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Full text of "Antioch News 08/19/1994"

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MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

. Whether you Just stop In a 
local diner for a cup of coffee, or 
turn up for a township meeting, . 
it Is apparent the higher property 
assessments arc on the minds of 
Antloch residents. Township 
officials arc reporting a number 
of phone 'calls about the 
assessments which were seiit out 
lastweck. 



"We have gotten some calls," 
quipped Township Assessor Cliff 
Houghton, "And, I am sure we'll 
get some piore.".' . .: 

Even Highway Road 
-Commissioner Marie Ring, who 
has nothing to do with property ' 
assessments, has reported 
receiving. sonic i calls from 
disconcerted residents.* Ring 
says he has received calls for 
several days.' 



While some are Just 
grumbling, others arc preparing 
to mount an attack. Some, 
subdivisions are contacting 
subdivision residents to file 
groiip appeals with tlie county, 

"Something has to be done," 
said Carol Jonitcs,. president of 
.United , Homeowners of 
Uhincorpoiatcd . Antioch. 
"Everybody is up inarms." ' 

After talking to the county 



assessor's office,' Jonltes learned 
the group appeal may be more 
effective In getting the 
assessments reduced.^ "Petitions 
for individual subdivisions wiU 
be circulated,." she said. "Taxes 
will not be mentioned on the 
petitions since our taxes have not 
yet been levied." 

During the last Anttoch 
Township meeting on Thursday, 
See TAXES page AlO 




no-wake 



TINA L SWIECH 



Staff Reporter .^ 

The agreement by the'Fox 
Waterway Agency to have 
Attorney. John Roth prepare an 
ordinance implementing a 150- 
foot no-wake zone on the Chain 
O' Lakes, has been given flnal 
approval.. 

The no-wake installation will 
take effect April 1, 1995, and will 
not effect the Fox River.. ' 

According to officials, the 
ilecisive meeting held at the 
McHenry town hall last week, 
proved to be an "interesting" 
one. 

Carl Warner of McHenry 
County made a surprise move, 
when he changed' his vote 
against the no-wake zone. At the 
previous meeting Warner was in 
favor of it 

Bob Llndquist, . agency 
director, cast the deciding vote. 
"It was the right decision to 
See WATERWAY page AlO 




Hay you 

Summer days offer an opportunity to make new Wends. Donna Szostak, 3. greets a new pal 
wltti an afterrtoqn srack of hay during a visit to ttie barnyard; Youngsters are heading back to 
school throughout the county this week putting summer memories behind ttiem. — Photo by 
Bill Caroy 





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Village to inspect sewers 



Summer sizzle 

Marty Mtehlels cooks brats andburgers at ttw annual Loon 
Lake Sportsmen's Assoclatkxi plcnk: t)eld In tt» Loon Lake 
Inn ptentclot.— Photo by Ckwda M. UfMitf 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

A list is being compiled of 
problem areas in the Antioch 
Village sanitary sewers to be 
inspected by a televised 
camera. Rose Robinson, of 
Antioch. was on* hand at 
Monday night's board meeting 
to complain about her sewer 
problems. 

She told the board she had 
raw sewage backing up into 
her home on two. separate 
occasions. "It is not very funny 
when raw sewage backs up in 
your home," Robinson said. 
"It is not a pleasant situation." 

Robinson seemed very 
upset about the situation. 
"What aire you going to do 
about it?" Robinson asked. 

According to Village 
Administrator Tim Wells, 
Robinson's sewer connection 
will be rodded and inspected 
on a regular basis until the 
public works department 
compiles a list of at least 1,000 
feet of problem areas to be 
Inspected via television 
camera. 



"We will wait until 1,000 
feet need to be inspected 
before televising," said Wells. 
"It is more cost effective." 
Wells predicted it would be 
roughly 60-90 days before 
tejievising the sanitary sewers. 

While Wells felt that only 
two Incidents in 20 years is not 
"unusual," he did admit two 
backups occurring wittiin a six- 
month span was a matter of 
concern. Mayor Marilyn 
Shineflug suggested the latest 
problem was a result of a large 
mass of roots which had 
broken free. 

"We have no way of 
knowing," Shineflug admitted. . 

Robinson asked the board if 
it was possible to be connected 
elsewhere, however, village 
officials were unable to 
determine if that was possible 
at this time. "Without knowing 
the situation, I can't answer 
you," said Wells. 

"It was rodded Friday, and 
will be inspected and rodded 
the following Friday if 
necessary, until we can televise 
it," Wells assured Robinson. 



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!C1 COMMUNITY UkclANd Newsp/vpERS AugutT 19, 1^94 




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Celebration continues 

state Bank of tt>e Lakes shows Its community spirit at \he Undenfest parade. State Bank, wtiicti 
has branches In AnttocK Undenhurst and Grayslake, Is celebrating Its centennial this year.— 
Photo by Kovln Hanrohan 



Village changes zoning car dealership 



MARY FOLEY . 

Staff Reporter 

Ihe Antioch Village Board is in 
the process of changjUig both an 
annexation ordinance as well as the 
listed land uses for their M-1 cate- 
gory. New and used car sales will 
. now be indudcd for the M-1 (limit- 
ed manufacturing) dassification. 

The Antioch Village Board, 

acting upon the recommenda- 

. tipns of the Zoning Board, had 

*. the'' first reading of the changed. 

oniinances at the board meeting 

Monday night. This action fol- 



lowed the public hearing to 
change the annexation ordinance 
which had classified 10 of the 60 
acres purchased by Terry Upton 
for a new car dealership, fiPomB- 
3 Planned Unit Development, to 
M-1. There were no objections to 
the proposed change at the pub- 
He hearing. 

The addition of. new and used 
car sales to the M-1 dassification is 
a rather after-the-fEK:t action since 
all iMit one'of Antioch's car dealer- 
ships are operating in M-1 zoned 
areas. *^e're trying to correct an 



inadvertent error," said Trustee 
Marvin CHdenbuiger. 

The arhcndment in the 
annexation ordinance will con- 
tain a reverter clause. The village 
will have the optidn to change the 
zoning of the 10 acres back to B-3 
PUD if no buUdinjg permits are 
issued within 270 days. 

All actions arc based on the 
recent purchase and plans to 
move a Lake Villa car dealership 
to a new location north, of Roiite 
173, southeast of McMilliah Road 
inAntioch. 



Skokie Valley Asphalt gets Antioch hid 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

Skokie Valley Asphalt was the 
low bidder of the Crandall 
Subdivision road work, and the 
Antioch Township Board 
approved the contract at the last 
board meeting. The project, 
which is funded htim a commu- 
nity block grant, will include the 



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Antioch News-Reporter 

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Otfkm ot Publication: 30, South Whltn^ St, 
GraysUkB, IL 60030. PhOM (700)223-81 Bt. 

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Nawt-Repoiler, 30 South Whitney Straat', P.O. 
Box 268, QrayilaJM, llinofai 6003a 

(708) 223-8161 



black-topping of theroads in that 
subdivision. 

Skokie Valley's bid came in at 
$13,890. Ttie next lowest bid was 
from Peter Baker at $17,400. 
"They are both good," comment- 
ed Town Clerk Richard Harlan. 

Supervisor Jim Fields 
explained^ why the Skokie Valley 
bid was so much lower. He said 
that Skokie Valley would already 
be in Antioch doing work for the 
township road department and 
the lower cost results from having 
the equipment in place. 



Mark Ring, township road 
supervisor, said that despite the 
blacktopping, the roads would 
remain private. "They cannot be 
part of the township road sys- 
tem," said Ring. He said this was 
because the roads were too nar- 
row to meet the applicable stan- 
dards. 

Ring credited Fields with the 
acquisition of the grant money to 
have the roads paved. "This is 
)im Fields program," said Ring. 
"He deals with the director and 
the grant." 



Antioch News-Rapoitor 
. LaJw Zurich Entipso 
UkiVilaRNod 
Munda)«in N«ws 
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WILUAM H. SCHROEDER 

Publbher/PresWont 

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Genera! Manager 

SHARON ZASADIL 

Operations Manager 

JLLDePASQUALE BOBSCHflOEDER 
J0DAV6 ANNII.ROeEnTS 
RHONOAVWZAffT; . 



BrieFs 



Meeting date change 

The Antioch Village Board has changed its next meeting 
date from Sept. 5 to Sept. 6 because of the Labor Day holiday. 
The board meets at the Antioch Village Hali and the meeting 
will begin at 7:30 p.m. 

Lyons Ryan gets contract 

Lyons Ryan of Antioch was awarded the contract for two 
new squad cars. The cars will be 1994 Crown Victoria's priced 
at $14,063 each. 

Antioch gets new mower 

The Antioch Village Board accepted the bid from Town and 
Country for a 72-inch grass cutter. The cost of the mower will 
be $11,029. 

Get well soon 

St. Peter School's Principal Sharon Henriksen has been hos- 
pitalized for heart suigery and Is not expected to return to her 
duties at the school until October. In the meantime, Mrs. Darrc 
will assume the principal's duties with Mary Lutgen acting as 
assistant principal. 




AuqusT 19, 1994 UkdlANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 



yotir engines, get 

Feast 




MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reportor 

If you arc hoping to pur- 
chase a new car this year and 
like a good October Fest, you 
are going to, love Antioch's 
newest idea, the Autobcr Feast. 
Sponsored by the ViUage of 
Antioch, Community Action 
Now, the Antioch Chamber of 
Commerce, and the Antioch 
Alliance of Auto Dealers 
(A/VAD), this combination 1995 
auto show and October Fest .is 
scheduled for Oct. 7 and 8. 

The Antioch Village Board 
approved both the dates and a 
contribution of $5,000 for this ' 
extravaganza, at the last board 
meeting.^j/n think it is a won- 
derful idea," said Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug^r 

"All the car dealers are 
thrilled with the idea," said 
village Administrator Tim 
Wells. The sale wUl feature 
vehicles made by Lincoln, 
Chevy, CMC, Oldsmobile, 
Chrysler, Dodge, Buick, jeep, 
Mercury, Plymouth, Pontiac, 
Ford, Eagle, and Suburban. - 

Organized • by Downtown 
Director Claude LeMere, he' 
told the board the sale will 
enable local dealerships to 



compete and draw clients away 
from other areas including the 
Autornall in Kenosha. Over 200 
cars are, expected to be on dis- 
play, all of .them new. 

"I have,' some problems 
with used cars, •*: Trustee 
Wayne Forresta said. '.'But, 1 
don't have a problem with 
new or dcmonstrator^cars." 
LeMere assured the board the . 
sale would includcncw cars 
only. 

The two-day.evcnt will take 
place in the village on Toft 
Avenue as well as in the munic- 
ipal lots behind the Moose Club 
and the watcrtower. Besides 
the cars, area banks will be set- 
ting up computers and fax 
machines to facilitate easy 
financing for buyers. 

Along with the cars, there 
will be food and nonalcoholic 
beverages. Prizes will be given 
to lucky raffle winners, and 
musical entertainment will be 
ongoing. 

The Feast begins on October 
7 from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. and 
continues on Saturday, from 9 
a.m. to 6'p.m. So, make sure 
you stop out and see the new 
cars and enjoy the traditional 
October Fest activities. 



Village approves hiring of 
cable television consultant 



MA^Y FOLEY 



Staff Reporter 

The Antioch Village Board 
approved an intergovernmental 
agreement for an expenditure 
of roughl5r$500 to hire a con- 
sultant to. review cable televi- 
sion rate information. Early 
this year, the village took 
advantage of the opportunity to 
join in a consortium along with 
nine other villages to regulate 
basic cable television services 
and installation rates. 

"We just received Form 1200 
with the new rates," Village 
Administrator Tim Wells told 
the board. "It is a one-time 
review." 

Several trustees voiced 
some concerns regarding the 
recent rate decrease and partic- 
ipation in the consortium. 

"There was a rate change,* 
said Trustee Wayne Forresta. 
"Weren't they supposed to noti- 
fy us before that happened?" 

Of course, Forresta was not 

concerned about a rate 

decrease. He was, however, 

. worried that a' rate increase 



could also take place without 
notification. "Shouldn't wc 
have had first approval?" 
Forresta asked. . 

While it was not known why 
the board had no notification of 
the rate change. Mayor Marilyn 
Shineflug suggested that the 
change may have been outside 
of the village's authority. "It 
could have been a change out- 
side the regulatory process," 
she suggested. - 

"As long as the procedure is 
in place if the rates go up," 
Shineflug added. 

Trustee Dorothy Larson 
voiced some concerns about 
the village's participation in the 
consortium. Specifically, she 
was worried that the village 
would be limited to decisions of 
the group: '!If they make a deci- 
sion we don't like, can wc 
leave?", Larson asked. 

"We. have not lost any inde- 
pendence," Shineflug told the 
board. 

Wells agreed and explained 
that the village could leave the 
group at any time. 



Township helps Ride-A-Thon 



MARY FOLEY 



Staff Reporter • 

Antioch Township has 
approved a contribution to the 
Second Annual Bill Brooks Ride- 
A-Thon. The money generated 
from this event goes to the Lake 
County Unit of the American 
Cancer Society. 

The Township Board 
approved a $100 donation to tliis 
worthy cause after both IJoard 
members as well as the audience 
attested to much needed services 
the Cancer Society supplies to the 
township. Terry Colby, a resident 



of the township, told the board 
how the society helped her family 
and "there was never any ques- 
tion of money." 

While Supervisor Jim Fields 
had . not heard of the Ridc-A- 
Hion, he felt more comfortable 
about the donation after hearing 
about the services provided. "As 
long as it goes back to Antioch," 
Fields said. 

Trustee Claudette Skvarce 
made the motion for the dona- 
tion and Trustee Rich Kufalk sec- 
onded. The motion was unani- 
mously approved. 



I 

1 



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COMMUNITY UkelANd Newspapers Auqusr 1 9, \ 9?4 



^School BmEfs 



Not too late to register 

VVhilc you may have mlsscd'thc mail-in registration at 
Antioch Community High School, the school is holding late reg- 
istration on August 18 from noon to 3 p.m. and August 19 from 
9a,m. tonoon. Remember, school starts August 23. Freshman 
orientation will be held August 18 at 9 a.m. in the auditorium. 

Cr afters wanted 

Grafters are wanted for the 3rd Annual Pcddlei^s Alley Craft 
Show, which benefit the Student Assistance Program- The 
Show will be held on October 8 at Antioch Community High 
School. For information call 395-6690. 

Gifted program approved 

The Grass Lake School Board of Education has approved a 
contract to hire retired teacher Norma Rubash to establish a 
gifted program for the school. Rubash recently retired from 
Grass Lake School and has had specialized training for her new 
position. 

Scliool begins soon 

According to the ofTicial calendar for Antioch Community 
Consolidated School District 34 schools will officially open on 
August 29. However, the first day of school for students will be 
August 31. Kindergarten begins September 1. Enjoy your 
summer kids! 

Other schools begin too 

St. Peter's School opening day will be August 23. Parents 
will receive neccssaty Information in the mail. Grass Lake 
School opens on August 23 for a half day. 

Grass Lalie seeks member 

As a result of the resignation of Cynthia Marquart, Grass 
Lake School Board of Education is seeking a new board mem- 
ber. Interested applicants living in the district should send a 
letter to Grass Lake School, 26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Antioch, 
IL 60002. The deadline for applications is August 26. 



Sequoit Pride to raffle off house 



Sequoit Pride, Antioch High 
School's booster club, is an- 
nouncing an exciting house/cash 
raffle. The house, with an esti- 
mated value of $225,000, will be 
constructed by award-winning 
Saxonian Builders, Inc. of Lake 
Villa. 

A maximum of 4,000 tickets 
will be sold at $100 each. The 
house is to be built at 630 Asbury 
Ct in Antioch. A minimum of 
3,000 tickets must be sold in or- 



der for construction to begin. If 
less than 3,000 tickets arc sold, 
then half of the proceeds will be 
awarded as a cash, prize up to 
$75,000. ' ' ' 

The profits from the raffle will 
be designated for equipment and 
needed supplies in areas such as 
academics, fine arts and athletics. 

Tickets may be obtained at 
many local business establish- 
ments and from members of the 
Sequoit Pride Organization. 



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Children go to school #ile migrants work 



ALECJUNGE 
Staff Reporter 

While few people arc aware 
migrant workers come to Lake 
County, fewer may know about a 
special Round Lake Summer 
Migrant Program designed to 
help educate the migrant's chil- 
dren wliile their parents work. 

Tlic program runs from mid- 
June to the end of July. This year 
260 students from all over Central 
America and Mexico spend six 
weeks at Village Elementary 
School in Round Lake. 

The program is funded by a 
federal grant The co- coordina- 
tors, Maria Teresa Coleman and 
Dan Starzynsky revamped the 
program. 

Oach classroom had one 
mono-lingual tcaclicr or assistant, 
and one bi-lingual teacher or 
assistant Coleman said it worked 
well for the tcachci^, student and 
the coordinators as well. 

"It's not a summer camp," 
Coleman said. "These students 
have a lot to overcome. They 
move around, take extended 
vacations and wc help refresh 
them on what they learned and 
prepare them for the start of the 
school year." 

'Wc assess tHclr needs and try 
and work with them to reinforce 
what they learn," Starzynsky said. 

The focus is mainly on lan- 
guage skills such as reading, writ- 
ing and spelling. Also students 
did have some science, social 
studies and arts as well. 

Students went on some field 
trips. The third to fifth-graders 
went to Milwaukee Museum as 
part of a rainforest exhibit The 
fifth to eighth -graders went to 
Volo Dog as part of a science unit 
, "They really enjoy it" said 
Linda Flores, recruiter. "The chil- 
dren look forward .to it every 
year." 



Flores, who works for the 
Lake County Head Start, receives 
a list of workers and it's her job to 
make the contacts to get the chil- 
dren in the program. ' 

"I make phone calls and I also 
go out into the fields," Flores 
said. 

Flores said many of the 
migrants travel to various areas 
tluoughout the year. They come 
from countries such as Mexico 
and El Salvador. 

The program is designed to 
help migrant children overcome 
educational disruption, cultural 
and language barriers, social iso- 
lation, health-related problems 
and other factors that inhibit 
their ability to do well In school. 
Also the program prepares kids 
for succcssM tnthsltton to post 
secondary education or employ- 
ment 

Students arc Ln school from 9 
am. to 3 p.m. during the weekdays 
where thi^ learn new skills and 
refresh the ones tiicy already know. 

To celebrate the end to the 
program for tiiis year, a Festival 
Day was held on July 28. Each 
class from the 3-year-old room to 



eighth-grade performed a special 
skit Guadulupe Vargas from 
Guidcz Musical provided the 
music. y 

Each class also designed and 
made their own plnata 

The 3-ycar-olds did a dance 
medley called "Across the 
Bridge," the 4-year-olds per- 
formed "Tiic Lion Sleeps 
Tonight" and the Klndeigarten 
class line dance to "Achy, Breaky 
Heart" 

The program Is about 10 years 
old. ' 

Among the other .perfor- 
mances was tlilrd-grade singing 
"It's My Party" and the sevcnth- 
and eighth-graders combining 
for a skit based on mix of well- 
known villains, 

. The event concluded with a 
traditional Spanish feast The 
food included burritos, tamalcs, 
cnciiiladas, Floutas(fried chicken 
in tortilla) and polUo con moUe 
(chicken and sauce). , 

The migrants usually work 
labor intensive jobs such as land- 
scaping in areas such as Lake 
Zurich, Wauconda, Inglcside, the 
Round Lake area and Fox Lake. 



Fighting Back seeks nominees 



The Fighting Back Project is 
seeking nominations to honor 
those persons, groups and 
organizations (youth and adult) 
that have made a significant 
impact in the prevention of 
alcohol, tobacco and other drug 
abuse In Lake County during 
the past year (Oct 1993 to Oct 
1994). 

The mission of the Lake 



County Fighting Back Partnership 
is: "To promote an environment 
where healthy lifestyles, hope 
and opportunity replace the 
abuse of alcohol, tobacco and 
other drugs for all persons of the 
Lake County community." 

For additional Information 
or a copy of the nomination form, 
contact the Fighting Back office 
at 546-7144. 



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AuqufT 19, 1994 UlxlANd NevspApEia COMMUNITY 





PolicE Beat 



Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven guilty In a court of law. 



Worker's death accidental, 
could have been prevented 



ANTIOCH . 

Car missing 

Antioch Police investigated a suspicious cir- 
cumstance Friday, Aug, 12, after receiving a 
report of a possit)lc stotcri car. The car, a red 
two-door Mustang, was parked In tlic west 
municipal iot by die owner. A friend called 
police vylienthc.car could not be found. ' 
Apparently, the owner isTvacationing In Mexico. 
The owner's friend told police that numerous 
individuals iiave a key to the car, and it was 
unknown who was in possession of the car. 
Officers advised the man to notify the owner 
upon his return. 

Art work on toilet 

Police responded to a report from the 
beach guards at Oakwood Knolls beach that 
pcrson(s) unknown painted a gang sign on the 
inside back waU of the portable toilet located 
on the property Aug. 12. The signs were pho- 
tograpiicd for evidence. The amount of dam- ' 
age done is not known. 

DIJI 

Caroline J. Mitsch White, 35, of Antioch 
was arrested Aug. 12 at 1:17 a.m. for driving 
underthe influence of alcohol. According to 
the police rep Qrt she was observed at Deep 
Lake Road north of Route 173. White refused a 
breathalyzer, but reportedly fell against the 
door when police questioned her. She was 
released on bond. 

Thomas H. Homan, age 26, of Zion, was 
arrested for driving under the influence and 
possession of cannabis on August 14. Homan's 
first breathalyzer test reached .21 percent. He 
was arrested and released on bond. 

Noise nets arrest 

Gregory A. Shatley, age 22, of Antioch, was 
arrested after police visited a party after receiv- 
ing complaints of loud noise on Aug. 12. After 
talking to Shatley and receiving promises that 
the volume woiild be kept down, police lah 
Shatley's idcntirication through the computer 
and discovered an outstanding warrant for pos- 



session of cannabis. Shatley was released on 
bond. 

* 

Park vandalized 

Centennial Park was vandalized Aug. 13 
when persons unknown wrote lengthy mes- 
sages on the entrance po^ts. Danftage is esti- 
mated to be $100. . / 

Fight results in arrest 

Richard W. Turner Jr., age 19, of Antioch, 
was arrested on Aug.l3, when police discovered 
an outstanding warrant after quelling a domes- 
tic argument. Turner had warrants for failure 
to appear and disorderly conduct. Turner was 
arrested and taken to Lake County Jail. 

loud music complaint ^ 

Police were dispatched to the Waterfalls 
Restaurant on August 14 after neighbors com- 
plained of the noise. 

Invalid license 

After observing Ted O. Doltom, age 37, of 
Antioch, driving on Nelson Road and knowing 
he had a revoked license, police stopped and 
arrested Bottom on August 14. Boltom was 
released on bond. 

Vomiting tips police 

After observing Ricky L Johnson, age 17, of 
Antioch, vomiting and staggering off a balcony 
apartment on August 9, police stopped Johnson 
and Joshua J. Piinkoi age 18, of Antioch, as they 
were leaving the buUding. Both appeared to be 
intoxicated and admitted to police they were 
under the age of 21. They were subsequently 
arrested for underage drinking. Police then 
went to the apartment and were told by Scott 
A. Kipkcr, age 23, of Antioch, "Hey, everyone 
here is over 18." Ofticcrs observed a large 
number of beer cans'and bottles and saw 
Timothy C. Presley, age 19, and'Grcgory . 
Pfeiffcr, age 20, in possession of ticer. Both 
were arrested for underage drinking. Kipker 
was arrested for delivery of alcohol to minors. 
AU were released on bond. 



Teen charged 
after touching 
'Bugs Bunny' 

A teenager will face mis- 
demeanor battery charges for an 
incident at Six Flags Great 
America. 

No one was injured when 19- 
year-old Kevin Williams of 
Qiicago and two teenage friends 
asked an employee wearing a 
Bug's Bunny costume what sex it 
was. ' 

Gumee Police Chief Henry 
Schwarz described what could 
have led to the incident. 

"When you get a group like 
that, there is always some subtle 
encouragement,'" Schwarz said. 
He added the incident was over 
quickly. 

The employee was with an 
escort at the time of the Aug. 10 
incident and walked away. 
Williams, according to one 
report, touched the employee 
-wearing the costume. , The 
employees were from Racine, 
Wis. and Vernon Hills. 

The two Juveniles were re- 
leased to their parents, while 
WUiiams turned in a $75 bond. 
The three were detained by Six 
Flags Great America security fol- 
lowing the incident, which took 
place just before 9 p.m. 

WUiiams has a court hearing 
Sept. 16 in Zion branch court. 



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A Coroner's inquest jury 
questioned the safety procedures 
of an Antioch Company after an - 
employee was electrocuted. 

Lake County Coroner Battiara 
Richardson said the jiuy found the 
death of Erilc Peterson, 19, of Round 
l^e Deacti to . be accidental, 
Peterson died oh June 29 while oper- 
ating a cutting machine atTuscarora 
Plastic Company in Antioch. 

. "The jury found the accident 
could have been prevented," 
Richardson said. 

Tlic jury felt the company could 
have heeded warning signs the 
machine wasn't functioning prop- 



erty, according to Richardson. ■ 

Peterson was considered a 
good worker by the company. He 
had worked for the company for 
about one year. A 

' Manager Brian LaCoursc said 
Petci^on was wcll-Dked by other 
workers. He seemed to get along 
with everybody. 

The coinpany could have 
added more safeguards, accord- 
ing to report. TTic inquest con- 
cludes the investigation on the 
death of Peterson. Richardson 
said no criminal action would folr 
low but a civil lawsuit is likely. — 
byALECJUNGE 



Woman dies in niotorcycle crsish 



AlEC JUNGE • 

Staff Reporter 

An Inglcsidc woman died as a 
result of a motorcycle accident at 
the intcisection of Hart Road and 
Rtc. 134. 

Jennifer Mccicr, 34, a passenger 
on a motorcycle, was pronounced 
dead Sunday night at the Nordiem 
Illinois Medical Center and the dri- 
ver, Roger Kenna, 32, ' of Round 
Lake Park sustained head and leg 
injuries. The motorcycle ran into 
the back of a vehicle driven by 
Antonio Carranza of Round Lake 
Beach. 

"She flew 100 feet in the air into 
the wcstix)und lane of 134," said 
OETiccr Gerard Hcndrickson of 
Round Lake I^oUcc. 

She was run over by a 1992 
Amigo driven by James Wheeler, 
43, of McHenry, according to 
Hcndrickson. 

"She was wearing dadc clothing, 
had dadc hair and wasn't wearing a 
helmet The witnesses said they 
had no idea what it was," 
Hcndrickson said. 



Hcndrickson said he will ask the 
States Attorney's office to press 
charges as a result of this accident 
As of lakeland Newspapers dead- 
line there was no arrest He did say 
there might be possible reckless 
homicide charges. 

Hcndrickson, admitted he 
believes alcohol was "a nriajor factor 
in the accident" He didn't elabo- 
rate on who might be charged. 

This is the second major motor- 
c^c accident in the area in the last 
two weeks. Last week Charies 
Tookstxiry of 2Son stnick a van at the 
intersection of Rta 83 and Rollins 
Road He is still in serious condition 
at Froedcrt Hospital in Milwaukee 
with hcadjand leg injuries. 

Both Kenna and Mecicr weren't 
wearing helmets. Kenna is in 
Northern Illinois Medical Center in 
the Intensive Care Unit for observa- 
tion, according to Hcndrickson. 

The visibility was clear. There is 
a dispute as to whether the traffic 
signal at the intersection was work- 
ing properly, according, to 
Hcndrickson. 



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COMMUNITY UkclANd Newspapers Auqusr 19, 1994 



1 ,j. 



PM&L Theatre to mark 34tli season with six produGtions 



Could It be? 

No matter what you read 
here, please remain secure in. the 
fact that I really do have a few 
good years left On most days I 
know my name, even my address 
and phone number, etc. So, when 
Itcll you that the "Carp Whales" 
coming In to feed on my bread 
scraps are showing definite signs 
that they Icnow mc, trust that 
there is an outside chance this 
can be true. Odd, but true. 
Remember, I am not claiming to 
recognize them as individuals, 
but as sure as I am writing this 
crazy tidbit, I believe they know 
me and my feeding routine. 

Why, you ask? Well, try this on 
for size. When I meander down to 
the waterfront and plop down on 
the pier with no one else around, I 
barely toss in three to four bread 
tidbits and they arrive in droves. 
They come in singly and other 
times swimming side by side, two 
and three at a time, breaking water 
as they suck up a bread scrap. It 
looks like a day at the races, witfi 10 
to 20 fish frantically racing to get 
their fair share of the goodies. 

If the neighbors come over to 
watch the feeding process, the 
carp quickly scatter and the few 
that remain stay far beneath the 
water's surface. Now, if this only 
happened once, I would think 
nothing of it However, when it 
happens time and time again, I 
prefer to believe they "recognize 
mc"! On the other hand, who am 
I to judge, a crazy lady who has 
mothered more animals than 
kids and relocated from the city, 
no less. Once again, "Dumb ani- 
mals indeed"! 



Another season 

The PM&L Theatre of 
Antioch will soon be beginning 
its 34th season "Laughter and 
Tears — Mopes and Fears." They 
have six fine productions sched- 
uled. "Annie" (Sept- 
ember/October), "How the Other 
Half Loves" (November), 
"Rumors" (February), "Inherit 
the Wind" (March/April), "The 
Sound of Music" (June), "Lend 
Mc a Tenor" (July /August). 

You can purchase individual 
tickets or six-show and three- 
show passes. The sbc-show pass is 
$40 and the three-show pass is 
$21. Senior citizens and student 
passes arc also available. 

The PM&L continues with its 
improvement construction and 
some shows may be held else- 
where. If this occurs, ample noti- 
fication of the site will be given. 
Please remember that seating at 
the theatre is limited and reserva- 
tions can be made by calling 395- 
3055. 

Help 

Janet Harrison created a 
lovely rock, flower, fish pond in 
the backyard of her new Lake 
Villa home. Her pond residents 
consist of some goldfish, frogs 
and baby channel catfish. 

While Janet, .hubby Ed and 
Little Blake and Brittany arc 
enjoying the pond immensely, 
Janet doesn't know a "hill of 
beans" about winterizing it so the 
frogs and fish may survive the 
winter. 

She asked me to inquire from 
my "Hometown Goodies" read- 
ers if anyone has any knowledge 
on how to winterize a small pond. 



If you have expertise or experi- 
ence in this area, please call and 
I'll pass on your suggestions to 
Janet 

Bine eyes 

Janet Harrison Insists that 
the channel catfish tii her pond 
have blue eyes. Sounds good to 



HOMETOWN GOODIES 



UZ 
SCHMEHL 




79;'9780 



mc. Don't foriget, I'm the one who 
believes to be recognized by a 
large group of "carp whales." I'm 
glad I'm not the only crazy lady in 
the Antioch area. Remember, 
misery loves company. 

Baveyon... 

Hatie you stopped in at J.J. 
Blinkers of- Antioch to see' the 
beautiful selection of personal 
"Cards by Karen?" Karen designs 
special invitations and cards for 
special occasions. 

The following arc some of 
the items available to order — 
invitations for baby showers, 
wedding showers, communions, 
graduations, weddings, bachelor 
and bachclorette parties, ovcr- 
the-hili birthdays, anniversary 
celebrations, special holiday par- 
ties, birth announcements, etc. 

If you are planning a special 
event, make it a point to view the 
beautiful, personal touch — Cards 
by Karen, I've seen her work and I 
guarantee you will be impressed. 



Last call 

Last call for history informa- : 
tion and memorabilia concern- 
ing Emmons School of Antioch. 
In honor of the 150th birthday 
celebration of Emmons School, 
the historical committee is 
rounding up alumni and histori- 
cal information and Items relat- 
ing to the school. If you can be of 
help in this area, call the school at 
395-1105 or Jan Lyons at 395- 
2456. More Emmons tilstory is in 
the making as the ground, etc., is 
being prepared to begin the 
much-needed addition to the 
school. How exciting to see histo- 
ry in the making, and Happy 
150th Birthday, Emmons School! 

School board 

If you would like to serve 
your community by being a 
school board member, contact 
Grass Lake School and inquire 
about the board opening created 
by the recent resignation of board 
president Cynthia Marquart. 
Applications for this position are 
available at the school and must 
be returned no later than Aug. 26. 
Interested parties must live in the 
Grass Lake School District. For 
further information call the 
school at 395-1550. 



Same/dinerent 

I had a recent conversation 
'with a fine senior citizen. Tliis per- 
son docs not like to be in the limc- 
llglit and indicated if I wanted to 
put her remarks to print, please 
omit her name. She indicated how 
much she enjoys reading 
"Hometown Goodies," She particu- 
larly enjoys my granddaughter 
stores, animal stories and "Out of 
the moutlis of babes" children sto- 
ries. In her opinion, even though 
she doesn't know all the people or 
happenings personally, she enjoys 
reading them because they are pos- 
itive, wholesome, down-to-earth 
stories that could involve anyone. 

It is always nice to receive a 
compliment I told her I have found 
people to be different in many ways 
and yet the same. I said that is pipb- 
ably why she enjoys reading about 
people and situations that she 
doesn't know about personally. I 
thanked her for her kind words, 
encouraged her to keep reading, 
and to call me with a tidbit from 
time to tiffte. - 

She said she would be turning 
90 years old in 1995 and would con- 
tact me witha birthday tidbit I'll be 
waiting, and something tells me 
this fine lady will be 90 years 
• "young," not "old!" 



ENqAqEMENT — - 

Gronnlger-Adanis 

Mrs. Roberta Gronniger aimounccs the 
engagement of her daughter, Gretta Gronniger, 
whose father is the late Michael Gronniger, to 
Michael Adams of Antioch, son of Mr. Ronald 
Adams of Sturgeon Bay, Wis., and Mrs, Doima 
Adams of Island Lake. 

The ceremony will be performed by Father 
McDcrmott and Father Kuzinkas of Saint 
Patrick's in Wadsworth on April 22, 1995. 

The bride-to-be is a 1987 graduate of Antioch 
Community High School and a 1992 graduate of 
the University of Illinois-Champaign with a 
bachelor's degree in elementary education. 

She is employed as a teacher for Saint 
Joseph's School in Round Lake, 

The groom-to-be is a 1982 graduate of 
Wheeling High SchooL He is employed as an 
inside sales representative for AVG Electronics in 
Carol Stream 
■ The couple plans to settle In Waukegan. 



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What's Happening? 

Lakeland Newspapers Is 
looking for Items to be listed 
each week In our 
Community Calendar fea- 
ture. Items sucti as club and 
organization meetings, 

church socials, announce- 
ments, special events, etp. 
Send Items to Tina Reulbach 
Lakeland Nevwpapers, 30 S. 
Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 
60030. 



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AuqusT 19, 19.94 'LAkElANdNEWspA|>Ei» COMMUNITY > 




' 




Summer's final fling 



It's rapidly approaching, 
summer's final fling. Before you 
realize what's happening you'll 
find ^^oursclf. at the barbecue 
grilling hamburgers for your 
LUbor Day picnic. But stop — 
summer isn't over yet— there arc 
still warm days ahead and great 
bargains to find, especially in 
Antioch. . 

Antioch merchants have 
been busy this week marking 
down prices for their annual 
"Final Fling Sale" of summer. 
Participating merchants will be 
offering rock bottom pricing on 
summer clearance and Intriguing 
sales on tiic latest In fashions for 
fall and winter. Get ready to hit 
the streets and pound the pave- 
meQts during the Final FUng sale 
starting Thursday, Aug. 18/ 
through Sunday, Aug. 21.. 

Being the wise consumer 
that you are, you're probably 
already thinking to yourself: 
"Sale ... Summer Clearance Sale 
... why not plan ahead for next 
sufiunei- ..." The Final Fling is the 
perfect time to enhance your 
summer wardrobe, for this sum- 
mer and next • 

You'll And lovely and'' 
unique apparel for. men, 
women and children during the 
Final Fling. Participating shops 
will be ready to help you create 
an appropriate wardrobe that is 



both fun and practical. 

With the cool days wcl^ve .. 
recently experienced, ifs time to* 
start putting together a fall 
wardrobe, so take advantage, of 
the Final Fling for super savings. 
Don't forget about back^to- 
schobl shopping, now*s the time ; 
to shop while selections are still 
the best If your cHild will be 
wearing a school uniform,-, 
remember to pick up a few but-- 
Vits for picture day and other spe- 
cial occasions. 

It's also time to startmaking 
plans for fall clean-up around the 
yard: Qieck out your Inventory of 
tools to make sure you'll be ready 
when the time comes. There's 
nothing worse (or more pre- 
dictable) than having to stop 
mid-way through a project and 
having to f run to the hardware 
store** to pick up a few things. 
Many of us have had to do tfiat 
from time to time. 

