb. boxes, per lb 40 

"Acme" Pellets, 5 lb. cans, per can. . 2 00 
"Acme" Pellets, fancy boxes (40) 

per box 1 50 

Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers, 5 lb. 

cans, per can 2 00 

Licorice Lozenges, 5 lb. glass jars 1 75 

5 lb. cans 1 50 

"Purity " Licorice, 200 sticks .'. 1 45 

" 100 sticks 73 

Dulce, large cent sticks, 100 in box ... 75 

MINCE MEAT. 

Wethey's Condensed, per gross, net $12 00 
MUSTARD. 

COLMAN'S OR KEEN'S. 

Square Tins— per lb 

D. S. F., 1 lb. tins $0 40 

% lb. tins 42 

% lb. tins 45 

Round Tins — 

F. D., % lb. tins 25 

% lb. tins 27% 

" 4 lb. jars, per jar 75 

1 lb. " " 25 

" 4 lb. tins, decorated, p. t. 80 

FRENCH MUSTARD. 

Crown Brand— (Greig &Co.) 

Pony size, per gross 9 00 

Small Med. " 7 80 

Medium " 10 80 

Large " 12 00 

Spoon " 18 00 

Mug " 16 20 

Tumbler " 12 00 

Cream Jug " 21 00 

RICE, ETC. 

Rice— per lb. per lb. 

Standard " B " 03% 03% 

Patna 04% 

Japan 05 

Imperial Seeta 05% 

Extra Bunnah 03% 04 

Java Extra 06% 06% 

Genuine Carolina 09% 10 

GrandDuke 06% 06% 

Sago 03% 05 

Tapioca 03% 05% 

Goathead (finest imported) 06% 

STARCH. 

EDWARDSBURG STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches— 

No. 1 White or Blue, cartoons 05% 

Canada Laundry 04% 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. draw-lid boxes 

and fancy packages 07 

Silver Gloss, 6-lb. tin c 'nnisters. . 07 
Edwardsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. 

ehromo package 07 

Silver Gloss, large crystals 06% 

No. 1 White, bbls and kegs 04% 

Benson's Enamel, per box 3 00 

Culinary Starch— 

W. T. Benson & Co.'s Prepared 

Corn 07% 

Canada Pure Corn 06% 

Rice Starch— 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White, 1-lb. 

cartoons 09 

Edwardsburg No. 1 White or 

Blue, 4-lb. lumps : . . . . 07% 

THE BRANTPORD STARCH CO., LTD. 

Laundry Starches- 
Canada Laundry, boxes of 40 lbs.. 04% 
Finest Quality White Laundry— 

3 lb. cartoons, cases 36 lbs 05% 

Bbls., 175 lbs 04% 

Kegs, 100 lbs 04% 

Lily White Gloss — 
Kegs, extralargecrystals.lOOlbs. 06% 
1 lb. fancy cartoons, cases 361bs. 07 
6 lb. draw-lid boxes, 8 in crate 

48 bs 07 

6 lb. tin enamelled cannisters, 

8 in crate 48 lbs 07 

Brantford Gloss— 

1 lb. fancy boxes, cases 36 lbs. 07% 
Brantford Cold Water Rice Starch— 

* lb. fancy boxes, cases 28 lbs 09 

Canadian Electric Starch— 
40 packages in case 3 00 



Culinary Starch- 
Challenge Prepared Corn — 

1 lb. pkgs., boxes 40 lbs 06% 

No. 1 Pure Prepared Corn — 
1 lb. pjfgs., boxes 40 lbs 07% 

KINOSFORDS OSWEGO STARCH. 




f 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. pkgs., 08% 
SILVER-: 6-lb. boxes, sliding covers 

GLOSS \^ (12-lb. boxes each crate. 08% 

PURE 12-lb. boxes 07% 

OSWEGO , 40-lb. boxes, 1-lb. 

CORNSTARCH.' packages 07% 

For puddings, custards, etc. 
ONTARIO , 38-lb. to 45-lb. boxes, 

STARCH i 6bundles 06% 

STARCH IN t Silver Gloss 07% 

BARRELS r Pure 06% 

Brown & Polsons Cornflour. 

Lib packages m 

40-lb boxes g 80 

SUGAR. 

„ , . , c. per lb. 

Granulated q 04% 

Paris Lump. bbls. and 100-lb. 

boxes ...... o 05% 05% 

«• •. n "15011). boxes.... 05% 05.80 

Extra Ground, bbls. Icing 05% 05% 

Powdered, bbls o 05% 05% 

Very bright refined o 01% 

Bright Yellow ' 04% 

Dark Yellow 6 03% 04 

SYRUPS AND MOLASSES. 

SYRUPS. per gallon. 

_. , bbls. %bbls. 

Dark 30 33 

Medium n 33 38 

Bright 38 43 

Redpath s Honey o 40 

2 gal. pails, i'io 1 15 

3 gal. pails. 1 45 1 50 

MOLASSES. 

Barrels... 28 32 

Half -barrels o 30 35 

SO A P. 

Babbitt's " 1776 " Soap Powder .... $3 50 




1 Box Lot 5 oo 

5 Box Lot 4 go 

Freight prepaid on 5 box lots. 

P. M. LAWRASON'S SOAP8. 

Wonderful, 100 bars $4 00 

Supreme, 100 bars 3 60 

Our Own Electric, 100 bars 2 00 

Sunflower, 100 bars 2 00 

BRANTFORD SOAP WORKS CO. 



rmmw 



Ivory liar— per box. 
3 lbs. and 2 6-16 lbs. , 60 bars in box $3 30 
13% oz. and 1 lb., 60 bars in box.. 3 30 
12 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 4 00 



44 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




YOU CAN 

PLEASE YOUR CUSTOMERS 



BY 



SELLING 



BRANTFORD STARCH 



10 oz. cakes, 100 cakes in box 3 60 

Twin cake, 11 % oz., 100 cakes in 

box 3 85 

All wrapped with lithographed wrapper, 
printed with finest alkali proof 'ink. Quota- 
tions of lower grades of all kinds of soap 
furnished on application. 

IHIBIPH SOAP CO. 

Pure, 60 bars, 12 oz., per box S3 00 

Silver Star, 100 bars, 12 oz., per box. . 4 00 

Royal City, 31b. bar, per lb 05 

Peerless, 2%-lb. bar 04 3 4 

Genuine Electric, 72 bars, per box 2 50 

TEAS. 

BLACK. 

Congou— per lb. per lb. 

Half Chests Kaisow, Mon- 

ing, Faking 12 60 

Caddies, Pakling, Kaisow 18 50 

INDIAN 

Darjeelings 35 55 

Assam Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 18 25 

CEYLON. 

Broken Pekoes 35 42 

Pekoes 20 40 

Pekoe Souchong 17 35 

CHINA GREENS. 

Gunpowder- 
Cases, extra firsts 42 50 

Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

Young Hyson — 

Cases, sifted, extra firsts. 42 50 

Cases, small leaf, firsts . . 35 40 
Half Chests, ordinary 

firsts 22 38 

Half Chests, seconds .... 017 19 

" thirds 15 17 

" " common 13 14 

PING SUEYS. 

Young Hyson- 
Half Chests, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 

Half Boxes, firsts 28 32 

" seconds .... 16 19 
JAPAN. 
Half Chests- 
Finest May pickings 38 40 

Choice 32 36 

Finest 28 30 

Fine 25 27 

Good medium 22 24 

Medium 19 20 

Good common 16 18 

Common 13% 15 

Nagasaki, % chests Pekoe 16 22 

" Oolong .... 14 15 

" Gunpowder 16 19 

" Sittings.... 07% 11 



SALADA " CEYLON. 

per lb. 

Green label, retailed at 30c 22 

Blue '• " 40c 30 

Red " " 50c 36 

Gold " " 60c 44 

Terms, 30 days net. 

TOBACCO ANT) < 1GARS. 

British Consols, 4's; Twin Gold 

Bar, 8s 59 

Ingots, rough and ready, 8s 57 

Laurel, 3's 49 

Brier, 7 s 47 

Index, 7s o 44 

Honeysuckle, 8'a 56 

Napoleon, 8's 50 

Victoria, 12 s 47 

Brunette, 12's 44 

Prince of Wales, in caddies 48 

in 40-lb. boxes 48 

Bright Smoking Plug Myrtle, T. k B., 

3's 60 

Lily, 7's 47 

Diamond Solace, 12s 50 

Myrtle Cut Smoking, 1 lb. tins 70 

%-lb. Plug. 6-lb. boxes 70 

oz. plug. 5-lb. boxes 70 

CANADIAN TOBACCO CO., MONTREAL. 

Cut Tobaccos— 

J/8Bh Com fort, 1-6. 5 lb. box 22 
Champion, M0,51ti.i>x 38 
LO. F. 1-10. Sib. box 28% 

Bohmer, 1-10, Sib, box 32% 

[mperia] Cigarette Tobacco, 1-10, 

51b. box 40 

Qneanel Tobacco, all sizes 60 

Crown Cut Plug Mixture, % lb. tin 50 
1 lb tin 47 
Cigarettes— 

per 1,000 

Sonadora Havana 10 00 

Royal Turkish Egyptian 10 00 

Creme de la Creme 7 50 

Marquise cigarettes, Canadian .... 7 00 

Imperial " " 3 50 

Plug tobaccos (sweet chewing) - 

Navy, in caddies 35 

Navy, plug mark 33 35 

Honey, boxes and caddies 43 

Spun roll chewing, boxes 55 

Plug smoking (with or without tags) — 

per lb. 
Black Crown smoking, in 

caddies 35 

Crown Rouge smoking 38 

Leaf tobacco, in bales 08 20 

Cigars- 
La Sonadora Reina Vic- 
toria Flor Fina, 1-20 $85 00 




La Sonadora Reina Bou- 
quet, 1-10 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 

Victoria Extra, 1-20 55 00 

Creme de la Creme Reina 

Victoria Special. 1-20 50 00 

Honey moon. Regalia Com- 

me il Fait, 1-40 55 00 

El Caza Culebras, 1-40 55 00 

La Fayette Reina Vic- 
toria, 1-20 32 50 

Noisy Boys, Blue Line, 1-20 .... 25 00 

Princess of Wales. Prin- 
cess, 1-10 25 00 

Ditto, low grades 13 50 20 00 

Cigars. 

B. HA VIS SONS, MONTREAL. 

Sizes. Per M. 

Madre E Hijo, Lord Lansdowne 460 00 

" Panetelas 60 00 

" Bouquet 60 00 

" Perfectos 85 00 

" Longfellow 85 00 

" Reina Victoria 80 00 

" Pins 55 00 

El Padre, Reina Victoria 55 00 

" Reina Victoria Especial.. 50 00 

Conchas de Regalia 50 00 

Bouquet 55 00 

Pins 50 00 

Longfellow 80 00 

Perfectos 80 00 

Mungo, Nine 35 00 

Cable, Conchas 30 00 

" Queens 29 00 

Cigarettes— All Tobacco — 

Cable 7 00 

El Padre 1 00 

Mauricio 15 00 

DOMINION CUT TOBACCO WORKS, MON- 
TREAL. 

Cigarettes— Per M. 

Athlete $7 50 

Puritan 6 25 

Sultana 5 75 

Derby 4 25 

B.C. No.l 4 00 

Sweet Sixteen 3 75 

The Holder 3 85 

Hyde Park 10 50 

Cut Tobaccos— per lb. 

Puritan, lOths, 5-lb. boxes 70 

Old Chum, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes .... 75 
Old Virginia, 1-10 lb. pkg., 10-lb. 

boxes 62 

Gold Block, 9ths, 5-lb. boxes. ... 73 

Cigarette Tobacco — 

B. C. N. 1, 1-10, 5-lb. boxes 83 



Puritan, 1-10 5-lb. boxes 
Athlete, per lb 



10 

R. 13% 

R. 14% 

ce, 14% 



Plug Tobaccos- 
Old Chum, plug, 4s, Solace, 16 lbs. 

8s, " 16 

8s, R. & R. 

" chew 78, R. & 

7b, Solace, 

' 8s, R. & R. 16 

8s, Solace, 15 

" plug 8s, Twist, 16 
" 3s, Solace, 17% 
" Is. 
" 12s, 
" 7s, 
" 5s. Twist 



O. V. 
O. V. 
O.V. 
Derby 
Derby 
Athlete 



17 

17% 
17 

9 



83 

1 15 



68 
68 
68 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
55% 
51 
51 
74 



WOODEWTARE. 

per do*. 

Pails, 2 hoop, clear. No. 1 $160 

" 3 165 

" 2 2 1 40 

" 3 2 1 

' painted "2 1 

Tubs, No. 9 

1 7 50 

2 6 50 

3 5 50 

Washboards, Globe 190 200 

Water Witch 1 40 

" Single Crescent 1 85 

Double " .... 2 75 

Jubilee 2 25 

" Globe Improved 2 00 

•' Quick and Easy 180 

World 1 75 

Rattler 1 30 

Butter Tubs 160 3 60 

Mops and Handles, combined 1 25 

Butter Bowls, crates assort'd 3 60 

THE B. B. EDDY CO. 

Washboards, Planet 16* 

Waverly 1 50 

XX 140 

X 125 

Electric Duplex 2 25 

Special Globe 150 

Per Case. 
Matches— 5-Case Lots, Single Caw- 
Telegraph »3 30 $3 50 

Telephone 3 10 3 30 

Tiger 2 60 2 80 

Parlor 1 70 1 75 

Red Parlor 1 70 1 75 

Safety 400 420 

Favorite 2 25 5 35 

Flamers 220 2 49 



Licorice Goods 



SOME OF OUR 
LEADERS ARE : 



TJ0ORG S CffiYUlE'S 



Komz 

Licorice 



r ^Pellets 

Stick bicoRicE 



YOUNG & SMYLIE, 



Pure Calabria "YftS" Licorice 
Acme Licorice Pellets 
Tar Licorice and Tolu Wafers 
Licorice Lozenges 
"Purity" Penny Licorice 

Brooklyn, N.Y, 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

■f For ♦ 

1 25 cents { 

♦ We will mail you a valuable ♦ 
X little book on £ 

I BUYING I 

1 SELLING AND % 

t HANDLING OF TEA t 

♦ This is a complete and use- ♦ 
+ ful work, which every grocer X 
T should have in his possession. J 



♦ The MacLean Publishing Co. ♦ 

i 26 Front St. West, Toronto. T 

♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦t ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

DURABLE PAILS and TUBS. 



TRY 




THEM 



The Wm. CAKE & SONS MANUFACTURING Co 

OF NEWMARKET, OUT., 

The goods are hooped -with Corrugated Steel 
Hoops, sunk in grooves in the staves and oannot 
possibly (all off. The hoops expand and contract 
with the wood. BEST GOODS MADB. 

Represented by 

Chas. Boeckh & 80ns, Toronto, 

H. A. Nelson & Sons, Montreal. 



THE 

Oakiille Basket Co., 

MANUFACTUBHRB OF 




i, 2, 3 bushel gram and root baskets, 
i, 2, 3 satchel lunch baskets. 
1, 2, 3 clothes baskets. 
1, 2, 3, 4 market baskets. 
Butcher and Crockery baskets. 
Fruit package of all descriptions. 

For tale by all Wooden ware Dealers 



Oakville. Ont. 



English 
Malt 

Six GOLD Medals YI^EGr AR 

GRIMBLE & CO., Ltd., LONDON, N. W. ENG. 

. . OPART'S SPECIALTIES . . 

• HIGH CLASS ■ ■ GREAT NOVELTY - - GOOD PROFIT - 

ODART'S PICKLE -_m_ - ODART'S SAUCE 

ODART & CO.. PARIS, FRANCE, AND LONDON, ENC. 



%*2&y. 




v, 




CLUBBING RATES 



TELLS what to buy and how to sell it ; gives a 
regular course of Window Dressing, Store 
Management, Advertising; describes all new 
goods, etc. What more do you want ? One Pointer 
from a single copy should net you at least Two 
Dollars. Twelve copies, or one year, should net you 
Twenty-four Dollars. This is a fact, and the reason 
we have subscribers 



The Dry Goods Review and ^< t (\(\ 
The Canadian Grocer Jj-""' 



Send for Samples. 



THE DRY GOODS REVIEW 

TORONTO .... .... MONTREAL 




N.B — The old Standard Brando! HORSESHOE 
Canned Salmon still takes the lead, and aBords the 
greatest satisfaction to both dealer and consumer, and 
for uniform excellence in quality and weight has no 
equal 

EVERY CAN WARRANTED. 

We are alsopackersof the well and favorably known 
Drands of BEAVER, COLUMBIA and TIGER, all 
guaranteed prime Red fish. 

ALL i-IVE GROCERS KEEP THEM. 



J. H. TODD & SON, 

Victoria, B.C., Owners. 

AGENTS— Geo. Stanway, Toronto, 

Agent for Ontario, 
" W. S. Goodhugh & Co,, Montreal. 

" Tees & Persse Winnipeg. 



Walter Balcer & Co. Limiteff, 

The Largest Manufacturers of 

PURE, HICH CRADE 

Cocoasand Chocolates 

on this continent, have received 

HIGHEST AWARDS 

from the great 

NDUSTRIALandFOOD 

EXPOSITIONS 

In Euro pe and A merica. 

fl A TTTTCk'Sr • I" view of the many 

^ ■^ a - U -*- ■*- v^-i-» • imitationsof the labels 
and wrappers on our goods, consumers should 
make sure that our place of manufacture, 
namely, Dorchester, Mass., >9 printed 
on each package. 




SOLO BY GROCERS EVERYWHERE. 



WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 
DORCHESTER, MASS. 



"ATHLETE" CIGARETTES THE CANADIAN GROCER 



DERBY" CIGARETTES 





B.RP. 
Cough Drops 



SOOTHING AND HEALING 



Convenient in size and shape 
and pleasant to the taste. 
Put up in 5-lb. Glass Front 
Canisters. 

Toronto Biscuit & 
Confectionery Co. 




The "GENUINE" 



Is a Chimney full of quality 

See our Registered Trade 

Mark on each one. 




Do not buy any so-called 
Flint Chimney, but insist 
on having the GENUINE 



GOWANS, KENT & CO., Toronto 




GOX'S GELATINE 



Always 
Trustworthy. 

E8TABLI8HED 1726 



Agents for Canada: 

C. E. COLSON, Montreal. 

D. MASSON & CO., Montreal. 
ARTHUR P. TIPPET & CO., 

Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Montieal 



EDWARD STILL 

Assignee, Accountant, Auditor, etc. 

1 Toronto street, TORONTO. 

Commercial Accounts and those of Estates, Munici- 
palities, etc., thoroughly audited and investigated. 
Charters obtained for Joint Stock Companies. 
Parties in difficulties can procure prompt settlements 
with creditors, on easy terms, without publicity. 



CHARLES F. CLARK, EDW. F. RANDOLPH 

President. Treasurer. 

ESTABLISHED 1849. 

THE BRADSTREET 

nEROINTILE dQENCT 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY, 

Executive Offices, PROPRIETORS. 

NOS. 279, 281 AND 283 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Officci in the principal cities of the United States 
Canada, the European Continent, Australia and 
in London, England, 
The Bradstreet Company is the oldest and, 
financially, the strongest organization of its 
kind— working in one interest and under one 
management — with wider ramifications, with 
more capital invested in the business, and it 
expends more money every year for the collec- 
tion and dissemination of information than any 
similar institution in the world. 

TnROVTn nFinri ,J6 Front St. East and 

TORONTO OFFICES 2? Wellington St> Eagt 
TH08. C. IRVING, Superintendent. 

OAKEY'S 

•WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

The Original and only Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery. 



> 

r 


TJ 

2 

o 

H 
I 

O 
> 

30 

O 
r 

2 

> 

Cfl 

3 
O 
* 

2 

O 

H 
O 
03 
> 

o 
o 
o 



John Oakey & Sons, limited, 

Manufacturers of Emery, Black Lead, Emery and 
Glass Cloths and Papers, etc 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Representative in Canada : 
JOHN FORMAN, 650 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



"RICHMOND STRAIGHT CUT" CIGARETTES 



"SWEET CAPORAL" CIGARETTES 



VOL. X 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, FEBRUARY 7, 1896 



No. 6 



IN COMPETITION WITH THE WORLD 

We have received the Highest Awards Made. 



Sell 

ONLY 
THE 

BEST! 



THESE substantiate our claim that 



Qolmans M ustard 

IS ™ E BEST IN ™ E WORLD 



To Grocers 



The season is on for Marshall's popular Scotch Pickled Herrings. All 
principal wholesalers carry stock. The margin of profit to the dealer 
is good. He should not be without this leading brand. 



" CROWN 



*> 



BRAND 



Marshall's Scotch Herrings 



FROM THE FAMED ABERDEEN FISHERIES 



In Kegs 
Firkins 
Half Barrels 
Barrels 



FULLS and 
MEDIUMS 

SOLE AGENTS : 



N. B. — Marshall & Co., Aberdeen, own their fishing fleet; 
pack only the Finest Selected Herrings. Every package 

guaranteed. Their Kippered. Fresh Herrings, Herrings in To- 
mato Sauce, etc., are very superior. 