If the end of summer means 
looking forward to a long winter 
stuck inside a house you've been 
meaning to decorate, check out 
the Final Fling specials at partici- 
pating furniture and decorating 
shops. 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is 
a weekly newsletter showcasing 
Antioch's merchants and retail- 
ers. Prepared and written by 
Barbara Porch of Choosey Child. 













New boat safety class planned 



TINA L SWIECH 



staff, Reporter. . _, 

The U.S. Coast Guard 
Auxiliary announced the next 
boating safety courses, and a 
new class In Antioch is onie of 
them. 

On Monday nights starting 
on Sept. 19 at 7:30 p.m., the 
regular classes held at the 
Grant Township Hall in 
Ingleside. on 411 Washington 
St. will begin. The cost is $20 
for books. 

This year the Antioch sea- 
manship course will be brought 
back. The class will start at 7:30 
p.m. Sept. 21 at Pedersen's 
Marina at 840 W. Hwy. 173. 
Cost is $25. 

Instructor Millard Rutkowski 
said several years ago there 
were safety courses held In 
Antioch. 

Rutkowski is busily involved 
in the U.S. Coast Guard 
Auxiliary five nights a week. 

This fall on Friday nights he 
will start teaching a course in 
navigation at the McHenry 

Library to offer 
preschool program 

The Antioch Public Library 
Dist. will have a preschool read- 
ing program and school aged 
activity hour starting Oct. 1 
through December 17. 

There are lots of activities 
planned for children 3 through 
. 10. Movies will be shown once a 
month on Saturday at 2 p.ni. 

Registration will be taken 
Sept. 6 through 20. Participants 
must register in person. 

A signer will be made avail- 
able to children who need com- 
munication in sign language. 

Three weeks advance notice 
is needed. For more ihforma-. 
tion, call 395-0874. 



County College once again. On 
I^ondays^hc.wUlJ»c teaching i n 
thc/Fox Lake area, then on. 
Tuesday's he teaches the boat- 
ing safety course In Palatine. 
Wednesday's will be in 
Antioch and on Thursday's 
Rutkowski teaches the U.S. 
Coast Guard class in Arlington 
Heights. 




Barrel beauty 

The barrels In downtown 
Antioch are the product 
of a coordinated effort 
between Joane Linker of 
J.J. ' Blinkers, Mdrc 
Ma Hen of Innovative 
Screen Printing and Stan 
Llvermore of Antioch 
True. Value. Forty-eight 
barrels were set up on a 
hot afternoon In July. 
From left, Joanne Linker, 
a couple of J.J. Blinker's 
customers and Channin 
Peuclennik of True 
Value. 






August 
1994 



■■;!■>- 




Ivakeland 

Newsjpapcis V 



19 



8 p.m. PM&L perforrT>s "Th>e 
Foreigner.' HekJ at old 
GloiDe store. 395-3055 

6 p.m. Upstart Theatre, Racine, 
Wis., perfomrw "Fool 
For Love.' 639-3481 



If. you vyqnT.io 
drink ttxit'sybii 
buslne^„.tf y6<j 
want to stop, 
that's Otis.' 



AA hotline 
call: 

395-6988, 
362-1811 or 
623-9660 • 



Tuesday 



23 



6:30 p.m. 



7 p.m. 



Chamt>er of 
Commerce meet- 
ing In Advertiser 
Executive Room 

First day of sctxwl, 
ACHS 

Bteycle Club of 
Lake County meets 
at Cook Memorial 
Library, Ubertyvllle 
450^294 



Saturday 



20 



1 a.m.- Where the buffalo 
1 1 :30 a.m. roamed at dd 
School forest pre- 
serve. Reservations. 
948-7750 

5 p.m. Upstart Theatre In 
and Raclrie, Wis., performs 
8 p.m. "Fool For Love." 639- 
3481 

8 p.m. PfvlSiL performs 'The 
Foreigner.' Held at 
old Globe (Depart- 



24 



Wednesday 

7:30 a.m. CAN (Community 
Action Now) meet- 
ing at First National 
Bank of Antioch 

10a.m.- Cuneo h/luseum 
5 p.m. and Garderw open. 
362-3042 

8 p.m.- SOLO singles group 
midnight weekly dance at 
Princess Restaurant 
In Llbertyvllle. 
816-1011 



Sunday 



21 



10 a.m.- Teddy Bear Show 
4:30 p.m In Madison, Wis. 

414-255-4465 

1 1 a.m. Shut-In Mass for 

the handicapped 
at St. Peter's 
Social Center 

2:30 p.m. PM&L performs 
and "The Foreigner.' 

8 p.m. Held at old Globe 
Department 
Store. 395-3055 



Thursday 



25 



10 a.m.- Cuneo Museum 
5 p.m. and Gardens open. 
362-3042 

7 p.m.- Lofty Gourmet Gook- 

9 p.m. Ing School In Long 

Grove offers "Healthy 
CooWng With Herbs," 
634-9287 

7:30 p.m.- Country dancing 

10 p.m. atVFW. $4per 

person. 395-4915 
or 356-7786 



Monday 



22 



7 p.m. Rational Recov- 
ery Self Help Net- 
work meets at 
Antioch Manor 
Apts. 838-2530 . 

7 p.m. A Safe Place 

support group for 
battered 
women, Vernon 
Hills. 249-5147 . 

7 p.m. Toughlove meets 
at Round Lake 
Pari< Dbt. 546-1202 



Coming Up: 

Aug. 26 CLC Art Gallery 
7-9 p;m. opens new exhibit 






Aug. 27 



Aug. 27 
and 28 
lOa.m.- 
4 p.m. 

Aug. 31 



Antioch Lion's 
Club regular 
meeting 

Arts and Crafts 
Fair at Lake 
County Fair- 
grounds. 223-1433 

First day of school 
Dist, 34 



■^:^:^>;\fi>^^ 



G©KS«)METHINeSGOING ON? GAtlUSII^Ind Reurb^ 



t^^k 



tmu 




!] COMMUNITY LAkElANd Newspapers AuqusT 19, 1994 






Crane calls upon president 
to back GOP healtii care plan 

Eighth Dist. Congress-man Philip M. Crane said now that the 
House has defeated the Clinton Crime Bill and shown it opposes 
wasteful spending of taxpayer dollars, the Qlnton Administration 
should embrace Republican at-tempts to pass a health care package. 

"The president has been shown that a majority of House mem- 
bers, including 58 Democrats, did not believe the way to fight crime 
was to spend billions of dollars on dance programs, arts and crafts, 
midnight basketball and programs to promote self-esteem," the con- 
gressman declared. 

"A House-Senate conference committee loaded an extra $8 billion 
onto. an already ovcrioaded bill calling for the expenditure of $22 bil- 
lion,'* he went on. 

"The nation can have a health care bill this year if President 
Clinton will give up his call for socialized medicine," he added. 

Crane has cosponsorcd a bill which does not raise taxes or force 
employer mandates upon small business as the president wants to do. 

Ttic Republican bill would permit workers to keep health insur- 
ance when going from one job to another. It would cover pre-existing 
medical conditions, and provide for medical IRAs. Small business 
' would be permitted to Join pools to lower premium rates. 




Best wishes 

state Sen. Adeline Goo-Karis and a friend ride In \h& Geo 
mobile at ttie LIndenfest parade^.—Photo by Kovln Hanrahan 



PEopU News 



Mllgrads Battalion, 1st Force Service 

Antioch residents Ghrlsto- Support Group, Marine Corps 

pber AposUd and Christopher Base. Camp Pendleton, Calif. He 



Polark have graduated from 
Marquette University in 
Milwaukee, Wis. Apostal eamed a 
■BS in computer science and 
Polark an MBA. 

Completes training 

Navy Scunwi Recniit 
Nicole O'Neill, daughter of 
Frances O'Neill of Antioch, has 
completed basic training at Re- 
cruit. Training Command, Or- 
lando, Fla. 

Receives certificate 

Merlne Lsnoe Cpl. Shawn 
M. McFarland, whose wife, 
Kelly, Is the daughter of Cathie 
Radlein of Antioch, has received a 
Certificate . of Conunendation. 
McFailandws^ cited for superior, 
perfiorinance of duty while 
assigned with 1st Maintenance 



Joined the Marine Corps in June 
1992. 

Graduates college 

Antioch resident Pamela 
Riedel has graduated from Na- 
tional-Louis University, 
Evanston, with a Bachelor of Arts 
degree in management 




Phil Gonce of Woodcrost Subdivision gets dinner ready for the subdivision's first Annual Pig Roost. 
The pig weighed In at 200 pounds and the chefs Isegan cooking at 4 a.m.-^Photo by Mary Foley 

Wopdcrest picnic has huge turnout 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

The newly re-formed 
Woodcrcst Subdivision held its 
first subdivision-wide pig roast 
last weekend. At last count, 125 
members of the association 
turned out for the event. 

According to association 
officials, almost' all of the 200- 



pound pig was eaten by dusk. 

The group was very pleased 'of subdivision property. 



Tavern, Baskin Robbins, White 
Hen Pantry, Raymond Chevy- 
Olds, Action Video, Autumns 
Hair, and Armanetti. Liquors. 

Members of the subdivision 
had an opportunity to spend time 
with their neighbors in a social 
setting instead of legal meetings. 
Many members of the subdivi- 
sion were recently named iii a 
countcrsuit about the ownership 



that despite the threatened 
showers, there was no rain for 
the event. 

Commercial supporters of the 
roast included First Chicago 
Bank, Video Explosion, Antioch 
True Value, Wasz's Resort, 
Neurauter's Restaurant, TNT's 
Restaurant, Triangle Sports, 
Waste Management, Dinks 



WeddiNq 



Woodcrcst Subdivision, locat- 
ed in the far northwest end of 
Antioch Township, has been in 
and out of court to clear up a title 
issue regarding homeowner asso- 
ciation property. Last month, the 
homeowner's association was 
told to rcfilc the property lawsuit 
in the subdivision name instead 
of the association. After doing so, 



individual members were named 
in a counter-suit ■ by John 
Krueger, another property owner 
in the subdivision. 

Problems started for resi- 
dents in 1980 when John 
Krueger, a Cook County resi- 
dent, formed a land trust 
through a bank. According to 
the association's attorney,' John 
Casey, ICrucgcr included in the 
property description the associ- 
ation's beach, parks, and ease- 
ments. While Krucger's actions 
did not make him the owner of 
the property, it did cause a 
cloud to be put on the title of 
the property. 

Despite the subdivision's 
legal problems, residents were 
still able to enjoy a good old-fash- 
ioned pig ro^t 



Adams-Mason 

Karen Adams and Bryan Mason of 
Champaign were joined in manriagc on May 21 
at First Baptist Church of Mahomet Pastor 
David DeMott officiated the double ring cere- 
mony. 

The bride is the daughtei: of Susan Adams of 
Antioch. She is a graduate of the University of 
Illinois with a bachelor's degree in social work, 
and is employed at Bethesda Diiworth 
Memorial Home in Oakland, Mo. 

The groom is the son of Tom and Maiy 
Mason of O'Fallon, 111. He Is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois with a bachelor's degree in 
architectural studies. He is employed by 
Hospital Building and Equipment Co. in Creve 
Coeur, Mo. 

The matron of honor was Debbie Prathcr. 
Cindy Battaglia and Barb Lochhcad were the 
bridesmaids. The flower glri was Lindsey 
Adams. 




^ Mm^ (Brian gniadd^ (D/D.S, ^M M^ 

' w^ GeneraCdr Cosmetic ^Dentistry %^ 



generaCe^ 

• /fl/kitftt Contro[!^(onitomg St^tm 

• Consuttatiotts JIt !^ Cfia^i 
•^// 'Hom'SkaJmg S<jstm 



dentistry 

• Jatmlif ImatOm JqtM^ 
•Senior Citizen ^counts 
•Tftyfomf^ottA Qmds Jet Sports • 






20561, gmdSbn, Undti^ml- Liii^Tba ftagk Toois..) 




State Farm 
Sells Life Insurance. 



Michelle Wolf 

1724 E. Grand Ave. 

Lindenhurst 

g08)m3353 



•mi r*iM 



IMIUIANCl 



:. 



Sitta Fwin Uf* (luumnoa Coninwiy 
, Ho(mQffio«Btoo(nlnglofi,llinoM 



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Auqusr19, 1994 UlcElANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 




At-Risk program available for 
Antioch's youngest residents 



MARY.FOl£Y 



staff Reporter 

Antioch Community 

Consolidated Sctiool District 34 
will once again offer Its 
Prcldndcrgartcn Program for 
Ctiildrcn at Rislc of Academic 
Failure, The district's budget 
proposal has been accepted by 
the Illinois. State Board of 
Education for fiscal year 1995. 
. The program is for children 
between the ages of 3 and 5 who 
arc in need of enhanced learning 
to prepare them for a successful 
educational experience. In addi- 
tion, the At Rislc Program 
improves parenting skills as edu- 
cational improvement for the 
children's parents. 

"This isa great program," said 
Director Janet Bchling. "They do 
a lot of interesting things includ- 
ing art and music as well as devel- 
op gross physical motor skills." 

The grant from the state 
allows for the education of 50 
children. Screening Jor children 
at risk is ongoing throughout the 
school year. .. 

The program has two teach- 
ers, two teacher assistants, and a 
family resource counselor. The 
children either attend a half-day 
session four days a week, or 
become part of the home-start 
program. According to 

Bchling, the home start program 
is for younger learners or those 
children whose parents arc 

Agency looks 

on 




>rf»%¥7" 




Speed-boats 



TINA I. SWIECH 



staff Reporter 

After its first move to imple- 
ment a 150-fpot, no-wake zone 
around the Chain O' Lakes, the 
Fox Waterway Agency may be on 
its way to reducing high-speed 
vessels on the water as well. 

While some were pleased with 
the no-wake decision last week, 
others were not. . 

Those against the change 
cited difficulty getting it 
enforced, as well as just having 
too many rules to follow on the 
Chain which would take the fim 
outoft>oating. 

Others said their safety 
improved with the no-wake zone. 

Whatever the feeling, the 
Agency knows one thing. They 
will be tackling a fervently con- 
troversial issue which has been 
the grounds of concern for many 
residents and boaters. 

Although the brand name 
"Cigarette" boats that operate up 
to about 70 m.p.h. arc making 
waves with a lot of people, 
"There's a very small percentage 
(of them) realistically," said 
Agency Executive Director Karen 
ICabbes. : . 

Kabbes estimates that only 
about 30 of these cigarette-style 
boats out of 23,000 boats the 
Agency issues user permits for 
each year, may actually be oper- 
ating on the Chain. 

At the last Agency meeting, 
the board announced a desire to 
have input from citizens, and to 
. draw up petitions for and against 
a possible ban on cigarette-type 
boats on the waterway. 

If there's enough- interest, la 

public hearing could take] place 

- on the issue, said.Kabbes . 



unable to get them to school. "I 
give the mom's some Ideas," said 
Bchling about the home start 
program. "It's a real nice pro- 
gram." " 

Parents and parenting skills 
arc not ignored in the program. 
"We try to address the family's 
educational needs," said Behling. 
"Vic really work hard wlth^ the 
parents educational needs. We 
try to help them to set education- 
al goals." -. : 

Fridays arc often reserved for 
parent-child activities. "We have 
play group, field trips and work- 
shops," explained Bchling.^ Every 
year the youngsters, along, with 
their fathers, carve pumpkins for 
Halloween. "I always learn a lot 
from the parents," Bchling 
addqd. 

"Screening is available to all 
the children in the district 
between the ages of 3 and 5," said 
Behling. Parents' who believe 
their child may be at risk should 
call the Center of Early Education 
and Development at W.C. Petty 
School, 395-1440. 




Sportsman's picnic 

LooTi LakG Sportsman's ^soclatlon officers serve refreshements at ttie organization's annual 
picnic. From left, Mark Reeves, vice president; Steve Br/son, president; VIcW Craig, treasurer; 
and Keltti Larsen, secretary. Proceeds from ttTe picnic and auction go towards restocking ttie 
lake.— Pholo by Claudia M.Lonart * 




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n COMMUNITY UIceIancI Newspapers Auqtisr 19,1 994 



I' . 



Residents provide funding 
for Antioch Rescue Squad 



'Tlic Annual Anttoch Rescue 
Squad auction netted over 
$40,000 this year, providing a 
solid funding base for the volun- 
teer organization. In addition, 
the squad received a generous 
donation of $10,000 from Claude 
Smith of NuWay Speakers, 

"Obviously, the community 
generosity was evident," said Tim 
Osmond of the Rescue Squad. 
"This year's auction seemed to 
have more items as well as a lot of 



different bidders." 

Everything from furniture to * 
boats were sold at this year's auc- 
tion which was held on August 7 
at Williams Park. Evert Oftedahl 
donated his 1940 Chevy truck for 
the auction. 

The members of the Rescue 
Squad want to thank the commu- 
nity for their continued support 
and would also like to remind 
residents of their ongoing CPR 
program. 



Taxes 



From page Al 

residents and trustees ques- 
tioned Koughton about the prob- 
lem. "How docs this affect the tax 
cap?" Trustee Claudcttc Skvarcc . 
asked. 

"The tax cap affects the 
qmount the township can ask 
for," replied Houston. Despite 
the higher assessments, 
Houghton reminded the group 
that the amount of taxes is 
dependent on the taxing districts. 

"1 could double the value of 
your home and your taxies would 
not go up," he said. "It Is up to 
the taxing districts." 

"What will this do to taxpay- 
ers?" Skvarcc asked. 

"In my opinion, it will force 
people out of here," Houghton 
replied. The problem, according 
to Houghton, is that people seem 
willing to pay increasing amounts 
ofmoney to live in Antioch. .» 

"It's incredible," Houghton 
said. "We have places that went 
up 50 percent. Especially the 
waterfront properties." 

Houghton was asked what 
would happen if he ignored the 
higher sales and simply failed to 



Waterway 



raise the assessments. Houghton 
explained that the state would 
then come in and add a factoring 
amount that would penalize the 
entire township. 

Those at tlic township meet- 
ing then launched into a discus- 
sion about taxing alternatives. "I 
have long personally been in 
favor of increasing the income tax 
and eliminating the school dis- 
trict portion of property taxes," 
said Floughton. 

However, he went on to 
explain that one of the problems 
with that plan is that If the econo- 
my went into a recession, there 
may not be enough income tax to 
fund school districts. Houghton 
told the group that Wisconsin is 
considering a similar plan, how- 
ever it has not yet been enacted. 
And, he felt it was too soon to 
evaluate the new school funding 
program enacted in Michigan. 

Houghton reminded the 
group that citizens are requiring 
more and more services and that 
there needs to be a way to insure 
the necessary funding for those 
services. In the meantime, prop- 
erty owners must grin and bear it 



From page Al 
make," said Undquist. "This new 
no wake area will provide a place 
along our lakes for nshcrmen and 
swimmers, improve safety and 
help improve water quality," he 

added. 

Another director, Judy 
Martini said, "I'm very pleased 
the board voted to take this 
important step." 

Now canoers and non-motor- 
ized boaters will be using more of 
the lake, explained Director 
Wayne Blake. 

In related action, the Agency 
also approved a compromise no 
wake area for the Fox River in 



Algonquin. 

In accordance with the Village 
of Algonquin's previous proposal, 
the Agency board voted unani- 
mously to move the no wake area 
front 1,500 feet upstream of the 
dam to 2,200 feet 

A 450-foot wide semicircular 
turnaround area for boats would 
be included in the center of the 
river between 2,000 feet and 2,200 
upstream of the dam. 

The ordinance states that the 
no wake area goes into effect ^^ 
the village's request, once a per- 
mit violation at Ericson Marina is 
resolved between the State of 
Illinois and Mr. Ericson. 



Immunization clinics held for children 



V, 



Hie Lake County Health Dept 
offers immunization clinics for 
Lake County children. 

Childhood immunization clin- 
ics will be held at the following 
locations and times. A parent or 
guardian must accompany all 
children: 

Shlloh Center, Emmaus and 
27th Street Zion, Aug, 19 from 9 
to 11 a.m.; no appointment is 
necessary. 

American Legion Post 867, 
Rtes. 176, 60 and 83, Mundelein. 
(Enter from Maple Street, one 
block south on Rte. 83), Aug. 24 
from 9 to 11 a.ni.; no appoint- 
ment is necessary. , , 

The Highwood Recreation 
Center, 428 N. Green Bay Rd., 
Highwpod» Aiig. 26 from 9 to 
11 a.m.; no appointiiient Is 



necessary. 

Belvidere Medical Building. 
2400 Belvidere Rd., Waukegan, 
Aug. 31 from 5 to 7 p.m.; no ap- 
pointment is necessary. 

At the clinics, children can be 
immunized against polio; diph- 
theria, tetanus, whooping cou^ 
(D.P.T.); measles, mumps, rubel- 
la (German measles); and 
Haemophilus influenza, type B 
(HJ.B.). 

Parents are asked to bring 
their children's past immuniza- 
tion records. If a child has an 
immunization letter from a 
school nurse, it should also be 
brought to the session. 

For more information call the 
Lake County Health Dept 
Communicable Disease Program 
at 360-6761. 




Small fire 

Antioch flreflghteis fan the Loon Lake Inn after extinguishing a smal electrical flre that. was 
apparently caused by extenston cords keeping the food warm at the Loon Lake Sportsman's 
Association annual picnic. 



Engineer on leave, undergoing therapy 



TINA I. SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

The engineer of the Metra 
express train which hit and killed 
a Long Lake woman Aug. 3, is 
currently undergoing counseling. 

"It was a traumatic experience 
for him,** explained Chils 
ICnappton of Metra. 

Lindenhurst resident Paul 
Rowland is on leave from his job, 
and Knappton said he doesn't 
know if the engineer plans to 
return to work anytime soon, or 
even at all. 

The Metra representative 
explained often when a situation 
occurs such as the one where 
Stephanie Pcasc-Basile was 
killed, a train engineer may. 
become so traumatized he never 
returns to his job. 

Knappton explained how 
helpless an engineer feels when 



there's a person or vehicle on the 
tracks. The huge engine can't 
steer out of the way, and traveling 
as fast as they are, they can't stop 
very quickly. 

"You can lock up on those 
brakes, but you'll slide a quarter 
mile like he did," Knappton said. 
During the impact that morning 
the car was dragged nearly aU the , 
way to Fairfield Rd. 

According to the Lake County 
SherifTs Highway Division, wit- 
nesses recounted they never saw 
Basile's brake lights go on. 

Corporal John Janslcy of the 
department reported the white- 
Ford Probe the woman was dri- 
vbig, was traveling between 20 to 
25 miles per hour and went 
straight over the tracks even 
though the engineer blew his 
horn and the red crossing lights 
were flashing. 



Jansky said he doesn't buy the 
theory that Basile was blinded by 
the 7 a.nL sun and couldn't see 
thelights. 

Ihc corporal explained videos 
were taken of the site during the 
same time of day, and the red 
lights on the north end where the 
driver was coming from, were not 
glared by the sun. 

Reports from several neigh- 
bors say .they saw Basile on her 
way to work many times, playing 
a kind of "game" with the train. 
Family and friends of Basile have 
coiiunentcd that she was a very 
cautious driver. 

The Illinois Department of 
Transportation (IDOT) 

announced they would be erect- 
ing crossing gates at the Long 
Lake site sometime after the 
beginning of the 1995 fiscal year 
starting in October of this year. 



Pine Hills owner gets another extension 



MARY FOLEY • 

Staff Reporter 

The owner of the Pine Hills 
Lakes development, NBD Bank, 
has received another extension of 
two weeks to get drainage prob- 
lems under control as well as con- 
tract for the construction of walk- 
ing paths. However, it Is eitpected 
that another extension will be 
needed for the cleaning of the 
ponds since an engineering study 

Restaurants to award 
food scholarships 

The Lake County Restaurant 
Association will award scholar- 
ships up to $1,000 to College of 
Lake County students pursuing a 
career in the food service Indus- 
try. 

Wiimers will be chosen on 
the basis of academic perfor- 
mance, work experience and 
future career goals. 

Candidates must be Lake 
County residents enrolled full 
time in an accredited food service 
program. 

Applicants must subrnit two 
reference letters, a resume, an 
ofHcial transcript from the school 
they most recently attended and 
a statement describing their 
financial need. 

The application deadline is 
Sept. 6. Applications may be sent 
to Clifford Wcncr, College of Lake 
County, 19351 W.Washington St., 
Grayslake,IL 60030. 



is needed to determine the cause 
of the silting. 

Mayor Marilyn Shineflug, 
Director of Planning, Zoning, and 
Building Robert Silhan, and other 
village staff members met with 
representatives of NBD Bank of 
Mount Prospiect on Aug. .9 to once 
.again discuss some of the other 
improvements needed in the sub- 
■ .di\dsion. The completion of the 
public use projects has been 
dragging on for an extended peri- 
od of time. 

"The engineers have been on 
site," said Silhan to the tnistees in 
a recent meeting. "Plans have 
been submitted." 

There are problems with the 



storm sewers and catch basins, 
creating drainage control prob- 
lems. Walking paths have yet to 
be constructed and the ponds on- 
the west side need to be cleaned. 

It is expected the Pine Hills 
Issue will once again be on the vil- 
lage board's agenda. Resident of 
Pine HiUs attended the most 
recent village board meeting, but, 
on the whole, remained silent as 
they learned of yet another cxtcn- 
sioiL 

"If the progress is not what we 
want, wc can cash their check and 
do the work ourselves," said 
Trustee Marvin Oldenburger. 
The extension will expire 
Septembers. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

STATE OF ILUNOIS 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
In the Matter of the E«Ute of 

Gregory M. Hanan No.94P641 

Deceeiad . 

CLMM NOTICE 
Notice Is given of the death of Qregoiy M. Hanan, of Antioch, Illinois. 
Letters of office were issued on July 25, 1994, to Dorothea M. Hanan, 
whose attorney is self-representation, Dorothea M. Hanan, 25420 W. 
Madison, Ingteside, IL 60041. 

Claims against the estate nnay be filed in the office of the Ctertt of the 
Circuit Court at 18 N. County Street, Waukegan, Illinois 60085 Room 
C-104 or with representative, or twth, on or before Febiuaty 7, 1995 
which data is not less than six months from tiie date of the first publi- 
cation of this notice and any claim not filed within ttiat period is baned. 
Copies of this daim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to 
the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it is filed. 

Dorothea M. hiarian 
(Representative/Pro Se) 

Oe94A-017-AR 

Augusts, 1994 

August 12, 1994 

. August 19, 1994 



■•>"*'-'',» 



AuqusTl9, 1994 UkflANcJ Newspapers COMMUNITY 




I 



THISAVEEK 



-chiefs appreciate 
fan PAGEA12 



m. 



/''?M 



On Track 

Pebbles, Larson lead 
GHS track PACE Al 2 

For More 
SpORTs/LeisuRE 

SEt^Bfl^EC21c 



;y^ 






^"8K- Race, walk 
revents to help 
:..Glenfcirk 

GlenJdrk's Third Annual 
8K (4.96 miles) Turiccy Trot 
and 2 Mile Fitness Walk will 
' be held on Sunday, Nov. -13 j 
in DcerflcIdfStait and finish, 
of the race will take place on^ 
"' Chestnut Street, near the 
. Mctra Station. Enjoy a 
,\. sccnlc.and fast.oburso \ - ,; 
;' 'throu^-Deeifleld and ' *' ' 
^'Bahhociclium. Course is 
" USATF certified. Start time 
is 9 am. A huge post-race 
^ party and avmds .ceremony ^,; 
. ' will be held IminMiat'ely fbl- '. 
lowing the event Ent^ fces'*i: 
forthe8KRunare$13Ui< > 
' advance, $15 race day. ^|^ 
y«,Fitness waUcisSll. For an ^ ■ " 
^ ' apprication;jcatt'272-51 II, 
■cxt. 126. Proceeds benefit..., -. 
- the developmentally dis- '^j^'H 
abicd served by Glonkirk.^ 

5K walkj jog^ #■ 
im Highland 
Park 

Highland Park Hospital 
, and the park district of 
Highland Parkl will co-spon- , 
sora5KWalkaii(15K]ogon 
Sunday, Sept 18. "Hike for a ' 
Healthy Heart" is for anyone ,» 
undergoing cardiac re- ' 
hablUtatidn and their fami- 
lies, lliehilce will begin at 9 
a.ni at thVHighlond Park 
Hospital Green Bay PavUibn, 
1936 Green Bay Rd The $10 
xegjstration fee includes a t- 
; shirt, cohtental breakfast 
following the event, and raf- 
fle prizes. Tlie non-re- 
fundable early registration 
fee must be received no later 
than Tuesday/Sept 13, 
' Registratioh oh the day of 
the hike Is $12. For more 
information, call Highland 
j;Kuk Hospital's Cardiac 
pfehabiiitatlon Department 
at 480-3860 



rPjioto correction 

Lakeland Newspapers 
used an Incorrect photo 
identlfyiiig Thomas Furlan . 
in the Aug. 12 edition: The 
former Antioch Sequolt 
football standout is now 
playing football for Eastern 
Illinois University. 
Lakeland Newspapers 
regrets the error. 



Antioch Softball team gives strong effort iii^seetion 




For the first time In five years, 
a girls' Softball squad represented 
Antioch in'scctional action. 

Prospect Heights ousted 
Antioch In sectional play by a 17- 
14 score, but that was not without 
Antioch making a strong bid to 
upset the more experienced team 
from Prospect Heights.' 

Antioch scored six runs in the 

first inning and added one in the 

second, and two In the fourth to 

hold a 9-4 lead going into the 

•fifth. 

Shgitstop Kelly Periman had 
to leave the game because of an 
illness, which resulted In a long 
delay from a controversy on sub- 
stitution rules. ' 

After the controversy was set- 
tled, Prospect Heists came to bat 



and scored ciglit runs to Uikc a 12- 
9 lead. Antioch never recovered. 

Coach Dennis Murphy said 
after Periman left the game, he 
had to move players into unfamil- 
iar positions defensively wtiich 
led to a number of fielding errors. 

Lisa Murphy went the dis- 
tance on the mound, striking out 
three and issuing seven walks^ 

Laura Dcutsch was the defen- 
sive standout, playing shortstop 
and outfield. 

Offensively, Murphy had 
three singles, one double and 
tlircc RBIs;- Deutsch connected 
for three singles. Dcanne 
Dalgaard singled and tripled for 
two RBIs, and Sarah Rockow 
knocked in two with two singes 
and a double. 





1994 Antioch Sonlor Loagu» Girts All Star Team. Front row ftom left: 
Unda DeSatvo, Laura Deutich, Kristin Fronzen, Marlssa Blosko, 
Krlsten Lynch. Row two: Dednne Dalgaard. Amy DIetz, Joanna 
Miller. Jamie Sllarskl. Bock row: SaraK Rockow, Kelly Periman, Usa 
Murphy. Coaches: Dennis Murphy, Ted Sllarskl. Not picfured: Kelly 
Williams. 



■i 




Ivakeland 

Newspapers 



1 

! 

.pi 

i 



Antioch Waves finish season, name award winners 



Antioch's swim team, the- 
, Waves, concluded its swim sea- 
son by competing in the North 
Central Swim Conference finals 
InDeKalb. 

The Waves placed 10th out of 
15 teams in the season finale, and 
their dual meet season finished 
on the winning end of a 4-2 
record.' 

"We had a yery good year this 
year," said Waves Coach Gregg 
Henning, w^o has led the team 
for the past six years. 

He said the team started slow- 
ly" by losing its" first couple of 
meets, but once the members 
began swimming as a team they 
were able to string together a 
couple of dual meet victories. 

"At the end of the year, the 
kids came together as a team. 
They formed as a group and 
swam as a team instead of for 
individual marks," Heimlng said. 

The conference finals were 
highlighted with a first-place fin- 
ish by the 200-mcter freestyle 
relay team of Josh Guros, Brian 
Murphy, Roger Behm and 
Rodney Bchm.The .foursome 
swam a 1:36.36 in the 15- to 18- 
year-old age bracket 

Other Antioch swimmers 
.placing in the conference finals 

included: 

• Ryan Rotheriticl (under 12 
boys), third, 50-meter freestyle, 28.37; 

• Murphy (15-18 boys), ihlrd, 100- 
metcr rrccslyle, 53.56; 

• Taylor Pectiaucr (under 8 boys), 
fifth, 25-nieter breastrolce, 23.27: 

• Elizabeth Wiliding (under 6 
girls), second, 25-mcter freestyle, 
22,17; 

• David Roy (under 6 boys), third, 
25-meter freestyle, 24.64; 

• Guros (15-lB boys), fourtli, 200- 
meter individual medley, 2:19.11; 

• Kris Vanderkooy (12 and under 
boys), fourth, 100-meter backstroke, 
34.65; 

• Guros (15-18 boys), third, 100- 
mcter backstroke, 1:02.32. 

Coach Henning said some 
players, bcludhig Katiannc 
Pechauer, Eliora lares and Katie 
Meyers, wUlhave prospective 
futures as they develop their 
swim skills. 

''Some of our younger swim- 
mers are incredible for their age 
categories," Henning said. 

Ilie Waves also named their 

season award wirmers. 

Winning Most Dedicated awards 
included Bret Huotari, Macgan 
Pctkus, Clare Shcchan, Kimbcrly 
Meyer, loc Fusz and Dawn DcScrvi. 

Earning ttic Most Improved 
awards included Lcc Clark, David 



Roy, Kaltlyn Amcnt, Ross LeFave, 
Lindsay Bolton, Peter Ihlen, Heather 
Huotari, Doug Matlascic, Susan Barr. 
Mike, Korczyk, Stephanie Zerbst and 
lason Mohdcllo. 

The Most Outstanding awarcls 



were given to Catherine Eschbacb, 
Bret Huotari, Eliora Jares, Taylor 
Pccliauer, Katie Meyer, Ryan LeFave, 
Katianne Pechauer, Kris Vanderkooy. 
Jessica Kos, Joe Skiirski, Dawn 
DeScrvi and Brian Muiphy. 



Rodney Behm was honored with 
the Dodd Award. The State Bank of 
the Lakes in Antioch, team sponsor, 
gives the Dodd Award to the individ- 
ual who demonstrated team leader' 
ship. 




Parading trophy 

Members.of the. Lake Villa Township Mustang team display tt>e state champlonsNp trophy dur- 
ing the Undenfest parade. State champs Include Kevin Pendergast, Shawn Schuier, Tom 
Chapman, Josh Rapier, Chris Kocinskl, Chris Chebney, Nick SevetK>n, Kyle Davis, Scott Straub, 
Trent Domel and Ryan Meyers. The team was coactied by Ryq^endergast, John Chapman 
and Rick Chebney.— Photo by Kevin tianrahan 



Antioch karate 
students advance 

The Antioch Parks, and 
Recreation Department 

announced those students who 
advanced to the next belt level in 
karate. 

The Parks and • Recreation 
Department established the pro- 
gram in February. Instructor 
Anna Conners conducted the 
exam. 

Students advancing to the 
next level were Tyler Bolton, 
Jonathan Carroll, Jeffrey Danna, 
Ryan Engel, April Klcpacki, Marge 
Klcpacki, Theresa Suski, Roxanc 
WojnarowskI, Tom Webel, 
Spencer Yetman and G. Taylor 
Yctman. 

Fall classes for the Shotokan 
Karate program begin Sept. 13th 
and 15th. For more Information, 
call 395-2160. 



H()Sli}\ i'llOESLX SA.\ l-h'.lM'l:.Ci) llUt a! nl <J! I.K 



ni iiu>: 



As a professional, your business 
takes you on the road. At first the 
trips are exciting, adventurous and 
with some apprehension. Later you 
become a pro at navigating in 
distant cities, airports and with 
aggressive business schedules. 

After the business is concluded, 
the plane lands and you return 
to the neighborhood, a sense of 
relief is felt 



Rick Broquet 



JliM^A^ JxjQyulQALQ/XjJbi^uXjinieA 



K« 



^m4^ 



When looking to buy 
or sell your home call me. 



^mtt vS ^'^^ ^^^P y^^^ ^^^ your place called home, 
^J C/a^* Wk: 249-65 1 3 Hm: 356-6968 
RE/MAX Heritage 4641 Grand Ave. Gumee, IL 60031 



HiH\iis(:ii.-tM A"/.'*' y(>i<f<^ si: 



A' \/.i:i<.;n 



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COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers Auqusr 19, 1994 



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Chiefs appreciate efforts of long-time fan Kowell 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Before the game against Tay- 
lorvillc, Utah, Kotch Kowell 
watched intently as the Lake 
County Chiefs tossed baseballs, 
ran laps and generally prepared 
for the third game of the AAU 
World Series. 

Kowell, wearing a Chiefs t- 
shirt, gave the 12-and-undcr 
team her own version :of a pep 
talk before an 11-2 win. 

. "When they hurt, 1 hurt; when 
they make an error, I moke an 
error. When tlicy get a hit, 1 get a 
hit," Kowell said. 

Kowell is a Chicago resident 
'who is great aunt to team mem- 
ber Matt Rollins, She attended 
last week's AAU World Series in 
Burnsvillc, Minn, as she has at- 



tended much of the Chiefs 50- 
plus games. The Chiefs con- 
cluded the post-season with a 4-2 
mark at the World Scries, good 
enough for a top ten fmish. 