WALTER R. WONHAM & SONS, 



3 1 5 and 3 1 6 
Board of Trade Building, 



Montreal 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



139 MEDALS AND HIGHEST AWARDS FROM THE WORLD'S EXHIBITIONS. 



Purveyors by special appointment 
to Her Majesty 

THE QUEEIS 

Empress of India. 




Purveyors by special appointment 
to H.R.H. the 

PRINCE OF WALES 

K.G., K.T., K.P. 



MACONOCMIE 




BROTHERS 



131 Leadenhall Street, London, England 



Manufacturers of First Quality 



Potted Meats 
Fish Delicacies 
Jelly Squares 
Pickles 
Sauces 



Vinegars 



• • • • L~dlLs* 



The Best 



The World Produces 



All particulars from agents : — 

SEETON & MITCHELL, Halifax, N.S. 
LIGHTBOUID, RALSTON & CO., Montreal 



Agents for British Columbia : 



& - 

Vancouver and Victoria 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Standard Goods the Best to Handle 



FOR 



P URITY 



vkoaafe. 



FOR 



S TRENGTH 



TRADE 

This brand is always reliable. 



MARK 



Highest test 98*% pure. 



Madeomy The UNITED ALKALI CO., Ltd., Liverpool. 



"New Process" Soda, finest on the market. 



Under the direct 
patronage of 
His Royal Highness 
The Prince of Wales 




And His Excellency 
Lord Aberdeen 
The Governor-General 
of Canada. 



A FEW OF 




The 

LEVER TOP 
PICKLE 

NO CORK NO LEAKAGE 

Most Useful Jar When Empty. 



. . LAZENBY LEADERS . . 

Table Jellies 

Chow Chow Pickles 

Lucca Cream Olive Oil 

Solidified Soup Squares 
Assorted Potted Meats 

Fortt's Oliver Biscuits 

Harvey's Sauce 



ALL ABSOLUTELY PURE. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 

A. P. TIPPET & CO. 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 

F. H. TIPPET & CO. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



I PAPER 1 
I BAGS 1 



PRINTED 



IN 



ANY 



STYLE 



1 FLOUR 1 
I SACKS 1 



From 2 to 30 lbs. 
Regular Sizes. 



From 3<4 to 50 lbs. 
Regular Sizes. 



?IUUiUlUiUiUUMiUUU^ 



^UUUUUUUUUUUIUUI? 



Our Manilla Paper for the above has, under 
severe and various tests, proved to be stronger 
than that of any other manufacturer. 

Count is fully guaranteed, and every bag 
and sack is sound. 

The sizes are the largest of their kind, and 
there is no skimping of paper in their 
make-up. 

Send for samples and prices. 



THE 



E. B. Eddy Co. 

Hull, Canada 



ltd. 



319 St. James Street, MONTREAL 



38 Front Street West, TORONTO 



Agents: F. H. Andrews & Son, Quebec; A. Powis, Hamilton; J. A. Hendry, Kingston; 
Schofield Bros., St. John ; J. Peters & Co., Halifax; Tees & Persse, Winnipeg; James 
Mitchell, Victoria. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Find their equal if you can . . 





Approved by the highest medical authorities as a Per- 
fect Cheese, being easily digested. It is a soft, rich 
cheese, unexcelled for lunch or dinner in Private Houses, 
Clubs, Restaurants and Hotels. Put up in White 
Opal Pots. It is especially adapted for travelling or 
excursion parties. For sale by all leading Wholesale 
and Retail Grocers. 

A. F. MacLaren & Co., Toronto 



IF THERE IS A GROCER IN 
CANADA WHO HAS 
NOT TRIED 




LET HIM 

WRITE FOR 

SAMPLES AT ONCE 



14 Lemoine St., MONTREAL 



. . ADDRESSES . . 

128 Richmond St. W„ TORONTO 



Hudson Bay Co., WINNIPEG 




Agents, 



ROSE & LAFLAMME 



4QQ St. Paul Street 



. . , MONTREAL 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



The St. Lawrence Sugar Refining Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

Laboratory of Inland Revenue, 
Office of Official Analyst, 

Montreal, April 8th, 1895. 

" I hereby certify that I have drawn, by my own hand, ten samples 
of the ST. LAWRENCE SUGAR REFINING CO.'S EXTRA STAND- 
ARD GRANULATED SUGAR, indiscriminately taken from ten lots 
of about 150 bbls. each, I have analysed same, and find them 
uniformly to contain : 

99ioo to 100 per cent, of Pure Cane Sugar 

with no impurities whatever." 

(Signed) JOHN BAKER EDWARDS, Ph.D., D.C.L 

Prof, of Chemistry and Pub. Analyst, 

MONTREAL. 



Do You Sell Crockery ? 

Then we want your business. We manufacture all kinds of Yellow, and Bristol 
Glazed goods, also Rockingham Ware, which we guarantee fully equal to any on 
the market, either of home or foreign production. Catalogues, prices or travelers' 
attendance, if you drop us a card. 



Brantford Stoneware Mfg. Co. Ltd. - Brantford. 



OTHER SPECIALTIES. 

NOUGAT 
RAHAT LAKUHM 
ALMOND ROCK 
EL MAHNA 




BUTTER SCOTCH , 

^ (The Celebrated Sweet for Children). Jk 



MEDALS AND DIPLOMAS. 

PARIS 

SYDNEY 

MELBOURNE 



CANADIAN SPECIALTY CO., Toronto, bk 3»a*»- £M RQSE & LAFLAMME. Montreal. 



WORKS : LONDON, W.O. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



Silver Dust 
Washing Powder 



Will make you trade and money. . . 
Cleans anything and everything in the house 
without the use of any kind of Soap. 
Does it in half the time for half the money. 
Your customers will be surprised and de- 
lighted with a trial. . . . . . . . • 



PUT UP a FN 5, lO AND 25c. PACKAGES. 



SILVER DUST MFG. CO., Hamilton 



CRESCENT BRAND 




BRUNNER, MOND & CO., Ltd, 

3STOETH-WICH, ZEZDTGKL-^IISriD 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Y , , BICARBONATE of SODA 

' ^ADE MAfl^' REFINED and RECRYSTALIZED--The Purest i 

SODA CRYSTALS 



REFINED and RECRYSTALIZED— The Purest and Cheapest in the Market. 



Of the Finest Quality. 

In Barrels and Drums. 
Orders for direct importation from 
the Wholesale Trade only. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA 



A GOOD THIN6 




To suit every taste. 



4 CRAPES MANUFACTURED 

No. i. Pure Mocha and Java 
" 2. Pure Java 
" 3. Pure Jamaica 

" 4. Pure West Indian Coffees 
with a small propor- 
tion of chicory. 



BUY IN SMALL LOTS 
AND OFTEN 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



WE DON'T 

1/1/ /\ f\l I if C J I J To take for granted all we say regarding Teas ; 

^■^ ^■^ we simply ask a fair, intelligent test of the lines 

we bring before you from week to week. You know a good Tea when you see 
one, and we leave the result with you. 

IS OW OUR EYES are open for all the good things the market affords, and 
this week we wish to direct your attention to some really splendid values 
we have secured in 

Japan Teas 

To retail at 25c. You have our statement that they are above the average in 
point of style and liquor. We await your judgment. 

Drop us a card for samples and quotations, or examine standards in the hands 
of our travellers. 




W. H. GILLARD & CO. 



Wholesalers 
Only 



HAMILTON 



JOHN MOUAT, Northwest Representative, WINNIPEG. 



u 




BL 



M 



looking for sleepy canned 
goods. BOULTERS' are "THE" 

sellers. If you doubt it, 
just order a few, that's all 
we ask 



Boulters' 

Goods are 
Pure Goods 



I WETHEY S 1 

^~~ CONDENSED ~"^ 




AUTfLVsu^E CRUST ,STHEN 




% Mince Meat 



THE SECRET OF OUR SUCCESS 



A most delicious preparation, which 
keeps well, and is easily and quickly 
made up into pies, patties, etc. 
All wholesalers have it. . . . 



Manufacturer, 

ST. CATHARINES 



£ J. H. WETHEY, __ 



This journal has the largest circulation and the largest advertising 

patronage of any grocery paper in the world. We prove it. 




Vol. X. (Published Weekly) 



TORONTO AND MONTREAL, FEBRUARY 7, 1896 



(S2.00 per Year) No. 6 



DROPS FROM THE EDITOR'S PEN. 

Like candy to children is candor to adults: 
it wins 

A perverse son is as a cloud and not as a 
sun to his parents. 

The canner who puts up soaked peas is 
trying to " soak " the public. 

If you want to make your business pay, 
advertise it then without delay. 

'Tis business built on proper lines that 
make men rich these modern times 

Some men are big circulation liars because 
the circulation of their journals is small. 

Unlike turnip seed, the seeds of energy 
sown in the morning of life always bear fruit. 

The effective advertiser is a consistent ad- 
vertiser, let times be dull or let times be 
bright. 

It is not necessary to advertise heavy 
goods in order that your " ads." may carry 
weight. , 

The only anchor which will fasten dis- 
agreeable customers to your store is pleas- 
antness. 

Popularity built upon good goods is as a 
house built upon a rock which the floods of 
competition cannot remove. 

Tarrying long at the pool table does not 
develop mental muscle necessary to enable 
one to pull well in the race of life. 

A man must climb if he wou'd win suc- 
cess in life ; but if it is failure he wants all 
he needs do is to sit down — and slide. 

Merchants who consider they can do 
without a trade paper are as mariners who 
fancy they can dispense with the compass. 

Hard workers in their young days will be 
spared remorse in their old days, no matter 



what their lot may be. The sense of duty 
done is worth more than gold, and is more 
lasting. 

The richest of all jewels is consistency, 
and yet it requireth not gold for a setting, 
and is at the command of the rich as well as 
the poor. 

The president of a bus ness men's associa- 
tion may not necessarily be the brains of 
the organization, but he is supposed to do 
most of the thinking. 

The Retail Grocers' Association of Cleve- 
land is wrestling with the pedlar question. 
It is to be hoped the grocers will win at 
least a majority of the falls. 

Never designed was it that man should 
be a donkey, and yet a near relative of this 
patient but stubborn animal is the merchant 
who persists in indiscriminate credit-giving. 

The advertisement in the trade paper is 
the traveler's herald, going before him, often 
many days, and announcing to buyers what 
manner of goods the house he represents has 
to sell. 

The merchant who pays his clerks in the 
coin of the realm only, for services rendered, 
is not giving them their full wages : tuition 
in business ethics should also be forth- 
coming. 

Mis(s) Understanding and Mis(s) Repre- 
sentation are two misses that merchants 
should try and keep out of their store. Their 
reputation is not good, and where they abide 
customers will not come. 