"I enjoy the good chemistry 
on this team," Kowell said. 

She likes the coaching style of 
Manager Art Mansavagc, Tim 
Nolan and Rick Ruh - always pos- 
itive. In turn, the coaches and 
players appreciate Kowcll's Inter- 
est. 

"She's .great," Mansavage 
said. 

"1 think this team can do it," 
Kowell said of the Chiefs chances. 

Kowell played baseball In a 
women's league in Chicago in the 
1940's. She .said the movie, "In A 
League of their Own" was realis- 
tic. 



The Chiefs, who finished 46- 
10:2, made the trip north and 
pleased their loyal fans and par- 
ents by winning their First three 
games. It got tougher after that, 
as Rhode Island handed Lake 
County a 4-2 loss and Sari Diego 
eliminated the Chiefs 6-0. 

Baseball notebook:' The 
Chiefs participated as one of fl7 
teams in a parade before the 
Twins-Red Sox game at the 
Mctrodomc, the third to last day 
before the strike.. .The Twins won 
5-2...0ne player's view of the big 
league work stoppage, the eighth 
^In 22 years: "1 think the players 
are greedy, but I will miss my 
favorite player, Mark Grace," 
lamlc Jankowski of Lake Zurich 
said. 



Gurnee Days lOK race results 



Tlic Gurncc Park Dist. has 
announced liic resiills Inlhc lOKracc 
and Two-mllc Fun Run held 
Saturday, Aug. 13. Tlic final limes for 
the 1 OK race arc as follows: 

lercmy Arndt, Beach Park, 
34:08.5; Elia Zashln, Wilmcttc, 
36:18.7; Eric Burgess, Long Grove, 
36:32.3; Andrew Miller, Zion, 36:35.7; 
Jeffrey Murphy, Waukcgan, 36:43.7; 
Mike Ives, Waukcgan, 36:49.8; Chuck 
Wathcn, Mundclcin, 36:57.7; Calvin 
Garth, Waukcgan. 37:27.3; Jose 
Dcsardcn, Waukcgan, 37:33.9; Jesse 
Shearin, Glenshaw, Pa., 38:03.0; 
Dennis Ray, Gurncc, 38:33.4; Gerald 
Kochman, Kenosha, Wis., 38:59.7; 
Michael Parker, Gurnee, 39:02.0; 
Christopher Braun. Wilniette, 39:10.0; 
Joe Legal, Waukcgan, 39:29.9; Stacey 
Lovelady, Zion. 39:32.1; Willie Irvin, 
Wheeling, 39:46.5; John Carrino, 
Gurncc, 40:36.9; Jeff Alder, 
Lindcnhurst, 40:40.5. 

Jay Myers, Grayslakc, 41:02.0; 
Michael Brcnnan, Grayslakc, 41:03.2; 
Brad Flamcnt, Wadsworth, 42.03.2; 
Don Mowics, Libcrlyvillc, 42:12.3; Jeff 
lohnson. Anlioch, 42.21.1; Mike 
FuUcrton. Inglcside, 42:25.0; Dave 
.Cheney, Winthrop Harbor, 42:25.5; 
Shaun Zcnncr, Gurnee, 42:43.0; Mike 
Monloya, Ft, Sheridan, 42:44.9;" Mike 
Odom, Lake Bluff. 42:54.2; Martin 
Conner, Winthrop Harbor, 42:56.0; 
Bill Black. Gurncc, 43:10.6; Bill Zcck. 
Gurnee, 43:17.6; Chris Graul, 
Chicago, 43:32.3; Larry Goldlng. 
Gurncc, 43:44.3; Karen Graham, 
Gurnee, 43:46.5; David Collins, 
Gurnee, 43:53.9; Javier Hernandez, 
Gurnee, 44:01.4; Pat Frank, 
Wildwood, 44:08.5. ■ 

Lawrence Byrne, Vernon Hills, 
44:20.6; David Ulbcrt, Buffalo Grove, 
44:24.17; Michael Powell, Winthrop 
Harbor, 44:28.0; Jack Taylor, 
Waukcgan, 44:29.8; David Hanson, 
Gurnee, 44:32.3; Alex Linn, 
Waukcgan, 44.53.1; Niles Hanson, 
Gurnee, 45:04.6; Chris Swindell, 
Gurnee, 45:06.1; Stephen Brayden, 
Gurnee, 45:06.5; Tim Regier, Elk 
Grove Villa, 45:20.3; Adam Roth, 
Waukegan 45:22.1; Mitchell 
Freidman, Buffalo Grove, 45:22.8; 
Michelle Mitchelll, Lake Zurich, 
45:25.0; John Kurtz, Wood Dale, 
45:26.4; Kim Dahm. Mundelein, 
;4S:3L1; John Cushman, Wauconda, 
45:36.3; PhU McWhorter, Gurnee, 
45:37.1; Rodger Brayden, Gurnee, 
4551.3. 

Tom Reiland.Grayslake, 45:52.2; 
Alflredo Valenda, Zion, 45:57.8; 
Robert Hansen, Zion 46:03.8; Nathan 
Lynn, Waukegan, 46:04.4; Bill 
Pomykala, New Lenos, 46:19.1; Hilary 



Ncgcic, Grayslakc, 45:19.3; Tracy 
Barnhlll, Gurncc, 46:32.0; John Welch, 
Libcrlyvillc, 46:45.0; David Gavncy, 
Antioch, 46:55.1; Jeff Mack, Kohlcr, 
Wis., 47:15.3; Gordon Thicle, Gurncc, 
47:17.1; Eric Arndt, Beach Park, 
47:38.7; John McDonald, Libcrlyvillc, 
47:43.3; James Klioro, Waukcgan, 
47:44.2; Dave Wright, Waukegan, 
47:55.8; Patrick Loslnski, Grayslakc, 
48:10.3; Tom Rochik, Decrficld, 
48:32.4; Doug Morgan, LibertyviMe, 
48:33.2; Wayne Staplcton, Gumcc, 
49:00.2. 

Gail Stone, Wheeling, 49:06.0; 
David Ward, Waukcgan, 49:09.6; Jim 
Lundhcrg, Mundclcin, 49:11.7; 
Wilson Rios, Zion, 49:43.3; Craig Linn, 
Waukcgan, 49:49.8; Vincent Mcery, 
Gurncc, 49:52.9; Ben Floyd, 
Grayslakc, 49:53.2; Dennis Thul, 
Antioch, 49:59.8; Jcnna Morgan, 
Wilmcttc, 50:12.0; Anne Hoos. 
Wilmcttc, 59:13.4; Mike Waller, 
Waukcgan, 50:13.9; William Wens, 
Buffalo Grove. 50:19.1; Sue Dixon, 
Waukcgan, 50:26.8; Paul Androsky, 
Gurncc, 50:29.1; Rich Rogers, 
LlbcrlyviUe, 50:45.5; Jaybec Davis, 
Zion, 50:55.1; Steve Capizzi, Gurncc, 
50:56.1; David Diiorio. Gurncc, 
.50:57.0; Bill Mclcndez, Gurncc, 
51:16.4; Carrie Mouritsen, Buffalo 
Grove, 51:27.8. 

Luis Zircs, Gurncc, 51:33.3; I'aul 
Diamond, Waukcgan, 51:33,6; Adreana 
Lombardo, Chicago, 51:43.0; Dave 
Gomski, N. Olmsted, Ohio, 51:48,3; Neil 
Hanson, Gumcc, 52:02.8; Liz Leibham, 
gurnee, 52:10.3; Dave Thaman, Gumcc, 
52:15.5; Valerie Williams, Gurnee, 
52:20.5; Joan Dunham, Lake Geneva, 
Wis., 5226:3; Jennifer Lee, Chicago, 
52:32,2; Carol Colaizzi, Gumcc, 53:16.8; 
Tracey Einspanjer, Lindcnhurst, 
53:23.9; Terrence Webb, Liber tyvlllcl, 
53:47.0; Eddie Krumrcy, Burlington, 
Wis,, 53:53.5; Joyce Reyes, Vernon Hills, 
54:13.9; Jane Moderwell, Gurnee, 
54:25.3; Lynn Kamcr, Waukegan, 
54:36.5; E)avld Andersen, Libertyville, 
54:43.4. 

Randy Housner, Gurnee, 54:45,5; 
Dan McCarthy, Gurnee. 54:56.7; BUI 
Chamerlik, Gurnee, 54:57.5; John 
Greinier. Waukegan, 55:10,5; Beth 
Derosic, Gurnee, 55:31.4; Randy 
Wells, Waukcgan, 56:07.1; Cliff 
Thornton, Gurnee, 56:49.2; Howard 
Levin, Deerfleld, 56:54.1; Brad 
Howell, Gurnee, 57:28.2; KaUiy 
Carrino, Gurnee, 57:38.4; Hank 
Johnson, Gurnee, 58:01.3; John 
Morrison, Lake Forest, 58:32.3; Lupe 
Mercado, Deerfield, 59:08.8; Gerald 
Anderson, Lindenhurst, 59:13,4; 
Dolores Ohiwein, Highland Park, 
59:24.9. 



James McCormack, Waukcgan, 
59:35.8; Sail! Walker, Gurncc, 
' 59:38.6; Adrian Moses, Gurncc, 
59:59.5; Edward Bogcrl, Highland 
Park, 1:00:16.8; Danielle Miller,. 
Lindcnhurst, 1:00:28,3; Erin 
Chamerlik, Gurncc, 1:01:00.5; Pete 
Laffcrty, Glandale Heights, 
1:01:33.9; Brenda Carey, Gurncc 
1:01:39.8; Tom Westberg, Gurncc, 
1:03:12,8; Ayse Baker, Lake Forest, 
1:03:49.1; . Kevin Koolstra, 
Lindcnhurst, 1:04:14.3; Tom Smith, 
Wauconda, 1:04:15.3; Mary Ibcric, 
Gurncc, 1:04:25.6; Mauri Bfcazard, 
Gurncc, 1:05:42.9; Adcle Smith, 
Wadsworth, 1:08:03.5; and Carol 
Nles. Gurncc. 1:09:30.9, 

The final times for all runners in 
thcTwo-milc Fun Run-arc as follows: 
Tony Pcllctlierc, Gurncc. 
12:07.1; Jay Bouma, Gurncc, 12:08.2; 
Brandon Drysdale, Zion. 13:06.6; Jeff 
Ross, Lindcnhurst, 13:12.3; Nicky 
McDowell. Wildwood, 13:28,7; Tom, 
Peltier, Gurncc, 13:32.8; Molllc 
Siciner, Dcerncld, 13:41,5; Laura 
. Ross, Gurncc, 14:25,0; Dan Carey, 
Gurncc, 14:41.4; Judy Peltier, Gurncc, 
15:11.7; Brian Flamcnt, Wadsworth. 
15:37.2; Michalc Aykroid, Gurnee 
15:53,.3; Kurt Chccscman, Mundclcin, 
16:00.6; Ann Capozzi, Gurncc, 
16:32.6; Michael Ross, Gurnee, 
16:33.0; David Ross, Gurncc, 16:33.4; 
Laura Johnson, Waukegan, 16:37.3; 
Don Johnson, Waukcgan, 16:37.6; 
Shelley HoletsMcCormack, 

Waukcgan, 16:45.4; Jim Roche, 
Mundclcin, 17:15,8; Kim Sullivan, 
Gurncc, 17:19.2; Erik Andersen, 
Gurncc, 17:29.0. 

Shelley Rtzzo, Gurnee, 18:12.3; 
Lena MIrrctti, Gurnee, 18:12.6; 
Megan Whalen, Gurncc, 18:42,9; 
Nathan Weber, Waukegan, 18:50.9; 
Anne Kobitter, Deerfleld, 18:51.6; 
Craig Allexon, Grayslakc, 19:00.5; 
Mike Yost, Gurnee, 19:04.9; Laura 
Gaughan, Island Lake, 19:05.8; 
James Romans, Gurnee, 19:08.7; 
Dan McBricn, Lake Villa, 19:45.3; 
Patricia Feager, Lake Villa, 19:48.6; 
Susan Nixon, Wadsworth, 20:02.3; 
Lisa Swindell, Gurnee, 20:08.3; 
Darren Thul, Gurnee. 20:19.1; 
Sarah Romans, Gurnee, 20:22.5; 
Jacalyn Roche, Mundelein, 20:26.6; 
Barbara Welch, Libertyville, 
22:08.9; Dennis Thul, Gurnee, 
22:33.9; Kendell Rizzo, Gurnee, 
24:30.9; Paul Brandes, Gurnee, 
24:40.1; David Brandes, Gurnee, 
24:42.5; John Whalen, Gurnee, 
24:48.8; Julie Martino, Gurnee, 
27:33.3; Alison Whalen, Gurnee, 
32:35.5; and Alexis Martino, 
Gurnee, 33:20.9; 



Wilmot reschedules all-s^ir circuit of champions 



The i3th Annual Wilmot Open 
Sprints sanctioned by The 
aub/AU Star Circuit of Cham- 
pions and sponsored by Miller 
Genuine Draft has been resched- 
uled for Sept. 9 at Toft Auto 
Racing's Wilmot Speedway. 
. Heavy rains hit the one-third 
mile day oval just after the track 
was woiked In on the first attempt' 



to get the show in Aug. 3, then 
steady rains on the bade side of a 
slow moving cold front on Au& 4 
forced the second postponement 

A 40-lap "A" Main paying $4,000 
to win, part of a total puise of 'over 
$20,000, wlU be on the line in the 
final appearance in the Chicago- 
Milwaukee area for the AllStais. 

Grandstand gates open at 5 p.m. 



witii. sprint time trials slated for 6 
p.m. and the first race at 7 p.m. 
Rainchecks fiom Aug. 3 and 4 will 
be valid in September. 

Sept 9 grandstand adihissk>n is 
$15 for adults, $13 for senior dti- 
zens, active inilitaiy and students 
ages 12 to 18; youngsters ages 8 to 
11 pay $6; and ages 7 and under 
admitted fipee. ' 






%S-' ' 






to 
for track 




Kotch Kowell. lake County Chiefs Nq. 1 fan. |olns Manager Art 
Mansavage' before a game. Kowell cheered the Chiefs to 4-2 
record at AAU World Series In Burnsvllle. Minn. — Photo by Steve 
Peterson ' 



Peebles 
Rams at 

STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Joel Peebles will be directing 
the track and field program next 
spring at Grayslakc Community 
High School. 

Peebles takes over for Mike 
Jones, who is still on staff at the 
school. Peebles, who came to 
Gray.slakc some 15 years ago, 
coached the boys and girls teams 
to three Northwest Suburban 
Conference championships .in 
the last decade. 

"Tliis is a great position and 
with the growth, we would like to 
see more boys and, girls tryout," 
Peebles said. 

Peebles will be assisted by 
Brad Larson, who came on staff at 
the same time Peebles did. The 
Rams are looking to name two 
new assistant positions as Shelly 
Hubert resigned. \ 

Peebles can recall the first 
years the Rams experienced track 
success in the early 19n0's, lead- 
ing up. to the girls conference 
championship in 1984. The girls 
won the league again in 19B7 but 
had to wait seven more years 
before gaming the trophy. The 
boys last title was in 19B6. 

'^c want to defend the girls 
title and be competitive with the 
boys," Peebles said. "I would like 
to bring a banner (champi- 
onship) to the high school." 

Wndle the ^Is team won the 
conference last year, the boys 
team did have its highlights as 



well. The. 4x800 relay tcarn' of 
Jason Gannt, Jake Parsons, Steve 
Rczmer and Dan Bureau nearly 
tied the school record. 

He is looking forward to a 
strong year with the boys team. It 
will be helped with the transfer of 
Chris Perssons, a state qualifier 
from North Carolina. 

Standouts for the '94 Rams 
girls championship team includ- 
ed Jenny Dunbar, Lisa Titus, 
Beclcy Eidcn, Molly Runilall and 
SaraThorson. 

Peebles is a native of Fon du 
Lac, Wis., who ran the 600 meters 
indoors and (100 meters outdoors. 
He later ran for the University of 
Wisconsin track team. 

He may talk track literally at 
' the drop of the hat, always willing 
to promote his sport. He has been 
a member of the board or- 
ganizing the summer Fun Run in 
Grayslakc. 

The Rams have used the co- 
ordinator system in track for two 
years. "You have one person who 
has the pulse of both teams," 
Peebles said. ' ^ 

He credits his high school 
coach, Eari Jcwett, with inspiring 
him to get into coaching. 

Peebles will continue to coach 
cross country. "We have nearly won 
the title, finishing in second place 
seven times," he said. 

Cross country begins with a 
3:20 p.m. practice Aug. 15. The 
fitst home meet is Aug. 31 against 
Waukegan at Central Park. 




Stan 

Men 
Con 

Steri^ 

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Con 

Mid 

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Jets 

Out 

Fai 

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Brod Larson. left,.and Joel Peebley will b« directing Hm Groydako 
Community High School track and fMd) program nexl tpilrig. 
PooblMWlleooi^ioal^.bolhmo boys and glrli.tociint. 



■'V^^rj^-^r^'^^-.-'^^^^ 




AuiiufT 19, ;1f 94 [AhUnd NewspApcw COMMUNITY 




1 

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•je 

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St 






kito 




standings as of Augutri 5 

Monday League 

Competitive D W L 

Sterling FInlsh/Vyilson 12 2 

John's Garage 9 3 

Convicts 9 4. 

Midnight Dluc Lounge, 8 5 

Y-Not Sandbar/Mirowskl 8 5 

Jctsons • ■ 7 6 

Outlaws 4 9 • 

Fatboys Construction 2 12 

Inlaws 2 13 



Hendrlxons and Sons' 13, ,2,' 

Midwest Brick Paving 10. 3 

Hello Folks . 10 3 

The Hitmen 9 7. 
Barbs Florlst/Growcrs Equip. 9 ' 8. 
Rockies .89 
American Family Insurance B • 9 
A's , ' . '5 10 

Hcadin'Homc 4 . 13 
Yvonncs '3 13 

D 

GM Concrete 13 2 

IDC 12 3 

Tempcl Steel 11 4 

Nielsens Enterprises 9 6 

Sterling Finish/Larson 9 6 

Cherry Electric 6 9' 

C/CPub 5 9 

Mimi's Lingerie 5 9 

A Custom Touch 4 10 

PNC Mortgage/ Rockies 2 13 

Women's 

Yvonncs 15 I 

Greg Larson Excavating 13 

Nielsens Enterprises 13 

Austlns/Libcrtyville 10 

Rings Radiator 9 

Main Event . B 
Romantic Times/ 

Summer Thunder 6 

MGA 3 

. Kross-tnn 2 

ITS Marauders 1 

Church 

Lakeland Evangelical - 13 

Faith Lutheran 10 

Bethel Lutheran B 

Shepardorthc Lakes 8 

Living Waters I 7 

Holy Cross Lutheran B 

Trinity Lutheran 6 

St. Gilberts KOC 3 

Living Waters n 2' 

Tuesday League 
Industrial 

Y-NoiKanaby . . 14 2 

KHM Plastics ' 12 4 

Those Guys 12 S 

Your Town Video 11 6 



4 
4 
6 
6 
9 

9 
12 
13 
16 



1 

4 . 

6 

6 

6 

7 

8 

11 

11 



Pharm Boys/Baxter 9 7v.^ 

Coca-Cola , 10 B 

Piper Pjalics 9 B 

Jardls Industries 5 13 

Prototype Equipment 1 15 

Ducblin Company 1 16 

Competitive D 

Quiet Storm 13 2 

B&H Mold/Bad Boys 12 3 

Cloudy Horse 10 4 

Profusion 10 5 

Slugs 7 8 

Big Johnsons 6 8 

Bills Pizza 4 11 

BigDawgs 3 11 

Dowel Movement 1 14 

D . 

CICRoofers 13 1 

Tigers 10 5 

Midwest Motor Coach <' 9 5 

Pro-Tool 7 8 

Margots 7 8 

IBEW 6 8 

Austlns/Libcrtyville 5 8 
Young Guns/ World Gym 5 10 
GapSIappcrs .3 11 



Chill Whippcrs 11 3 

D&G's Limited 11 4 

Sasparlllas 10 4 

CPI 10 6 

TIMFramers 9 7 

Roadkill/Yvonnes ' 7 B 

The Tavern on the Lake Str. 6 10 

Spartans 5 9 

Hello Folks/LlU 4 • 11 

Du-Hawks 2 13 



Bamums/Libcrtyville Lanes 13 1 

USFP 8 4 

Douglass TV/Knucklcheads 9 6 

Beavls, Butlhcad & Boys 7 5 ' 

Jardls Industries 7 6 

Hastings SB Club 8 7 

Downings Bar 5 7 

Stooges ' ■ , 4 8 

UnderSix ' 2 10 

Longshots 2 11 

Wednesday League 
Women's Competitive 

Old Gold 16 1 
Mundclcin Animal/ " ' 

Arrow Glass 10 

RJB/SBG 10 
Century 21 Market 

Place/HMI 9 
Zooland Pel/Iwema Sl Farm 8 



Shanty 6 

FlexFotir 6 

Dream Chasers 6 

Priceless Design 4 

Kristofs Entertainment 2 



5 
.5 

6 

7 

8 

10 

10 

10 

13 



CLC cross country coach 
comes home with trophy 



When CoUege of Lake County 
cross country runners reported to 
fall practice this week, they may 
have received more than the 
usual "what 1 did on my summer 
vacation" talk. 

Coach Karen Graham cap- 
tured a trophy as the first femaJe 
nnisher in the GurnceDays 10)C 
race held Saturday at Viking Park. 

"I like the rain," Graham said 
as raindrops began to get bigger 
following the fljiish. 

.JGrahami a teacher at 
Grayslake Community High 
School, ran the course in 43:46.5. 
The Gumcc resident was the 38th 
finisher overall. 

Graham is looking forward to 
CLC's season, which will feature 
an alumni race in October. 

The winner was Jeremy Amdt, 
a 14-year-old from Beach Park, 
who ran it in 34:08.5. He edged 
second-place fmisher Elia Zaghin 
ofWUinette. 

Amdt is a senior at Waukegan 
HigK^TWs was the third time! I 
had run the course.' I thihkit^V«b?' 
shorter last year," he said; ' 



D 

Stcltz' Resort 11 1 

Jack trost Iron Works 11 2 

K-Mart/Nllcs 9 3 

Cass Photo/Misfits 8 7 

M&M Excavating 8 7 

Y-Not/Gmblch .6,8 

Surgipath ' 5 9 

Schmerler Ford 3 - li 

Pitbulls 13 



Waukegan Safe and Lock 12 2 

BIS Builders 11 3 

Abilities Unlimited 10 3 

ABC Roofers 9 3 

Bud Brothers 7 6 

Last Chance/ 16 tnchcrs 8 7 

Lyons and Ryans 6' 8 

I/WBulldcrs/NakcdGuns 44 10 

Robinsons 1 14 

Legion of Doom 1 14 

D 

Marriott Maulers 12 3 

Mlcro-Cal 10 3 

Hillbillies 10 5 
Dlchards/ 

Ccrtincd Auto Body 7 7 

McKay Mazda f 1 

A* 1 Installations • 7 7 

Dancin* Machine 6 8 

Sportln'Wood 5 9 

DucceEX 4 10 

Jones In tcrcable 4 10 

C-Major 

Y-Not Sandbar 9 4 

Edwardos/Downing Bar 9 5 
Worms/HlUer Construction/ 

Stans Lumber 8 5 

Bud Lite/Off 7 6 

Don Garden Enterprises 7 6- 

On a Roll Painting 7 6 

Ken Cook Tmcking/TPS 7 7 

Bail Brothers 5 . 9 

DaBoyz 3 10 

Thursday League 
Induatrlal 

The Mudville Ten ' 12 3' 
CF Industries 10 5 ' 

Downings Bac 9 6 

Segerdahl Printing 9 6 

Wolohaii Lumber 8 7 

Dueblin Company 6 9 



Y-Not/Kccfer , G 9 

Men With Wood 4 11 

Quill Corp. 3 ,11 

Competitive D 

Intrupa 8 ; 4' 

Slammcrs 9 3 

KHM Plastics 9 3 

Ultimate Body ,64 

Gam-Mcd 7 5 
Four star Auto Body/ 

Untouch. < 6 7 

Segerdahl Printing 5 8 

Silver Clout 3 11 

Tavern on the Lake Street 2 10 



Assault/Gary Stuart 14 2 

Podracks , 13 ' 4 

GoncFlshin' ' 11' 4 

Ultimate .97 

OoglaBoogla ' 7 7 

Avanti's/Ca5eofHitandRun7 9 
Modern Homes 5 11 

Midwest Hose 4 . 10 

Big Johnson's Shotguns 4 11 

Bakes 3 12 

D 

Slammcrs 

Preferred Slowboys 

Men With Wood 

Roadrunncrs 

Hello Folks No. 1 

DanStubing 

Dynasorcs 

Midni^t Blue Lounge 

Walgrccns 

Kalscrs/Horchak Chiro 

D 

Flukes 14 

Dragons 13 

GPW Builders 9 

Nlxs . . 9 

Hello Folks No. 2 B 

Fall Guys ' 8 

Capaccio Bros. Furniture 6 

Highland Green Nursery 5 

TCI Cable 4 

Phantom Reign 

Friday League 
Coed 

Keiths TopsoU 14 1 

Sole Survivors 10 4 



13 


1 


13 


3 


9 


5 


9 


6 


7 


9 


6 


10 


5 


10 


5 


10 


4 


8 


4 


11 



1 

3 
6 

7 

7 

8 

B 

9 

10 

16 



Greenwood 76/Ultlmate 10 6 

VR&N 10 6 

Beyers Bunchs . 8 7 

JfJTwlgs 9 8 

Just Oak 7 >8 

Longshols/Vltla Rosa Pizza 6 10 

BassBrawtcre 3 ,12 

Waste Tech , 15 

Coed 

B&H Mold 14 2 

A-Tlre 11 4 

The Unknown ' 10 5 

LlndcnhurstSlugg/ 

Sports Authority 9 7 

Quill Corp. ,87 

OddBalls 8 8 

RapldOverhcad 6 10 

OMC Dream Team 5 9 

Gumce Mills . 4 11 

InglcsideCitgo 2 . lA 

C 

Grand Tracks 14 1 

Main Eyent/Rock-N-Roll 12 3 

Boss Construction 10 5 

Batmen 9 7 

Dakotas 7 8 

On a Roll Painting 7 8 
Northern Illinois 

Mechanical 7 B 

Barbarians 2 ' 13 

King of Diamonds 15 

D 

REMAX/Huelett 11 4 

Landscape Concepts 11 4 

Superior Pavlng/Sealcoat 11 4 

Color Concepts 10 5 

TNT 9 7 

Blackjax 7 8 

Palatine Ace Hardware ,4 ll 
Zaro mba Man. SI a m me rs/ 

Muellman 3 12 

Big Sticks 2 13 



Knucklchcads/Bumpcrs 12 3 

OTralnas 12 4 

Norberlll 11 5 

Lake County Medical Gas * 10 '5 

White Lightning 8 7 

Tappers 7 7 

Blasters 7 8 

HciUgo /Slammcrs 4 12 

Abels Diablos 3 12 

DK Contractors 2 14 



He said he often runs with his 
teammates in the off-season. 

Dennis Ray, age 29, was the 
first Gumee finisher. He clocked 
a 38:33.4, good enough for 12th 
place. 

The oldest runner was 65- 
year-old Jack Taylor of 
Waukegan, ^o finished 45th of 
127 fmishers. 

The 2K race featured a battle 
between Gurnce residents Tony 
Peltettiere and Jay Bouma. Pel- 
letticre defended his title, 12:07.1 
to 12:08.2. 

"I run a lot in my neighbor- 
hoodp" Pellcttiere said. 

The Warren Township Hi^ 
School freshman woiks at Gowe 
Beach this summer and will play 
soccer for Warren this season. 

Laura Ross, age 12, was the 
top female finisher from Gumee 
with a time of 14:25.0. 

Nicky McDoweU, age 13, of 

WUdwood, was fifth and Tom 

Peltier, age 35^ of Gumee, was sixdi. - 

ivi.: ;jim!i Roche, ^age * 47j' "of:?:^^ 

V c Murfdeielh,' WadSIthe*<rtdfist Zftiii^CI 

ner, and he finished 20th. 



We Wish To Thank The Following Sponsors 

For Their Generous Support And Service To 

The. Gumee Days Corporation: 

PLATINUM CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS: $1000 OR HIGHER 

HeatherRldge AssociaQon; Gumee Park District; Gumee Mills Mall; NBD Bank; PEPSI; Village of Gumee. 

GOLD CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS: $500 TO $999 

Grand NaUonal Bank; Harris Bank Llberlyville; Marsh Funeral Home Ltd; Popovlch Photography. 

SILVER CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS: $250 to $499 
Dakcn Gallery and'pramc Shop; Wanen Newport Gedit Unlai; First National Bank of Antioch; Ace Hardware; CEN- 
TURY 21 Sunshine. Inc.; Daniel Roblson ArchitecU PC; Doyle Distributing Co.; Law Offices of 
"^ CeckowsU & Venturi; MagneUc Resonance Institute of Lake County; PPG Industries. Inc.; Roquetie America, Inc.; • 
Saint Paul the Apostle Catholic Church; Williams InnovaUve Technologies, Inc.; Spot-Not Car Wash. 

BRONZE CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS: $100 TO $249 

Elrich Machines, Inc.; Welton's Pick 'N Save; Balmes Rower Shop; Westfield Homes; Amerigj-aphx Marketing 

Communications; Bank of Northern Illinois. N.A.; Slogan's Awards & Sportswear, Tien C. Cheng. M.D.; 

E. D. Clark School of Photography; Walter I. Fried, Ph.D., M.D., S.C; Gumee Discount Fumlmre; Gumce Funeral 

Home; Gumce Masonry Inc.; Haapancn/Burkelt, Inc.; Drs. Hamming, Hamming, & Dugan Orthopedic Surgeons; 

Joseph J. Henderson and Son, Inc.; Hunnemedcr Chiropractic; Medical Eye Services, Ltd.; Petersen Excavating. Inc.; 

Point Restaurant; Potesla's Pizza & Pasta; RUS of Chicago; Mohammed Siddlquc, M.D.; Barbara J. Swanson, 

Attorney at Law; Tomei Insurance; Warren Township High School District 121 ; Worth's Amoco. 

COPPER CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS: $50 TO $99 

Arbour Florist; American Speedy Printing; American TYadesman Inc.; Best Panda Chinese Restaurant; 

Brookhavcn Apartments; Coldwell Bankcn Properties Unlimited; El Rancho Motel; F^st Federal Bank, fsb; 

First State Bank of Gumee; Fredrick Chiropractic Plus; Gallagher Corp.; Grai«I Sporting Goods; 

Gumcc Counseling Group, Ltd/Phil Kirshbaum and Nancy Flaherty; Gumee Valley Liquors; Jon's Hair 

Designers, Inc.; Kenall Manufacturing Co.; Kimberly Financial Services; Lake Co. Pediatrics, S.C; LighihaUs 

Inc./Dalry Queen; Dan Lodcsky Trucking, Inc.; Lube Oils, Inc.; Magna & Hausen McCann's Barber Shop; McClure's 

Garage; PEP Consulting; Po«r Richard's Pub; Barbara Richardson, Coroner of Lake County. 

Additional contributors 

Advanced Accounting & Taxes; Dada's Cleaners; Expressly Portraits; Mrs. Vcme Gowe; Gumee Cinemas; 
Six Flags GreV America; Vamer Press; Wairen Township Historical Society. 

■■ ' ■ li ■ '1 . 

' '■ Tii QUBNEE MYS (XlRPOfWON It i Non-ProFrt Oroinlaton ferm«d ter Uw pui^^ , 

Wina* Siniai , Pri«ld«ni; EHubalh Eb<rt,' P(iMid«n-B«rt: Mwy DotuW*. S«)fi*«iyj P« WmoIokwW, Tmtur**. i ; ' ' : . , ' 
GURNEE OAVS li • community iHilr organlzMt »W th« putpoM ol bringing ih* community togMlw ttvooth itw'iog and %miPQ Whrt th« 
' * v»riou»o*Btnlutlonih«wtootNr. ...... i ., 4 ,',,■•<.••■ • 



..* 



I . 1 




1 




COMMUNITY UkElANcI Newspapers Auqusr 19, 1994 



IDOT announces dredging and raking -LocaI ChuRchES 



The Chain O' Lakes Fox River 
Waterway Management Agency 
wants permission for mainte- 
nance dredging and raking of 13 
sites in various areas in Lake and 
McHcnry counties, 

And the Stepan Chemical Co, 
wants to perform maintenance 
dredging of a barge dock area on 
the Des Plaincs River need 
Elwood, south of JoHet. 

The agency and the compa- 
ny have applied for the pertinent' 
permits from the department's 
Division of Water Resources. 



Interested persons — cither the existing channels to a depth 
favoring or opposing the plans — of about six feet. 



arc invited to send written com- 
ments. 

The agency wants to do 
dredging and raking of sites in or 
along the Fox River, Plstakee 
Lake, Meyers Bay, Lake Jcrllyn, 
Redhead Lake and Nipperslnk 
Lake. 

■' The proposed work Is from 
just south of the Stratton Lock & 
Dam up to the south end of 
Nipperslnk Lake. 

The dredging would restore 



The site of the Stepan com- 
pany is an estimated two mites 
upstream of the Interstate 55, 
bridge over the Des Plaines River, 
near niwood. 

Inquiries, written statements 
on the- applications and requests 
to review plans should be direct- 
ed to the Northern Area Office of 
the department's Division of 
Water Resources, 201 W. Center 
Ct, Schaumburg, IL 60196, call 
705-4341 for further Information, 



Grayslake Summer Days steps off with parade 



NEAITUCKER 
staff Reporter 

The fim is coming again to 
Grayslake with the annual 
Grayslake Summer Days Festival. 
Leading the Summer Days 
parade is Grayslakc's most senior 
resident, Bessie Rltta, described 
as 101 years young. 

Ritta's husband and father 
operated a house-moving busi- 
ness during the 19205 through 
1957. The parade is scheduled for 
Aug. 20 at 11 a.m. 



The festival is set for Aug. 19- 
20 in downtown Grayslake. The 
excursion Is to take place around 
the village hall and the village will 
assist in closing off the neccssaty 
streets during the two days. ' 

The festival, sponsored by the 
Grayslake Chamber of 

Commerce, will feature musical 
acts, food booths, games of 
chance, a beer garden, and a vari- 
ety of demonstrations and partic- 
ipant games for the whole family. 
The Grayslake Exchange Club will 



Volunteer for Catholic Charities' Ti^ Days 



Volunteers are needed to 
give at least two hours to help 
with Catholic Charities' seventh 
annual Tag Days on Sept. 9 and 
10. Proceeds will benefit the. 
agency's services to needy senior 
citizens who live in Cook and . 
Lake counties. 

During Tag Days, volunteers 
will be stationod in busy areas 
throughout Ciiicago and the sub- 
urbs with Ea^e Snacks honey- 
roasted peanuts and red and 
white Catholic Charities' canis- 
ter inviting people to donate 
money. Tag Days will be from 6 
a.m. to 6 p.m. on both days. 

Catholic Charities' elderly 
programs benefiting from Tag 
Days include abuse prevention, 
home help services, food pro- 
grams, adult day care, affordable 
housing for seniors and job train- 



ing. A small percentage of Tag 
Days' money will benefit some of 
Catholic Charities' programs for 
children, families and people 
lacking basic necessities. 

To volunteer or for. more 
injformation on Tag Days, call Ed 
Collins at C50«-9605. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

The Public Hearing for the ' 
Emmons School 1994/95 Budget 
will be at 7:00 p.m. on September 
20, 1994 at the school located at: 

24226 W. Beach Grove Road 

Antioch 

The budget will be available for 
public inspection in the school 
otfioe Monday through Friday from 
'7:30 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. 
Questions can be directed to Mr. 
Mathias M. Tabar. Superintendent 
at 708-395-1 105. 

0894C-073-AR 
August 19, 1994 



RLE NUMBER: 
PETITIONER: 



OWNER: 
PROPERTY: 



REQUEST: 



PROPOSAL: 



DATE: 

TIME: 

PLACE: 



again have a beer booth. 

Members of the newly formed 
Downtown Merchants 

Association wlU be sponsoring a 
sidewalk sale during the event: 

The majority of the cost of 
this year's event Is being under- 
written by the local business 
community and local civic 
groups, as was done last year. 
Sponsorship was broken down 
into three different categories 
based on the level of financial 
support given by the businesses. 
All of the sponsorships for this 
year's event have already been 
sold, and the Chamber 
expressed appreciation for the 
generosity of those businesses 
or groups that will make this 
year's celebration a success. 



A.«!cmbIyOf God: ^ 

CHRISTIAN LIFE FELLOWSHIP, 

4 IBZT) N, Deep Lake Road, Antioch, 

395-8572. 

Services: Sunday at 

10 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday at 

7 p.m. Sunday school at 9 a.m. 

Baptist: 

CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 554 
Parkway, Antioch, 395-3393. \ 
Services: Sunday at 11 a.m.; Sunday 
school at 9:45 a.m. 

Bible Church: 

CHAIN OF LAKES COMMUNITY 
BIBLIi CHURCH, 23201 W. Grass 
Lake Road, Antioch, 83B-0103. 
Services: Sunday at8:15a.m.,10:45 
a.m. and 6 p.m.; Sunday school at 
9:45 a.m. 

Episcopal: 

ST. IGNATIUS EPISCOPAL 

CHURCH, 977 Main SL, Antioch, 

395-0652. 

Services: Sunday at 7:30 a.m. and 

g;.^0 a.m., Wednesday at 8 a.m. and 

7 p.m.; Sunday scliool at 9:30 a.m. 

EvangcIlcaJ-Frce: 
ANTIOCH EVANGELICAL FREE 
CHURCH, 42457 N. Highway Drive, 
Antioch, 395-41 17. 
Services: Sunday al8:15 a.m., 11:00 
a.m.and6p.m, Wednesday at (t 
.p.m.; Sunday School at 9 a.m., 
Awana Club on Wednesday at 6:30 
p.m. 

Luthcran—Evangcllcah 

ST. STEPHEN LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

1155 Hillsdale Ave., Antioch, . 

395-3359. 

Services Sunday at 8 a.m, 9:15 a.m and 



1030 a.m; Sunday school al9 ia.m 

Luthcraii— .Wisconsin Synod: 
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
CHURCH, 1275 5. Main, Antioch, 
395-1660 or 395-1665. 
Services: Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10:30 
a.m; Sunday school at 9:25 a.m. 

Non-Dcnomlnatlonnl: 

RUSSELL COMMUNITY CHURCH, 

14610 W. Russell Road, Russell, ■ 

395-4939. 

Service: Sunday at 10:15 a.m.; 

Sunday school at 9 a.m. ^ 

Roman Catholic: 

• ST. PETER'S CATHOLIC CHURCH, 
557 Lake St, Antioch, 
395-0274. 

Services: Saturday at 5:30 p.m., 
Sundayat 6:30 a.m., 8aim,9;30 
a.m., 11 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. (Latin); 
Weekdays at 7: 15 a.m. and 8:00 a.m. 

ST BENEDICT'S ABBEY & ST. 
CATHERINE BENET LAKE CEN- 
TER, Nelson Road, Doncl Lake, Wis., 
(414) 396-4351. 

Services: Saturdayat5p.m.and 
Sunday at 10:30 a.m 

United Church Of Christ: 

MILLBURN CONGREGATIONAL 

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, 

Corner ofGrass Lake Road and Rte. 

45,Ml)lburn, 

356-5237. 

Services: Sunday at 8*J0 a.m. and 10 

a.m; Sunday School at 10 a.m 

United Methodist: 

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF 

ANTIOqn, 848 Main, Antioch. 

395-1259. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given by the Board of Education of School Dlstnct 
36 in Lake County, Illinois that the tentative Budget for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1 , 1994 will be on file and available for public inspection 
at the Grass Lake School office at 26177 W. Grass Lake Road, 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 from and after 9:00 a.m. on the 10th day of 
August, 1994. 

filotice Is further hereby given that a public hearing on said budget 
will be held at 7:00 p.m. on the 13th day of September, 1994 at Grass 
Lake School. 

Dated this 10th day of August, 1994, Board of Education, School 
District 36 in the County of Lake, State of Illinois. 
Linda Boerman • 

Secretaiy 0B94C-063-AR 

Board of Education August 19, 1994 



PUBUC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 

PLANNING & ZONING BOARD 

VILLAGE OF ANITOCH 

PZB94-16 

Prisdlla Santi 

24658 Magnolia 

Antioch, IL 60002 

(708) 395-7954 • 

American Legion Post 748 

Commonly known as 256 Ida Avenue, which is 

situated at the southeast comer of Ida Avenue and 

Bishop Street and is depicted on the Lake County 

Tax Maps as PIN 02-oe-409-001 and 02-06409-002; 

legal description is on file with the petition In the 

Offwa of Village Cleric 

Petitk>ner is requesting a Special Use wittiin the 

current R-2, Single-family Residential District 

pursuant to Section 150.073-B and 150.072-B-9 of 

the Antioch Zoning Ordinance. 

Petitk>ner proposes to purchase and use the 

existing building for a Fine Arts School (dance, 
' music, drama, etc.). '. 

Thursday, September 8, 1994 

7:30 P.M. 

Board Room, Village Hail 

874 Main Street 

Antioch, IL 60002 
All persons desiring to appear and be heard thereon for or against 
said petition may appear at said hearing*and be heard. . 
Barbara Johnson. Chairman. 0894C-0B1-AR 

' Planning 4 Zoning Board ; * , . .August 19, 1994 , ,, 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Comptroller of the Currency 
Administrator of National Banks 

REPORT OF CONDITION 

Consolidating domestic subsidiaries of the Rrst National Bank of Antioch of Antioch in the state of Illinois, at the' 
close of business on June 30, 1 994, published in response to call made by Comptroller of the Currency, under title 
12, United States Code, Section 161. Charter Number 12870 Comptroller of the Currency Central District. 
Statement of Resources and Liabilities 

ASSETS . ' Thousands of dollars 

Cash and balances due from depository institutions: . 

Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 1 ,945 

Interest-bearing t>atances 

Hekl-to-maturity securities 2,800 

Available-for-sale securities 19,783 

Federal funds sold 

Securities purchased under agreements to resell 
Loans and tease financing receivables: . 
Loans and leases, net of unearned income 54,428 
LESS: Allowance for loan and tease losses 888 
LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve ' . 

Loans and leases, net of unearned income, allowance, and reserve 53,540 

Assets held in trading accounts ;, 

Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 2,444. 

Other real estate owned 

Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

Intangible assets 

Other assets 1,179 

Total assets . , 81,691 

Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1823(j) N/A 

Total assets and losses deferred pursuant to 1 2 U.S.C. 1623(j) 81 ,691 
LIABILITIES . ^ 
Deposits: , ' 

In domestic offices 75,436 
Noninterest-twaring . '7,916 
Interest-bearing 67,520 

Federal funds purchased 

Securities sokJ under agreements to repurchase 

Denwind notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 

Trading liabilities 

Other borrowed money: //////////// 

With original maturity of one year or less ; 

With original maturity of nwre than one year . . ■ .0 

Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases 

BanWs liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

Suborcfnated notes and debentures 0. 

Other liabilities 456 

Total liabilities 75,892 

Limited-life preferred stock and related surplus ' 
EQUITY CAPITAL 

Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 

Common stod( * 537 

Surplus 1,897 

Undivided profits and capital resen/ea 3,902 

Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities (537) 

Total eqiflty capital 5,799 

Losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 18230) ' I^A 

Total equity capital and losses deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 18230) . 5,799 

Total liabilities, limited-life prefen-ed stock, equity capital and losses //////////// 

deferred pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 18230) 81,691 
We, the undersigned directors, attest to the correctness of this statement of resources and liabilities. We 
declare that it has been examined by us, and to the best of our knowledge and belief has been prepared in con- 
formance with the instmctions and is true and correct 
Ted C. Axton 
Donald C. MarsW 
Marvin J. Oldenburger, Directors ' ' ■ 

I, Louis Korom III, Senior Vice President & Cashier of the above-named bank do hereby declare that this 

report of con<£tion is true and correct to the best of my knowfedge and belief. /s/Louis Korom III 

July 26. 1994 
0894C-07i-AR 
August 19, 1994 



#.t*l.«A*. 



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l\t»%*V^»«>ll»l' 



• * * % V * ^ 



> « t I * * * \.1 t »■ 



f,.1,«tt«>t11t1^ 



AuqusT 19, 1994 UkeUNd Newspapers. 





^ 



H 



i. 



Reputable Health Club with proven track record s^ks 
members left in the cold by ever changing health clubs. 
Much to offer jl^only one fee -^a/^^^^^ 

• Whiripoor"* •FreeWeigms 

• Tae Kwon Do • Steam Room 

• Nautilus Gircuii Training 

• tread Mills 

• Sehwinn 

• Aerobic Classes 




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• Stair Machines 

• Step Aerobics 

• Aerobaflex Floor 



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/'children OK! We have babysitting services available. 

- ■ ^ * ' - I 

Lets meet ... stop by^ealth Systems and see for 
Ask about our payment plans. 




We welcome all Body Network members. Come 
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unmi 



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HEALTH SYSTEMS 
FITNESS CENTER l 

CALL 3M-1 132 

750 West Rte. 173 - Antioch (In Antioch Bowling Complex) 

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 6 AM - 9 PM 

Saturday 8 AM ■ 4 PM 

Sunday 9 AM - 1 PM 




iV 



■■ COMMUNITY Ukclwd NewspApew Auquw 19, 1994 







CHOOSEY 



Choosey Ch/7d 

"An upscale children's boutique" 



CHILD. 



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Summer Savings 

Aug. 18-21 
up to gQO/o gj^es 0-14 



ANTIOCH, IL 



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on selected 
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891 Main St. • ANTIOCH • 708/395-9020 






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Furniture 

made the Old) 

World Way 

'(Oak, CKerry, Birch, 

Maple or Hickory) 

Wc Specialize In ^ 
Custom Furniture 

lunutier Final 
Fling Sale 

708-395-4780 

Mon.-Thun. 10-6; Fri. 10-7: 
Sat. 10«5: Sun. 11-4 



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Au<)iist19, 1994 




Improved advocacy oflfered for senior citizeiBP* 



MARYFOUY 

Staff Reporter;. , ., • 

As a result of the Elderly* 
Service Officers Training pro- 
gram, sponsored by the Illinois 
Attorney General's Office, there is 
a heightened awareness in Lake 
County of elderly victimization. 
Gait. DIake, Senior Protective 
Services Elder Abuse Investigator 
of Catholic Charities, attended 
the 40 hour program which was 
held at the police academy in 
Springfield. 

. "The classes were tremen- 
dous," said Blake. "I justt^an't say 
cnougli good things about the 
program. The best thing about 
the classes was that they included 
both police officers as well as 



elder abuse investigators. At the 
end of the flyc-days there was 
bonding." 

filakc said prior to tlic training - 
program, she felt there was a 
"mutual distrust" between law 
enforcement and social workers. 
But, as a result of the program, 
that distrust has been converted 
totnist. • 

"The program .helped ., me ' 
understand the frustrations 
police feci," explained Blake. "It 
also helped, mc to realize the 
amount of resources out there 
available to seniors. Not Just in 
the county, but tliroughout the 
country." 

The course's objective is fos- 
ter an understanding of older res- 



idents and, cxaminliig and 
improving police and social ser- 
vice response to elder victimb.a- 
tion. According to Blake, better 
understanding and communica- 
tion are necessary if aging and 
birth trends continue. 

"By 2030, we will see as many 
people over 50 as under age 50," 
said. Blake. "If we don't have 
things in place/ we arc going to 
have problems." 

In. the course,' Blake learned 
that while older Americans fear 
physical violence, more elderly 
people are victims of financial 
crimes. "Scams against the elder- 
ly are \more prevalent," said 
Blake. 

These scams include palm 



readers, insurance schemes,- 
unnecessary home repairs, black 
topping, illegal lottery schemes, 
lonely heart con men, apartment 
subletting ' schemes, medical 
quackery, night deposit scams, 
and faitn healing. And, these arc 
just a few of the ways quick-talk- 
ing people take advantage of the 
elderly. 

According to Blake, the elder- 
ly are often targets of these kinds 
of things -because many seniors 
are afraid to report they are a vic- 
tim.- "People are afraid to make a 
report because they don't want 
anyone to know, especially their 
families," said Blake. Blake said 
that seniors do not vyaht their 
families to think they can no 



longer take care of. themselves or 
their businesses. - In addition, 
See SENIORS page B5 




Gall Bklto 








Newspapers 






.1 
I 





^^tfg|ff^ivf >■.,- ;;.,,:;;;. 




Local doNCtor buys bells 
Cei 



encan 
church^ R*efeB9 




Critic's Choice?, 



"The Secret Garden" 
falls short PAGE B 1 5 

Expansion 

CLC Board receives 
Globe deed PAGE B8 

Medical ^* 
support 

:Area reservists heading 
to Croatia 
PACE B8 



Interaction 

Law enforcement 
getting facelift 
PAGE B6 

Top quality 

Good Shepherd 
recognized PAGE iB20 



Mettawa preparing for long war with Grainger 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

As long as no building Is 
standing, Mettawa Tiustcc and 
W.W. Grainger antagonist ]cre 
Zenko feels the Tight against the 
Fortune SOO company will con- 
tinue. 

Until a building is actually 
erected, Zenko said Grainger offi- 
cials can expect to be running in 
circles.- . 

In the latest round,: the 
Mettawa VUlajge Board approved 
an open-ended motion to file suit 
against the Skokie-based compa- 
ny wishing to build its coipprate 
headquarters near 1-94 and Rte. 
60. Last month, the County, Board 



gave the okay to rczonc the area 
to meet Grainger's needs after the 
corporation agreed to a generous 
list of zoning conditions. 

Zenko said the grounds of the 
suit have not been determined 
yet, but she said both Grainger 
and the County will be parties. 

This concept that Grainger , 
has won is malarkcy," Zenko said. 
"The village Is interested In pre- 
serving the existing zorung (coun- 
tryside/estate), and the village has 
aiighttodetermine its destiny." . 

She said that keeping the 
pressure on Grainger has pro- 
duced good results. She pointed 
to the 257-acre donation to the 
Lake County Forest Preserve as a 



victory, and she noted- the fact 
that Mettawa and the surround- 
ing communities have been fight- 
ing Grainger for six ycars^ and 
there is still no building. 

Zenko said taking them to 
court is another stalling measure, 
and she said she is prepared to go 
the distance. 

"We're in a time game here. 
There are so many things in play. 
I'll keep them rtmning in circles," 
Zcnkosaid. ' 

There are a number of key 
issues still at , play, including 
where Grainger is going to get its 
sewer. Also, Grainger will be con-, 
fronting a county board with 
some new faces come November. 



"Grainger is the last thing 
(County Chairman) Bob Depke 
will be able to use his political 
musde and win." Zenko said. 

She added that Grainger's 
conservation development plan 
is a good one where it's needed 
and where it's wanted. Mettawa 
does not need it or want it, North 
Chicago and Waukegan needU 
and want it, Zenko said. 

"The county.sent a strong sigr 
nal: Why does anyone lieed^to 
develop In Waukegan or North 
Chicago?'* Zenko said. 

And Mettawa: sent a strong 
signal: Buckle up GraUiger, there 
could be some buihpy roads 
ahead. 



cnme 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



slated for more than 30 pet social 
projects by Congressmen. The 
social programs and other pork 
barrel legislation attached to the 
bill were some of the determining 



Staff Raportor . 

Congres'sman Philip Crane 
said the defeat of the Democrat- 
led anti-crime bill was the first 

step toward drafting a bill meant factors that lead Republicans to 

to fight crime, and not to fund vote against the bill last week, 
odiersocial programs. . Crane said the Democrats 

Nine billion dollars of the $33- "really gutted the crime bill of any 

billion anti-crime package was meaning" by including the social 



programs. "Social spending does Democrat and Republican input., 
not belong in a crime biU;" he "By forcing them back to con- 
said, ference, they have to negotiate 
Many Democrats agreed, as with Republicans," Crane noted. 



58 broke ranks with the President 
Clinton endorsed bill. The House 
action was actually a vote 
whether to consider the bill. The 
defeat sends the bill back to con- 
ference to be re-drafted with both 




Republicans on wheels 

During the Undenfest Parade, .the Lake County Republicans sponsored ttielr traditional float. 

Some of the GOP bigWigs appearing In the parade Included State Rep. RolDert Churchill, State 
. Sen. Adeline Geo-Karis, County Clerk candidate Wlllard Helander and Lake County Republican 
'Chairman Jotn Schullen.— Photo by.K^yln Hqnrahan 



The bill authorized ftmdlng 
for what could have amounted to 
100,000 new police officers 
nationwide. Crane called that 
provision another "unfunded 
mandate" on state and local 
authorities. He said the federal 
government would have provid- 
ed the initial funding but funding 
would have been phased over 
time, leaving local departments 
with the responsibility to finance 
the new officers. 

The bill also included the 
much-talked-about "three strikes 
and you're out" and "truth in sen- 
tencing" provisions. Crane said 
the Democrat version diluted the 
intent of the provisions by 
exempting 60 percent of the 
' repeat criminals. 

Banning assault weapons was 
another provision dividing 
Congressmen. Various studies 
indicate that deaths from assault 
weapons only account for one 
half of 1 percent of the total 
homicides. 

"(They're) not the weapon of 
choice," Crane said of assault 
weapons. He added that more 
murders are committed by knives 
and handguns, and the ban 
would offend law-abiding citi- 
zens who own assault weapons. 
He opposes any assault weapon 
ban in a crime bill. 

Crane said he would rather 
see provisions limiting^ the 
See BILL page B5 



a 



I 




COUNTY UkelANd NEwsp/vpERS AuqusT 1 9,1 994 



-IVlARRiAqES 

July29 

Richard James Ahrcns and ' 
niizabcih Ann Barret, Gumcc; James 
Walter Becker and Kathleen Ann Lael, 
Inglcsidc; luan Roberto Castillo and 
Trisha Kristinc Saenz, Round Lake 
Beach; Thomas Gene Ciura, Jr. and 
Connie Frances Lesko, Fox Lake; 



Michael John Dcmskl, Vernon IIUIs 
and Jennifer Penelope Fallbachcr, 
Palatine; Daniel Burke Dilkowsky, 
Mundclcln and Joyce Colleen Cooper, 
Ark.; Glenn Daniel Edwards, Evanston 
and Catherine Marie Brcslcy, 
Libcrtyvlllc. 

Christopher George Grcnda, Lake 



Zurich and Angela Mae Ladd, Palatine; 
Thomas Joseph Kenna, Great Lakes' 
and Amy Kay Dcgncr, Vernon Hilts; 
Michael Gclau Klanang, Hanover Park 
and Marie Irene Van Wolvclcar,.Fsland 
Lake; William John Klcpek and Susan 
niizabcth Lichey, Antioch; Patrick 
Scan Magulre, Gurncc and Juanlnc 



Marie Koopman, Grayslake. 

Joseph Karl Neutz and Mario 
Jeanettc Sujak, Vernon Hills; Rohcrt 
Charles Searcy and Nancy Helen 
Mublcy, Round Lake Park; Seoll 
Gerald Stobaugh, Wis, and Melissa Lee- 
Franks, Antioch; Paul David Ohlcr and 
Jodi Christine Meyer, Ukc Villa; David 



Wade Van Hook, Sr, Mundclcln and 
Mary Shirley Salmi, Llndenhurst; 
Jeffrey Scott Van Patten, Antioch and 
. Cyntliia Dawn McGraw, Spring Grove; 
Fred Allen Waring, Jr. and Jill Carrie 
Martin, Gurneo; Ross Adam 
Zimmerman, Vernon Hijls and Anna 
Helen Wasyluk, Chicago. 




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AVqinTl?^' 1994 UkEUNdNev^pAp^itt COUNTY v|[ 



At A 





Baseball fields closer 

lAKEVIIiA— Lake Villa Township Baseball League 
is a step further in its attempts to secure three baseball 
diamonds at the Sun Lake Forest Preserve. The 
Finance Committee of the Lake County Forest Preserve 
approved the concept plan for the Relds and will work 
with the Village of Lake Villa on an intergovernmental 
agreement on the site. While the two sides are moving 
closer, concerns about parking, noise and sewer and 
water need to be addressed before the full board would 
give its approval, according to Steve Mcsserli, executive 
director. 

Compost facility hearing 

GRAVSLAKE— The DK Recycling Systems, Inc. 
composting facility on Route 60 in Grayslakc has 
applied to the Illinois Envirormiental Protection 
Agency for a 10-year permit renewal. The current 3- 
ycar permit expires In September of this year. Because 
of public interest in the renewal application, the lEPA 
has scheduled a public hearing for Aug. 24 at 7 p.m. at 
the Grayslake Park District Legion Building at 42 S 
Seymour St in Grayslake. The 4.5 acre facility accepts ' 
landscape waste with an annual volume of 40,000 
cubic yards. 

Passenger Idllieil in accident 

ROUND LAKE— Jennifer Mccier. 34, of Ingleside 
was pronounced dead at Northern Illinois Medical 
Center in McHcnry last Sunday evening. She was a 
passenger on a motorcycle driven by Roger Kenna, of 
Round Lake Park, when it struck another vehicle at the 
corner of Hart and Fairfield Roads causing her to fly 
100 feet into the west side of Hart Road where she was 



stiuck by another vehicle driven by lames Wheeler of 
McHbniy,' Officer Gerard Hendricks said he will go to 
the States Attdhey's OfTlcc to determine if chaises arc 
to bo filed. 

Engineer undergoing therapy 

LAKE LONG— The engineer of the Mctra express 
train which hit and killed a Long Lake woman, is cur- 
rently undergoing counseling. "It was a traumatic expe- 
rience for him," explained Chris Knappton of Metra. 
Lindcnhurst resident Paul Rowland is on leave from his 
job, and ICnappton said He doesn't know if the engineer 
.plans to return to work anytime soon, or even at all. The 
Mctra representative explained often when a situation 
happcnslikc the one where Stephanie Pcase-Basilc was 
killed while crossing the Main St. tracks to get to work, a 
train engineer may become so traumatb.cd, often they 
never return to their jobs. 

Trustees KO special tax area 

• GURNEE— Approximately 500 homeowners' lots in 
Gumcc's wcstcnmiost area will be managed in the tra- 
ditional homeowners association format. Hie builder, 
Sundance. Homes, proposed a Special Service District 
for the development, but the idea was rejected by vil- 
lage trustees. The board voted 4-2 to deny a bid to set 
up the village's Tirst such distiict 

No agreement in fee debate 

MUNDELEIN— Fremont School faces the opening 
of the 1994-95 school year with a few students already 
coming out of the Cambridge North development 
With the tax lag, the district will receive no income 
until 1996. The school board is still in negotiation with 
Cambridge Homes over the developer's offer of. 
$63,000 per acre as a contribution in lieu of impact 
. fees. The stumbling block centers on the fair market 
value of the property. 

Parents busted for teen party 

HAWTHORNWOODS— The Hawthorn Woods 
Police Department enforced its Parental Responsibility 
ordinance for the first time. Following an underage . 
drinking party, police cited 10 17- and 18-year-old 
males for unlawful possession and consumption of 
alcohol. The owners of the home where the party was 
held were also cited for violating the village's newly 
enacted Parental Responsibility Ordinance. Althou^ 
the parents were away on vacation, the ordinance 
holds parents responsible for underage drinking at 
their place of residence. Violating the ordinance carries 



vsdth It a minimum $500 fine. Hawthorn Woods police 
said they hope thc.tnessag;c is sprcadlnjg that underage 
drinking will not be tolerated. 

; Celebration in Grayslake 

GRAVSLAKE-^bowntown Grayslakc's annual cele- 
bration, Grayslakc Summer Days is set for Aiig. 19-20. 
The event Includes a parade, Jed by 101 -year-old Bessie 
Ritta, musical acts, food booths, games of chance, a 
beer garden, and a variety of participant games and 
demonstrations for the whole family. The Grayslake 
Area Chamber of Commerce sponsors the festival with 
the aid of member merchants and businesses. The 
retailers of the Downtown Merchants Association of 
Grayslakc will be sponsoring a sidewalk sale during the 
event. , _ 

Board approves land swap 

GURNEE — Gurncc trustees approved a land swap 
with developers surrounding the municipal golf . 
course. The Ijoard approved authorization of execution 
for the deed to the golf course with NBD Bank. "This 
has some clean-up items such as legal description 
changes and some trading of land. The village will give 
up 24,748 square feet and will receive 20,957 square 
feet. This will square off the boundaries but will not 
affect playability or layout of the course," Village 
Administrator Jim Hayner said. The 18-holc course 
may be ready for play In 1995. 

Taxes on their minds 

ANTIOCH^As a result of the higher property 
assessments, taxes are very much on the minds of 
Antioch residents. Township ofTicials report receiving 
a number of phone calls about the assessments that 
were sent out last week. While some residents are Just . 
grumbling, others. are preparing to mount an attack. 
Some subdivisions are contacting subdivision resi- 
dents to fdc group appeals with the county. 

No rodeo charges filed 

WAUCXINDA— The Lake County States Attorney has 
determined no chatges should be filed against the . 
Wauconda Rodeo for cruelty to animals or a bystander 
. accus^ of battery, "^e have decidied not to fflc charges 
in cither of the cases," said Michael ]. Waller. Both 
stemmed firom aninial ri^ts activist who complained of 
abuses to animals and fiom one protester being stmck in 
the face by a passenger in a pick-up truck following the 
mdeo's July 8 performance. As far as Waller is concerned, 
the cases involving the rodeo are over. ; , 



Village wants home rule status 



Village officials have been dis- 
' cussing putting a home rule ques- 
tion on a ballot, and may decide to 
wait until the spring 1995 election. 
Mayor Deborah A. Vasels said 
unless village staff comes up with 
information quickly, it will become 
too late to place ^c issue on the 
November ballot 
I lome-rulc would allow the vil- 



lage to implement taxes available 
to only home- rule communities, 
such as imposing a sales tax of .25 
or .5 percent that could raise up 
to $2 million per year, an official 
said. This would enable them to 
pay fqr increased facilities, such 
as fire fighting equipment, a new 
police station and roadway 
improvements. 




The Eighteenth Annual 



j.;.| ■ ■ - ' " I I ■ I I 



■iJS*?«Si«fe^St 



COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY 



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Hie Road to 

Business 
Success 



sponsored by Condcll Medical Center 
Libertyvllle, Illinois 



A comprehensive management skills training and business planning 
course for individuals ready to start a business. 
Ten consecutive Mondays beginning Sept. 19 from 6:30 to 10 p.m. 
CLC Grayslake campus, 19351 W. Washington St. 



Learn planning strategies used by successful 
entrepreneurs and business professionals 
• goal-setting • business research • marketing 
strategies • sales planning • finances •record- 
keeping • taxes • business management 



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Cost: $275. Visa, MasterCard and Discover accepted. For information 
and registration, call 223-3633. Sponsored by the CLC Center for 
Economic Development Regional Small Business Development Center. 



CONDELL DISTANCE 




CLASSIC 



8:1 a.m. - MetLlfe 5K Run/Walk (»9*) 

8:15 a.m. - Lakeland One Mile Fun Run (*5*) 

9:00 a.m. - Condell 1 0K Race (*1 5*) 

•prices higher on race day 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1994 
T-Shirts To First 1000 

Random Prize Drawings After Races. 

For more information or race registration 
form, call Condell Medical Center 

(708) 362-2905 ext. 5275 

Sponsored in part by the Lakeland Newspapers ■ 




Sj; COUNTY UkclANd NewspApEs Augnsr 1 y,l 994 



-4. ■n.-L,; -.. 



BiLLER Press 

966 Victoria St. 
Antioch, IL 

"We're Your 
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or exiting the school bus. 

That leaves it up to you as a driver; to be extra careful around 
schoolyards, neighborhood play areas/ and departing school 
buses. 

So remember.. when you see^ yellow, be sure'to see red - as in 
red alert. Let's ail slow down and give our children the 
chance they deserve. 

This message is brought to you be these fine lakeland area businesses and services. 



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Auqu»T.1,9 ,1«9,4 UkclANd Newspapers 





United Way of Lake County's 
General. Campaign Chairman, 
Donald M.* JPctcrson, President 
and CEO of Triistiharlc Insurance 
Company; has .announced the 
1994 Campaign Cabinet - 

"This year's campaign goat is 
$7.15 minion;' and it is going to 
taice much' 'Hard woric by our 
many volunteers to ensure a suc- 
cessful campaign for bur social 
service agencies and the pro- 
grams they provide," said 
Peterson. "This Campaign 
Cabinet Is very dedicated and will 



announces 




woric hard to achieve that goal." 

The following individuals 

have agreed to serve with 

Peterson on the 1994 Campaign 

Cabinet: Chairman of the Board, 
Richard . H. Morchcad, Abbott 
Laboratories; Pilars Club Chalrnian, 
M.BlaJte Inele, Pii.D., CANJI, Inc.; 
Campaign Advisory Group Chairman 
Daniel J. LaVlsla, Ph.D., College of 
Lalce County; Marlceting Chairman 
Terry Simmons, \/U}boU Laboratories; 
Cultivation Division Chairman Joe 
Ncmmcrs, Jr., Abbott Laboratories; 
Loaned Executive ,RccrnItmcnt 
Chairman Hd Fattcs, Tnistmaric 
Insurance Company; Combined 
Federal Campaign Chairman RADM 



Made C Gaston, USN, Great Latccs 
Naval Training Center; Combined 
Federal Campaign Coordinator Lt - 
Fritz Schluctcr, Navy Public Worlcs 
Center;.. . :" - 

Abbott Division Chairman Miles 
Whitc,^Abbolt Laboratories; Abbott 
Division Coordinator Mary Quinn 
Boyd, Abbott Laboratories; Baxter 
Division' Chairman Lawrence D. 
Damron, Baxter Healthcare Corp.; 
Baxter DhHsion Coordinator Thomas 
C;- Freyman, Abbott .Laboratories; 
Major Manufacturing Division 
Chairman Robert W. Roolc, Carcmarlc 



International Jnc; Joint Accounts 
Division Chairman Brian Ri^sscau, 
Abbott Laboratories; General 
Business Division Chairman James P. 
Conway; Tnistmaric Insurance 
Company; Commerce Division 
Chairman Steve Henley, First 
MidwcstBanic,NA; Finance Division 
Chairman Steven A. RIslcy, Harris 
Banic Libcrtyviile; Professionals 
Division Chairman Sheila Maries, 
College of Lake County; Training 
Division Chairman Judith P. Clarice, 
Kemper National Insurance 
Companies; Print Communications 



Division Chairman GerlHahncnstcin, ' 
Baxter Diagnostics Inc.; ,SpccIaLi 
Materials -Chairman, Rose tCahlll, 
Kemper National ' Insurance 
Companies; and Video 

Communications/ Meeting Producer ' 
Faye Cater, Abbott Laboratories. 

The United Way of Lake 
Coimty Campaign supports 106 
programs offered through 50,' 
local agencies. For more informa- 
tion about United Way, of, Lake . 
Cmmty or volunteer opptHtunl- 
tics, call 816-0063. . ; 




-PErbfThEWEEJc 




Ashley has special need 

Ashley is a 5 year old, spayed ^ 
female, medium size, black/tan' 
shepherd mix. Even a dog who 
had a home, can be an "aban- 
doned" pet,- and that's what hap- 
pened to our Ashley. Ashley was 
left alone, on a chain, in a yard, 
with food, water and little else; no love, no care, no play and no quali- 
ty human interaction. She languished there until the authorities final- 
ly removed her and brought her to Orphans of the Storm. 
Understandably, when Ashley Ttrst came, she was painfully shy, scared 
and unresponsive. • 

After months of rehabilitation, Ashley has learned how to wag her 
tail and soak In all the love she can get She has also learned how to hug 
and ask for love. Ashley has come a long way, but she still has a way to 
go. She is a smart dog who needs gentle, patient, consistent love, posi- 
tive interaction and training by people she knows care about her. In 
this way, she vyill learn to trust and develop self-confidence. Once she 
does, she will be an cxtremciy sweet, docile, quiet bundle of love who 
will consider her family to be her savior, and she will be touchingly 
devoted forever. Here since December of 1993, Ashley is in desperate 
need of a loving, luting home. 

A cash $55 donation includes free spay/ncutcr, leash, collar, follow- 
up. care, fust shots and more. Orphans of the Storm is located at 2200 
Riverwoods Rd., in Dccrfield. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a 
week. Call 945-0235 for further information. 



From page Bl 

number of habeas corpus appeals 
which "have really clogged the 
courts," he^said. He would also 
strengthen the "three strikes and 
you're out" provision to assure 
that repeat felony offenders serve ' 
their sentences in prison. 

Back on the homefront, Bob 
Walberg, Crane's Democrat chal- 
lenger for the 8th Congressional 
.seat, held a press conference in 
Palatine while Representatives 
were voting on the anti-crime 
measure in Washington. 

Walberg, who supported the 



Seniors 



bill, said Crane Is out of touch 
with his constituents who 
Walberg said support measures 
such as the assault weapons 
ban. , ■_ 'y/„ ^^.:, 

"He had an opportunity to 
vote on a bill to make our com- 
munities safer but didn't," 
Walberg said of Crane. 

Walberg added that the $33 
billion bill would have gone "a 
long way to providing a safer 
environment for oiir families" 
and "to help curb the rising tide 
of crime."" 
. Walberg pointed out that 



crimes related to assault weapons 
dropped dramatically when for- 
mer President George- -Biish- 
placed a ban on imported assault 
weapons. 

• Walbierg supported the mca- • 
sures that wotild have provided 
for additional police bfTtcersL He: 
also faVors legislation that would 
create a National Police . Corps, 
which would mirror the high 
school ROTC program. ■"-. . 

"Students could pay for col- . 
lege by giving back two to three . 
years to your community in 
police service," Walberg said. 



From page Bl 

Blake said she learned that the 
elderly are more frequently tar- 
gets of fmancial crime because 
they keep more money In their 
homes and arc often more trust- 
ing than younger people. - 

.Besides the helpful informa- 
tion, Blake especially enjoyed the 
networking betwreen agencies. 



Those attending the program now 
publish a newsletter that just went 
nationwide. "It was great to meet 
other service providers," she said. 
Blake also had high praise for 
other organizations providing 
services to the c.lderiy. in particu- 
lar the Lake County Sheriffs 
Department's "Arc you okay" 
program, and Commonwealth 



Edison's "Gate Keeper" program. 
"Local authorities coiildn't be 
better," Blake said. 

For more information about 
the various programs for the 
elderly in Lake County, call 546- 
5733 or l(800)-942-3930 eve^nings 
and weekends. As Blake 
explained it, "I am on caU.:24- ' 
hours a day." ' * " 




SCHOOL BUS SAFE1Y TIPS 

FOR THE PASSENGEKS: 

• School buses provide a safe ride to school. 
Always follow the bus safety rules and obey the driver. 

• Al\A/ays stay in your set while the bus is moving. 
Do not disturb the driver. ^ 

• Sit and talk quietly while riding the bus. Mm 
Do not make loud noises. ^^ 

• Obey crossing guards and school bus drivers. 
They will help you get on and off the bus safely. 

• Before you cross the street to get on a school bus, 
look right then left again. 

• Before crossing the street while getting on and off the bus, 
look for the special sign from the school bus driver that is 
safe to cross. Always cross in front of the bus and far 
enough ahead of the bus to see the driver's signal. 




M^pLjM 



PRINTING 



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4tl78N.Rt.83 
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(708) 395-0620 

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(708)838-1415 



WORLD'S FIHESTPIZM 



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1913 E.Grand Ave. 
Lindenhurst, IL 

(708) 356-2300 

Bring the family 
Visit our Game Room 

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Join us at the Outback Bar 
for all sporting events. 3 TVs 
to watch all the games . 

Beautiful view of the lake 

9m Pizzn fm 



h J T \ T « %'•* f V:4^ It. 



^ A » t 




•Q EDITORIAL UblANcJ Newspapers AtiqusT 19, 1994 




■ The face of Ipcallawtenforcerhis is chariging rapidly.\; 
VNHiile violence arid danger ever lurk, police work here"'' 
and in neighboring comnnunities is more high tech and 
socially orientated than cops and robbers of years past. 

Wauicegan has a bicycle patrol. Lake Zurich issues ." 
cip'urtesy tickets as a means of spotlighting potential 
dinger; Mundelein operates a police command post in 
a high crime apartment complex and maintains a full- 
time officer in the high schoolto heighten law enforce- 
ment visabitity. ;V 

Now Grayslake is studying the feasibility of establish- 
ing a foot patrol in the business district. Police Chief 
Dennis Kpletsbs chuckles at the thought of "going back 
tooldentimesi" butanofficeronVbeatwoiildbea ■ 
serious step toward heightening citizen interaction with 
law. enforcement. 

- "Interaction" is the buzz word of local enforcemen t ^ 
these days, the key to making the concept of communi- 
ty policing work; 

)r Outmanned and often out-gunned by well-arrried 
gangs, I aW enforcement leaders see increasing depart-^ 
ment eyes and ears through community.policing as a 
; means of leveling the playing field with rising crime or 
; at I east provid ing lavir officers wi th mo rie tod Is. 
>; We see the new breed of law enforcement officials 
being aggressively pro-active \h keeping the peace and 
improving the quality of life as opposed to old-fashion, 
head-knocking policing that essentially is reactive". 