If men won't work for their families they 
should be made work for the state, for while 
their families may not gain anything, it is 
certain they will not lose anything by such 
a condition, and the state and society would 
assuredly benefit thereby. 

Business success is won by continuity of 
effort, and he who, attracted by some will-o'- 
the wisp, is ever and anon shunting off into 



some side track can no more hope to suc- 
ceed than can the runner who stops in the 
race to flirt with the cook. 

If all merchants were as zealous to guard 
the good name of their own business as they 
sometimes are to malign their competitors, 
it would be better all round, financially as 
well as morally. 

A poor man with a dollar would not hesi- 
tate to invest it where he knew one hundred 
and twenty-five cents could be obtained in 
return ; but a merchant with an appreciation 
of the benefits of advertising will refuse to 
advertise on the plea that he cannot afford it. 

An alleged creditor of the Canada Atlantic 
railway has adopted the expedient of at- 
tempting to wreck the trains of the debtor. 
The expedient is novel, but it cannot be 
commended. Neither can any other system 
which injures more the innocent than the 
debtor. 

The Latin motto which the Consumers' 
Gas Co. of Toronto affix to their documents, 
and the interpretation thereof is, " For the 
Common Good." A friend of mine thinks 
this a travesty. I don't. It means for the 
common good of the shareholders, only the 
well-known modesty of the company pre- 
cludes it from affixing the word "share- 
holders." 

I see by the programme of the Western 
Packers' Canned Goods Association, which 
is to meet in Chicago this month, that the 
"Hon. Wellington Boulter, of Picton, Cana- 
da," is down for a paper, on " The Social 
Features of these Gatherings." I suppose 
it has reference to our mutual friend Mr. 
Wellington Boulter, president of the Can- 
adian Packers' Association. He is honor- 
able enough, but he has not yet got the 
honorable with a cap. "H," although it is 
not because Mr. B.'s fellow canners have 
not made an effort to have the title prefixed 
to his name. Vide resolutions of the asso- 
ciation asking Sir Mackenzie Bowell to ap- 
point him to the Senate. Thoie Yankees 
are great people for anticipating. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



A GRIEVANCE TO CANADA. 

Editor Grocer, — The following extract 
from The St. John Sun of 27. h inst, if re- 
published in your paper, which is probably 
read by more business men than any other 
paper published in the Dominion, will doubt- 
less have a good effect in impressing on the 
minds of our fellow countrymen the great in- 
justice which, we, as residents of St. John, the 
natural winter port of Canada, are suffering 
at the hands of the Canadian Government. 

When the Canadian Pacific Railway was 
being constructed our people were promised 
that in return for the taxation which was 
being put on us we would be doubly repaid 
by having the winter exports of the great 
country which was being developed pass 
through our port. In anticipation of the ful- 
filment of these promises, our people un- 
complainingly bore the burden, and in order 
to be capable of handling the trade, spent a 
sum of over $300,000 in building a grain 
elevator and freight sheds and otherwise 
improving our facilities. 

Now that we are in a position to handle 
the trade, what do we find ? Simply this : 
that the Government, instead of rewarding 
us, compels us, in common with the other 
residents of Canada, to pay for heavy sub- 
sidies granted to the Dominion and Allan 
companies to deliver the export and import 
trade of Canada via a United States port, 
viz., Portland, Maine. 

We are actually compelled to bear taxa- 
tion, the result of which is to build up a rival 
port in the United States at the expense of 
our own city. 

To give an idea of the large sums of money 
which are left with the citzens of Portland 
by means of these steamers, a Portland 
paper is authority for the statement that the 
Scotsman distributed $12,000 on her last 
visit. 

How long would the citizens of any United 
States city submit to being taxed in order to 
build up with United States trade a rival 
city in Canada ? 

There is a growing trade between the 
Upper and Lower Provinces, the balance of 
which is large'y i n favor of the former. 

If these steamship companies were subsi- 
dized to make St. John their term nus the 
money distributed would be of immense 
service to our merchants, and bv bettering 
them financially react to the good of the 
Upper Province manufacturers. 

This is not the case with Portland, Maine. 
The Americans take all they can get, but 
give nothing in return save insults to the 
Mother Country. W.th a tariff wall sur- 
rounding Maine, trade is out of the question. 
If every exporter and every importer would 
mike it a point to order their shipments via 
St. John great results would be accom- 
plished. Yours, etc., 

St. John. 

[The paragraph referred to by "St. John" 
readi as follows : " The ss. Vancouver sailed 



from Portland, Me., on Thursday with a cargo 
valued at $203 000. The Canadian portion 
of her orgo consisted of 17230 bushels of 
peas, 5,171 maple blocks, 986 wooden doors, 
78 crates of ro<d carts, 58 organs, 13 cases of 
sewing machines, 12 cases of p >ultry, 8 
cases and 29 bales of leather. 1,680 bales of 
cut hay, 228 case? of apples. 710 boxes of 
ham and bacon, 43 tierces of pork, 92 cases 
of canned meats, 13 boxes of butter, 120 
packages of agricultural implements, 63 
crates of p illeys, 36 package? of emery 
stones, 25 boxes of tobacco, 10 crates of 
bicycle rims, 125 boxes of beans, no boxes 
of peas, 250 bags of oatmeal, 120 bales of 
oil cake, 19 packages of sundries."] 



A SENSIBLE VIEW. 

He who avers that advertising draws money out of in- 
stead of into the pocket is in the same boat with he who 
could not see the logic of baiting his hook with a minnow 
to catch a mackerel.— Canadian Grocer. 

So many men, when told the cost of an 
advertisement, will open their mouths in 
sheer horror at the mere idea of paying such 
a price for advertising. They forget that 
the more an advertisement originally costs 
the better results it is liable to produce, for 
the high-priced publications are usually the 
ones who have found that their advertising 
was worth the high price charged to adver- 
tisers. The first cost of an advertisement 
means in itself nothing. If you have to 
mortgage your house to spend $1,000 in ad- 
vertising, and get $4 000, it has paid you, 
hasn't it ? — Grocery World. 



A QUICK PASSAGE. 

A prominent business man of this city, 
who is extensively interested in Canadian 
steamship service, gave The Herald a short 
interview last evening. He said that the 
port of St. John, N.B., was rapid y coming 
to the front as a desirable and advantageous 
freight and passenger route. It was not 
behind its rivals on the other side of the 
line, and, as an illustration, remarked that 
the Lake Ontario, of the Beaver Line, left 
Liverpool Saturday, January 18, at 4 p.m., 
arriving at St. John on Tuesday, the 28th 
ult., at 6 a.m. The passengers left on the 
afternoon train, reaching Montreal Wednes- 
day morning. Twenty cars of freight were 
despatched the same evening, and were de- 
livered in Montreal Thursday at noon. Thus 
goods were shipped from Liverpool via this 
route and delivered in Montreal in the short 
time of twelve days. — Montreal Herald. 



BECOMING NERVOUS 

It is now understood that a very large 
amount of sugar has been ordered forward 
from Cuba to be stored and held in New 
York. About 25,000 bags have already ar- 
rived, and the total will probably reach at 
least ioo.oco bags ; some estimates are 
double that amount. This movement is due 
to the disturbed state of aff urs on the island, 
and is believed to h ve been quickened by 
pressure from underwn ers who were becom- 
ing nervous over the fear of destruction of 
stock by the insurgents. 



WINNIPEG CITY TRAVELERS. 

WHO THEY ARE AND WHAT THEY REP- 
RESENT—ANNUAL CELEBRATION. 

WINNIPEG, within the last eight 
years, has made such rapid strides 
in the commercial arena that she 
now ranks as fourth in the Dominion of 
Canada as a wholesale distribut ng point, 
and perhaps a word or two in reference to 
those who are potent factors and prominent 
in helping to push the chariot of commercial 
industry along might not be amis=, and 
prove an avenue of introduction to the con- 
suming public of a lot of jolly good fellows, 
remarks The Tribune of that city. The city 
traveler as a rule is an unassuming in- 
dividual, bat a firm believer in 

"All things come to those who hustle 
For men of brains or men of muscle ' 

His face and handsome figure has become 
familiar in this city's business thoroughfares, 
as he pushes along with keen eye and active 
mind through the crowded streets, not only 
looking after the interests of the retail mer- 
chant, but feeling conscious of being amicus 
humani generis. Possessing tact, push, 
principle and ability, the business men have 
come to realize that they are a medium that 
cannot successfully be dispensed with in the 
commercial world. As the city travelers are 
not members of the Northwest Travelers' 
Association, The Tribune understands it is 
their intention to form an association of 
their own, and, being inspired by the success 
of their At Home last season, the members 
are making arrangements for a brilliant 
gathering at an early date. 

Following are the names of the represen- 
tatives and firms : 

Alex. Pratt, for the firm of Paulin & Co. 

D. B. McRea, for Ogilvie Milling Co. 

A. K. Morrison, for McPherson Fruit Co. 

R Barclay, for Standard Oil Co. 

K. J. Johnston*, for McKenzie & Powia, 

Wm. DeCow, for Blackwood Bros. 

N. Hughes, for the Rublee Fruit Co. 

John Home, for Thompson, Codvillc & Co. 

R. S. Sharpe, for Imperial Oil Co. 

J. M. Scott, for Strang & Co. 

D. M. Home, for Sutherland & Campbell. 
M. B. Steele, for J. Y. Griffin & Co. 

J. Dickie, ford. F. & J. Gait. 

J. K. Atkinson, for Dyson-Gibson Co. 

A. E. Scott, for Lang Manufacturing Co. 

G. H. Spurgeoti, for Turner, Maekeand & Co. 

M. E. Carroll, for Lake of the Woods Milling Co. 

R. Galna, for Parsons Produce Co. 

T. H izlewiod, for Riddell M mufacturing Co. 

E. Tugwell, for McKenzie & Mills. 

Hugh Armstrong, for Consolidated Stationery Co. 
A. Towne, for Brown Packing Co. 

— Clinton, for Ferguson Stationery Co. 
J. Warren, for A. Maedonald & Co. 
Geo. Parr, for Monsoon Tea Co. 

R. Buettner, for Dalasala Confectionery Co. 
John Mouat, for W. H. Gillard & Co., Hamilton. 
H. Buckle, for Buckle & Sons, 
W. Sloan, for J. E. Dingman. 
J. A. Thompson, for J. Carman. 

— Williams, for Williams & Hilton. 
T. Reed, for J. .1. Philp, 

— Hood, for Escott & Co. 
Geo. Adam, agent. 