Call it "touchy, f^ely" law enforcement, but the mod- 
ern approach offers the opportunity to "make things 
better," as one police professional put it, "before they 
get ugly." r\:-- 





courts 



.'■■i 





County bureaucrats have been whittling away for a 
long time at a once bright idea— a network of Branch 
Circuit Courts that Would be convenient for comt u^ers , 
(mostly traffic offenders) and save local police time - 
away from duty for court appearances and costly over- 

• time pay ;■...•■:■ • '..■.<■; .^ ^:--:^-.., v'-- '•■■>■'-:■.■ ■/" " ^ 

Atone time, the decentralized court plan was hailed 
by officialdom as an "enlightened way to bring the 
courts and government closer to the people. ^ Alas. 
Time has a way of turning good intentions into bad sys- 
tems. Court aides complained about inefficiencies. 
Host villages grumbled about problems associated with 
court traffic^ -Fox Lake officials became openly con- 
temptuous of "riff raff" corning to their community for - 
court appearances. Besides, rent paid by the county 
was chronically below market, local politicians groused. 

The once enlightened system eroded into new 
enlightment: close the branches and save. Slated for 
closure in the latest round are branches at Prairie View, 
Zion and North Chicago. Vernon Hills Police Chief Gary 
Kupsak sees the plan as a plot to undercut his tight bud- 
get. Circuit Court Clerk Sally Coffelt and County Board 
Rep. Pam Newton (R-Vernon Hills) tussled in the heat of 
debate: Chiefs from Lincolnshire, Buffalo Grove and 
Zion have voiced displeasure. The closing isn't going , ■ 

easily '' '■y-K''^-'---':^'^'^^^ ' , ■ ,' 

;;County Board members acted Wisely. They voted 13 
to .8 to delay a decision until their September meeting. 
Equivocation is the better part of valor. Besides, maybe 
a deal or two can be worked out with more time. 

What the county is opting for is two mass production 
"ticket mills," one currently in operation at a Grayslake 
shopping center and another at space to be riernodeled 
in iikehurst Mall. "Cost efficient and convenient," 
-remarked Circuit Judge John Goshgarian. Efficiency 
and convenience for who? ' 



— ViEwpoiNT— — - 

Health law 'good' 
for political pros 




PILISCHROEDER 

Publisher, 

Scary, but long .before the 
snow flies, there may be new 
hcalth-carc legislation intruding 
in the way you handle family 
health needs. 

It's all a numbers game. As 
Rush Umbaugh puts it: "What arc 
the Democrats waiting for? 
They've got the votes. They can 
pass any health bill they want." 

Indirect results of new federal 
health care laws likely will have a 
great impact on the daily lives of 
Amcncans than purported bene- 
fits themselves: new taxes on 
insurance premiums, hefty ciga- 
rette tax, changes in the way 
Medicare is administrated. 

Because the Dcmocrdts need a 
lift for the .1994 Congressional 
races and *a Clinton Repeat in 
1996, the politics of winning dic- 
tate that sometliing be put on the 
books, not a Hillaiy-stylc over- 
haul, but something. 

And here's what's really scary. 
Any kind of health bill will be 
good for the Republicans as well. 
They'll have something to run 
against. 

Dick Cheney, former Sec. of 
Defense and a former GOP 
Congressman, is flooding the 
tnails with an opinion poll on 
health — and a fund raising 
request when he says the surren- 
der of individual freedoms is 
frightening. He sees health care 
meddling as cutting back on your 



choice of a doctor, picking your 
hospital or clinic, needless wait- 
ing, increasing unemployment 
and greatly increasing the nation- 
al dcflclL 

In the end, health care politics 
is a "can't lose" proposition for 
the pros in both parties. But we 
all know who the real losers will 
be, don't we?' 

PAimr PARTY— Tickets arc 
in the mail for "Take 25!" BUled as 
a gala celebration, "Take 25!" 
Saturday, Sept 10 is the College 
of Lake County Foundation's 
contribution to the school's 25th 
anniversary observance that will 
be celebrated in a variety of pub- 
lic ways. 

Black tic will be optional for 
the posh gourmet dinner-dance 
at Baxter headquarters in 
Deeifield. Besides food and fun, 
the big attraction will be a 
$10,000 cash raffle. 

IN TUNE— Ukc County's 
most durable musical group, the 
Sanford-Rossi-Schrocdcr trio, in 
business for 25 years, is returning 
to action Aug. 31 with a perfor- 
mance at the Zion Senior Center 
foUowing a momentary respite 
due to a stay in the hospital for 
accordionist Armand Rossi of 
Waukegan. 

Armand's time-out gig for 
angioplasty provided drummer 
Jim Sanford of Zion and sax 
man Bob Schrocdcr of Antioch a 



brief vacation. Noted for taste- 
ful servings of 40's and 50'shlts, 
the group never has gotten; 
around to picking a namc:( 
Members of the trio take turns! 
serving as leader. . 

BANKING SPLENDOR-^ 

Opening of the hew State Bank of 
the Lakes branch in Grayslake 
produced raves for . decor, and : 
customer comfort. -^v.-u* 

Featuring dark woodwork, 
thick carpeting and .traditional 
furnishings, President Randy 
Miles wasn't kidding vvhcn he 
stated, "We -wanted to make ^a^ 
statement . that , we're ; here to 
stay." The 1007ycar-old Antioch 
institution also has a facility at 
Lindenhurst - ,.'.•» .. 

Non-proflt organizations arc 
invited at no charge to use the. 
richly appoihtcd. community 
room, which resembles . an 
upscale hotel lobby. , . 

ONE MAN'S FAMILY— Erlka 

decided that her scooter chair , 
was too confining and crawling 
was too slow, so she just stood up 
and started walking. Just like thati 
Guess the new-found mobility 
graduates her from infancy to 
toddler age. 

Bill Schroeder offers editorial 
commentary every Tuesday on 
Lake County Live presented by, 
STAR Channel 3/U,S. Cable at 
5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 



t Lll I \J I \ I /\ L Newspap^ 



Lehers to ThE EdllOR 




Zoning hurts children 

Editor 

Our service recently received a phone call from 
a family who is planning to purchase a home in the 
southwest corner of Lake County. As a licensed 
child care provider for several years, the wife is 
planning to continue this service in her new home 
in Lake County, The problem: in the community 
where they were ready to purchase a home— zoning 
laws arc prohibitive regarding this service. . 

These restrictive regulations exist in spite of the 
fact that over 57 percent of women with children 
under age 6 arc working. It is estimated that by the 
year 2000, 70 percent of pre-school cliildrcn will 
have mothers working outside the home. These sta- 
tistics reveal a great demand for child care now and 
in the future. Child care centers offer one alterna- 
tive, but many parents prefer family child care for 
infants and toddlers. 

It behooves any public official to become 
informed of the child care needs in their communi- 
ty. Lack of quality child care can influence a family's 
decision not to buy a home in a community. Family 
child care and center child care offer a much heed- 
ed service for working parents. 

Diane Philipp 
YWCA of Northeastern UUnois 

Kids event successful 

Editor 

The Kids 1st Health Fair owes its success to the 
monetaiy and in-kind contributions of county.busi- 
nesses, service oiganizations, coalitions, schools 
and churches. The ini|l6r contributors included 
Abbott Laboratories' '^Fund,' Northwestern 



University, The Eariy Intervention Council of Lake 
County, Baxter International, Commerce Clearing 
House, Waukegan Township, Allstate, American 
National BankofLibertyville, Federal Life Insurance 
Co., Hollistcr, Dean Witter Financial Services, J.D. 
Searle and Carcmaik. 

In addition to this list, there were about 90 
more donors! Hospital Partnerships' support 
included doctors and nurses from Finch University 
of Health Sciences/Chicago Medical School,^ 
Highland Park Hospital, the Medical Center of Lake 
County/Condcll Hospital, Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center, St. Thcrcse Medical Center and 
Victory HospitaL The 480 medical volunteers 
teamed with the 160 community volunteers assured 
a successful event that overcame the waiting times 
experienced by last year's fairgoers. The enthusiasm 
expressed by our volunteers even led one of our 
1993 workers to become our successful Fundraiser 
Chau^inl994. 

The 30 social, educational and recreational 
agencies who were at the fair to provide information 
to those attending as well as the entertainers who 
offered their services helped to make it a multi- 
dimensional event. Waukegan High School Dist. 
60's efforts to supply not only the site but also the 
manpower to help the fair function smoothly is 
deeply appreciated. . . | 

Out of more than 1,500 children attending, 
1,250 children (whose fanulies'live on limited 
means) received medical services. They all will start 
school this fall with their medical, dental and school 
supply needs met Hie 0- to 4-year-olds were given 
lead tests and the ^imip^inizations. they needed as 
v/ell as screening fqijdwelppinentai delays, hearing 
See LEITERS pag^B7 { i ] t ! 



1 

! 



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AvqusT 1 9, 1 994 UblANd NcwspApew COUNTY ^ 




- Party Uines^ — ' 

Aw^t new d^elopments 






CofToir 



'^drtyUties, the Lakeland 
Newspapers column ofpolitt- 
cat opiriion, is prepared from 
staff reports, - 

Insiders arc predicting 
that there will be new devel- 
opments in the feud between 
fellow Republicans Circuit 
Clerk. Sally Coffdt and 
County Board Rep. Puncla 
NfWion (R-Vcmon Hills). 
Both CofTelt and Newton backed away from 

expansion oh differing opinions over the proposed 

closing of Branch Circuit Court In Prairie View in 

Newton's district. The truce may be short-lived, 

aa:onling to onlookers. 
J Coffelt "popped'a cork'^because Newton went 

directly to Prairie A^ew personnel. Coffelt was 

incensed that Newton "had 

no right to talk to my employ- 
ees." Observers reported that 

Newton shook biff Coffelt 

when the clerk attempted to 

grab her arm to discuss the. 

closing plan one-on-dne. 
The encounter included 

a reported -threat from Coffelt 

that she ' would ' intercede in 

Newton's ' campaign for 

reelection tills November. ' 

The bottom line is that by being a team player 

and supporting thc'GOP line on the Grainger rczon- 

ing, Newton has accumulated sufficient stature to 

dictate what statutory ofTiccrs can or can't do. In 

Chicago they caU that clout 

Happy> Xfoce— Embattled but unbowed 
Highway Coiiim.JiiBfSei]]iiierlliig of Lake Villa 
Twp. is grinning from car to car these days. He's 
excited about promoting tax-paid snowplowlng for 
senior citizens and he's getting a kick out of squab- 
bling between Sap¥. Sue Hanaon and some board 
members. "See?" Jim intones. "I'm not such a bad 

guy aifter all.". 

'• • • 



vows times are changing in Lake County and that a 
traditional one-party mic is a thing of the past. He 

also vows that Democrats won't forget the Zon case. 

"••:•■■■ 

Ldalrig steam— Chalk 

up another office holder who 
appears to be losing his taste 
for public service. County 
Board Rep. Ed Fo|tlk (R-Fox 
Lake) mticK prefers to spend 
time In his 'dnig store or oh 
the road with his v\^e who Is 
an Arabian horse judge with 
a national reputation. 
Fojtik's in mid-term of a 
four-year toi^. . 




Fojttk 




Nowton 



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Potarson 



Great party— With the 
com as high as an elephant's 
eye this year, Howard 
Blaze's annual Republican 
corn roast Thursday night 
was better than ever. Bieze 
always identifies a GOP orga- 
nization to benefit from party 
proceeds. This year Bieze 
departed' from custom and 
honored State Sen. BUI 
Peterson. Lucky Bill! 



Desperate attempt— ,Lake County 
Democratic Central Conmiittec Chairman Terry 
Unk is calling the Republican party's check on 
SyMa Zon 's petition for Regional Superintendent 
of Schools a desperate attempt by the Republican 
Party to maintain unchecked its influence over the 
lives of Lake Countians. The circuit court ruled this 
week that Zon's papers were not in order and her 
name will not appear on the November ballot Unk 



A moose In the house— Hawthorn Woods 
trustees were not the only ones to get excited over 
whether the village should remain a member of the 
Corridor Plaiming Council, another giiest appeared 
to be excited by the flaming debate as well. A mouse 
literally surfaced from the dark corned of the 
Village Bam, interrupting the meeting. It was seen 
scmrring under the chairs of the trustees. The 
mouse caused such a disturbance that trustees 
urged Chief of Police WnUam Urry to shoot it, and 
Village President Doaglas Challos offered his 
gavel to "club him." Animal rights activists should 
not get alarmed. The tmstccs did not harm the 
furry, little critter, although Trustee Sharon 
Coromllas and Village Clerk Rozacl 
HoQsenakker rested their feet above the floor for 
the remainder of the meeting. 
.'■•■•• 

Term itanlts — Now in iiis 24th year of elected 
service, Rep. PhU Crane has 
been cited as one of only 15 
congressman liamed a "term 
limits hero." Crane is among 
those representatives push- 
ing for real reform and a 
return of government to the 
citizens. Under the bill Crane 
is supporting a representative 
would be limited to serving 
three terms or a total of six 
years. In view of his endorse- Crano 
ment, virill he be bowing out of the, November race in 
which he is facing Robert Walberg? If he wins, 

Crane will bcgiii his 13th term in Congress. 

• • • 

Republican Unlty^ Republicans wiU be gath- 
ering at the Westin Hotel in Chicago for a Unity 
Dinner Sept 15. Former Vice President Dan 
Qaayie will be the featured speaker. The event is 
being sponsored by the Family, Taxpayers Network, 
headed by former Gov. |lm Edgar foe, fack 
Roeser. Secretaiy of State George Ryan will be 
among the speakers. The fee is $250 a pop' and for a 
few more doUars, you can have your photo taken 
with Quayle. Republican insiders say a successful 
event could generate funds and stop the third-party 
governor's bid of Stefwen Baer right in its tracks. 
Roeser, wl>o ran against Edgar in the primary, is 
supporting Edgar's re-election bid in November 
against Democrat Daim Caark-Netsch.- 





letters 



From page B6 
and (Speech. 

We'd also thank the six leagues that make up the I^ke *; "' 
County League of Women Voters and also the Lake County . . / 
Health Dept who co»sponsorcd this event for themany hours ., 
they spent in planning and implementing the fair, Invcstingln , 
idds is investing in our future. 

Claire Weincr and Beryl Horn, CoChalrs 
League of Women Voters of Lake County 

Sleazy campaign trick 

Editor: ' ' / 

In a recent letter sent statewide, Patrick Quinn attacked ; ' 
George Ryan for accepting the security detail the General 
Assembly has provided for the elected Secretary of State, Quinn /; 
says that ''I do not intend to have any (bodyguards) as Secretary ' 
of State." And he proposes a statute that would limit the use of 
bodyguards for statewide elected officials to ca.ses where "a threat 
presents a clear and present danger to tlie personal safety of the' 
ofliccholdcr." 

Quinn Is not leveling with us. He's not stupid and he's been - 
around. He must know that George Ryan as Secretary of State is 
subject to credible threats, "presenting a clear and present danger 
to his personal safety" on a regular basis from' drunk drivci^ \ 
whose licenses he has lifted And Quinn surely knows that Ryan n 
couldn't pnidently disclose specific threats for fear of encourag- < 
ing others. So Quinn can hammer away at Ryan's security, relying 
on Ryan's own concern for his own safety to keep him quiet 
about the real threate to the Secretary of State. s 

If this sleazy trick helps him get elected, Quinn can cheerhilly 
accept a fiill security detail the minute he gets a credible death f 
threat, saying that the conditions in his proposed statute were the 
conditionsbfhis own "intent" to refuse bodyguards. ' > 

Patrick Quinn has played even this life and death issue like a ■ 
reckless, hypocritical demagogue. Is he the kind of person we 
want as Secretary of State? 

Patrick!. Kelly 
Professor of Law, SlU 
Carbondalc 

Board enjoys hindsight 

Editor: 

J was very surprised to read that Woodland Elementary 
District 50 has a growth problem. This was certainly not the 
image that Supt. Dennis Conti or the incumbent school board 
members projected during the lastschpol board election. 
It is refreshing to hcarthetmtii finally being revealed. 
Woodland needs another school and possibly two new schools to 
handle the growth in enrollment. Woodland has also announced 
another possltile.optiqii, which is year-rpuhd sciioolingv 
However, that issue raises many'qucstions. flow does year-round 
schooling reduce the size of a classroom? What do the majority of 
families with two working parents do with their children who 
would be at home for 15 days after they attended school for a 60- 
;;day period? The concept of year-round schooling will place an .':." 
additional biu-den on families virith two working parents. Are the: ■ 
nibther or fatiher expected to take a 15-day vacation from work 
every 60 days to supervise the children? Many families cannot ; ■ 
afford this alternative. Should they be penalized for this situation? ' 
Are there any day-care centers that offer a 15-day program? v, 
; ;; : T^ is an incredibly sad situation. We arc talidng about the ^ 
future of our children's ediicatioh. However, we must realize that 
we Uve iri a real world, where this amount of funding to build new 
schools is unreasonable. People all over Lake County arc 
;l:^TV0CED-6in''^ and are tired of receiving higiier jproperty tax bills ^' 
■every year. Alsoi let's look at the lack of success in passing school v^ 
refcrendums in other villages in Lake County. Shouldn't the facts 
tell us something about our chances of lundiing $50 million for 
two new schools in Woodland School Dist. 50? What it does tell . 
me is that the Woodland School Board's hindsight is much better 
than it's foresight. 

Dave Anderson, vice president 
Gumee Residents Action Committee 

GoodNelghbor 

Editor 

We are well aware that there is a need to assist low income . 
seniors and disabled individuals with various tasks associated 
with maintaining their homes and independent lifestyles. 

Using public equipment such as township trucks and plows 
in addition to funding for the employees' salaries of private prop- 
;erty is strictly prohibited by state statute. Since the township 

:bpardis h^^ within the lim- 

I its of the law, v^ certai nly cannot authorize any other govern- - 
merit Agency to provide the snowplowlng 6n private property. 

: Consider the ramifications of allowing government officials to use 
gbvernraetvt property for private use. . 

.' : L^ residents with a \ 

viable and legal alternative. The '-Crood Neighbor Program" 

: enlists volunteers from our community. We welcome individuals, 
brgaiiizatiom, church and school youth groups, as well as family 
members to assist these individuals with various tasks. Volunteers 
arc invited to submit their names to the township supervisor's 
office at 356-21 16. Aiiy individual v\iio anticipates needing assis- 
tance with yard maintenance or transportation such as an occa- 
sional trip to the doctor's office should also call in to have their 
name put oh a corresponding list. 

■Submitted by Lake Villa Township officials, 
.•"-;::.:; •,■.: : ■''■■X ' ^^ "i^ ^•;; : : ( ly-x-; Sue Han^ Supervisor 




•>■ ! ■ •l■■^ i< 






VI 




.51>*> 




51 -COUNTY UkElANc) Newspapers AuqusT 19, 1994 



CLC Board receives deed for Globe 



In a special prc-board meet- 
ing ceremony, College of Lake 
County .trustees completed the 
purchase of the Globe depart- 
ment store from the Waukcgan 
city council. CLC board 
Chairperson Barbara Ollschlager 
presented a copy of the check for 
the building to Waukcgan Mayor 
Dili Durkln and, in return, Mayor 
Durkln presented a copy of the 
building deed to Ollschlager. 

CLC and the City of 
Waukcgan entered a preliminary 
agreement on March 15 for pur- 
chase of the building to expand 
the Lakeshorc Campus. Under 
tlic agreement, CLC agreed to 
purchase the downtown 
Waukcgan building for $185,000 
and invest a minimum of $2 mil- 
lion to remodel and repair the 
building. Tlic City of Waukcgan 
will provide 300 parking spaces, 
leasing 150 for the college's 
exclusive use. 

Ollschlager and Mayor 
Durkln were joined at the cere- 
mony by City of Waukcgan ofii- 
cials, LiUccshore Campus adviso- 
ry committee members and CLC 
officials. 

"Tonight marks a new com- 
mitment to Lakeshorc Campus, a 
commitment In which we cele- 
brate the continued partnership 
between the college and the com- 
munity In our mutual efforts to 
enrich the quality of life of the 
residents of Lake County," said 
Ollschlager as she accepted the 
deed. "Through this inter-gov- 



ernmental agreement between 
CLC and the Waukcgan City 
Council, the Globe buUdhig 
becomes tlic property of CLC. 
Once it Is renovated, the facility 
will allow us to expand our tur- 
ricular offerings and student ser- 
vices at Lakeshorc.'* . 

The Lakeshorc Campus 
expansion, expected to be com- 
pleted by the end of 1995, will 
provide for additional class- 
rooms, new laboratories and a 
child care ccntci-. 

Following a public hearing, 
the board approved the fiscal 
year 1995 budget at the regular 
monthly meeting. The $36.2-mll- 
lion budget, on display since July 
5, represents a 4.3 percent 
increase over last year. This year, 
65.2 percent ($23.6 million) of the 
budget will go directly to instruc- 
tion, academic support and stu- 
dent service, according to Arthur 
Kent, vice president of adminis- 
trative affairs. Last year, about 
62.1 percent of the budget went 
to these direct student instruc- 
tion and service areas. 

"The higher percentage of 
resources allocated for instruc- 
tion and instructional support 
reflects the college's emphasis on 
improving and expanding acade- 
mic programs and student ser- 
vices," Kent said after the meet- 
ing. 

In other business, the board 
accepted the college administra- 
tion's recommendation to ask the 
Capital Development Board to 



reject construction bids for the 
multi-use classroom and instruc- 
tional performing arts buildings 
at the Grayslakc campus. The 
board further directed the 
administration to work with state 
ofiicinls and local architects to 
redesign the buildings wltliln the 
budgetary guidelines. The board 
took this action after reviewing 
the construction bids which 
exceeded original project esti- 
mates. 

In other action, the board 
accepted, more than $200,000 in 
grants -from the Illinois 
Community College Board for the 
Center for Economic 

Development to provide training 
for local businesses and purchase 
instructional equipment for the 
college's career programs. 
Additionally, the board accepted 
federal and state grants totaling 
$513,076 to renew adult and con- 
tinuing education programs. 

In purchasing, the board 
approved the repair and replace- 
ment of the badly deteriorated 
access roads and catch basins on 
the Grayslakc campus by 
Klrs'chhoffcr Construction Co. in 
Zion at a total cost of $262,000. 
This Life Safety Project has been 
approved by the Illinois 
Community College Board. 

Finally, the board passed a 
resolution recognizing the ser- 
vices of Harold Mitchell, who is 
retiring from CLC after serving 
more than 19 years as head cus- 
todian. 



Reservists to provide medical support in Croatia 



In this tunc of "rightsizing" 
Naval Reservists are once again 
being called upon for assistance 
in . international crises. Six 
Reservists from fleet Hospital 
(FI I) 22, which is administered by 
Naval Reserve Readiness 
Command (REDCOM) Region 13 
out of Great Lakes, were selected 
from 14 billets nationwide to sup- 
port UN peacekeeping forces in 
Zagreb, Croatia. 

"This deployment is to sup- 
port Field Hospital Zagreb," said 
LT Paul Jacob, REDCOM 13 
Medical Training Officer. "They 
will provide medical support to 
UN forces." 

"This was set up to integrate 
the reserves into the active duty 
forces that are there right now," 
said Jacob. 

The Naval Bureau of Medicine 
(BUMED) authorized 14 bUlets 
for the reserves in this operation. 
To be selected a reservist had to 
be recommended by their Fleet 
Hospital Commanding Officer, 
and BUMED chose 14 from a 
pool of reservists nationwide. 

Upon selection, each reservist 
■ had to go through a short training 
course to prepare for this deploy- 
ment. "In July they had to com- 
: pictc the Fleet Hospital 
Operations and Training 
Command (FHOTC) Phase II at 
Camp Pendleton. Calif.," said 
Jacob. "This type of training con- 
; sisted of emeigcncy response and 
\mass casualty-type exercises." 
' The 14 reservists will leave the 
United States August 23 and are 
scheduled to return February 17, 
1995. These reservists will be 
deployed 179 days. 

HM2 Richard Whitten, a 
reservist out of Naval Reserve 
CcnterHNRC) Decatur, is a para- 
medlc/EMTI with Arrow 
Ambulance in Champaign, 111. 
and is one of the 14 selected to go 
, to Zagreb. . . 

"We will be working with two 
other hospitals in Zagreb to take 



care of citizens and the UN 
peacekeeping forces," said 
Whitten. 

His main job vwU be to go out 
to get the wounded and. bring 
them back to the hospital. "It will 
be a real good experience," said 
Whitten. "We will be taking care 
of people who arc a lot more 
appreciative of the care." 

This mission is dangerous, but 
Whitten is ready for the chal- 
lenge. "I feel confident in my 
skills and what I've got from my 
training," he said. 

The best part of this mission is 
"knowing that they're better off 
with my help," said Whitten. 

Also chosen to go was HM3 
Kristina Whitten, an operating 
room technician also with NRC 
Decatur who works as an oral 
sui^ery assistant in Champaign, 
Ul. in her daily job and Richard 
Whitten's sister. 

Being selected from 14 nation- 
wide was a feat in of itself, but 
two selected from the same fami- 
ly was quite another. 

"I was shocked when I heard 
my brother and I were both 
selected," said Kristina. "There 
were so many people with the 
qualifications needed (to choose 
from). I thought our chances 
were nil to none." 

"At least we will be together," 
said Kristina. "We'll both have 
someone to lean on for support/' 

The two Whittens will be 
assigned to Camp Pleso, which is 
south of Zagreb, Croatia. "It cur- 
rently provides medical assis- 
tance for nearly 36,000 troops 
from 34 countries assigned to the 



United Nations Protection Force 
throughout the Former Republic 
of Yugoslavia." (MSGT Chariic 
Morgan, USAF, Navy Medicine). 

"My parents were kind of 'bas- 
ket-cases' for a while when they 
heard we both were going," said 
Kristina. "We do have a (younger) 
brother just graduating from 
(Navy) boot camp, but we're not 
a military family. (Once they 
calmed down), my parents were 
pretty proud (since only 14 were 
chosen in the country), and my 
Mom said 'You do know your job, 
and you do it well.'" 

"I have mixed emotions 
(about this deployment)," said 
Kristina. "At times I'm kind of 
excited, and at times I have no 
clue what's going to happen to us 
over there. (We know we) have a 
lot of barriers to overcome, and a 
lot of uncertainties (before us)." 

"It will be great to lend them a 
hand," said Kristina. "We just 
hear about (this situation) on the 
news. Now we'll be there, and It's 
going to be a part of history." 

"Those personnel being 
selected from FH22 proves that 
FH22 individuals are ready and 
capable of assuming any given 
task put before them," said LT 
Jacob. "Their readiness levels 
due to FH training and their 
civilian jobs (in the health ser- 
vices field) prepared them for 
this mission." 

"Ihat's what (being a part of 
the medical profession) is all 
about...," said Kristina. "...help- 
ing, caring or lending an 
car...providing comfort whenever 
possible." 



Sch<M'$ Opin^^ Week 

Gov. Jim Edgar has proclaimed Aug. 22-26 as "School's Open 
Safety Week" in Illinois.; ' 

1 1n his prodamatiori,' Edgar alerts motorists to the need for 
special attention to children Walking to and from school as they v 
return to classes. Extra driving care also is needed near school ;,/ 
bUSStopS.,- v;.. ■ ''.V'-./^'r^''-:::^'::: ,■■ ■'■''■' ■ .■■■.'[''■'^\:-'':^r-KJ'-'^^^^^^^ 




GOP wave 

Sen.. Adeline Geo-Karis. who represents the 31st senatorial 
district, waves to the crowd from her "Geo-moblle" during 
the annual LIndenfest Parade. The long-time Republican 
represents the north and northeastern portions of thecoun- 
tyl— Photo by Kovln Hanrahan . 



NICASA opens center 
for women, children 

The new Women and Children's Center of the Nortlierh Ullnois 
Council on Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (NICASA) officially 
opened this week at 2031 Dugdalc Ave., North Chicago. 

About 200 people attended a celebration Sunday, Aug. 14, billed 
as a "Community Shower" and "Family Fun Day." Participants donat- 
ed gifts, enjoyed refreshments and entertainment and toured the 
remodeled church, once home to the Chapel of the Cross and now 
home to the intensive day treatment program for substance-abusing, 
poverty-ridden women and their children. 

Program components include outreach and transportation ser- 
vices, medical services, nutritional services, skill building services, 
children's services and gender and culturally specific programming on 
such topics as sexual abuse, racism, domestic violence and assertivc- 
ness training. 

"NICASA has embraced the spirit of giving in a most meaningful 
way," said 

Rear Admiral Mack Gaston, commander of the Great Lakes Naval 
Training Center and a member of NICASA's Board of Directors. 

Speaking before he helped cut the ribbon outside the front door of 
the one-story brick structure. Admiral Gaston praised project director 
Joann Jacobs and her staff for helping women take charge of their own 
lives and raise healthy, productive children. 

"We arc helping to mold our future in the most positive way," he 
said. 

Bobby Thompson, North Chicago's mayor, also praised NICASA 
and the new center. ' 

"I'm honored to have you in the nei^borhood," the mayor said. 

Illinois Secretary of State George Ryan, w^o was unable to attend, 
commended NICASA in a letter "for your efforts to address the serious, 
and sometimes overwhelming, needs of substance abusing women. I 
have the utmost respect for the leadership you have .shown in provid- 
ing intensive day treatment and support and advocacy for the vulner- 
able population you serve." 

Joining Thompson and Gaston in cutting the ribbon was Laverne 
Garris, a founding member of the Chapel of the Cross! The church 
recently merged with Trinity United Lutheran Church of Waukcgan. 

David Amory, president of NICASA's Board of Directors, wel- 
comed participants and Nancy Magce, president of the Women's 
Board of NICASA, was cd-chair of the celebration. 

Noting that two invocations were offered at the beginning of the 
ceremony, Magce said. "We're In good hands when we're doubly 
blessed." She thanked the volunteers for their hard work and saluted 
Jacobs and her staff. 

Jacobs, in turn, offered special thaiiks to Deborah Cassale, 
NICASA's director of finance, administration and development "for 
making the prograni ai reality," and Judy Fried, NICASA's executive 
director, for her vision. Cassale had written much of a grant proposal 
that resulted in federal funding of the project and Fried had recog- 
nized the need for women to receive gcndcr-spccific substance abuse 
treatment built on an empowerment model.' 

Women represent 4^ percent of the addiction population, but 
only 23 percent of the treatment slots in Illinois are filled with women, 
Fried said. 



..i». 



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Air<iusT -19, 1994 UUlANd Newspapers -LAKEUFEI 




ALECJUNGE 



Staff Reporter 

Beautiful music reaching out to others is what a special interde- 
nominational choir is all about 

TcU the World Is a choir based out of Wauconda's Evangelical Free 
Church Wlilcti has been dazzling audiences for 14 years with their mix 
of contemporary; gospel sotmds. 

"It's contemporary Christian Music/' Walt Martin, director said. 
"We sing all types of gospel, wc sing country, blucgrass, black and tra- 
ditional southern gospel and wc play the artists such as Sandl Patti and 
Steve Green;" 

The group goes to area churches for Sunday performances. The 
unique part of the choh* is its ability to adapt. 

"We use a special performance sound system so we can change 
sounds easily," Martin said. 

The choir is In the process of scarclilng for a few more singets. 
Martin said he' is looking for tenors and bass but has a need for all 
-singing parts. • 
' Sec CBOIR page BIO 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



DoGroR and 
baRiDony ro 





Tho boll at Iho top Is orw of threo bronzo boautfos to ocho 
hooventy sounds from a Guatemalan etiurch. Thanks to Dr. 
William Dam, below, with Holland-native Janske 
Tlmmermons, and Dam's wife. Meredltti Anderson-Dam, on 
the far right, ttie bells will ring out for a long time to come. 
On the right Is the bell towf i; also donated by the Dam fam- 
ily of Fox Lake. ; f ; It i . 



pRovide heavenly 
AmfcRlcan chuRch 



jT^ enedlcttne Monks in a small Guatemalan 
1"^^ village were happy when a much needed 
I ^ church was finally going to be constructed. 
M ^^ ^ The building plans were beautiful, but 
'. were lacking one thing— the promise that 
the townspeople would be hearing a heavenly sound 
echo through the hills and trees. 

Doctor William C. Dam, former mayor of Fox 
Lake and proprietor of the Westlake Clinic In 
Inglcsidc, was asked along with his wife, Meredith, if 
they would be willing to donate bells and a bell tower. 

Dr. Dam's interesting life history prompted the 
link to the church in Central America. 

Before he was a physician, Dr. Dam attended the 
St Meinrad Seminary and then became a cloistered 
monk with the Marmion Abbey. 

The newly constructed mission in 
Quetzaltenango is conducted by the Benedictine 
Monks of Marmion Abbey in Aurora, Illinois. 

But Meredith and Dr. Dam didn't, 
know where to begin. They had inquired 
at a few places and none of them sold the 
big bronze bells. . . 

A friend in Fox Lake, Dec Frost of Jack 
Frost Iron Works thought she coidd be of 
assistance. Dr. Dam and Ids wife browsed 
thorough a large number of catalogs 
which sold literally everything there was 
to buy. But still no bells! 

The Dams soon found out that none 
of the big bells are made or sold any- 
where in the United States, Canada, 
Mexico or South America. The best 
sounding and most beautiful bells are 
made in Holland, and come from a com- 
pany called Petit & Fritsen— bcllfdunders 
since 1660.' 

For America's Bi-Centennlal, bells 
were made at tiie Dutdi company espe- 
cially for our country's celebration and 
shipped to the U.S. . . _ - :- 

The Fox Lake family dIsOTVcred wis 
after talking with a Dutch friend, a nurse 
who worked with Dr. Dam in the 1970s at 
the Machame Hospital in Tanzania, 
Africa. 

The Dam's noted they named their 
dau^ter Marike the same as their Dutch 
friend's child. (The Dam's also have two 
other children Case and John). 

Janske Timmcrmans said she simply 
asked the priest at her church where the 
bells in his building came from. 

Dam and his wife chose a set of three 
bronze beauties from the "Glory Scries" 
and named each one after a saint. 



The bell with the higher pitch is inscribed in 
honor of San Geraldo. The bell with the medium: , 
tone is dedicated to San Patricio, and the bell with 
the lower pitch is hi honor of San Maicos^ O; 

Some confusion took place, as the bcUs were 
shipped around to several different ports before they 
went to the right place. They arrived just the day 
before the dedication. 

"The quality of the bells produced in this factory ■ 
have such a clear sound," explained Meredith. She* 
added that they arc all hand-made, constructed the ' 
old-fashioned way. 

The family should know. After the consecration; ' 
they traveled to Guatemala last month to visit and to 
sec the bells. ^ 

"When they rang out (for the first time)," said Dr. ' 
Dam, the entire city went out and applauded."— BV 
T1NAL.SWIGCH 





;Wi 




3m LAKEUFE lAkclAnd Newspapers Auqiisr 19,1994 



—Kids Fare— — ' — 

Children's Theatre at the Cuneo 



The Cunco Museum and 
Gardens with the Writers' 
Theatre- Chicago will present a 
program for children at the 
Museum, 1350 N. Milwaukee 
Avenue, Vernon Hills, Aug. 20 
from 1 - 2:30 p.m. 

The cost of the performance is 
$4 and includes refreshments. 

Tlie Writers' Theatre Chicago, 
a hi^ly acclaimed professional 
theatre company will take your 
children on an imaginative trip 
into the wonderful world of 
words. 

Festival of arts expands 
children's program 

The David Adler Cultural 
Center will present Festival of the 
Arts '94 Sept. 10 from 10 am. to 5 
p.m. and Sept. 11 from noon to 5 
p.m. This years expanded chil- 
dren's program will include 
"Reggae Man." A collaborative 
children's effort, "Reggae Man" is 
a life-size sculpture made of 
wood, chicken wire, cloth scraps, 
yarn and dyed fabrics. 

Created by the children who 
attended the 3rd Annual 
Childrens Art Fair at the Cunco 
Museum and Gardens, this sculp- 
ture has captured the hearts of 
,the children in the community. 
Children attending Festival of 
Arts '94 will have an opportunity 
to continue work on "Reggae 
Man" and create his new com- 
panion piece in the Children's Art 
Yard on Sept. 10 and 11. 

Adler art faculty, board mem- 
bers and volunteers will be 
encouraging kids to create, 
explore and experiment through- 
out the day. A variety of activities 
including portrait painting, clay 
play, face painting (provided by 
the Kohl's Children Museum) 
and jewelry making will be avail- 
able, plus children will have the 
opportunity to work on the pot- 
ters wheel. The Children's Art 
Yard has been designed to 
encourage children to work with 
professional arts and craftspcr- 



son and enhance their experi- 
ence of quality fine arts and crafts 
exhibited at the Festival of Arts. 

Ella lenklns to perform 

Highly acclaimed children's 
performer Ella Jenkins, will pre- 
sent a children's concert titled 
"Adventures In Rhythm," at the 
Woodstock Opera House on 
Saturday, Sept, 24, beginning at 2 
p.m. 

Smithsonian /Folkways 
recording artist Ella Jenkins, Is 
perhaps the most influential chil- 
dren's performer in American 
music. Over the years, Ella 
Jenkins has performed for chil- 
dren on all seven continents 
(including Antarctica.) 

Tickets for this children's con- 
, cert.arc priced at $fi each and are 
on sale at Woodstock Opera 
House box office, 121 Van Buren 
Street, Woodstock, IL e009B. For 
tickets or more information, call 
(8715) 338-5300. 

Children's activities set 
for Fine Arts Festival 

A vast variety of children's 
activities turn the Elgin Fine Arts 
Festival into the perfect family 
outing for a late-summcr week- 
end. The festival, scheduled for 
Saturday, Aug. 27 and Sunday, 
Aug. 28 in the downtown Elgin 
Civic Center Plaza, literally offers 
something for everyone, includ- 
ing pint-sized visitors. 

There is a special area, Just for 
kids, on the East Bank of tiie Fox 
River, with the children's enter- 
tainment stage across the bridge 
on Walton Island. 

From 10 a:m. to .5 p.m. 
Saturday, children will be invited 
to participate in Art and Crafts, a 
moon walk, mural painting and 
sand castle building. During this 
time the Elgin Public Museum 
will offer button making, nature 
painting and a nature scavenger 
hunt The Children's Discover 
Mu.scum of Elgin will provide 
face painting and bubble making. 



Children, parents and grand- 
parents will enjoy a wide variety 
of entertainment during the festi- 
val. On Saturday, Shanta will pre- 
sent "Stories and Songs of African 
People" at 11 am., followed by 
the Illustrated Theatre's Summer 
Celebration at 12:30 p.m. 
CaptalnBlack will host aTrcasurc 
hunt at 2 p.m., \vlth a puppet 
show by the Damcn Avenue 
Puppeteers at 3:30 p.m. 

Entertainment begins at noon 
on Sunday with Storyteller 
Donna Dcttman's "Frogs and 
Other Princes." The Highland 
Dancers perform at 1 p.m., fol- 
lowed by "Scales and Tales" with ' 
Beth Bishop and her exotic ani- 
mals. The entertainment wraps 
up with a program by the Rope 
Warrior called "Rope Jumping in 
a New Dimension" at 3 p.m. 

Tlic Elgin Fine Arts Festival 
offers the A.A.U.W. Art Showcase, 
the EOS Young Virtuosi 
Competition, Entertainment 
Tent, Artist Demonstrations, and 
a concert by the Elgin Symphony 
Orchestra over the course of the 
three-day event. All activities 
take place in the Civic Ceriter 
plaza, with the exception of the 
ESO Concert, which will be pre- 
sented free of charge at Elgin's 
Wing Park on Friday night. Food 
and beverage vendors will be 
located adjacent to the 
Entertainment Tent. 

All activities arc free and open 
to the public. For further infor- 
mation, call the Elgin Fine Arts 
Festival Hotline at (708) 931- 
5G13. „ 

'Kids Need Culture, Too' 

"Kids Need. Culture, Too!" 
returns to the Northbrook 
Theatre with yet another year of 
popular performs for the younger 
set. 

This series of Saturday 
Spectaculars start on Sept. 17, 
with the Atomic Fireballs, back by 
popular demand. A rock band 
just for kids. 



Dancetiter North welcomes new teacher 



Danccntcr North is proud to 
announce the arrival of Julie 
Cartier, a founding member of 
the Chi-Town Jazz Dance Com- 
pany and Especially Tap 
Company. Cartier will be teach- 
ing jazz and tap to advanced stu- 
dents for the fall semester. 



GET «IF 

OFF YOUR 

CHEST 

Lakeland Newspaper's 
newest service, "LIPSER- 
inCB". allows you to get "If 
off your chest. 

Complaints, ' compliments, 
Ideas, opinions on any sub- 
ject. Whatever 'If Is, we'll 
take your call and print in In 
all 13 editions of Lakeland 
Newspaper's "UPSDIVICC" 
column. . 

So If you have something 
to say. Just dial 223-8073 and 
give It some "UPSniVICI" 
we're good listeners. 

tIPSERVICE 

Ift the talk 
of the town. 

223-8073 



Originally from Wauwatosa, 
Wis., Cartier came to Chicago in 
1978 to study at the Gus Giordano 
Dance Center. She went on to 
perform with the River North 
Dance Company and the Lynda 
Martha Dance Company before 
settling in with Especially Tap 



under the direction of Bruce 
Stcgman. Throughout her career, 
Cartier has been involved in 
musical theatre and industrial 
productions. She has taught mas- 
ter classes and worksiiops all over 
the. U.S. and Germany, before 
making her home in Glcnvicw. 



ffpW&Xf% 

\(^ Presents ^^ 

The Foreigner 

by Larry Shue 

MitTors our prejudices will} rilHiciding bumor & slapstick fun at an Old Geoi^a liia 
Directed by Tom Hausman 

Aug. 19. 20, 21 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 

Adults *9. Students & Seniors *7. 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • Orchard St. (Old Globe Dept. Store) 

Box Olfice Hours: 

Mon. thru Thurs. 5;30-7;30 p.fn. and 1 1/2 hfs. before shbwtimes. 

Reserved Seating. VISA/MC 



^Into ihE NiqkT 






Friday 

yellowman will bring the Island reggae sounds to Shades, 21060 
N. Milwaukee Ave,, Dcerfield, 634-BLUE . , . Beatle Bros, at 
Sluggers, 2fl5 Center Dr., Vernon Hills, 362-7411 . . . Baaro^ reg- 
gae, at Cabana Beach Club, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine, 776-9850 . 
. . Studebaker John & the Hawks, hot rodded blues, at Slice of 
Cliicago, 36 S. Nortliwest Hwy., 991-2150 . . . Exit South is at 
Sundance Saloon, Routes 176 and 03 In Mundclein, 949-0050. 

Saturday 

Redeye Express will be rocking and singing the blues at 
Robinson's, 34020 N. Mwy. 45, in Gages Lake, 223-6507 . . . Kevlii 
Purccll and the Nlghtbumers at Slice of Chicago . . . Baaro at 
€abana Beach Club . . . The Ugly Truth at Sluggers ... Lil Mike 
& the Tornados at Shades . . . Exit South at Sundance Saloon . . 
Enjoy an evening of Folk music with Larry Swenscn 7:30 p.m. 
at the Lake County Museum in Lakewood Forest Preserve on 
Route 176 just west of Fairfield Road in Wauconda. Tlic museum 
and Ju.st Folks Music Company is sponsoring performances on the 
third Saturday of each month. For information call 526-7070.— by 
CLAUDIA M.LENABT 



Choir 



From page B9 

"This is not a typical church 
choir. These are a lot of people 
who sang in high school swing 
choirs. We also combine chore- 
ography in. our performances," 
Martin said. 

The group performs on 
Sunday evenings. Martin said the 
group doesn't want to interfere 
with choir members' regular 
church services. 



Many different denomina- 
tions are represented in the choir. 
This makes the group unique in 
itself and Martin added he knew 
no one else in Lake and McHenry 
Counties who was doing anyr 
thing like Tell the Worid. 

The group is beginning to 
book for next year. For more infor- 
mation about the choir or to book 
them, call Martin at 526-8306. 



Long Grove celebrates *By-Gone Days' 



Saturday, Aug. 27, from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m., visitors to Long 
Grove can experience a day down 
on the farm as it was years ago. 
The lake County Farm Mcritagc 
Association will set up displays 
and hands-on demonstrations in 
Fountain Square, near the cross- 
roads of the historic village. At 1 
p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 2B, an old- 
fashioned country auction will 
take place on the lawn across the 
road from the Village Tavern. The 
weekend event is sponsored by 
the Long Grove Merchants Assn. 

The Saturday program 
includes horse-drawn antique 
farm equipment; old tractors 
from the 1930s through the '50s; 
antique rope making demonstra- 
tions, with jump ropes made out 
of binder twine; threshing 
demonstrations; making and sell- 
ing miniature straw bales; old- 
fashioned laundry equipment' an 
old corn mill; and a demonstra- 
tion of butter making. From 10 
am. to 4 p.m. the Lake Weavers, 



v^th costumed spinners Carol 
Sorcnson and Carol Jenkins, will 
demonstrate their craft; 
SpringField blacksmith Ken 
Engel, sponsored by Joan's 
Country Cupboard and the 
Covered Bridge Cafe will be work- 
ing near those establishments; 
and woodcarver Irv Marion will 
greet visitors. The Farmside 
Country Store will have a working 
beehive on display, and will show 
how to use local honey in recipes. 
Red Oaks will.haVe a demonstra- 
tion of dried flower arranging on 
the porch from 1 to 4 p.m. 

The 1 p.m. Sunday country 
auction will be conducted by the 
Village Tavern's Chip Ullrich, well 
known for his auctions for 
Chicago area charities. The auc- 
tion will feature many items 
donated by Long Grove 
Merchants. Free musical enter- 
tainment will kick off the after- 
noon, which will benent the 
Make a Wish Foundation. For 
more information call 634-0008. 



International Student Exchange of Iowa 

A nonprofit organization founded in 1 969, in Waterloo, to wa 

^very actively looking for more ILLINOIS families 
1$^ to host Foreign Teenage Ambassadors i^fe 
^^^ for the 1994-95 school year: ^f 

r~\ Families are eligible to host in all walks of life, with young children, 
*~^ teenagers or grown-up children, or without children. 

n Interested families provide room & board, love & care and a stable 
warm environment; select teenage boy or gjri and country of origin 
fArgentina, Brazil, Colombia, Gemiany, Hungary, Mexico, Russia, 
Spain, Ukraine). 

r| students speak sufficient English, will attend local high school, are fully 
insured, have their own pocket money. 

□ True jBwarding Inlercultural educational family sharing experience. 
24-hour support system. 

n Help ISE of IOWA celebrate 25 years of activity building thousands of 
• intemationa) lifelong friendships... 

Loving Sharing. GMna Carina, this is what lllindis families can do when 
hosting an ISE of IOWA student... Think of the rewards... V^ink of the 



student's iov when rocQivina your first letter of Wefcnma malting ypu at the 
ait voti and finally entering your home, your family , your life as a full-tJmB 
member, new son or daughter, brother or sister,. , 

Apply with no delay ; for information, catlNOW 1-800-356-9365. 









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I 



Auqiisrl?, 1994 UkEl 




islAKELIFE 



ml 






FY 1 . 



"The Foreigner* 

The Foreigner" mirrors 
our prejudices with rib-l!ck- 
Ijling humor and slap-stick fun 
at an Void; Georgia Inn. The 
PM&L production will be per* 
informed .ai... the Globe of 
Antloch 6n,0rchard Street. 
Performance dales arc sched- 
uled for Aug. 19, 20 and 21 at 8 
p.m. Matinees will be offered 
at 2:30 p.m. on Aug. 7, 14, and 
21. Tickets are priced at S9 
and S7.Call 395-3055 for further ticket 
information. 

Country 'Phantom' 

Marriott Lincolnshire theatre 
presents the "Phantom of the 
Country Palace." This hysterical 
musical takes you down-home to the 
capital of country music, where you'll 
witness the hilarious adventures of 
the Country Palace regulars as they 
prepare for their Country Music 
Extravaganza. Performances are 
Wednesdays at 2 and 8 p.m.; 
Thursdays and Fridays at 8 p.m.; 
Saturdays al 5:30 and 9 p.m.; and 
Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Tickets to 
all performances arc $3Z50. Senior 
citizens and students receive- $10 off 
the' regular tickctt price on Wedne- 
sday's 2 and B p.m. and Sunday's 2:30 
p.m. performances. "Phantom of the 
Country Palace" runs through Aug. 
21. Call 634-0200 for reservations. 

'An Occasional Impala' 

Stage Two presents "An 
Occasional Impala," a comedy by 
George Savage Jr., which plays in- 
rcpcrtory with "Artificial Intelligence" 
and "The Progressives." Suggested for 
mature audiences, . performance 
dates are Aug. 18, 20 and 27. Times 
are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, B^ 'p.m. 
Fridays and Saturdays; and 
Saturday/Sunday matinees at 3 p.ru 
Admission is $10 for adults and $8 
students, seniors and military. Ticket 
packages for the entire summer 
repertory arc available at a discount, 
with three shows for $25 adults and 
$21 for seniors, students and military. 
Call 662-7088 for reservations. 

'Best of Second City" 

"The Best of Second City," a com- 
pilation of scenes and songs from the 
best of Second City's 34 years of 
material, will run through the end of 
the summer at The Second City 



Northwest, 1701 W. Golf Rd.,' Rolling 
Meadows, Show times are 8:30 p.m. 
Thursdays, 8 and 10:30 p.m. Fridays 
and Saturdays, and 7 {}.nn Sundays. 
Ticket prices arc $10 on Thursday, 
Fridays and Sundays, and $12 on 
Saturdays. For reservations or further 
Information call 806-1555. 




"Fool F/)r,L6vc,"by Sam Shepard.- 
Thi^ production will be performed on 
Aug. 19 at 8 p.m., Aug. 20 at 5 and 8 

, p.m., Aug.' 21 aC2 p.m/Aug. 26 at 8 
p.m., Aug 27 at 5 and B p.m. and Aug. 
28 at 2 p.m. Ail performances will be 
held at the: Univ. "of Wisconsin - 
Parkside's Studio Theatre, at .the 
south end of the main campus com- 

; . plcx Admission Is $6. For Information 
and reservations cail (414)639-3481, 



For further information contact 
Sharon. Dhuyvetter, 234-0703 or 

MaggleHenncberry at 680-1116, " 



'From Branson to Broadway," east 
Larry Higgs,. Robb Edwardt and 
Mlk*Wllllamt. 



'Branson to Broadway* 

Marengo's Shady Lane Theatre 
welcomes "Frotn- Branson to 
Broadway" running through Sept. 30. 
Company member- Robb Edwards 
and producer Mike Williamson Join 
Lany Higgs on stage for unique vocal 
harmonics that make "From Branson 
to Broadway," a great musical to 
catch this season every Friday and 
Saturday. Every Sunday at 3 p.m. a 
different show is performed, "The 
Sunday Showcase," with Williamson 
arid special guests. Dinner and the- • 
atcr packages are $32.&0, show only Is 
$15. For further ticket information 
call (815)568-7218. Shady Une is 
located just west of Marengo, Hi. on 
Hwy.20. 

'Fool For Love' 

Upstart Theatre Co., a summer 
community theatre group, Is prcpairr 
ing its second show of the season, 



YoiingVhtuosl 

-The Young Virtuosi 
Competition, to take place 
Aug. 25 and 27 during the 
Elgin Fine Arts .Festival, will 
welcome 60 young musicians 
who will perform for cash 
prizes and a chance to appear 
as guest artists with the Elgin 
Symphony Orchestra during 
the orchestra's regular sea- 
son. The competition, pre- 
sented by the Elgin 
Symphony Family Board/ Is' spon- 
sored by Mr. and Mrs. David C. 
McClintock of Barrington. Prelimi- 
nary performances for Division I (to 
age 12) and Division n (ages 12.to 16) 
will be held at Elgin Community 
College on Aug. 25 and 27, with the : 
top fWc finalists in each division com- 
peting for prizes at Hcmmens 
Auditorium oh Aug. 27, beginning at 
2:30 p.ra This event is free and open 
to the public. For further Information 
call Edie Fltts at 888-7389. 

Voices In Harmony 

Women who, enjoy singing are 
invited to attend a rehearsal of Voices 
in. Harmony, a women's barbershop 
chorus. In an attempt to make the fun 
of singing accessible to more women, 
the chorus has changed Its meeting 
location. Rehearsals are now held 
every Mqnday night at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Faith Lutheran Church, Rte. 41 
and Dcerpath Road in Lake Forest. 




:Sbt Flags Great America wel- 
comes several of country music's 
hottest acts during Country Music 
Festival at the Six Flags Grandstand 
on Saturday and Sunday, SepL 3 and 
4. Concerts are free of charge to ail 
park guests. David Bali will kick off 
. the festival on Saturday at 6 p.m. At 8 
p.m. .The Mavericks. . On Sunday 
music sensation Hal Kctchurn at 7 
. p.m. For further details call 249-2133, 

exteioo. 

Music test 

The Elgin Fine Arts Festival, 
scheduled for Aug. 28 and 29 In the 
downtown Elgin Civic Center Plaza, 



will feature two days of tionstop free 
cntcrtalnmenL Bermuda triangle will 
set the mood with Caribbean rnusic 
on the P[aza beginning at 10:30 ,a.ni 
on Saturday, followed by the colorful- 
ly clad women of Samana.; ,. , > . 

'The cHautauqua Ensemble, a 
(Ivc-piccc contemporary. Jazz; group, 
takes the stage at 1 p.m., with thcjr 
original music inspired by the tiadi- ' 
tions of Africa, Europe,* North and 
South America, Asia, and the Middle 
East At 2 p.m. on Saturday, Special 
Consesus will perform, a four-person 
acoustic bluegrass band. They will be 
followed by the Elgin Symphony 
Orchestra Wind Ensemble at 3 p.m. 
and the Univ. of Iowa Double Reed 
Ensemble at 4 p.ni 

The Elgin Community College 
Jazz Ensemble will perform at 5 p.m, 
followed by Louie BcIIson and his 
band at 6:30 p.m. Sunday entertain- 
ing begins on the Plaza with the Elgin 
Co nununity College Steel Drum Band 
at 10:30 a.m. Performances move to 
the Entertainment Tent at noon with * 
Elgin Children's Choms, followed by 
the Elgin Symphony Orchestra Joplln 
Ensemble at 1 p.m. Mr. Taps add a 
twist at 2 p.nL, followed by the Elgin 
Symphony Orchestra Brass Ensemble 
at 3 p.m. For a complete listing of 
events cail 931-5613. 
See FY1 page B12 






*•••***•**** 



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The Truth About Airfare Wars 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

You may remember the "fare waf of June of 1992 when the lowest price on a 
ticket to almost anywhere really was cut in half. 

Well, ttiat was the last real fare war. What we have today are airfare sales. 

These sales do offer some good deals. If s the, shall we say "creative" way in 
which the airilnes are allowed to advertise, which can be very misleading. 

Last week TWA promoted a Two-for-One" sale (which all other airlines 
matched). The lowest round trip fare on TWA to Oriando was about $232.00 per 
person.. Seems logical that on a Two-for-One" sale two people should fly for 
$232.00. Thaf 8 not the way the atrtines figure prices. 

You see airlines have six or more fares to choose from on every flight, each 
with different niles, restrictions and costs. In the above case TWA picked a fare 
with a round trip cost of $436.00 on which to base their two-for-one sale. To that 
you stilt have to add $12.00 ai»port tax on the free ticket bringing the total to 
$448.00 for two people. . , 

Compare that to purchasing two regular excursion fare tickets at $232.00 each 
and you've got a total savings of only $16.00 for the two tickets, not $232.00. 

This week most atrtines are promoting a so called 1/2 price sale (started by 

Continental). . 
Again a fiigher fare was chosen to compute the reduced pnco. ' 

Since we altea^ know the pre-sale lowest price to Orlando was about 
$232.00, then the sale fare should be around $112.50. Instead we're looking at 
an airfare sale price of around $165.00, 

Thaf s a substantial savings of $67.00, but hot 1/2 price. . 

Keep in mind that there are many mles (flying on certain days of the week, 
blackout dates, a Saturday night stay, etc.). that affect prices. 

The main reason why you may not gat that low price, though, is very few seats 
on each flight are actually sold al the lowest fare. In fact, an airiine only has to sell 
one seat on a flight at the sale price to be able to advertise it. 

Again, there are some great airfares out there. Just don't be misled by airiine 
advertising. 



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LAKEUFE UkcUNd Newspapers Auqusr 19^1994 



r- 

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F.Y.I. 



Entrants sought for gumbo cook-off 



^^ 



^^'' 



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From page Bll 

Dance classes 

, Danccnicr North rcgistra- 
llon has begun Tor the fall 
semester which runs from 
ScpL 8 through (he end of 
fanuaiy 1995. Classes Include 
a Tull range of ballet tech- 

Qnlquc from preschool basics 
for children to advanced 
pointc for junior hl^ throu^ 
adults. The Jazz program has 
expanded with a new 
advanced class taught by Jazz 
masters from the area. The tap pro- 
gram has grovkm with more classes for 
children from first grade through 
adults. For further Informallon or a 
brochure, call 367-7970. 

Line dance lessons 

Country Western line dance 
lessons will be held starting Monday, 
SepL IZ The classes meet for eight 
weeks from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at First 
United Methodist Church, 128 N. 
Utica St, Waulccgan. Call Liz or Bob 
Wilson at 623-6422 to register or for 
information. 



Ladn heritage 

Figurative paintings by 
Chicago artists Mario Castillo, 
Oscar Luis Martinez and 
Michclc Tuohcy will be fea- 
tured in the College of Lake 
County's exhibit "Transfor- 
mation of the Modern 
Figure/ The exhibit will open 



with a reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 
26 In the Community Gallery of Art at 
CLC, 19351 W. Washington St, 
Grayslake. The display will continue 
through Sept 25. Gallery hours arc B 
'a;tn. to 10 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, 9 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 5 
p.m Sunday. For mure Information 
call 223-6601, cxt 2240. 




Anyone whocvci^s drcamctl of 
having a world-famous chef taste 
their culinary creations should 
enter the Chef Cuisine Gumbo 
Cook-Off. The grand winners of 
that cooking contest will be cho- 
sen by none other than Chef Paul 
Prudhommc, the Cajun Chef. 

Sponsored by the 14th Annual 
Chef Cuisine Benefit of the 
Victory Hospital Foundation, the 
cook-off will av^d *winners in 
two categories — professional 
chefs and amateur chefs. The ini- 



tial judging will be by the Club 
ChefjJ of America. Five profes- 
sional chef finulists and eight 
amateur chef finalists will be cho- 
sen. They will each receive two 
free tickets to the I4th Annual 
Chef Cuisine Benefit (a $50 
value). 

The final judging will take 
place at the benefit on Sunday, 
Sept. 18 atMidlanc Country Club, 
14565 Yorkhousc 'RU., Wads- 
worth. Chef Prudhommc will 
choose one grand winner from 



each category. Each winner will 
be awarded a fraihcd Giimbo 
Chef certificate and a Gumbo 
Cook-Off trophy. 

There is a $15 entry fee for this 
competition. The deadline for 
entering is Monday, Aug. 29. 

To receive an entry black and 
more information, call Laurie 
Stone, Victory Development 
Dcpt. at 360-3000, ext. 5665, 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.* 
Monday through'Priday. 



Bowen Park Theatre Company announces season 




Alico and the Queen of Hearts 

'Fabulous 505' 

Stay Tooncd Gallery will premier 
over 100 never before seen original 
Walt Disney Studio artworks from the 
1950s at their Barringion location on 
Friday, Aug. 26 from G to 9 p.m. A 
champagne reception for the pre- 
miere will take place at Stay Tooned 
Gallery at Woodbridgc Square, 220 S. 
Cook Sl, Harrington. Admission to. 
the premier Is free, invitations to the 
premier can be obtained by calling 
382-2357. Additional informallon on 
the cxiilbit can be obtained by call Ing 
Jim or. Tracy Lentz at 3B2-2357. The 
exhibit will run in all , three Stay 
Tooned Galleries through Oct 15. 



The Bowen Park Thrcatrc 
Company proudly announces Its 
ninth season. Tlic thrce-pIay sub- 
scription scries will include 
Anthony Shaffer's mystery 
"Sleuth," Athol Fugard's powerful 
drama "Bocsman and Lena," and 
Alan Ayckbourn's comedy "How 
the Other Half Loves." The sea- 
son runs from September 
through June and tickets arc now 
selling at the Jack Benny Center 
for the Arts inWaukcgan's Bowen 
Park just off N. Sheridan Rd. 



Individual ticket prices are 
$12 for adults and $10 for full- 
time students, senior citizens and 
military personnel. Season tickets 
arc substantially discounted at 
$30 for adults and $24 for stu- 
dents, seniors and military. 'Hie 
season package may be pur- 
chased in conjunction with the 
Bowen Park Opera season, which 
enhances the savings. The Bowen 
Park Opera productions will 
include Engelbcrt Humper- 
dinck's "Hansel and Gretel" and 



Bcdrich Snictana's "The Bartered 
Bride." 

The Bowen Park Theatre and 
Opera Companies arc fully pro- 
fessional, non-union companies. 
Tlic subscription series for the 
theatre company will feature 
three different directors, each 
vying for the position of artistic 
director. 

For more information, call 
the Jack Benny Center for the Arts 
at 360-4741. 




Lakeland Nev^spapors wants to tiear news of local sporting events, clubs, organl- 

zaflons, etc. Black and yrfilte ptiotos are also welcome. Please send news Items 

ClaudkiM.Lenart 30 S.Whitney, Grayslake, 60030 or call 223-8161. - ' 




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LIFE'S A BEAR 



DONNA ABEAR 





AuqusT '19^ 199,4 UkelANd Newspapers lAKELlFE^l? 



You're only as old as your birth certificate 



I might as, well confess — by the 
time this week's column is pub- 
lished,! will be 40. Forty. Forty. 
Forty. I have to keep saying It over 
and over again because I can't 
quite believe it 

, Mentally, r'yc been attempting 
to prepare for this birthday from 
the time I turned 39. Every so 
often, I'd practice saying, "I'm 
40." I'd roll it around on my 
tongue every so often, but each 
time I did I had this urge to lie 
and say "I'm 39." Or "I'm 35." Or 
anything but 40. VX. 

I'm hoping to get through the 
actual day without any of the 
usual huiniliattng 40th birtliday 
hoopla. Like signs in front of my 
house that start with, "Lordy, 
Lordy.,..." Please spare mc. There 
must be another word in the 
English language that rhymes 
with 40. And I've already put In 
for a vacation day from work so 
that I won't have to walk to my 



desk only to find black crepe 
paper, blaclc balloons arid bats 
strung all over, or a lovely gift 
wrapped Jar of wrinkle crcaih on 
my chair. Save your money— I 
don't have wrinkles, just lines of 
experience. 

In order to keep myself from 
being depressed by this particu- 
lar birthday, I have tried to find 
something good about it. I 
thought and thought, and 
thought Hmmm (that's the 
thinking sound). Something 
good about being 40. Hmmm. 
Hmmm. (Wait— I'm still think- 
ing.) Okay! I've got it Since I'm 
40, I guess that makes mc wise. 
I'll make alistof all the things I've 
learned now that I'm wise (not 
old— just wise). Be sure to have 
your teenagers read the list so 
that they can become wise at an 
earlier age (with their mind, not' 
just their mouth): 

1. Your parents really aren't 



stupid. 

2. The key to a happy marriage 
is making your husband watch 
the movie "Fatal Attraction". 

3. Money can't buy happi- 
*ncss— just politicians. 

4. Santa Glaus lives in Lake 
Forest 

5. Never give your teenage son 
$20 arid expect him to bring you 
the change. 

6. Elvis is dead. 

7. Someday, you will be as old 
as your parents (Just not at the 
same time). 

0. You're only as old as your 
birth certificate. 

There. Look at all the things 
I've learned now that I'm 40. 
Whew! All that knowledge makes 
me tired. Actually, that rocking'' 
chair over there looks pretty 
good. There. All comfy. Except ' 
now my shoulder hurts. 

Okay— who took the Ben Gay 
and foi^ot to put it back?!? 



Good Food 



■n:r.-1 



Taste of Austria with Tiroler Rotilade 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



Raglonal Editor . „;.. 

The Black Forest Chalet, fln40 N. Waukcgan Rd. In Morton v 
Grove is celebrating Austria through Aug. 20. Chef Schaidrcltcr- "::._ 
along with the Innsbruck Trio will provide the food, music and "^ 
hospitality of Innsbruck, Austria. To experience the true regional 
cuisine of Tyrol, Chef Schaidreitcr has created an authentic 
Austrian menu. One of the selections Is the following: 

Tiroler Roulade 

4 thin illces of Inside round of beef (center cut) 

1 medium sliced onion 

t medium dill pickle cut In 4 pieces 

4 pieces of bacon 

1 small carrot cut In equal slices 

raw sauerkraut 

1 tablespoonof mustard 

salt to taste 

pepper to taste 

Combine raw sauerkraut and 1/2 ofthe sliced onion and saute 
while mixing in the tablespoon of mustard. Pound out meat and 
season with salt and pepper. Place the bacon, cartots and pickles 
on top bif he meat and cover with sauerkraut mbcture. Roll the 
meat tightly and seal the ends. Add some water and place in the 
oven on medium heat until meat is tender. Makes four servings. 




5 b ack f- 

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Dr. Nina Neyman is proud to announce the addition 
of Dr. Lawrence Amato to her offices 



NINA NEYMAN, M.D. 

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Round Uke Beach, IL 60073 

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At K.H. Kim's Tae Kwon Do m'. 
Libertyville, students learn more than just | 
Tae KwoD Do, T'ai Chi, Hapkldo and Hatha I 
Yoga, they can gain self-discipline and. 
improved mental and physical wellness. I 

"Tae Kwon Do is more than just learning I' 
how to kick and punch and break boards,"^ 
siad David Hatch, chief instructor at K.H.p| 
Kim's, "it is a complete self-defense system, 
Tae Kwon Do is a way of life. I'ts a way of 
training the mind and body so that you can 
be (he best you possible can." 

The study of martial am, particularly Tae^ 
Kwon Do, can improve nearly every aspect 
of one's life. 

"We see regular improvements in school 
grades, lessened career-related stress and 
better physical development," said Hatch 

"Martial arts, as they are taught generally | 
in the West, are taught from a "health club' ■ 
type of attitude, sort of an 'occasional* type ■ 
of altitude," Hatch said. "At K.H. Kim's, the | 
instruction is focused on the mental benefits 



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as well as the physical learning of martial 
art movements. We teach | 
the "art" at K.H. Kim's." ■ 

K.H. Kim offers Tae' 
Kwon Do classes for, 
students of all ages, 
beginning at age five. I 
Qasses axe also available 
In Hatha Yoga, Tai Chi| 
and Hapkido. 

For more information! 
about class times or the 
championships, call 
918-9322, or visit K.HJ 
Kim's at 1175 W. Park] 
Ave. (Route 176 and 
Butterficld Rd.}, in 
Libertyville. 









excluding prolessional tees. 
Save $30 on 2 pairs. 



k . ^ k 



r-^ STKTSOW • IHILO • VANDEIUULI 



j K.H. Kim's Tae Kwon Do of Libertyville [ 

1 1175 Park Ave. - Libertyville - Rt. 176 & Butterfleld Rd. i, 

918-9322 ' 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



CLIP & SAVE 



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' 1 • 



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LAKEUFE UkEtANd Newspapers AuqusT 19^1994 



Be TkERE 




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Visit Camp Ttmber-lee 

The Christian Singles group (ages 50 and up) Is composed or those who arc 
widowed, divorced, or iievcr married. The group is non-dcnominationa! and 
welcome visitors and new members any lime. Unless otherwise noted, the 
group meets, al Calvary Temple, 450 Keller Ave., Waukegan. On Saturday, Aug. 
20 at 3 p.m. the Christian Singles will meet atCalvaiy Temple for car-pooling to 
Camp Tlmbcr-lec for a steer and corn roast Entertainment following dinner 
will be by local artists. Tickets are SB.50. For reservations, call 244-1632. 



Ford has great presence in facing 'Danger' 






SuNd^y 



Hooved Animal Humane Society holds picnic 

The I toovcd Animal Humane Society will be holding Its annual picnic and 
meeting on Sunday, Aug. 21 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. al the society's rehabilitation 
farm In WoodstocJc. A horse parade, games, food, pony and wagon rides arc part 
of the fun of a day In the country. Come visit and pel some of the once abused 
animals who have been restored to health at the farm. Donation Is $2 for per- 
sons over 12. For information, call (815)337-5563. 



>M,yHm^'mm 



^^sill^^sliiii 



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Business executives offer counseling 

; Free counseling for small business owners and operators will be offered at 
the College of Lake County by representatives of the Service Corps of Retired 
Executives (SCORES). Counseling on business start-up, marketing, planning 
and financing will be offered fr9m 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mondays at CLC's Grayslake 
campus, 19351 W. Washington SL The service is ofTcrcd through the Illinois 
Small Business Development Center located at the Center for Economic 
Development at CLC. To make an appointment, call 223-3633. 









I \^' 




Woods and Wetlands to meet 

The Woods and Wetlands Group of the Illinois Chapter of the Sierra Club 
will hold Its monthly Swamp Squad meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 23 at 7:30 p.m. 
Meetings are held at the Central Baptist Children's Home on Rte. 83 in Lake 
Villa. All meetings arc open to the public. For more information call Bcrlt or 
John Massman at 838-9440. , 



For those of you who loved 
Alex Balwin's Jack Ryan In^Rcd 
October," and appreciated 
Harrison Ford's very different 
interpretation of Tom Clancy's 
agent of all agents, in "Patriot 
Games," the newest Ryan fUm 
adventure, "Clear and Present 
Danger," is a must. 

It's full of all the usual 
Ryanlsh intrigue, this time cen- 
tered on America's war against 
drugs. 

Ryan leaves his. analytical job 
with the CIA to become deputy 
director of intelligence) when 
asked by lames Eari Jones, who 
plays the ailing admiral holding 
that position. 

TTic title "Clear and Present 
Danger" comes from the 
American lavy that states that U. 
S. military power will not be com- 
mitted imless a "clear and prc' 
sent dangertb the national secu- 
rity" of the country exists. 

Ford soon beomes cognizant 
that our war against drugs is not 
succeeding and one of the rea- 
sons is because of a friend of the 
president's has a Columbian con- 
nection. The White House 
incumbent is played by Donald 
Moffat. 

There is a big mboip (how 
unusual in politics) when other 
presidential aids privately con- 
tract espionage expert Willem 
Dafdc to make the big military hit 



MoNtlily MEeriNqs 



Moms Club 

The Moms Club of Wauconda, a 
support group for al-home mothers, 
meets the second Thursday of each 
month al the Federated Church of 
Wauconda, 200 S. Darrlngton Rd. at 
9:30 a.m. For more information call 
526-4073. The Moms Club of Gumee 
meets the third Tuesday of every 
month. For more information call 
548-4016 or 263-7535. 

ChildServ 

The Lakie County Business 
Partnership Child-Carc Initiative is 
looking for responsible and nurturing 
adults to provide quality infant and 
toddler care in their home. By becom- 
ing part of this unique partnership 
you can receive many benefits includ- 
ing: running your own business, 
assistance with child referrals, and 
much more. For more information 
call Dena Thompson al ChildServ, 
263-2200. 

Tough Love 

Tough Love meets every Monday at 
7 p.m. at the Round Lake Area Park 
DisL Call 1(800)926-K1DS for further 
details. 



Home Bible studies 

The Apostolic Church of Liberty is 
offering free home Bible studies. Part 
of the United Pentecostal Church 
International, Bible studies cover 
from one simple lesson to lessons 
covering Genesis to Revelation chap- 
ters in the Bible. Church services arc 
held Sunday mornings and 
Wednesday evenings in Grayslake. 
Call 223-6813 or 526-7609 for further 
information. 



a 

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a 
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B 
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Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Le\A/is in \A/aukegan 



Air Conditioned 



£1 .50 all seats all shows 
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SAT. & SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:20 

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SAT. i SUN. 2:00-4:30-7:10.9:35 



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CROOKLYN (PQ13) 

FRI. & MON.-THURS. 3:10-7:20 
SAT. & SUN. 1:00-3:10-7:20 

THE CROW in) 

DAILY 5-.20-9:45 



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FRIDAY, AUGUST 19 THROUGH THURSDAY. AUGUST 25 I 


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(NO PASSES) 


PG 


DAILY 12:3O.a:35-4:5O<:55-9:05 


CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (DTS) 
(NO PASSES) 


pa-13 


DAILY 1:10-4:06-7:05-10:00 


FORREST GUMP (DTS) 

(NO PASSES) 


PQ-13 


DAILY 12:50.3:45-6:45-9:35 


IN THE ARMY NOW 


PQ 


DAILY l;IX>-3;05-5:05-7;20-9:25 


BLANKMAN 


PG-13 


DAILY 1:25-3:3a«:35.7l40-9:45 


THE MASK 


PQ-13 


DAILY 12:35-3:0O-S:20-7:3O-9:40 


UTTLE RASCALS 


PG 


DAILY 12:40-2:45^:45-€:50 


IT COULD HAPPEN TO VOU 


PG 


F & SU-TH 12:25-2:35-B:55-9:lD 
SAT 12:25.2:a5-9!lO 


THE CLIENT 


PG-13 


DAILY 4:35-9:00 


THE UON KING 


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TRUE LIES 

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Hypnosis Is The Answer 

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Miri 

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Appointment 

Call for 
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356-2670 or 
: 1-800- 
:310-2675 




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Certlflefd 
Hypnotherapist 



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Forrest Gump <FG-i3) 

(DlglUl) FRl-MON l:Q(Mi00-6:5Q-950; TUE 



tttp { 

S-TT4R 



4.00-6 50-950 (Dolby) DAILY 9 JO 



Tite Little Rascals (PC) (Stereo) 

FRI-MON 2:10-4:00-5:50-7:40; TUE-THR 4:00-550-7:40 



It Could Happen To You (PG> (Doiby> 



t20-/ 



FRI-MON l:O0-3:lO-5t2d-7:3O-9:40; TTJE-THR 5:20-7:30-9:40 



Clear and Present Dan, 

FRI-MON 1:00^:00-7:00-10:00; TUE 



er (PG-13) 

4:00-7:00-10:00 



Andre (rc) (Dolby) 
FRl-MON 1:20-3:20-5:20-7:20-9:20; TUE-THR 5; 20-7:20-9:20 



True Lies (R) (Dolby) 
FRI-MON 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00; TUE-THR 4:20-7:10-10:00 



The Lion King (G) (Dolby) 

FRI-MON 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00; TUE-THR 5:00-7:00-9:00 



The Client (FG) (Dolby) 

FRI, SUN. MON 2:a)-450-7:25-9:55; SAT 2:20-»:S0-955; TUE-THR 450-7:25-955 
Milk Money (PG-13) (Dolby) Sneak Preview Sat. 7:25 



Color ofNivht (R) (Dolby) 



gm 

'30; 



FRI-MON 2:00-4 J0-7;00-930; TUE-THR 430-7:00-9:30 



In the Army Notu (PG) 






FRl-MON 1:30-3 J0-530-7:45-955; TUE-THR 5^30-7:45-9:55 



TIte Mask (PG-13) 

FRI, SUN, MON 1:00-3:10-5:20-7:30-9:40; SAT 1:00-3:10-5:20-9:40; TUE-THR 5:20-730-9:40 
\ .'Corrina, Corrina (PG) (Dolby) Sneak Preview Sat 7:30 



Blankman (PG-13) (Dolby) 

FRI-MON 1:15-3;15.5;15-7:15-9:15; TUE-THR 5:15-7:15-9:15 




against Columbian drug lords 
without Ford's knowledge. 