E. W. Ashley, agent. 

The annual celebration of the city travel- 
lers of Winnipeg will be held February 17. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



YOU CAN DEPEND UPON THEM 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



HILLWATTEE 1 L 



L. P. & Co. Coffees . | NILLIini ILL | l. P. & Co. Spices . 
Diamond Crystal Salt | TPFh A | Roberts' Jellies .... 

*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦ 
LUCAS, STEELE & BRISTOL, agents Hamilton 

DO YOU WANT THE FINEST TRUE 

WE HAVE II 



Moyune Young Hyson 



ON THE MARKET? 
DO YOU WANT THE 



Best Japan Tea 



IN CANADA? 
DO YOU WANT AN HONE8T 



WE HAVE IT 



Blended Indian Tea ? We have it 



A GREAT SELLER AT A QUARTER 

IF NEEDING TEAS WRITE US FOR SAMPLES AND GIVE US AN OPPORTUNITY 

TO PROVE OUR ASSERTIONS. 



JAMES TURNER & CO. - Hamilton 



TEAS 



We will offer during January exceptional 
values to clear out short lines. See our 
samples before buying. 

BALFOUR & CO. Who, S&r. Hamilton, Ont. 



10 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 




ggiftttSSttSSSft ^^ 



s?as»^i S&9i^^^^ 



FISH 



Lake 
Lake 
Lake 



White 
Trout 
Herring 



Fish 



Fall Catch 



No. 



i Labrador Herring, in barrels and ^-barrels. 
No. i Split Herring, in barrels and ^-barrels. 
Kegs Loch Fyne Herring. 

Choice Medium Scaled Herring. 
Quintals Dry Codfish. 



Whole Fletched Codfish, ioo-lb. cases. 
Whole Table Codfish, ioo-lb. cases. 

Boneless Codfish, i and 2-lb. bricks. 

Boneless Fish, in 25 and 40-lb. boxes. 
y 2 Quintals Pollock. 




H. P. ECKARDT & CO. 



Wholesale 
Grocers, 



TORONTO 



THINGS TO THINK ABOUT. 

ONE thing is certain in this age of un- 
certainty in regard to the provision 
and other markets, and that is : 
there are a whole lot more bears than bulls 
in Chicago, and some of them grizz'y old 
customers at that. A person has only to 
take into consideration the following items 
which affect the business more or less, to 
make up his mind whether he knows any- 
thing about the situation or not, and the 
probabilities in store for the future. 

(1) Australian competition in beef, tallow, 
butte*-, etc. What effect, if any, it will have 
on the markets here, taking into considera- 
tion that they are fast overcoming the old 
difficulties which have beset them in refri- 
geration, etc., and also that preference will 
be given them, all things being equal, of 
course, in England ? 

(2) The prospects for all manner of pro- 
duct in Hamburgh, Antwerp, Rotterdam, 
London and other points. The conditions 
governing the conditions, etc. Stocks of oils, 
neutral, etc., must be figured at these points, 
and whether Nelson, Morris & Co. and 
others will keep them up or allow them to 
diminish, and what will the effect be in 
either case? 

(3) The existing stocks all over the world 
of all kinds of material, and the probabilities 
in the future. 

(4) The probabilities in the south as re- 
gards corn, cattle, cotton, cottonseed oil, 
provisions, etc. 

(5) The price of cottonseed this season, 
and the effect the meal will have on the 
western cattle, if used, etc. ? 

(6) Probability of shortage in cattle and 
hogs, and vice versa. 

(7) Whether the hog cholera has got away 
with all the pigs, except those it caused to 
be prematurely marketed, or whether the 
large crop of corn necessitates a correspond- 
ing large crop of hogs at correspondingly low 
prices, etc. ? 

(8) Whether all the stock cattle were mar- 
keted last year through hay crop failure, 



etc., or whether this country, being so large, 
the effect of such a possibility will not be 
felt? 

(9) Whether microscopic inspection, "beef 
combines," horse beef industry, butchers' 
unions, railroad and other strikes, trouble 
between England and America (or, more 
properly, between Olney and Salisbury), 
the Cuban matter or the Armenian, or the 
Chinese or the silver question 16 to 1 bar I, 
or the forthcoming Presidential election, or 
cinch bug, frost drouth, heavy rains, locusts, 
grasshoppers, trichinae, railroad and steam- 
boat rates, Standard oil, whiskey trust, Ar- 
mour, Cudahy and other minor matters will 
have any effect on the market ? 

These, dear reader, are only a few of the 
many items which are to be studied if you 
would " form " an opinion as to whether you 
know anything about the matter or not. 
There are people who reckon they do, bar 
accident or some unforeseen possibility. 

We might add that the people, having 
been forced to study economy in the imme- 
diate past, will they relax sufficiently to 
cause an increased consumption, or are they 
to be considered at all ; in fact, is it neces- 
sary in order to reduce stocks to have con- 
suming population ? If pink-eye breaks out 
among the Oregon cayuses or Martin's 
shanty is closed by order of the city, or the 
investigation now being prosecuted proves 
there does exist a beef combine ; or if Mr. 
J. Sterling Morton becomes president, what 
effect will such have on the market ? Specu- 
lation is rife as to whether Mr. Armour 
owns all the cash stuff or not, and whether 
he intends to bull the market a little this 
month, late as it is. Between " hay and 
grass " is a neat way of summing up the 
matter when you really don't know " which 
way the cat is going to jump." How profound- 
edly wise many men look when asked for 
opinions anent things in general and the out- 
look in particular. How many bases are 
brought forward to set the argument on. 
The right side is the safest always, and all a 
fellow has to do in the world is to " get 
there. 1 ' Is it any wonder that some of the 
' boys " go into a quiet corner and let go a 



demoniacal laugh with the least sign of 
risibility on their features, and then look 
around to see if they have been observed ? — 
National Provisioner. 



SUGAR BEET IN LEAMINGTON. 

Leamington and the Township of Mer- 
sea, it appears, are likely to prove a success- 
ful sugar beet growing district. 

In May, 189;, W. J. Smith, druggist, who 
has taken an active interest in procuring a 
beet sugar factory in Leamington, distributed 
about 60 pounds of beet seed among some 
70 or 75 of the farmers in that vicinity, and 
last November sent 17 sample lots of beets 
raised, each sack containing one large and 
several smaller ones, to Prof. Shuttleworth, 
of the Guelph Agricultural College, to have 
them tested for their percentage in sugar 
and purity, and has just received returns. 
Prof. Shuttleworth was surprised that beets 
of so large size as those from Leamington 
should analyse so well, and to make sure 
had duplicate analysis made : both reports 
agreed. 

The average analysis of the 17 samples 
showed solids 16.99; sugar in juice, 15.38 ; 
purity, 00.60. Many samples, of course, 
were much above this average. Leaming- 
ton thus has exceptional facilities, and un- 
doubtedly the factory located there will 
prove a complete success.— Banner, Chat- 
ham. 



CANNED VEGETABLES IN THE U.S. 

Says The Trade, of Baltimore : •' It is 
now four months since the close of the pack 
of fruits and vegetables of 1895, and in the 
ordinary calculations of the trade, one-half 
of the pack should have been taken from 
the producers, and probably should be con- 
sumed. There is every reason to believe this 
is so, yet the remaining half hangs as heav- 
ily on the market almost as if there had 
never been a case consumed. Yet the move- 
ment is steady and almost uninterrupted, 
differing from experience of former years in 
the smallness of wholesale orders and hand- 
to-mouth character of trade." 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 11 



^mmm^Fmmmm?nmmmmm!!fmmmmm!!fmmMFmn?m^f!?fmmmmm!!fmmmnrt?f?t?n^ 



Teas 



Complete Stock. Prices Right. 

We are also Wholesale Agents for 



IN LEAD PACKETS ONLY 
FOUR QUALITIES 
"A PERFECT BLENDED TEA" 



"Kurma" 



| DAVIDSON & HAY, EKST Toronto, Ont. | 






THEY ARE DEAR DOLLARS \ 

that go into a shopkeeper's till at the cost of the shopper's satisfaction. 



' SSSe^ 11 Buckwheat Flour , 

We are very jealous of the quality we send out V 

* THE TILLSON COMPANY, Ltd. to™*.*. o»t. \ 



•< 

4 
4 
4 

l 



Saying " it's best " . . i 

Doesn't prove it. If you want to prove the superiority of Flagship 
Salmon, sample a can for yourself. Let your own eyes and tongue 
be the judges. Compare it with any other brand you wish — nothing 
can beat it. 



t ROBEBTWAK I , & co..ua. : Canadian Pacific Packing Co. 

% Sole Agents 4 

I Victoria, b.c. LULU ISLAND, B.C. 



12 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



MUST USE CANADIAN PORTS. 

THE points made by the correspondent 
signing " St. John " are not altogether 
new to the readers of this paper. We 
have always been strong advocates of com- 
pelling all subsidized steamship lines to 
make some port in Canada their terminal 
point, and we are happy to be able to say 
that at least one member of the Government 
was induced to vote in favor of the subsidy 
to the Beaver Line in order to make St. 
John the terminal point from some of the 
arguments brought to his attention in these 
columns. 

It is a little more than a year since we pub- 
lished several articles showing how much 
money was actually distributed by some 
local steamship lines in Halifax for wages 
and supplies each trip. Many were sur- 
prised when they read them, and became as 
strong advocates of a Canadian port as we 
are. 

We have discussed the question with 
many of the leading business men in Mon- 
treal and west, and when they understood 
the matter they thoroughly agreed that the 
Government must compel all subsidized 
lines to make Canadian ports their terminal 
points. It is for the Maritime Provinces to 
interest the merchants and manufacturers in 
Quebec, Ontario and west. When they do 
they will have no difficulty in securing their 
active support. The Government are now 



in a better humor to listen than ever before. 
For years the business men in different lo- 
calities have submitted meekly to unfair — to 
unjust — treatment at the hands of the Minis- 
try at Ottawa. Strange, however, they did not 
blame the Government, but the business 
men in other cities who they supposed had 
a " pull " 

The MacLeans' Trade Journals took the 
matter up, and for months they have been 
exposing grievance after grievance — first in 
one city, then another, now in this section 
of trade, then in thit. These paper.-, with 
their principal offices in Toronto and Mont- 
real, and staff correspondents in the leading 
centres, brought business men in every part 
of Canada closer together. It was found 
that the most urgent representations of 
business men everywhere were treated with 
indifference by a Government whose chief 
object should be to promote the interests of 
trade. Montreal and Toronto Boards were 
positively snubbed for bringing up matters 
that were of vital importance to their mem- 
bers. 