The whole plot is reminis- 
cent of President Reagan, a cer- 
tain Virginia senatorial candi- 
date, and the contra rebels in 
South America. 

As in "Patriot Games," 
Ford's Ryan must place and use 
his patriotic efforts in the best 
interest of humanity, politics, 
etc. be damned! 

Tiic excitement flows realis- 
tically and smoothly for the first 
two-thirds of the film, tlicn Ford 
seems to surpass good sense and 
reason and head for the 
Columbian jungles after the big 
dmg kahunas. 

But this shouldn't surprise 
any red-blooded Clancy fan. 
Didn't Ryan go after a saboteur 
on a sinking Russian nuclear sul) 



in "October," and wasn't the con- 
clusion of "Games," with Ford 
dressed in a Broolcs Bros, suit, 
racing a boat in a storm after the 
evil ones, a little way out? 

Ann Archer continues her rote 
as Ryan's wife, Jones continues 
his Admiral's role from 
"October," and that endearing 
child, Thora Birch, plays Ryan's 
daughter again. AH of these bod- 
ing well for the picture's success. 

This PG-13 Clancy-Ford saga, 
doesn't rate the five stars that 
"Patriot Games," and "Red 
October" did, and maybe that's 
merely due to this reviewer's 
overexposure to this summer's 
action pbc influx. . 

It does get a 3.5 out of five- 
star-rating, well-worth the 
admission price. — by GLORIA 
DAVIS 



LAKE ZURICH THEATRES 708-5S0-0G00 



ROUTE 



., LAKE ZURICH 



■6 OO AC1UL H 



•3 00 CMILDRUN (llMrlni 



•3 00 MON FRI UNTIL 5 PM SAT A SUN UNTIL 2 30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 8/19/94 



COLOR OF NIQHT(R) 

BLANKMAN (PG13) • 

ANORE (PO) 

IN THE ARMY NOW (PG) 

THE LITTLE RASCALS (PQ) 

THEMASK(PQ13) 

IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU (PQ) 

CLEAR AND PRESENT OANQER (PQ13) 

TRUE LIES (R) 

FORREST QUMP (P013) 

THE LION KINQ (G) 



i:0O-a:4S-«: 

1:30-4:00-6: 

11:00-1:45^:15-6; 

1:10-3:35-6: 

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10:45-1:00-3:20-6; 

6; 

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12:45-3:30-6; 

12:30-3:20-6; 

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20.«:S( 

20-8:5C 

50-8:4S 

35-6:451 

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45-9: 1< 

35-9:1 5| 

1S-9:0C 

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SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31, CRYSTAL LAKE 

•5 00 ADUU TS • -3 00 CHILDREN (Unclot 1 ! i 
■3 00 MON -FRI UNTIL 6 PM SA T & SUN UNTIL 2 30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 8/19/94 



ANDRE (PG) 

CLEAR AND PRESENT DANQER (PQIS) 

THE LITTLE RASCALS (PQ) 

THE MASK (PGIS) 

TRUE LIES (R) 
FORREST QUMP (PG13) 
THE LION KiNQ (G) 



- 2:30-4:30-7:00.0:00 
'12:30-3:30-6:15-9:00 

1:30-3:15-5:00-7:00-9:00 

2:15-4:3O-6:4S-0:0S 

12:45-3:30-6:10-6:50 

12:30-3:20-6:05-9:00 

1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 



TTTTTTT I I I I I I I I I T T 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 8/19/94 

SHOWPLACE 8 -26 N. WILLIAMS STREET. CRYSTAL LAKE 
'5* Adults - '3'" Child (11 & Under) 815-455-1005 



BLANKMAN (PG13) 



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MON.-THURS. 7-B 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 378 LAKE ST., ANTIOCH 395-0216 



CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER {PG-13) 



•4« ADULTS •2« CHILD (1 1 & UNDER) •2* UlfflL 5 P.M. 

' Fn.fcSAT.-SUN.12:1M:t»4-« 
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LIBERTYVILLE 1 & 2 -70B N. MILWAUKEE. LIBERTYVILLE 362-301 1 



M.OO Adults ■ «2.00 Child (11 & Undof) •2.00 UnHI & p.m. 
ANGELS tN THE OUTFIELD (PG) .fhi.* s*t..sun. i:45-€:m mon-thurs. tw 

SPEED(R) FHI.»SAT,-SUN.1:tW;4M:1B*4S;MON..THURS.fct5-a:45 

'1.50 Adu«9 - M.SO Child {tl & Under) •2.00 Until 5 p.m. 

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*3.00 Adults -M.SOChild (11 & Under) 
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IAIRHEADS (PG13) FRI.&8AT.-8UN.4:1M:30i MON^THUrI: flw 

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■OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • BOX OFFICE OPENS 7:30 -"S" ADULTS - CHILD (1 1 & UNDER) FREE 

CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (PG1 3) starts 8:oo 
THE MASK fPGiai starts io:45 

^«. 2r«^I2.*«.llf.^'5;.'^" *°^^TS ■ ^^^ t< ^ * UNDER) FHEE" 

COLOR OF NIGHT (R) «# . - «« i 

THECUENT(PGi3) ,, .;; ; sS^'SiJSI 



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niiiibisiState Fair 

The Iltlhols Stale Fair will feature a weekend of auto racing on the 
World's fastest onc-mllc dirt track Aug. 20 and 21. The Tony 
Bcitehhauson Memorial True Value Hardware USAC Silver Crown scries 
will take place Saturday. Aug 20. The 100-mllc feature draws drivers 
from across tlie nation. The Pabsi Allen Crowe Memorial ARCA 100 
Stock Car Race takes place Sunday, Aug. 21. The 30 fastest qualifiers will 
race In the lOOr mile feature. Practice beiglns at 9:30 a.m. each day with 
time trails at 11 a.m. and races beginning at 12:15 p.m. For more Infor- 
mation call Bob Sargent at Macon Speedway, {217}764-3770, 

'Shining Through' 

TJie Lake County Urban League and the North Shore Music 
Academy arc sponsoring an urban musical entitled, "Shining Through." 
A first of Us kind for Lake County, llposlttvcly portrays the cultural 
socln/cconomlc differences of urban life. The first performance will be 
on Saturday, Aug. 20 at 7:30 p.m. at Waukegan East High School, Wlxom 
Auditorium at Jackson and Glenrock Streets, Waukegan. Advance ticket 
sales at $5 arc available at the LakcCpunty Urban League. Tickets at the 
doorwillbe$6.S0. Group discounts of 10 percent will be applied ■ 
towards the purchase of 25 or more tickets. 

Slo-Pokes Motorcycle Club 

The Slo-Pokes Motocross Club will be holding "open practice" at 
the former Maplehurst Cycle Park, 1 1006 Wllmot Rd., Spring Grove on 
Saturday, Aug. 20, Sept 17 and Oct is! The practice will be held from 8 
a.m. to 4 p.tTL and cost is S12. All riders must carry their own medical 
Insurance and full safety gear is required. Minor release forms must be 
completed on the premises by parent or legal guardian. For further 
information phone evenings at (615)675-2776 or (414)637-4388. 

Now appearing at Zanies 

Zanies Comedy Nitc^CIub, 230 Hawthorn Village Commons, Vernon 
Hills, presents Peter Berman, Peter Moor and Tim Baker through Aug. 
21. Appearing Aug. 23 to 2B will be Ken Sevara, Tony Boswcll and David 
Sparks. Cair549-6030 for reservations and further information. 

Racine In-Water Boat Show 

Lake Michigan's largest in-watcr boat show cruises into the 
Rccfpolnt Marina Aug. 16 to 21, bringing a one-stop shopping opportu- 
nity for area boaters to view, board and buy the newest and best models. 
Among the attractions will be: Family Day, Aug. 19, when kids 12 and 
under are admitted free when accompanied by their parents; free boat- 
ing workshops on Saturday and Sunday; free sailing lessons; radio con- 
trolled model boat races; and a vintage boat display. The show hours are 
noon to B p.ni. on Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission Is $6 for adults, S2 for children 6 to 
12. The show will be held at Rccfpolnt Marina No. 2, Christopher 
Columbus Causeway. Exit from 1-94 at Hwy. 20 cast and follow the Boat 
Show signs.Frcc parking and shuttle bus will be provided. 

Museum 'Star Watch* program . 

A public Star Watch program will be held on Friday. Aug. 26 at the 
Lake County Forest Preserves' Lake County Museum at 9 p.m., following 
the Lake County Astronomical Society meeting which begins at 7 p.m. 
Tlie program begins with an Indoor talk, followed by outdoor viewing. 
Telescopes will be set up for star observation by the Astronomical 
Society. All ages arc invited to attend. The fee Is S2 for adults and 75 
cents for students and children over 3 years, and Includes admission to 
the museum's exhllills. Reservations are not necessary. Call 526-7878 for 
details. 

'Sizzling Summer '94' 

Oyer 325 exhibitors will display and sell quality hand-crafted Items 
at "Slxzllng Summer '94," Lambs Farm's second annual summer art and 
craft show at Rosemorit Exposition Center on River Road, south of the 
Kennedy Expressway (1-90). Show hours are 10 a.ni to 8 p.m. Friday, 10 
a.m. to G p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $4 
for adults, children 12 and under admitted free. For further Information 
call 32G-B0B0. 

Model boat races 

Model Boat Races will be held at Lambs Farm on Saturday and 
Sunday, Aug. 27 and 28 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sponsored by the Minute 
Breakers Radio Control Model Boat Club, these high-speed races, fea- 
turing radio controlled hydroplanes and runabouts, arc the fall finale to 
the model boat season. Admission and parking arc free. Phone 362-4636 



Bright Horizons hosts unusual trip 



Bright Horizons, a not-for- 
profit resource and learning cen- 
ter in Muntlelcin, is hosting a 
special trip to the island of Malta 
this fall. 

"We are so excited about this," 
says Director Patty Pipia. "VJe arc 
going to do things that your aver- 
age tourist never gets to do." 

The program includes such 
features as limch'as guests in the 
home of a local family and exclu- 
sive visits to some of the island's 
6,000 year old temple sites. 

"Our original dream is to be at 
the temple of Mnajdra at dawn 
on the Equinox date of Sept. 23," 
says Pipia "The sun rises over the 
sea in exact relation to the temple 
positioning on, that day, pretty 
much the same way that It has 
since ancient times. We realljr, 
vi/ould like to tic that to the Bright 



Horizons concept of new begin- 
nings and spiritual growth." 

Pipia believes that the tiny 
island, located about 80 miles 
south of Si{:ily, has been a spiritu- 
al center since earliest times. 
Besides mcgolithic temples that 
predate the Egyptian pyramids, 
Malta today is home to 365 
churches. 

"The Maltese people have 
been known for their generosity 
and warmth since St. Paul wrote 
about his visit in 60 A.D. in the 
Bible. There's also so much histo- 
ry there," says Pipia. 

The tour leaves from Chicago 
via Swissair Sept. 21 to 30 and is 
open to interested people of all 
faiths. Details arc in a free 
brochure available from Bright 
. Horizons, 453 N. Lake St., Miin- 
dclcin; IL 60060; phone 949-4446. 





'Secret Garden' comes up a little short 



"The Secret Garden," a musi- 
cal by Lucy Simon from a book 
and lyrics by Marsha Norman, 
has taken root at the Pegasus 
Players' O'Rourkc Center for the 
Arts, at Chicago's Truman 
College. 

All the essentials in the recre- 
ation of the ciiildren's story by 
Frances Hodgson Burnett arc in 
place, under the direction of 
Victoria Busscrt, yet this produc- 
tion comes up shoit. ' 

Opening night, the production 
was plagued by a fussy sound sys- 
tem that rendered indecipher- 
able much of the output from the 
many fine singers in the 19-mem- 
bcrcast 

And the wobbly "brick wall" 
set dida't inspire confidence. 
Jeremy. Webb, as the feisty 
Dickon, had to hang on for dear 
life while performing "Winter's- 
on the Wing." 

Despite occasional bursts of 
inspiration, "The Secret Garden" 
limps from one dreary scene to 
the next as orphaned yotmg Mary 
Lennox (played by talented 
Bebccca Stevens) unravels the 
secrets of the estate of her sad 
Uncle Archibald Craven (Ted 




Tod Andonon and Cafolyn Stovons In *Tho Socrot Gardoh.* 



Anderson). 

Many "ghosts" inhabit this 
musical, the most appealing of 
whom is Lily, Craven's late 
lamented wife (played by Carolyn 
Stevens, Rebecca's real-life 
mother). 



"The Secret Garden" will mn- 
though Aug. 28. Ticket informa- 
tion is available at (312)271-2638. 

If they get some of the bugs 
out, "The Secret Gardeii" could 
really start to blossom.— Iljr TOM 
WITOM 



U.S. Navy Cruiser Sailors Assn. seeks new members 



The United States Navy Cruiser 
Sailors Assn. is seeking ncvy mem- 
bers. Membership is open to all 
ship's company, rnarine detach- 
ment, aviation division and flag 



personnel that served or are serv- 
ing aboard cruisers. Associate 
memberships arc available for 
past and present Navy men and, 
women, reservists, widows of 



cruiscrmen and interested indi- 
viduals. Contact Ronald 1. Macle- 
iowsld (U.S.S. Worcester CL-144), 
Secretary, U.S.N.C.SA, 55 Donna 
Terr., Taunton, MA 02780. 



SOME 

THINGS 

ARE 

IRRESISTABLE 




That includes our 
Certificate of Deposit Rates! 





ANNUAL 


TERM 


PERCENTAGE YIELD 


lyr. 


4.334% 


2yr. 


4.855% 


3 yr. 


5.378% 


4 yr. 


5.693% 


5yr. 


6.168% 



All deposits are insured to $100,000 by the National Share Insurance Fund; 
an Agency of the US, Government, 

With a minimum deposit of $1,000, our Certificates of Deposit are affordable to most 
everyone. Anyone can put some money away to save, but building financial security 
takes smart planning. Put yourself in control of your financial future by taking advantage 
of these irresislable rates, but act today, these rates are good now through August 31, 
1994. 



Warren-Newport 



CREDIT 
UNION 



Grayslake Location Gurnee Location 

Rtes. 120 & 45, Country Faire Plaza 1313 Skokie Hwy., Gurnee 

^ 223-0028 662-2050 ^ 

Full family membership is open to those who live or work in Warren, Newport ■ '' ' 
and Avon Townships and any employee of a school district in Lake County. : 






' ■'•''^•!jraV.'««^^»?*«-?^>;<^^ 



I.' -; 




'tAKEliFE UkEJANd NcwspApERs Auqusr 19,1994 



S 



1 

Dairy 
Queen 



«> 



CLIP AND SAVE 

DAIRY QUEEN OF 
ANTIOCH 

DQ SOFT SERVE ITEMS- 

YOGURT - HOT FOOD 

HARD ICE CREAM - NOVELTIES • 

SOFT DRINKS -CAKES, 

,. ,, « ■ PIES AND LOGS 

jiCocl Way To Send Flowers j3s^^^^^^\^ 

S900 f ^a^^PV 

OFF Any 10 or I IJuhiial^ 

Larger Cake. vL"^^^^ 

Expires 10/1/94 >j^ ^^ ^^rj 



2' 



Vbur Choice OfNon-Fat Frozen Yogurt Or 
DQ Soft Serve For All Products 

966 Main St., Antioch 
395-8383 




Contemporary Thai Dtnlr^g with a 
mouthwatering Thai Touch. 

— FOR LUNCH OR DINNER — 





OPENING! 



TiyH— 




You'H 
love 



3e7-1980 



or flSSII 

IJMrflllHMMmnilCMMMN 

01 TOOfVM nft SllHMn w^^Mnil DcMncti 

fflnMNfRU 



HaM.-ThuR. 

11;30-1Q00 

WASol. 

11;3O-10c3O 

Stn 12-ft30 





Waterfalls 

Dcfitflumnt • Banquets • Lounge • Dance Club 

24436 W. Rt. 173 • Antioch. IL 600O2 
708-395-2212 




sSg M^'sS I SUNDAY CHAMPACHEBRUNCH 

Etijoy After Dfntier Drinks In OnlytJB 

t. Our Lounge With MiisicFtvm *fl,98 Child 

ibe50's&60's,70's&80's MJS Hlghchilr / 

CLOSED MONDAYS 



®l (Mnhco i 





• • * I. 2 



Tin^ ItRltnn Cuisinr 




FRIDAYS 
AIIU 



All U want to Eat Crab Legs with Cod . . . 
DiMarco's Famous Fish Bake iaii ,.,oinqi . . . 

Early Bird Fish Fry (4 t p m coHer included) 

Lobster Tail with purchase of any entree 



OPCH: Tues.-Thurs. 5 p.m. • Frl-Sun. 4 p.m. • Closed Monday 

^ Banquets Available • Accepting Reservalions 

L' (708) 395-8883 * 883 Main St., Antioch, IL 



. .M6.95 
..Ml. 95 
. . .'8.95 
. . .^8.95 



Bring in this a. 

lof a Uee 
^ CanoHi 




Servlfig Dinner ■ 
Starting Itt 

5 |i.nL liies^ Wed, Thin 
4|i.m.Fii,S«LftSiiik 



■ FrL, Sat., Sun. 

PRIME RIB SPECIAL 

^9 SpeclalCut 1 1 



Reg. Cut 



Tues., Wed., Thurs. 
15% Senior Discount 

Evenings, Not Valid 

With Any Other Coupon 

Or Promo 



Eatiy Bird Specials 

A - 6 Fri.-Sun. 

AIl-You-Can-Eat Pasta Bars 
$7,95 - Fri. & Sat. 



LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 

Fri. & Sat Nite in Our Lounge 



Banquet Facilities for 10-300 people 

Meetings • Showers • Waddings •Golf Outings 

Call (708) 395-4800 

40150 N. Rte. 59, Antlocti. Open to tiie Public 



Where To 
EiiT Out 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 




RJ's a great place for 
food, fiin & friends 

RJ's Eatery, located on beautiful Sand Lake at 1913 
E. Grand Ave. in Lindenhurst, offers a fantastic view 
along with excellent service. Their atmosphere, along 
with the courteous and friendly staff, wlU.make your 
dining experience a memorable one, and keep you 
coming back for more. Another feature of RJ's is the 
Outback Bar, a great place to meet friends. 

The restaurant also boasts the "world's finest pizza" 
with your choice of homemade thin crust, double 
dccklcr, or pan pizza. Choose from a large selection of 
toppings that arc always fresh. Be adventurous and try 
one of RJ's Specialty Pizzas: Super Italian, AH Veggie, 
Mexican, Three-Cheese, or RJ's Special. Come in on 
Tuesday for all-you-can-eat pizza night 

Friday's fare includes the delicious all-you-can-eat 
fish. fry for only $6.95. That price also includes your 
choice of potato, soup or.salad bar. Saturdays are real- 
ly special with as many succulent Alaskan snow crab 
legs you can eat for only $1 6.95. 

Planning a wedding rehearsal, birthday party, 
shower, or special event? RJ's can accommodate 
groups up to 100 people. RJ's will give your event that 
special touch. 

You'll always find something you like at RJ's, 
whether it's thie 1/2 lb, burgers, delicious ribs, or mex- 
ican and Italian specialties. Kids even get their own 
menus to choose from, along with a game room. 

All items on RJ's menu is available for carry-out, 
also. And they even offer free delivery within the 
restaurant area. Call 356-2300. 

RJ's is open Monday through Thursday from 11 
a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 
Midnight, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 1 p.m. 




R]'s Eatery 

& Tho Ootback Bar 

World's Finest Pizza 

'Bring Tour Famiiy, 
Video Came Roam For Kids. 

Italian 4 Mexican Specialties • Ribs • Steaks 

•Breasted Chicken 

• Large Salad Bar • 1/2-lb. Burgers 

Dine On Our Patio Overloolcing Sarid Lake 



Friday Night 
Special 

ALL YOU CAN 
EAT FISH FRY 




Comes with your 

choice of potato, soup 

or salad bar 



Saturday Night 
Special 

ALL YOU CAN 
EAT CRAB LEGS 

$ j g95 

Comes with your 

choice of potato, soup 

or salad bar 



Visit life OuthdckBiMr^:^ 
3 TVs To Watch 
Yaur Favorite Sporting Events 

1913 E. Grand Ave. ♦Lindenhurst 
Phone 356-2300 

DIracllona: From I-B4, tak* Rta. 1 32 (Qrand Ava.) 

. Past Qurnaa Mllla. W*at 4 Milaa 
Opan Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.; Sal, 11 a.m.; Sun. a.m. 
DINl-IN ♦ CAfmV dUT ♦ FMII DiLIVEIfV 
DOUILE DICKSfl ♦ THIN CRUST ♦ PAN PIZZA 



\%i 



B 



TERRY'C 

Nencan Restaurant 



iNNOVAjiVE 

Gourmet Tex^Mex 
CuisiNE 



m 



•nn 



sws 



B8W:^ 



ifji 



DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS 

DiNiiNC Al Fresco! 

PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE! 



^•m 



'f'J V~5 i^f^^J 



ERRr 

MEXICAN 
RESTAURANT 

12f N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL 

ON THE HAWLEY COMMONS) CARRY'OUT 

. HOURS: MON.'Fn 11 AU'lOfM CjLJL OCm 

SAHIBOAY 12 NOON * 10 PM CLOSED SUNOMT #OOrT7 #V 



GREAT ALL-AMERICAN 
FOOD & FUN 




The Village Taiveia 

All You Can Eat Specials 

Served From 5 to 10 PM 
Tuesdays 

Meatloaf, Mashed Potatoes & Vegetables 
$6.50 



Wednesdays 

Chicken, French Fries & Coleslaw 
$6.25 

Thursdays 

BBQ Beef Ribs & French Fries 
$6.95 . 

Fridays 

^. Our Famous Fish Fry All Day 
With French Fries & Coleslaw 



An Served With Homemade Bread 



Whether you're on your own, with a date, family or 
friends, The Village Tavern Is always a great time! 

There's Always Fun & Entertainment 

Old McHenry Road in Long Grove 

(708) 634-3117 • 

All major credit cards accept^,. 



d 



Atfqu»T 1 f, 1 994 UkM NewspApEis IAKEUPe|| 





Where To 

AT CillT 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 




^/2 Off Any Sandwich] 

I Witb Purchase Of Medium i 
Fries fr Medium Drink j 

ri I ai;-! p.m. TQes.-Friday only. Expires 9/1 5/941j 



Any M 2 Order 'm 

ml a.n.-Ip.m.TQes.-Friday only. Expires 9/1 5/941j 

799 Belvidere Rd. 303 Rollins Rd. 
Graysiake Round Lake Beach 

223-4663 546-4674 

38 W.Grand 

finside Yacbf-Seasl 

Fox Lake 



587-4674 



Sammie's affeirs friendly 
service & fantastic food 

since 1972, Sammle's has been offering their 
customers dcticlous food. yVliat has become a fam- 
ily tradition that started in Chicago by brothers Sam 
and Joe Guinta has expanded into Graysiake and 
Rouhd.Lakc Beach. And Sammle's also has a new 
location in Round Dcach, which is owned and oper- 
ated by Dave Keith." Although Dave is not a family • 
member, he's certainly treated tike one, 

Sammle's takes pride in the quality of the food 
they serve and dcnnitcly don't take fast food for 
granted. It might be fast, but you always know it's 
golng.to be delicious. Some of the items on the 
menu include Italian Beef, Italian Sausage, . meat- 
ball, steak, and cither fried or grilled chicken sand- 
wiches. Sammle's also offers every kind of hot dog 
from Chicago style to Jumbo Polish, and of course, 
their famous Sambuigers. Sammle's in Fox Lake fea- 
tures pizza wliilc gyros arc,a popular item at the 
Round Lake location. ! '■ 

Sammle's also is health-conscious and offers a 
"lite"- menu' featuring grilled chicken breast and 
turkeysandwlchcs, garden salad, and grilled chick- 
en salad. Also on hand arc the traditional side items 
like french fries and onion rings, among others, and 
a hill line of beverages to choose from. 

If your taste buds need a treat, visit Sanimle's, 
located at 799 Belvidere Road In Graysiake,. 303 
Rollins Rd. in Round Lake Beach, or 38 W. Grand 
(inside Yacht-Seas Bar) in Fox I^c. ^_— --r: 






., •rt-*^" 



^^^ 



*^... 






rmMs^i 



llt^^^^^im 






EESTAURANnr 

&: 

LOUNGE 




OPEN DAILY 
.10:00 AM; :,. 

-M,-*5w. Open 7Mt ;^ 

^^^mmasECTioNHwv.iii) 
PPhone 689-9062 
Now Serving Brmlg'a^Saturday 7:00 a,nu 



Huge Lunch Buffet Mon.-Frl. 1 1 ain-3 pm 

Sunday Brunch - Large Selection 

LUNCH A DINNER SPECIAI^, ailLDREN'S MENU AVAIURLE 



GREAT FOOD - REASONABLE PRICES - 

NICE ATMOSPHERE 

Steaks, Prime Rib, Hickory Smoked BBQ Specials, 
Lobster, Crab Legs, Seafood, Sandwiches 



TsEAT Yom FamiiyAnd Your I^mos Jdmm Bring Them To; 



Daily 
Dinner Specicils 



SERVED TUESDAY -SUNDAY (Except Saturdays) 

August23-28 . $Q Qff 

Baked Boston Scrod Dcjongc ......... >r,^iJ 

Breast of Chicken Vessuvio XU»"3 

Lamb Kabob ^11.95 

Vcal Micanaisc X^»V^ 

BBQ Back Ribs ... 13«95 

tadudei Our Lazy Susan RelUh Tiay. Salad, PoUlo, VcBclable, Dcverage A Dessert. 
Cojual attire, moderately phced. ty reservation, charge cards aceepied. 




Cwci ouT dirdng lit the Wnley Start Catnlnf Etlali 

Rts. 120 & 45 - Gray.slakc • (708) 223-0121 
Your Hosts, Bill and Kris Govas 



[XXZ I 

Htiea N> 

Halt JT 



SanJLuis 

Mexican Restaurant &> 'Bar' 




■50 s. Green Boy Rd : 
Green Boy Rd. & Washington St. . - 
' Waukegan 

■ Fa]ltas,Comblnapon Dinners, 
ChMchangas, Tacos & Morel 




I Buy One Ifi#rce» Gc# Second . 1 
! 1 /a OW Of Fourth One fM gy I 

I . Dining Alone? 1 

j Have m drtnfc on Mie fieus« wllfc mntn; j 

iJlecBe [xeient coupon. One pel tobte. Not vdW on buffet, wme ex lettot vokjo J 

Operi 1 1 am-1 1 pm, Sun.-Thurs.; 1 1 am-lpm, Fri & Sat. 





YAN'S HUNAN INN 



Chinese Restauicint & Lounge 




SERVING LUNCH & DINNER 



LUNGHBUFFET 

Wednesdays & Fridays 



1 00 .\. Milwaukee Ave. 
U[)erl>^ille, IL 
708/8]H-69aH 



I DAYS A 
WEEK 



P2 
jkeluirsl Huml 



(:;irr\"ni!tS|H' 



Waukej^an. IL 
70a/.l73-!(iH0 





Sunday • Roast Chicken • 'aos 

Monday - New York SI rip & 

Grilled Shrlinp-'t0.95 

Tuesday -CLOSED 

Wednesday • Fried Walleye Pike: 

An-You-Can-Eal •9.95 

i\(ers !f!fstaurant, fRguulTB, 'Wauconda, IL 

(708)526^905 

^ouJQuno lis :.. We're. Uvfer s 



Tliursday - Prime Rib - •9.95 
Friday • Perch Piatten 
AH-You-Can-Eai "e-SO 
Saturday - BBQ Ribs: 
All-You-Can-Eal '8.95 





Take A 
Sweet, Lite 
Bite of Life! 

Enpy OUT Fanttuttc 

SOUP & SALAD BAR 

Tues.-FrL Lunch »355 

Dlimcn & Weekends ...... .'530 



Our Full Buffet Features 

Over 80 Food Items 

Tues.-Fii. Lunch •S.SO 

Tucs.-Fri. Dinner ."Z-SO 

Sat. & Sun. Brunch 

& Dinner : . .'9,50 




BeAn Early Bird 

ScSave! 

Full Lunch Buffet . . .Only '4.75 

Tlia.-fllll.ll!jOMM. 

Full Dinner DuHct . . .Only '6.50 



^U^ POLISH AUEIWANIUFFET 



Closed 
Monday 



217. NO. ROUTE 31, McHENRY {1 MILE SO. OF RTE. 120) 
(815)344-0330 




THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 



#• 



#^ 



6^iIiiUT aiiocib 



i'][iniiU* 










'Located In btautifuldottntoim GUmti* ■ 

438-0300 

FRIDAY a£SrRIBS 

FISH FRY "A FAMILY IN TOWN 

RESTAURANT" 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

Lunch & Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices _ ^ 




Gilmer & Midlothian Roads • Mundelein,DliBois 60060 



J— ebetvmss 

inn 



Banquet Facilities 6 Catering Avadabte 

Call 708-367-9696 • i=ax (708) 362-0899 

Sunday-Monday Closed * Tuesday-Saturday Luncti & Dinner 

411 East Parh Ave, UbertyvlBe on Rt 176Just east of Milwaukee Ave. 

The Worid's Icsl SlMki llack Ansm Strip Sttak, 
...■roikd, Siiiothcrtd wHh Onions (IB ex.) *98** 

;PAtJ^ vviffi AtoHrobfn 6 Bocotu!.,! $13i95 

-^'Sattfe^^VVienerscfaiteel^ ---'-,'; ■ - " - p ■ ", -,^1195/: 
: Roasted long Iskmd buckling y/ith pii im $lZ-50 ; 

r FffCSH SfiAfOOO OAliyi 

|:-:;::;:/":k:: ;;-.;_:. Evwy Friday Night 1^ 



iiHS;-:it^trS2^::^iiv^*-----*r ■ 






-it 




TIAKEUFE UkdANt! Newspapers Auqusr 19,19?4 







ACROSS 

1 -After rl>c. 

-"(ploy) 
5 Ninny 
8 Soul li west 

wind 
12 Lotion - 

ingredient 
13Diii« — 

(imfoir blonic) 
14Clm)1cnge 
15 Poker, for one 
nOolaicn's 

beloved 

18 Slight (race . 

19 Suinniory 
21 Jane Atistcn 

novel 

24 Pari of a niin. 

25 Dairy nniniais 
28 Ilnlion wine 

center 
30 Ship's stem 

33 Swiss canton 

34 Monetary 
penalties 

35 Enrly car 

36 Clniin 

37 Dill weed 

38 Carpenter's 
tool 

39 Monttng 
moisture 

41 Paper (quantity 
43 Found tn 
pralines 
46GanKorc]mt\cc 

50 Jcwisii nionili 

51 Asset held 
in reserve 

54 Sen swallow 

55 Yoko — 

56 Revelers'- cry 




57 — orihccanh 

58 Network 

59 Stiiciies 
. DOWN 

I Datum 
2Jai — 

3 lie reft, once 

4 Rocky shelves 

5 Constellation 

6 Fictional 
Spudc 

7 Hniitcncd 

8 Moxiiu 

9 King, cpiucn 
or jack 

10 Arcs' sister 

II Take five 



16 King sparkler 
20 l:i;:y))tinn 
goddess 

22 Syllable 
with line 

23 He was "Lou 
Grant" 

25 living — 

26 Money of 
account 

27 Deuce or 
joker 

29 Head, in 
. France 

3 1 Turkish cap 

32 Nail or dance 
34 Flutter 

servilely 



38 Church 

vestments 
40 Merits 

42 — Vigoda 

43 — dc fotc 
gras 

44 Paradise 

45 Pur on 
display 

47 Wheel hub 

48 Flourish 

49 Pindaric 
, works 

52 "My — and 
Only" - 

53 TciH>is stroke 



sees Bji)«: wwii?] 
sea BeciiiB u^^ta 



•y.-y.-yA 
yy.<<-'A: 





ARIES (March 21 lo April 19) A 
touchy friend may need handling 
with kid gloves. Ypu may be receiv- 
ing a commission or bonus soon. 
Consult with advisers about the best 
way to invest newly acquired funds. 
Weekend travel wil1:lead to new 
friendships. 

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 
Partners arc loving and supportive 
but a disappointment could arise in 
connection with a friendship. A 
breakthrough about a business con- 
cern comes through later in the week. 
You may receive financinl assistance 
from a relative. 

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) 
Even though you may have to deal 
with some sensitive egos, you will 
still make important business strides 
this week. Later on, though, it*5 best 
to follow a partner's lead. Use your 
charm to negotiate agreements with 
family members. 

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) 
You'll take the bull by the horns and 
what was a worry will turn into a 
business triumph. You'll know just 
how to cope with a partner's moods 
to insure good times. An assignment 
comes thai will be truly enjoyable for 
you and utilize your talents. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A 
loved one needs exlrn rca.'ksttrnncus 
now. Take some \\\\\c out for your- 
self in order to relax and unwittd. 
Certoin business concerns can wail 
for now. You'll make better 
decisions if you just step buck n bit 
and gain perspective. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) A co-worker may be out of sorts. 
However, on the home front, you'll 
quickly Hud a solution to a domestic 
concern. Someone close to you 
needs a favor but examine this before 
readily agreeing. It coiild be more 
than you bargained for. 

LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) It's important to find the proper 
balance between work and play this 
week. A problem won't seem so dif- 
. ficult after you take a break. You 
may have been pushing yourself loo 
hard. 




SCORinO (October 23 lo 
November 21) Tlierc's no sense in 
spending money on an cnlertali *ncnt 
that you probably won't enjoy, :cn 
though a friend is pushing: hard. i^r 
your participation. Home-based ac- 
tivities nre your best bet, for happy 
times. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) You niay be in the 
doldruins for a while, but the latter 
part of the week brings a surge of 
energy and renewed self-confidence. 
You may face extra duties in connec- 
tion with family. You rch arm works 
to your advantage this week. 

CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) A solution is finally, 
found, for a problem that had you 
|K:rpIcxcd. It's :i wonderfiij week for" 
milking itnponniil photic ctill.s' and ' 
winning others over id your |>oitU of 
view. Take advattiage of social in- 
vital ions ihis .weekend. However, 
watch your .spending. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Reading bci ween the . 
lines gives you the infonnalibn you 
need lo make your next business i 
move. Concern al)oui a tnoney malT 
icr needn't kee|) you awake nights. 
This weekend, visit with- some 
friends you've been ncglccling.ir. - 

PISCES (February 19 ijo March 
20) Allhougti it's not a good time for 
business confrontations, you'wtll; 
filill make valuable progress on tlic 
job this week. Be sure to follow 
through on this. Couples will find 
lime for each other now. Iriwardly; 
you're at peace. 

. OlOU't by l<ii)K Funluran Syiid, 



/. 