Thus, learning that the complaints were 
not confined to any trade or to any locality, 
but that all suffered alike, the tempers of 
business men began to rise above party con- 
siderations. The Government was told that 
unless more attention was paid to the re- 
quirements of business men they would no 
longer receive their support. Even that had 
no effect. Their opportunity came, as we 



pointed out at the time, with the election 
in Montreal Centre, when the business men 
— to us; a sporting term — simply wiped the 
floor with the Government candidate. They 
repeated the dose a few days later in Jacques 
Cartier, a suburb of Montreal with a large 
business vote. 

These were the arguments needed to 
bring the Government to its senses. They 
did. As we have said, now is the time for 
those who will directly benefit — and the re- 
mainder of Canada will benefit indirectly — 
to interest business men everywhere. They 
are in no temper to be trifled with by politi- 
cians. 



A LIMITED COMPANY. 

The Montreal agents have been notified 
that J. S. Fry & Sons, Bristol, have for 
family reasons converted their business into 
a private company, limited. All the shares 
will be held by members of the Fry family, 
and there will be no change in the manage- 
ment. The name of the new company is 
J. S. Fry & Sons, Limited. 



QUICK WORK. 

At 4.55 last Saturday afternoon a telegram 
was received by the E. B. Eddy Co., of Hull, 
from a Toronto daily paper, ordering a car- 
load of paper to be delivered as quickly as 
possible. The car was loaded same after- 
noon, left Ottawa on the C.P.R. freight at 
6.10 p.m., and arrived in Toronto the follow- 
ing Monday morning. 



Money Makers 



THREE WINNERS — They have been prepared with a yiew of making 
them the very finest Gelatines on the market. They are attractively clothed and 
present a fine, clean appearance when they are opened up. Appearance is not every- 
thing — it helps. We have put quality inside to make the goods sure sellers. 



Knox's 
Sparkling 
Calves Foot 
Gelatine 



Makes 2 quarts of Jelly 
of the greatest purity 
and finest flavor. 



ORDER A SAMPLE 



Knox's 
Crystallized 
Fruit 
Gelatine 

Makes 1 quart Jelly. 
Do not be without a 
supply. 

THERE'S MONEY IN IT 



Knox's 

Acidulated 

Gelatine 



Makes 2 quarts of Jelly. 
Any flavor can be used. 
Only one teaspoonful 
and water. 

QUICKLY PROFITABLE 



Agents, 



A. E. RICHARDS & CO. 



Also Agents for . . . 

Knox's Egg Preserver 



Caledonia 



Ont. 



All Wholesale Houses 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



13 



ADD to your POPULARITY and PROSPERITY by handling only STRAIGHT GOODS 

IN THE FRONT RANK ARE 

CARR & CO.'S 




English Biscuits 

Are exported to all parts of the world. 



Established 1831. 

The original manufacturers of 
Fancy Biscuits by Machinery. 

Appointed Biscuit Manufactur- 
ers to H. M. the Queen by special 
warrant, dated May 8th, 1841. 

CARR & CO. Ltd. 



CARLISLE, ENGLAND. 



Agents for Canada 



Robert Greig & Co, 



456 St. Paul St. 
, MONTREAL 



Rowntree's Elect Cocoa LTf^o, 0( Purity> strength 
Craven's English Confectionery F^J^c^ii-^&c 



_ — _ — j — , _ , — , 

fine Drug and Confectionery Trade. 



ncory. 



McKay's Kola-Cafe £#£? blending of Ko,a ' Coffee 
Union Produce Co. 



BRANDS : 

NEUFCHATEL BEAVER 

ROYAL ARMS MANITOBA 

FANCY CREAM 



FINK 
CREAM 





CROWN BRAND EXTRACTS 

-v 

Strength and Quality considered are the cheapest. 

ROBERT GREIG & CO. 



REGISTERED 



Manufacturers and Sole 
Agents for Canada. 



45$ St. Paul Street 



, f , Montreal 



14 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



THE STEPS 



to a successful and permanent tea trade can only 
be ascended by handling 



Ram Lai's 
Pure Indian 



UNIFORMITY 



Tea . . . 




PAYS A DOUBLE PROFIT, AS IT 
IS ALWAYS WINNING TRADE 
AND ALWAYS HOLDING IT 



WESTERN AGENTS 



Turner, Mackeand dc Co. 



Kocffs" » WINNIPEG 




You Trade With Us 



You'll find our goods right 
You'll find our prices right 

You'll find you are used right 
And you'll find your trade will increase every week 



The Snow Drift Co., Brantford, Ont. 

No Sulphur Match 

- 1 g . . CAN BEAT OVR . . 

Otl FT. fifth m S OVEREIGN QRAND 



We guarantee them to be Al. 

Freight charges allowed on 5-case lots. 



H. A. NELSON & SONS 



TORONTO 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



15 




J. B. Ma^LEAN, 

President. 



HUGH C. MacLEAN, 

Sec.-Treas, 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

LIMITED 

FINE MAGAZINE PRINTERS 

and 

TRADE JOURNAL PUBLISHERS. 

TORONTO 26 Front St. W. 

MONTREAL : - Board ot Trade Building. 
EUROPEAN BRANCH I 

Canadian Government Offices, 

17 Victoria St., London, S.W. 
R. Hargreaves, Manager. 

John Cameron. General Subscription Agent. 

CHINA SUGARS IN CANADA. 

CANADA'S imports of China sugars 
have increased to a marked extent 
during the past two or three years. 
People in Ontario and points further east 
may not be acquainted with this fact. 

A reference to the Trade and Navigation 
Returns of the past five years elicits the fol- 
lowing facts regarding the imports of sugars 
of all kinds : 

Quantity in lbs. Value. 

1891 27.749 $ 758 

189? 274,249 10,764 

1893 2,810,394 70,047 

1894 4,202,278 154,042 

1895 3,608,365 126,715 

The quantities of free sugar were : In 
1891, 394IDS.; in 1892,9,698 lbs.; in 1893, 
2,320,017 lbs.; in 1894, 1,927,269 lbs.; in 
1895, 682,550 lbs. 

In 1891 the Dominion Government made 
free all sugar under No. 14 Dutch standard, 
and 1892, it will be noticed by the above 
table, was the year when imports of China 
sugar began to increase. Previous to the 
tariff changes of 1891 the duty on sugar not 
over No. 14 Dutch standard was ic. per lb., 
70 degree test, and 3/£c. per 100 lbs. for 
each degreee above 70. The changes of 
1891 also reduced the duty on sugars above 
No. 14 from i^c. per lb. and 35 per cent, to 
a specific duty of 4 5c. per lb. 

Under this new order of things the im- 
ports of sugar from China above No. 14 
sprang from 14,202 pounds in 1891 to 246,- 
106 pounds in 1892, while of free sugar we 
took 9,698 pounds and of sugar candy, etc., 
18,445 pounds. In 1893 the increase was 
more remarkable still, our imports from the 
" Flowery Kingdom " being 469,130 pounds 
above No. 14, and 2,320,017 pounds of free 
sugar, besides 21,247 pounds of sugar candy. 
In 1894 we took 2,252,476 pounds above No. 
14, 1,927,269 pounds below that grade, and 
22,531 pounds sugar candy. 

On the 27th of March of the last named 
year the sugar schedu'es came in for a re- 
vision with the rest of the tariff. Except 
concrete sugar, all sugar was removed from 



the free list, while the standard was raised 
from No. 14 to No. 16 Dutch standard. On 
all sugars above No. 16 the duty was fixed at 
64-iooc. per lb. Concrete sugar is what its 
name implies, a hard, solid substance, and 
comes, we believe, altogether from China. 
As a rule it is not used at all by the refiners 
in eastern Canada, as, in fact, are none of 
the China sugars. 

The result of the changes in 1895 were re- 
flected in the imports of China sugars. Of 
low-grade sugars under No. 16 Dutch stand- 
ard we only imported 941 pounds, of con- 
crete, 682,550 pounds, but our imports of 
the higher grades were swelled to 2,907,122 
pounds, valued at $110,590. 

China possesses some important refineries 
as well as extensive sugar cane fields. She 
exports considerable sugar to Great Britain, 
but her shipments to Canada are confined 
to British Columbia ports, to which she 
sends both refined and raw. The principal 
sugar plantations of China are in Swatow 
and Takao, district of Formosa. 

The raw yellow cane sugar of China is of 
quality sufficiently good to sell from the 
grocers' counter. About fifteen years ago, 
when the Australian refineries were charging 
high pricesand reaping big profits, the experi- 
ment of bringing in raw China sugar into 
that colony was tried, and with success. A 
Toronto retailer, who was in Australia at 
the time, informs The Canadian Grocer 
that it was equal to the Canadian refined 
sugar he now sells at 4c. per pound. 



A QUESTION OF TERMINAL PORTS. 

WE print in another column a com- 
munication from a correspondent 
signing himself " St. John," dealing 
with the question of Canadian subsidies to 
steamship lines, which in winter make 
United States ports their terminus. 

As " St. John " declares, this is undoubt- 
edly a grievance, for every time one of these 
subsidized vessels enters an American port 
and discharges freight destined for this 
country, something is contributed toward 
the upbuilding, by the aid of Canadian 
money, of a competitive and alien port. But 
we cannot see eye to eye with " St. John " 
regarding the shoulders most entitled to bear 
the onus of this. 

The Canadian Federal authorities have 
obviously not done all that in times past they 
have promised they would do. Like poor 
miserable sinners they have done the things 
they should not have done, and left undone 
the things they should have done. But the 
fact that there is not much health in them at 
present should make us charitable. 

But the greatest sins, the sins of omission 
at any rate, have been more with the 
Imperial than with the Federal authorities. 
The ; r power to determine terminals is 
re'atively as much greater than Canada's as 
is her commercial importance to that of this 
country. Imperial Administrations after Ad- 



ministrations have subsidized lines running to 
United States ports without seemingly once 
considering that on this side of the Atlantic 
there was a large section of the British Empire 
that had ports, both summer and winter, that 
were superior to anything possessed by our 
neighbors, thus building up, to the negli- 
gence of Canadian ports, the shipping in- 
dustries of a rival nation. It is gratifying 
to know, however, that Great Britain has at 
last an Administration that has what pro- 
mises to be a colonial policy which is far 
reaching enough to interest itself in the pro- 
motion of a fast line of steamships be- 
tween the Motherland and its daughter on 
this side of the Atlantic. 

As far as Canada's position is concerned, 
efforts have been made to induce the subsi- 
dized s'.eamship lines to make the winter 
ports in this country the terminal points, but 
each and every effort has failed except in 
the instance of the Beiver Line, now run- 
ning out of St. John, N.B. 

But while there is room for educating 
both the Imperial and Federal authori- 
ties in the matter of subsidies, a little 
missionary work among our shippers is quite 
in order. In winter, as well as in summer, 
they should as far as possible send every 
pound of freight out by a Canadian steam- 
ship line having a Canadian port, for the 
more freight there is to be obtained at Hali- 
fax and St. John the easier will it be to in- 
duce steamship lines to make these ports 
terminal points. 



THE PORT OF ST. JOHN. 

The success which has attended the es- 
tablishment of the direct and subsidized line 
of steamers plying between St. John, N.B., 
and Liverpool exceeds anticipations ; but 
there is yet room for further expansion. 
And the people of St. John have shown that 
they have the ambition to bring about this 
expansion. 

But ambition must be whipped into ac- 
tion ; ways and means must be employed 
and schemes devised for inducing freight 
and passengers to patronize the lines which 
ply there. In a word, the good people of 
St. John must advertise their port and its 
facilities. 

This is what a merchant does with his 
business. A city is a community of mer- 
chants, and what is in order for the indivi- 
dual to do is demanded with equal force of 
the community. 

The Board of Trade is the body, it ap- 
pears to us, upon which the duty of adver- 
tising the port devolves. It is the recognized 
head of the city's commercial interests. The 
manner and methods this advertising shall 
take is not for The Canadian Grocer to 
say. The members of the Board of Trade 
are, no doubt, in the best position to deter- 
mine this. All we can say is: advertise, and 
advertise in such mediums as are most likely 
to reach the men who have goods to ship. 



16 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



CANADA'S EXPORTS OF BACON. 

CANADA stands first in the world as 
a cheese-producing country ; and she 
bids fair to occupy a similar position 
as a bacon-producer. 

This is demonstrated in the first place by 
our own export figures, secondly by the 
testimony of the British press, and thirdly 
by the press of the United States. 

Our own figures are in themselves a feast 
of reason, as is evident from the following 
figures relating to the exports of bacon for 
the past five years : 

Year. Quantity in lbs. Value. 

1891 7, 150.756 $ 590,852 

1892 n,544.»95 i.c94.2°5 

1893 17,288,311 1,830,368 

1894 26,826,840 2,754,479 

1895 37.526,058 3,546,107 

These figures are most gratifying, but 
they become more so when it is learned 
that the increased trade has been with the 
world's consuming market, Great Britain, 
where we needs must compete with the ex- 
porting countries of the world. Turning to 
the figures of the past five years dealing 
with our exports of bacon to the Mother- 
land, we find this result : 

Year. Quantity in lbs. Value. 

1891 7. 137,586 $ 589.599 

1892 11,493,340 1,089,060 

1893 17.274,676 1,828,555 

1894 26,765,866 2,748,072 

1895 37.765.934 3.544.ot5 

It will be noticed from these figures that 
Canada's exports to Great Britain have in- 
creased over 80 per cent, during the past 
five years. As the latter country in 1895 
imported 455,102,816 pounds of bacon it will 
be seen that Canada's contribution to this 
total was about 8. 10 per cent. This is, of 
course, small ; but in the period 1887-89 it 
was only 1.63, in 1890-92 period 1.63, and in 
1893-94 period 6.01 per cent. 

The increase in the commodity in ques- 
tion is due to quality. Hence a continuance 
of the quality means a continuance of the 
increase. The excellence of the quality of 
our bacon is due to the fact that our hogs 
are fed largely upon peas, which imparts a 
nicer flavor to the meat, while, in addition to 
this the animals are fattened to a stage that 
suits the fastidious British taste. Then our 
climate has doubtless something to do in the 
premises. 

The favor which Canadian bacon has 
reached in the English market may be 
gathered from the following, taken from The 
Mark Lane Express' review of the English 
provision trade of 1895 : 

■ Canadian pea-fed bacon has also made astonishing 
progress in its salt during the year, it being much es- 
teemed by consumers in the country districts for its delicacy 
and mildness of flavor, and it has often met with ready pur- 
chasers when other classes of salted meats have been ne- 
glected." 

The greater part of the year 1895 was, it 
wi 1 be remembered, one of severe depres- 
sion in the bacon trade of Great Britain. 

It is to be noted thit although the United 
States still enjoys the bulk of Great Britain's 



import bacon trade, the proportion of that 
country's contribution to the whole is not 
what it was. Last year it was scarcely 50 
per cent, of the whole, while the average for 
the years 1893 $4 was 74.8 per cent. 

The principal trouble with the American 
corn-fed hog is that it is too fat, for the 
home consumption as well as the foreign. 
The National Provisioner, Chicago, of Feb. 
1, points this fact out, paying a tribute, at 
the same time, to the Canadian hog. After 
referring to the abhorrence of the American 
consumer for fat pork, the journal in question 
says : 

" The European consumer has the same fault to find with 
our bacon, and is emphasizing the fact by sending his 
orders to Denmark and Canada. The farmers of these 
countries have realized what is requisite, and are. to their 
pecuniary advantage, paying a great deal of attention to 
both breeding and feeding. The results are very apparent 
and convincing. Of course, England is the great competing 
market, and we cite it as a criterion. In 1893 the exports 
of bacon from Denmark to that country were 711,845 cwt.; 
in 1894, 766,828 cwt. ; and in 1895, 1,013,930 cwt. Canada's 
exports for the same years were: 1893, 193,773 cwt.; 1894, 
2 54.443 cwt.; and 1895, 268,886 cwt. The figures from the 
United States were : 1893, 2,177,293 cwt.; 1894,2,651,203 
cwt.; 1895,2,649,482 cwt. These figures show a gain, but 
nothing in proportion to Canada and Denmark's increase. 
These figures tell their own story, and provide an object 
lesson for the American farmer. We want him to under- 
stand that quality is wanted, not quantity." 

Tne gratifying development of our export 
trade in bacon, while a subject for much 
congratulation, also imparts a lesson, and 
that is the necessi y of Canadians centring 
their energies on developing those industries 
wheh are her natural gifts from Providence, 
and not spending our time and substance in 
essaying to do those things which Nature 
never intended we should. Making hog 
products is one of our natural industries. 
Let us therefore do all we can to develop 
what has so rewirded our energies during 
the past few years. 

What the European consumer wants is 
bacon well streaked with lean, and merchants 
throughout the country can do good mission- 
ary work by impressing this fact upon the 
farmers, with whom they are so much 
brought into contact ; for if we can increase 
our exports of bacon to Great Britain by 
nearly ten million pounds in a year of severe 
depression, what can we do in a year with 
these unfavorable conditions absent ? 



as low as $5 50 per bbl., or a drop of $2, and 
Valencias 50c. to $1 per bbl. cheaper, at $3 
to $3.50. 

There is little sign at the moment of any 
change for the better, and shipment after 
shipment has not realized much more than 
freight charges. 



ORANGES DEMORALIZED. 

The market for oranges in Montreal has 
been demoralized by rather free offerings of 
rubbishy, inferior fruit. As a result, values 
slumped away sh irp'y, over $1 per bbl. in 
some cases. At the auction sales car lots 
realized as low as 65c. per box for California 
and prices on one or two carloads did not 
average higher than $1.15 per box. 

At this writing offers of California oranges 
are freely made at $2 50 upward for good 
mer hantable fruit. These low offers on 
Pacific coast stock have cut the ground from 
under all other values. Jamaicas have sold 



CALIFORNIA RAISINS UNSETTLED. 

THE California raisin market presents 
quite a few features of interest at 
Montreal. In the first place, despite 
the fact that stocks are not large, and that 
advices from the Coast are bullish, lower 
prices have been offered on the fruit during 
the past week. These low offers, however, 
do not signify that the market on spot in 
in Montreal is weak in its tone. Such is 
not the case. 

The lower range of values noted in the 
regular market reports is due to the greater 
variation in the quality of the offerings. 
Some of the fruit offered, though called 3- 
crown, has no distinguishing brand at all, 
and is as a matter of fact 2-crown instead of 
3-crown fruit. It is this fruit which is offered 
in jobbing lots at 3#c. and under, for no 
holder of good sound 3-crown raisins will 
concede from 5c. for a jobbing lot. They 
have no reason to do so either. 

The stocks here are not large, and an es- 
timate sent to a leading Montreal agent 
staled that there could not be much more 
than 75 carloads of fruit altogether avail- 
able in California. The stocks in New 
York also are well concentrated — in fact, 3 
and 4-crown on that market are relatively 
scarce, as the enquiry is confined almost 
entirely to the better grades, and prices 
are firmly maintained. 



HAD THE LEGITIMATE MAJORITY. 

The result of the recent aldermanic elec- 
tion for the Centre Ward of Montreal is a 
keen disappointment to every merchant of 
the ward, which is one of the chief business 
centres of the city. 

Mr. Laporte, of Laporte, Martin & Cie.,the 
well known wholesale grocers, was the can- 
didate of the business community, and polled 
a majority of the legitimate votes of the ward. 
He was beaten only by a majority of 40, and 
as it is well known that there was a colonized 
vote of over 50, Mr. Laporte, if the result 
were equitable, would have a clear majority 
of from 10 to 18 votes. 

The fact that the professional politicians 
were pressed so close, after resorting to such 
desperate efforts as they did, shows that the 
business community are tho-oughly awake 
and want business men every time. They 
have been, to put it plainly, cheated out of 
the election, and it is quite possible that the 
matter will not be allowed to rest where it 
is, but that the courts will be called upon to 
sift the matter to the bottom. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



17 



ROBERT BICKERDIKE. 

THE new president of the Montreal 
Board of Trade, Robert Bickerdike, is 
one of the most useful citizens of the 
"Commercial Metropolis," useful in the sense 
that he is both one of the leading sp rits and 
one of the pioneers of a trade that brings 
millions of dollars every year to our great 
port. 

When Mr. Bickerdike first started in the 
live stock trade it was a small business in- 
deed. To-day the cattle trade of Montreal 
is valued at over $9,000,000 per annum ; and 
this goodly proportion is due in no small 
degree to the untiring efforts of Mr. Bicker- 
dike. 

Agriculture is the backbone of Canada, 
and live stock is one of its most important 
branches. In extending this trade as 
he has, Mr. Bickerdike has not only 
benefitted Montreal, but the country 
at large. In every phase of the busi- 
ness that required sound judgment 
and prompt attention the new presi- 
dent has always been one of the lead- 
ing spirits, notably in battling against 
the unjust scheduling of our Canadian 
cattle in Great Britain. 

Mr. Bickerdike is one of the gentle- 
men who believes that Montreal 
should have a union stock yard, the 
benefit of which to the port none can 
deny. No doubt in his present in- 
fluential position he will be able to 
give this commendable project great 
assistance. At present Mr. Bicker- 
dike manages the Canadian Pacific 
stock yards in the east end. 

By birth he is a Canadian, King- 
ston being the place of his nativity, 
and it was in 1843 that he first saw 
the 1 ght of day. His father was a 
native of York, England. When a 
child his parens moved to the county 
of Beauharnois, where Mr. Bickerdike 
received his education, and in his 
boyish association with our French 
Canadian fellow citizens acquired 
that perfect knowledge of the French 
language which he possesses. At the age of 
seventeen he came to Montreal, entering 
into his business career by securing a posi- 
tion with a firm of pork packers, with whom 
he was employed until the year 1866 The 
live stock trade was then a puny infant, but 
Mr. Bickerdike saw possibilities in the 
trade, and he went into the business for 
himself. He made his first shipment of 
cattle to Great Britain in the year 1876. 
Since then he has unceasing'y pushed this 
branch of trade, until he is to-day one of the 
largest shippers in Canada. 

A fine trait in Mr. Bickerdike's character 
is his willingness to lend a helping hand to 
others, his many kind acts of this nature in 
assisting the younger men in the live stock 
business being strong evidence in this connec- 
tion. Besides his live stock interests Mr. Bick- 



erdike is connected with a number of other 
important business ventures. He organized 
the Dominion Abattoirs and Stock Yards 
Co., of which he is the managing director. 
He was one of the founders of the Dominion 
Live Stock Association, in fact, the chief 
factor, for as secretary he had to perform a 
vast amount of hard work. The success of 
the association is due largely to the zealous 
manner in which he looked after its interests 
during the early years of its existence. He 
was the founder and is now the president of 
the Live Stock Insurance Co. He is presi- 
dent of the Standard Light and Power Co., 
and has for a number of years been a direc- 
tor of the Hochelaga Bank, now holding the 
office of vice-president. 

A matter that Mr. Bickerdike takes a deep 



ADVERTISING AXIOMS. 



6* 



V 




Robert Bickerdike. 

interest in is the extension of the boundaries 
of Montreal, and he has made a c'ose study 
of the problem of rapid transit, and the 
needs of the city and suburbs in the matter 
of electric railways. 

It was in 1885 that he first became a mem- 
ber of the great organization of which he is 
now p-esident, and has assisted materially in 
the accomplishment of a great deal of useful 
work as a member of its council. He is 
also a member of the Corn Exchange As- 
sociation. 

In politics Mr. Bickerdike is a Liberal 
of the old Mackenzie-Dorion school, but 
though a sincere believer in his party, he is 
no narrow partisan. There is plenty of 
ronm for such class of politicians as Mr. 
Bickerdike, in boards of trade as well as in 
Parliament. 



IRTUE increases under a weight 
or burden," and results increase 
with a comprehensive expendi- 
ture of money in good advertising mediums. 
" Better late than never." The golden 
opportunity is still open to him who would 
enrich himself by judicious advertising. 
None other will pay. 

" Mind moves matter." Therefore exer- 
cise your mind to advertise so as to stir the 
gray matter of the brains of the people and 
affect their pocket books. 

Good goods will sell to good people con- 
stantly. Poor goods only once. Don't let 
people say, "After having praised their 
wine they sell us vinegar." 
" There is no lock but a golden key will 
open it," except that of the people's 
pocket book. First-class ads. will 
do this with golden results. When 
people think they want a thing, they 
do want it and they get it. 

To be prominent anywhere one 
must have marked characteristics. 
So it is with an advertisement in the 
crowded columns of newspapers and 
magazines ; in order to produce the 
best result it must be clear, definite, 
conspicuous and fresh. Is yours of 
this character ? — Merchants' Review. 



TO PREVENT FROSTING. 

These last few days have witnessed 
some pretty badly frosted windows in 
this vicinity, and therefore the follow- 
ing plan to prevent the trouble may 
strike some of the grocers as being 
worth a trial. We clip the item from 
Tobacco : " Run an inch pipe of tin 
along the lower inside edge of the 
window, this tube being perforated 
with small holes at every inch or so, 
the holes being on the upper side of 
the tube; carry this tube right across 
the window, having one end close to 
and the other running under the win- 
dow base.and terminating in an invert- 
ed tin funnel. Under this funnel place 
an ordinary kerosene lamp or gas jet, and 
keep it lit all day and night. The hot air will 
rise through the funnel, travel along the tube, 
and escape through the perforations to the 
window, ascending up the face of the glass." 



$100 A DAY. 



Printers' Ink, a journal for advertisers, in 
its last issue gives an interesting sketch of 
J. E. Powers, the advertising expert of New 
York, whose fee for writing, preparing and 
looking after advertising is $100 a day. Even 
at this price he refuses hundreds of orders. A 
few years ago Mr. Powers was John Wana- 
maker's advertising manager at a salary of 
$9,000 a year, his employer allowing him 
$100,000 a year for advertising in Philadel- 
phia alone. 



18 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



TRADE CHAT. 

THE store of Mr. John McCullogh, 
grocer, Ridgetowrj, was entered by 
burglars a few nights ago, and six'y 
dollars in cash taken from a drawer, where, 
by oversight, it had been left. 

J. H. Richards, of Guelph, has bought J. 
Butler's grocery at Woodstock. 

C. K. Graham will not remove his evapor- 
a'ing works from Norwich to Woodstock 
af.er all. 

The bankrupt stock of the Patrons' store 
at Lower Capel on was bought by Mr. W. 
Blue & Co., who are selling it off. 

To relieve the crowded condition of the 
wheat elevators at Fort William the C.P.R. 
will probably erect temporary warehouses 
there. 

The Moose Jaw Times states that the 
merchants of that town are meditating the 
formation of a protective association, the 
chief provision of the constitution to be en- 
tire abolition of credit. 

The bakers of London held a meeting the 
other night and formed a Master Bakers' 
Association. They also agreed that from 
and after that d iy 5 cents wou d be charged 
for the two-pound loaf. 

The Hovey Packing Company, of Sher- 
brooke, received a carload of hogs from the 
west this week that were in b id condition, 
and they refused to handle them and insti- 



tuted suit to recover payment. The defend- 
ants settled and paid all costs and removed 
the hogs. 

Prof. Robertson, finding his duties as 
Dairy Commissioner to be very onerous, 
has asked to be relieved of the care of live 
stock at the experimental farm, consequently 
it is the Government's intention to appoint a 
first-class man to look after live stock. 

The principal object of the Maritime Con- 
fectioners' Association, which was formed at 
a meeting of the manufacturers at Halifax 
last week, is to secure a reduction in the 
duties imposed on glucose and other raw 
materials which they use, and thus enable 
them to compete with American manufac- 
turers. — Chronicle, Halifax. 

The Brantford Board of Trade indulges in 
an annual banquet. This year's took place 
at the Kirby house, and was a very brilliant 
and succes-ful affair. Mr. Ferguson, pre- 
sident of the Stratford Board, Hon Tnos. 
Ballantyne and A. Pattullo, of Woodstock, 
were among the outside guests who spoke. 
Brantford's Board of Trade is a live organ- 
ization. Its energetic secretary is Geo. 
Hateley, the cheese buyer, and this year it 
has a particularly able and enthusiastic pre- 
sident in Mr. Fruk Cockshutt. 

The Nova Scotia R-fin*ry Benefit Siciety 
held its annual mee ing on Tuesday. The 
society, after seven year*' existence, was 
shown to be in a bettsr position than ever, 



before. The membership continued at about 
93. During the year new and improved 
rules have been adopted, increasing the 
amount of sick and death benefits. The re- 
ceipts for the year were $235.09 and the 
amount of benefits paid was $207.4o,-leaving 
a credit balance of $27 69. The reservtfund 
now amounts to S464 69. Officers for the 
year were elected as follows : P. J. Delaney, 
chairman ; Fred. Waters, vice do.; Jas. 
Ktmp, T. Williamson, Jas. Elliott, C. 
Crook?, Alfred Tobin and Jas. Purcell, 
managing committee ; G. A. McKenzie, hon. 
sec.-treas. — Chronicle, Halifax. 



MUST NOT SELL TO DEAD BEATS. 

The retail grocers of A'legheny, Pa., have 
formed an organization by electing the fol- 
lowing officers : N. G. Purviance, president; 
G. Go'.mer, vice-president ; C. W. Woods, 
secretary ; W. G. Good, treasurer. It was 
voted to request Director of Public Safety 
John R. Murphy to appoint William H. 
Haharhan ordnance officer. The society 
will run a " black list," each member furnish- 
ing a 1st of " dead beat " customers. A fine 
will be imposed upon any member selling to 
any person on the list. 



If you have not yet had any of the cele- 
brated B. F. P. ough drops, now is the 
time to send tor a sample can. You will be 
sure to order more. 



SUGAR Crops of the WORLD T o N NS 



Total Cane Sugar Production 


1892-3 


1893-4 


1894-5 


1895-6 


Est. Decrease 


3,040.486 


3,493,780 


3,543,151 


2,632,700 


910,451 


Total Beet Sugar Production 


3,428,515 


3,889,845 


4,792,520 


4,230,000 
^862^700" 


562,520 


GRAND TOTAL 


6,469,001 


7.383,625 


8.335,671 


1,472,971 



COST AND FREIGHT PRICE OF 96° CENTRIFUGALS DURING SAME YEARS 



MONTH 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


Feb. . . 7th 


3.44 per lb. 
3.3? per lb. 


3.44 per lb. 


3.06 per lb. 


2.23 per lb. 


2.75 per lb. 


Aug. . 22nd 
DecTT 30th 


3.50 per lb. 


2.68 per lb. 


2.32 per lb. 




3.44 per lb. 


2.87£ per lb. 


2.23 per lb. 


2.68 per lb. 





The foregoing figures are exclusive Of duty, and are compiled with the aid of Willett & Gray's Statis- 
tical Sugar Trade Journal, and will, no doubt, be found interesting to our many customers, at the same time show- 
ing the great possibilities of the future of the Sugar Market. 

We are heavy dealers in this commodity and are giving special 
prices for car lots delivered. 



W. H. GILLARD & CO., 



WHOLESALERS ONLY, 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



THE CANADIAN GROCER 



19 




ONTARIO MARKETS. 
GROCERIES. 

THE temperature of the sugar market 
has again assumed a more normal 
condition. The market, however, is 
still strong, but there is an absence of that 
excitement which was so marked a week or 
two ago. With the subsiding of the excite- 
ment there has also been a falling off in the 
demand, although there is still a good deal 
of sugar going out. As a result of the greater 
trade in sugar, people are turning their at- 
tention a little more to trade than they were, 
with the result that teas in this line shows 
some improvement. Canned vegetables are 
meeting with a fair enquiry for this time of 
the year, and there has been a little better 
demand during the past few days for canned 
salmon. Foreign dried fruits are quiet and 
steady. Payments are rather slow. 
CANNED GOODS. 
Deman