\ \' 



X 



H 



''WESPEClAUZElNAlARGEYmEnOF 
CONTINENTAL CUISINE FOR WNCH & DINNER'* 

GRAND PAUCE REUBEN •5.95 LUNCH 

RIGAnONI »7.95linch 

FILET MIGNON BROCHEHE '9.95 LUNCH 
CBICKEN OR SHRIMP STIR FRY »7.95 LUNCH 

CHICKEN FLORENTINE ^9.95 DINNER 

ORANGE ROUGHY * 41.95 DINNER 

STEAKS STARTING AT U0.95 DINNER 

PLUS DAILY SPECIALS! 

>f LuRches start at $4f*95 Dinners start at $5*95 
Chddren^s Menu starts at $0,95 

^ THE VERY BEST FOOD \t LOW PRICES! 



S ' -WE WELCOME ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS 



5S73;1I1^I GR^ AVE. GURNIEE 



(ONE APPETIZER PER CUSTOMER PER ENTRE^ SUN.-THURSy 
OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER - DAILY DINNER SPECIALS 

7 DAYS A WEEK • Our Chef Prepares All Food 



l'« 






FreS/) When Ordered. 



A«** 



tl'Fii 
1lun.-lOpjn. 

S^IMOpm. 



ontcnlldlhiuAti 1.31,94 





Uaititiinn&imtt 

RNl,lNyir<i 

witkeuturHiiilUu 

(SBflctiirfkwatir 

RL83) 
949-5550 








IIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIT 



VOTED BEST PAN PIZZA 
IN UKE COUNTY 

Family Dining 

7 Days A Week ^ 



Full Menu 



Full Bar 




Graduation Dinners 
Office Parties 
Reunions 
Birthdays * Showers 



Reserve Your Dates For That Sp«cial Event 
j Yj^^ ^Now! Loft. Accomodate^ao-lOO Guests t a ti 

Rt. 176, Lake Bluff 

17081 234-6660 



Lir'Noodles 




lUiim Amtrkan Dining 



Previously Red Noodle 



Open For Lunch 

Monday-Saturday 
nain-3:30pm 

Stop In For 

A Relaxing 

Delicious Lunch 

featuring. ^ 
Salads, Sandwiches, ' 
$195 pedals, Pasta, 
Pizza aTjd Salad Bar 






On Route 83Just Noilh of Rollins 
Round Lake Beach •; >■ 



■fty Our Broiled Chicken 



'Is 



Carry Out or Dine In 





AuqusT 1 9, 1 994 LaIceUncJ Newspapers AT HOHE HB 




^^^^X^^•>.• i>':: 



' ■''^^msmmw^i0-'ti^ 



eland 



■■i'; 



,'\ 






u 



Take a fresh look at vinyl siding 



The White House will ways be white, 
but It's In d shrinking minority. The safe, 
predictable "ohe-shade-flts-air white 
exterior siding chosen by Americans 
•eight out of 1 times Just a decade ago. 
Is selectedtoday less than half ttie time. 

Homeowners are rediscovering the 
power, of color to give their homes a 
uniquely personal stamp. Inside and 
out. And Increasingly, they're turrtng to 
today's vinyl siding to show their true 
colors on ttie outside. 

Nothing stxipes perception like ' 
color. Scleritlsts estlriKite that up to 60 
percent of our first . response to any " 
object Is based on Its color. Color 
affects how people see your home— 
tiow Wg or srriqll It looks, h»6w near or far 
from the' street. It appears. And your 
tiome's color affects how ottTer people 
see you— powerfully projecting your 
own Indlyldual personality. 

UiStll receritiy, though, homeowners 
WantJrig wide choices In colors had Just 
one ct^tee In finish— paint. But today's 
vinyl siding Is expanding those choices 
with a broader palette of colors, trims 
and flnbties ttiari.ever before, frorn del- 
icate pastels to deep, dark hues. • 

Newer premium sidings even offer 
the subtle color variations, texture orxd* 
grain of stalried cedar siding or natural 
cedar shakes. 

Meeting tlTe growing demand for 

. more color chok:es takes heavy doses 

of bott) science arxl art.. Gomblrtng 

pigment and plastic— especially In 



darker shade's— Is where the science 
comes In, rrvaklng darker colors look 
better and last longer. 

. Exterior color choices must also 
weather chdnglrjg fashions and 
tastes— which Is where the art comes In. 

Applylr»g the art of consurner 
research to \ help Industries— from 
apparel to graphic arts to automobiles 
to building products— spot cplor trends 
Is the Job of such organizations- as the 
1,400-member Color Marketirtg Group. 

What.are today's hot; /colors for 
homes7.The word from CMG research Is 
"rxatural." Reflecting greater environ- 
mental consciousness, greens and 
earth itones .are Increasingly popular. 
Regional colors— like |>each artd cream 
In the Southeast and tans In the j 
Southwest— are also gaining, while 
grays and blues remain perennial 
favorites. . -, 

But trendy colors that may look 
great on a dress or even a car can be 
too loud on something as big as a 
house. So ttie CMG also translates color 
selections Into more subdued versions, 
called "jet downs,' that are more sult- 
.abte for large or long-term applications 
like exterior paint and siding. 

With vinyl's traditional advantages 
of durability, easy maintenance and 
qffordablllty, today's vinyl siding offers a 
combination of fashlonabiilty and prac- 
ticality that has more and more home- 
owners taking a second look— and 
making it their first choice. 



rrs TIME TO prrcH iwr 

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Window Treatments 
Decorator Fabrics 
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liili^i 



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Whether buying or selling, you face major 
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You want responsive, experienced professionals 
applying the latest tools and techniques in the 
business. 

You deserve the best. 




Debbie Christcnscn 

Broker/Owner 

336-2600 



RE^KK^ Heritage 

4641 Grand Avenue 
Gumee.IL 60031 v •. 



r^ ■',.!- 




Eric L Babat 

Mortgage Broker 
Pager 379-4403 



Covenant Mortgage Corporation 

1641 N. Milwaukee Avenue 
Libertyville, IL 60048 ;.. 



.•■-^ \ ■ y ..'• i 






I > ' » 



f ^ 4 * 



^K*mM\9»A'*- r-M J ^^.. * • * t * 



,^u »» ji»-j> ■ n »> I ■ i m w^ 1 ••»j •. t K • 



Ki>,if.*y*i',ii;jr* 







:HEALTHWATCH UkElANd NcwspApcRS AuqusT 19,1994 



^ 



■•X 



Nurse assistant 
program 

Registration is open ; 
Ifor College of Lake V 
Gounty's seven-week 
Basic Nurse Assistant 
Training program begin- 
jiirigAug..22. Approved by 
tiic Illinois Dcpt. of Public 1; 
Health, the program will 
prepare students for 
employment In lorig-term ' 
care facilities, including 
hospitals and nursing ^ 

■'JlOmCS.;--;,.;^';"-.;:': - -/;.:•■:>..•:':—- 

; Classes will be offered^ 
. from 8 a^m. to nooii y ^ ■^f^ . : 
Monday through Friday at ; 
CLC's Grayslakc campus, . : 
lSf351W: Washington St, 
; and at Lakeshorc Campus, 
111 N. Genesee, y 
Waukegan. Ah evening 
class will be offered from 5" 
to 10 p.m. Monday 
through Thursday at the 
Grayslake campus. 
Clinical training will be 
provided at Lake County '- 
nursing homes. Applicants 
must speak English, have '^' 
an eighth-grade reading '. <^ 
lever and pass a reading ' T' 
placement test For regis-,:;" 
tration ihformationi call r 
223-6601, ext 2340. 



EHS Good Shepherd Hospital recognized for quality 



Vtc F()R\ Ml Moiiixl 
HospiiA 






Victbr| Fouridatibh 
gpibocookroff 

• If you have ever "; > ; 
dreamed of haying a ' ; ; 
world-famous chef taste 
your culinary creations, 
enter the Chef Cuisine ■ 
Gumbo Cook-Off. The 
grand winners of the 
cooking contest will be - ^ 
chosen by none other thari 
Chef Paul Prudhomme, 
the Cajun Chef. 

Sponsored by the 14th 
Annual Chef Cuisine 
Benefit of the Victory 
Hospital Foundation, the 
cook-off will award win- 
Jners in two categories- 
professional chefs and 
amateur chefs. The initial 
judging will be by the Club 

■Reliefs of America. Five , 
professional chef finalists 
and eight amateur chief 
finalists will b'e'choscril 

; 'They will each receive two , 
"firec' tickets to the 1 4th: 

( ;^nhual Chef Cuisine^^ V : 

-• Benefit (a $50 value). ;; 
The finial judging will 
tiakc place at the benefit 
V on Sunday, Sept. 18, at 
K Midlane Country Club, 

14565 Yorkhouse Rd., \ ^ 
: -Wadswdrth, Chef 
^ Priidhonime will choose 
• 'one grand winner from 
each category. Each win- 
ner will be awarded a 
framed Gumbo Chef cer- 
: "tificate and a Giimbo 
: Cook-Off trophy. 

There.is a $15 entry ^ 
'.' fee for this competition; i 
The deadline for entering 
is Monday, Aug. 29, To 
receive an entry blank and 
/more information, call 
, Laurie Stone, Victory 
Development Dept., at 
360-3000, ext 5665, 
between 9 a.m. and 5 
p.m., Monday through 
Friday.' 



The 1994 Commitment to 
Quality Award, sponsored by The 
Healthcare Forum, was present- 
ed to EHS Health Care, of Oak 
Brook, which owns five Chicago- 
area hospitals Including EHS 
Good Shepherd Hospital, 
Barrington. 

The award Is the health care 
Industry's most prestigious quali- 
ty honor. EHS Health Care was 
recognized for its Continuous 
Quality Improvement (CQl) 
efforts that draw upon the talents 
and input of employees and 
physicians to identify ways to 
improve patient outcomes and 
efficiently use resources. At EHS 
Health Care, CQI hiitiatives saved 
$38.5 mlUlon in 1993. ' 

A total of 47 CQI projects were 



undertaken at EHS Good Shepherd 
Hospital in 1993 by critical care, 
facilities, food servrice, human 
resources, laboratory, manage- 
ment engineering, nursing, nursing 
administration, nursing education 
and research, The Outpatient 
Center, operating room, pediatrics, 
prc-admittlng, pharmacy, psychi- 
atric services and quality manage- 
ment departments. 

The projects ranged from" 
decreasing the length of stay for 
pediatric asthma patients and 
orthopedic patients to Improving 
scheduling procedures for cardi- 
ology, radiology and ambulatory 
care patients and increasing cost 
savings in the laboratory. 

During the first nine months 
of 1993, EHS Good Shepherd 



saved over $373,000 by imple- 
menting, CQI in these types of 
daily processes. 

"Winning the Commitment 
to Quality Award is a tribute to, 
the teamwork throughout EHS," 
said Richard R. Risk, president 
and chief executive officer of 



EHS. "The commitment to quali- 
ty starts with the board and 
spreads to every level of our 
entire organization, including 
our medical staffs. 

"It's working togetlicr thathas 
allowed us -to build a culture of 
CQI." 



^IVbliihteers; recognized ■■^' ' ■ ■ ■■'■^t • t ; :'K^i;;v'''^^- rS^:. '$ 

i ' : ' T^ volunteers have received awards from EHiS 

'Good Shepherd Hospital for their donatiEd services: , 
:: ^e 5 Vblunleer from Algonquin: Eileen Lewand,'lOO hours; Voiuntecrs 
from Harrington; Carol Abrahamson, 3.500 hours; Diane Beverley,' 100 ' 
V hours; Cathryn DIMuccl,100 hours; Eileen Helden/lOO hours; Dorothy 
fc Hogg^ 4,000 hours; Sandra Howard, 500 hours; Lidia Johnson, 7,5po 
■■■hours,'-.',.'.:'.--'.--;".-,.- - .■"■■ ■ ;\: ^:-:.J-:^.^^ '...-v'.:::: ::_''.-:-:-[: ■:'--::----L ■■-■■■..:. ^"■*.^^■ 
: Volunteers from CaryiMarjoric Bcgjiln, 100 hours; Susan Brchnicr, :. 
100 hours; Meghan Garvin, lOOhoure^ ; ? r ' : i; ■ ' -"^ 
rvi ^Volunteer from KildccnTornDcko), 100 hours; from UkcZuridi:^^ 
..Margaret Rogers, 3,000 hours; and from Palatine: Lauren Bcntivcgna; 100! 
;"/;hours.t'.V-'v::-^". ■•>•.-'<'•'■'■■. /..."'■ 



-'\ji 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



.1 ' - \ 

No bones about it: We need more calcium 



Researchers from around 
the coimtry are calling for new 
calcium consumption guide- 
lines as a result of the flood of 
new studies pointing to calci- 
um's bone-building benefits. 

A panel of experts convened 
by the National Institutes of 
Health says most people need at 
least 25 percent more calcium 
than current Recommended 
Dietary Allowances suggest. 

In simplest terms, that 
means drinking at least one 
more glass of ice cold milk every 
day. 

An eight-ounce glass of milk 
has about 300 milligrams of cal- 
cium. NIH panelists say 11 -to 
24-year oltis need between 
1,200 and 1,500 milligrams of 
calcium daily to build stronger 
bones and reduce the risk of 
developing the bone-thinning 
disease osteoporosis. The cur- 
rent RDA is 1,200 milligrams of 
calcium for ages 11 to 24. 

Many researchers suggest 
higher calcium consumption 
even before age 11. 

"It's probably a good idea to 
increase calcium intake to 1,200 
milligrams at age 8, if not soon- 
er," said Dr. Steve Abrams of the 
U.S. ' Department of 

Agriculture's Children's 

Nutrition Research Center at 
Baylor College of Medicine, 
Houston. Current RDAs call for 
800 milligrams of calciimi daily 
for children ages 1 to 10. 

Abrams completed a study 
of 5-to 16-year old girls that 
"shows signiHcant bone-form- 
ing activity much earlier than 
previously believed," he said, 
lie found marked bone growth 
in the years just before and after ' 
the start of puberty. 

Abrams was one of 35 
researchers who testified in 
June before the NIH's 15-mem- 
bcr panel of independent scien- 
tists and researchers. 

"My findings indicate that 
the RDA's for calcium may not 
be adequate to reduce the risk 
of developing osteoporosis," he 
said. Other prominent osteo- 
porosis researchers agree. 

Dr. C. Conrad Jphnston of 
Indiana University also sees a 
need to up the calcium RDAs. 
Johnston, who also testified 
before the NIH panel, headed 
the "twins study", which found 



that additional dietary calcium 
beyond the RDAs enhanced 
children's ability to build 
stronger, thicker bones. 
Johnston's study concentrated 
on children ages 6 to 14. 

Recommended Dietary 
Allowances are the amounts of 
various nutrients experts 
believe most people need to 
maintain health. They're set by 
the National Research Council's 
Food and Nutrition Board. First 
published in 1943, the RDAs 
have been revised nine times to 
reflect new scientific knowl- 
edge. 

The most recent revision, in 
1989, showed increased calcium 
requirements for infants, and 
22- to 24-year olds. The latter 
recommendation acknowl- 
edged evidence that, although 
bones do hot tend to grow 
longer after age 10, they do con- 
tinue to grow thicker and 
stronger until about age 25. 
Newer research shows, bone 



mass increasing even up to age 
30. 

The Food and Nutrition 
Board already has begun the 
long process of reviewing the 
RDAs, but the newest recom- 
mendations probably won't be 
available for at least two to 
three years. The Nil I panel's 
conclusions arc not binding on 
the Food and Nutrition Board, 
but the board's review will 
include the same scientific data 
used by the NIH panel. 

The scicntiric literature on 
which the NIH's recommenda- 
tions are based has been pubr 
lished in the last five years," 
said Dr. Joan McGowan of the 
National Institute of Arthritis 
and Musculoskeletal and Skin 
Diseases, which co-sponsored 
the conference. "The purpose of 
the consensus conference was 
to review current research find* 
ings and make these available to 
the public." 

NIH panelists also say 



^ Cdcium Content of ^eie^ 


Food Item 


Serving Size 


Calcium Contest - 
' (Milligrams) 


Dairy pnMlacts 




- ■/'';■ - 


; Whole milk 


8 ounces 


29f 


. 2% milk 


Bounces 


297-:--:;-.c':..^-: 


l%milk 


8 oimccs 


300 .; 


; Skim milk 


8 ounces 


302 


Chocolate milk, 2% 


Bounces 


258 ;/: 


: Yogurt, plain, non-fat 


Icup 


'. 415.:--=':-;:::.^iN 


• Yogurt, fruit, non-fat 


Icup 


343 :;--.■■ ^■•^■-'- 


■ American cheese, 


* 


^ '• -:/.."■■-'■:::: \ 


•5^ pasteurized process 


2 ounces 


348 , 


! Cheddar cheese 


1 1/2 ounces 


306 , 


: Cottage cheese, lowfat 


1/2 Clip 


fiS'""^^'' \'j; 


Mozzarella cheese, 






low moisture, part skim 


1 1/2 ounces . 


311- V ---;-: 


Swiss cheese 


1 1/2 ounces 


408 -; 


Icecream 


1/2 cup 


88 ' 


Ice cream, soft serve 


1/2 cup 


118 


' Frozen yogurt 


1/2 cup 


89 


Meat, nab, poultry, eggs 






Chicken breast, roasted, 


> 




t without skin - 


3ovmccs 


15 


'Turkey meat, light meat, 


• 




roasted, withoiJt skin 


31/2 ounces 


19 


Gmund beef, lean, broiled 


Bounces 


•- 9 ■ - :■-;: 


Sardines, canned in oil, 




'-' , '-■'■■ '^ y 


with bones, , 


3oimces 


371 


Tuna, canned in water, 


i k 




..rsolid white * 


3 ounces 


17;;.,. :-■ ■ 


'aEgg^., . 


1 large 


25 


Vegetables 




'".- ^ ' ■ ■: ,■:> 


; Kale, fresh, cooked 


1/2 cup 


47,::-;..-" -•:■.; 


Broccoli, fresh, cooked 


1/2 cup ' 


> 89 '",■■.';■ 


■•;.■;■.■■:■,-:- - ' - 


Source: Dairy Council of]^iscansin 



women over 65 and those 50 to 
65 years old who do not take 
estrogen need 1,500 milligrams 
of calcium a day — almost dou- 
ble their current RDA. They rec- 
ommend women ages 25 to 49 
as well as postmenopausal 
women who take estrogen, get 
1,000 milligrams of calchim 
daily. Current RDA for women 
over 24 years is 800 milligrams a 
day. 

The panel also recommends 
increased calcium for men: 
1,000; milligrams daily for ages 
25 to 64, and 1,500 milligrams 
for men 65 and over. Current; 
RDA for men 25 and. over .is 800 ' 
milligrams. 

The NIH panel said calciiim- 
rlch foodis such as dairy prod- 
ucts and some vegetables are 
the best sources of the bone- 
building mineral. Dr. Robert P. 
Heaney, a Creighton University 
researcher who testified before 
the panel, concurred. 

"It would be extremely hard 
to hit calcium targets without 
dairy products," Heaney said. 
"Milk and other dairy products 
are the most convenient, most 
nutritious and most economical 
calcium sources in the western 
diet. Low-fat varieties especially 
offer very good bargains in 
terms of calories," 

Nutrition experts at Dairy 
■ Council of Wisconsin say con- 
sumers today have a wide 
choice of dairy products with 
varying fat levels to accommo- 
date individual needs and' 
lifestyles. 

"Two to three servings daily 
of. milk, cheese and yogurt are 
recorrunended as part of a bal- 
anced diet to meet the RDA for 
calcium," said Emcrita N. 
Alcantara, Ph.D., a registered 
dietician and DCW's vice presi- 
dent of scientiflc and regulatory 
affairs. "The additional calcium 
these researchers arc suggesting 
would be equivalent to at least 
one more serving of dairy prod- 
ucts daily." 

Dairy products provide 
about three-fourths of the calci- 
um available in the American 
food supply. Dairy products 
also have other essential nutri- 
ents, including protein and 
riboflavin. Fortified milk also 
has|vltamin D, which helps the 
body absorb calcium. ' 



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Auquir 19, 1994, UkUNcl NewspApcus HEALTHWATCH 




9 
tl 
it 
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n 
a 

Is 

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cs 

ns 

nt 

po 

liri-; 

jre 
ic- 

P. 
iity 
ore 

ard 
but 
aid. 

Acts 

lost 
lical 
tern 
iaUy 

)airy 
con- 
wide 
with 
imo- 
and' 




A new line of women's apparel 
being ' distributed by Baxter 
Hospital Supply Co. called 
Dignity Wear, Is how on the mar- 
ket to allcyiatc psychological bar^- 
ricrs In the cxamlfiatlon room 
and help make routine check ups 
more tolerable. 

Modesty, fear and embar- 
rassment keep millions of 
American wonicn from making 
regular appointrhcnts for gyne- 
cological exams, mammograms 
and routine physicals each year. 
That's why Atlanta gastroen- 
terologist Robert Cohen, M.D. 
invented the Dignity Wear line 
tliat includes Dlgni-PapTw, a new 
patented garment that covers the 
genitalia during routine pelvic 
exams, Pap tests, endometrial 
biopsies, dilatation and curettage 
(D&C), LEEP procedures, Ui-vitrt» 
fertilization and vaginal ultra- 
sound; and Digni-Mamm(S> for 
procedures on the. upper torso 
such as a mammography, needle 
biopsy or echocardiograms. 

"Having timely examinations 
literally save lives," says Dr. Co- 
hen.' "But psychologists and psy- 
chiatrists have long argued that 
many-, women arc so un- 
comfortable and embarrassed by 
the typical open-top and bottom 
gowns and sheets that expose 

Self-defense 
seinihar offered 

A free self 
defense seminar 
for adults, pre- 
sented by police 
aiid . -women's 
self defense 
expert Harriet 
Johnson, will be 
offered at EHS 
Good Shepherd 
Johnson Hospital from 7 

to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 24. 
The program will be held In 
the Prairie, Lakeview and 
Meadow rooms of the hospital. 

The seminar is part of EHS 
Good Shepherd's Campaign 
Against Violence series that 
focuses on violence issues that 
affect families, the elderly and the 
community. 

Johnson Is a director of ; 
Crystal Lake Hapkido Assn., Inc., 
and has 22 years of martial arts 
experience. She holds a second 
degree black belt in Hapkido and 
a first degree black belt in Tac 
KwonDo. 

A certiricd police instructor, 
Johnson is a police .trainer for 
North-East Multi Regional 
Training, a part-time police offi- 
cer for Oakwood Hills and chief 
^instructor for the . Child 
Abduction Prevention Program. 
She has over 24 years of teaching 
experience in all aspects of self 
defense and the use of weapons. 
Subjects to be covered in the 
program include; The basic prin- 
ciples of self defense, the body's 
natural weapons and vulnerable 
areas, fear and how to make it 
work for you, basic principles of 
survival and awareness, and sug- 
gested defensive devices that 
could be used against an attacker. 
Seating for the self defense 
seminar is limited and advance 
registration is required. To sign 
up, call EHS Good Shepherd's 
HealthAdvisor line at 381-5282. 

EHS Good Shepherd Hospital, 
which is part of EHS Health Care, 
is located north of Rarrington .on| 
Hwy. 22, two miles westo'f^tc.j 
59. . . . . 




their bodies that they often post- 
pond' or just don't have- vital' 
examinations and testing. ihaVs 
one of the reasons we dovisctithe 
Digni-PapTM," . . 

The single-use garments arc 
made from - a soft, comfortable 
DuPont material with a barrier 
finish that repels liquids, and 
come individually wrapped for 
guaranteed hygiene. • 

The Dignl-Pap™ is an. Idea 
whose time Is long overdue, ac: 
cording to mental health pro- 
fessionals. 

In support of. the Introduction 
of the Dign!-Pap™. Dignity Wear 
also cites a national survey of 
2,525 women age 18 and over 
commissioned last year by The 
Commonwealth Fund for' Its 
newly established. Commission 
on Women's Health. In It, more 
than one-third of the respon- 
dents reported they did'iiot have 
a Pap smear, a clinical breast 
exam, a pelvic exam or a coin- 
plctc physical exam within the 
last 12 months. 



exams 



Women age 65 and over were 
particularly at risk, the study said, 
with at least Half reporting that 
they did not have a Pap snicar or 
a niammogram during ttic last 
year! More educated and affluent 
women appeared more sensitive 
to negative experiences encoun- 
tered with their physicians, 
according to the survey results. 

Dignity Wear Ltd. products are 
in wide use nationally in private 
physician's offices and more than 
500 hospitals, diagnostic centers, 
HMOs, Veteran's Administration 
and military base hospitals.' The 
products have received strong 
endorsements frorh major med- 
ical centers, medical schools, 
medical associations and other 
leaders in the medical field. 

Cohen founded Dignity Wear 
in 1991 after undergoing a 
colonoscopy while wearing the 
traditional, open-back hospital 
gown. All the garments also are 
manufactured and: sold In both 
adult and pediatric sizes, Cohen 
adds. 



'4*1 



Festival of Trees chairmen set* 



'^/■^U^'', 



' Sue Keclcy, Waukcgan; Jan Knobbc, Beach Parle? and iCareri'f; 
v' Skciton Undcnhurst, chairmen of the Third Annual "Festival of 
^ Trees/ have announced that plans for the 1994 holiday benefit , 
' arc underway. Tlic 1994 festival is scheduled for Nov. 16 to 20 at 
"I ' Midlane Country Club, 14565 Yorkhouse Rd., Wadsworth. 
V Proceeds will benefit the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program 
Expansion at Victory Memorial Hospital. 

"Crcating.a successful community benefit like Lake 
County's Festival of Trees doesn't happen overnight It takes a 
lot of planning and behind the scenes work," said Knobbe, "Our 
planning actually began at the end of last year's festival." 
According to Keclcy, last year's event required the assis- 
, tance of over 300 comtnunity volunteers. 

Assisting the chairmen organize the 1994 "Festival of Trees* 
' is a core group of volunteers who arc serving as area chairmen 
for speciOc tasks, such as organizing the bake shop and devel- 
oping publicity. These chairmen Include Vema Bcllios, 
Libertyvillc; Betty Bums, Lindcnhurst; Ina Campbelly 
; Waukegan; Barbara Chervin, Waukegan; Gcrric Clennon, 
Skokie; Karen Diamond, Zionr Judith Dobnikar, Antloch; 
Barbara Donaldson, Zion; Kathy Dunk, Waukegan; Dave i - 

Gillaspie, Waukegan; Eleanor Jansen> VVaukegan; Bill Janscn, 
Waukegan; Mary Kingsbury, Murideleln; Joan Lcgat, Waukegan; ' 
Nancy Merlock, Beach Park; Nancy Miller,- Lake Forest; Carol - 
Passalaqua, Vernon Hills; Mary Pergander, Grayslakc; Barbara ' 
Richardson, Gurnee;.Linda Schucncman, Waukegan; Judy 
Sipos, Beach Park; Sarah Shldcri Undcnhurst; Pat Vasllius, 
Gumee; and Sandra Welkcr, Waukegan. 

To learn more about participating in this year's "Festival of 
Trees," call Victory Memorial Hospital's Development 
Department at 360-4246. 




'^m-^}^. 



At Victory, every .baby 
is a pin-up. 

I n the New Family Center at Victory Memorial, babies 
and moms get the celebrity treatment. In fact, everyone in 
the family feels kind of special with all the attention diey get. 

Our entire staff works together to make the birthing 
experience as smooth and relaxed as possible. We're 

"old hands" at it. After all, we' ve been delivering 

Lake County babies for generations. And to help you 

along, we offer an abundance of pre-natal programs that 

provide comprehensive, practical knowledge about 

pregnancy, childbirth and pain management. 
We even have sibling classes for big brother and sis; 

We're proud of the many positive comnients we receive. 

One mom writes, "I want to commend your entire 
niatemity staff on their superior performance. In all of my 
. hospital stays, Victory was the most memorablc.the 
environment was pleasant and very posltive...the caring 

and supportive attitude of the staff made all the 

differencc.besl quality of medical carc.thanks to your 

entire maternity staff." 

For a free Healthy Pregnancy Calendar and guided tour, 
call 1.800-THE CHOICE (843-2464). 
Victory — where future stars are bom. 



MANAGED CARE PLANS 

ACCEPTED BY 

VICTORY MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 



■ Abbott Laboratories 
Baxter International 

Chicago HMO 

CNR 

Commonwealth Edison 

Compass 

Employee Healdi Systems, Inc. 

First Midwest Bank Corp. 

Health Direct HMO and PPO 

Health First Network - 

Health Preferred Mid- 
America 

Health Network 

HealthStar 

HMO Illinois 

Humana/Health 
Chicago - HMO & PPO 

Imccra Group, Inc. / Pitman- 
Moore, Inc. 

LaborCare, Inc. 

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Private Healthcare Systems 

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Victory is continually adding 
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Jim McNichols at 

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Check with your individual 
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B22 



UPSERVICE UkclANd Newspapers Auqusr.'l.?, J994 



I 



il 



a 



•'' I 



LIPSERVICE 

It's tI-ie TAlkof tI-ie tow/in 

Get It ofF youR cIhest (708) 225-8075 




^H-r-. 



lyakeland 

Newspapers 



UpservlcG Is a phonQ-ln column presentBd as a fQature of McKinley Ave regarding 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers rriakes no claim to enforcing regulations, One 
the duttienllclly of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does neighbor that Just moved In has 
not claim the content or ttie subject matter as fact hut as the per- noise going on continually, all 
sonal opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the hours of the day and night. Ttie 
right to edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call In at police come out and say It's rto 
223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the problem. He has a Junk car on 
call Is anonymous, please leave your village r)ame. |(-,e street with a city sticker and 

license plate so that Is no prob- 
lem. They can do nothing 
about It. Mayor, as a new 
member of the community I 
am appalled at your actions 
and the actions of the police. I 
purchased a house in Fox Lake 
because I like the community. I 
am starting to get a bad taste 
In my mouth regarding my 
nelghbortxjod, the police and 
the community because of this 
attitude. 






-VjVi;^ ii^ 



It's all relative 

Shame, shame, shame. You' 
must hove friends or relatives 
who smoke. Do they all stink? 
Are they ail ignorant and 
hyper? There ore so many 
other things In life to worry 
about than us smokers. If they 
do, then stay away from them. 
I'm sure they would be happy. 
You need God's blessings more 
than I do. This Is signed 'Stinky.' 

Good men 

I wish to applaud my husband 
and father in law. My father Is 
flying here from California to 
stay with my children during my 
six-week stay In the hospital. 
My husband has been with me 
through my entire fight with 
breast cancer. Thank you. ■ 

Saved a life 

Thank you to the two men who 
picked up the little girl In front 
of the tower on Beachhaven. 
They brought her In and 1 ■ 
called 91 1 . She was a beautiful 
blonde girl with no shoes and 
she was lost. The Round Lake 
Police came right away and 
picked her up. Those two men 
saved her from possible harm. 

Who is this man? 

According to Fox Lake maps. 
Arthur Ave Is supposed to meet 
Lawrence Ave. Somebody 
bought a pub, tore it down 
and put up a * No turn around' 
sign. Who is he iha\ he tias this 
right? He Is ttie same guy who 
tore a building half way down 
behind his house and never 
bothered to finish It. Children 
are playing ori It and are going 
to get hurt, but Fox Lake is not 
messing with Ms guy. What is 
he doing? is It costing him a lot 
of money? 

One little cutie 

Did any one see the Utile Miss 
Lake County pageant? It may 
have looked organized but it 
was not. Some of the girls were 
left to change by themselves 
because all ttie dressers were 
around one little girl to tell her 
how cute stie was. One girl 
went out with her bathing suit 
improperly fitted because ho 
one paid attention to ft. the 
Emcee announced that he 
knew coming out of tt^ Inter- 
views who was going to win 
because this girt had such a 
high score and no one would . 
catch up to her. This was not 
the right ttilng to soy In front of 
the little girls. 

Thank smokers 

This Is In response to the non 
smokers. If It were not for srriok- 
ers paying such high taxes, wp 
would all be paying higher 
property taxes. You name It, 
you would pay higher taxes for 
Jt, you should be thanking us, 
not condemning us. 



Second class citizens 

As a home owner of the Eagle 
Point subdivision area, I am 
very upset over tfie planned 
route for tt^e Venetian Night. 
Are we second class citizens or 
no longer residents of Fox 
Lake? Why did they change 
the starting place? Is it 
because some have more 
money tt^ Issue? 

Courteous police 

I would like to congratulate the 
LIbertyvllle mounted police. 
Whenever I am In Ubertyville, 
they are always courteous and 
so good with the kids, it Is won- 
derful that the village has those 
officers. 

Still missing? 

There were posters up in 
Antloch about a missing girl. 
Amy Miller. I am wondering ! 
she was ever returned home 
safely. Is she okay? I am con- 
cerned. 

One happy family 

A trustee In Lake Zurich Is con- 
cerned about subdivision signs 
and wants them removed. This 
would supposedly make those 
residents involved Into residents 
of lake Zurich proper and not 
Just residents of a subdlvIslor>i 
We have more problems tt^an 
that. Cars race through to 
endanger our children and 
heavy trucks drive though as 
well. Every street Is a through 
street. Get your priorities 
straight, trustees and mayor. 

Sign to leave 

This Is to the person who tNnks 
the 30-foot sign In Hainesville 
looks very nice, 1 think they 
should go ahead and move to 
Chicago. 

Fox Lake attitude 

I Just talked to the Fox Lake 
Mayor. He did not want to talk, 
to me as a citizen because I 
would not leave my name and 
address. He says he does noth- 
ing anonymously and he needs 
all ttxat Information, 1 have a 
few complaints. The police 
can not seem to do ttielr job on 



Gates of promise 

I witnessed an accident In Long 
Lake that would not have 
taken place if Metro would put 
up the crossing gates. Ttiey 
have enough time to do the 
train station and put In the coin 
slots but where are ttie crossing 
gates they promised us 10 
yeare ago? This accident 
would rjot have txapperted If 
they would do their Job. 
Editorial note: According to a 
front page arthle In our Aug. 
12 Fox Lake Press, IDOf, Metro, 
and the Illinois Commerce 
Commission will be erecting 
crossing gates, using federal 
monies, sometime after Oct L 
1994, which is the beginning of 
the 1995 fiscal year. 

Manner rerun 

I have one of those neighbor- 
hood houses whvere all the kids 
congregate. 1 often have my 
cNldren's friends over to eqt, 
keep them over night, and 
take them on outings. For the 
most part, the kids have 
behaved okay. 1 am very fed 
up with parents that rarely do 
the same for my children. Also, 
has any one else had children 
coming to parties without party 
gifts and staying past ttie end- 
ing time? I tNnk it's time for a 
rerun on manners and eti- 
quette. 

'Un-entitled' 

This is addressing ttie call 'Help 
ourselves' regarding the for- 
eign aid our government pays 
to other countries. Foreign aid 
only accounts for one fifteenth 
of our national budget. Over 
half of our budget goes to enti- 
tlement programs. We need to 



stop supporting all the drug 
addicts and people who don't 
need the money because they 
go out and blow It on drugs. 
Only one In nine dollars In enti- 
tlement dollars goes to some- 
one who actually needs It. 
That is what we need to clean 
up. 

Local support 

I'd like to mention something 
about donations, Most non- 
profit organizations hit local 
businesses for donations. That 
Is fine and we like supporting 
those kinds of people. These 
folks are the same folks who 
support the major chains who 
don't support local folks or our 
local groups. Wtien you think 
that you want to support one 
of those major corporate 
stores, they don't put money 
back Into our local communi- 
ty,. They give It back to ttielr 
stockholders; 

Editorial note: We are taking 
Issue with your statements, but 
a few things should be known. 
Several of the rriajor discount 
store chains automatically set 
aside a fixed amount from ' 
profits each year for local and 
national charities. Also, we do 
derive some local tDeneflt from 
the majors. According the 
Illinois State Department of 
Revenue, for the first three 
monttis of this year, total tax 
receipts for Gurnee alone 
exceeded $4.7. million. 

School or strike? 

I was wondering If RourxJ Lake 
Schools was going to start on 
time or Is tt\e school board 
going to force their staff into a 
strike? 




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God the judge 

i am a former Protestant, and a ' 
current Catholic. I'm calling 
regarding 'f^ass disapproval.* 
It does not matter what you 
wear to church If our heart Is 
clean. It doesn't matter what 
you look like you were doing. 
God does rx)t care what you 
look like. To 'IVlass approval,' 
your are not God. Don't Judge. 
Let him do that. 

Resigned to leave 

District 41 School Board mem- 
ber Michael Leahy resigned 
because he was upset with 
school district finances and 
how they were handled. I find 
it Interesting that soon after- 
ward he put his house up for 
sale. Mr. Leahy, If you resigned 
for this reason, then, why are 
you moving out of tt»e school 
district? 

Moss fashion 

This Is In response to 'Mass dis- 
approval.' You are getting 
pretty petty when you are wor- 
ried about wtiat people are 
wearing to church. I thought- 
we were attending church to 
worship God, not for a fashion 
show. 

After curfew 

This Is to ttie chief of police of 
Round Lake Park. What Is 
golr>g on wltfi your men? The 
man who wort<s at nightsacts 
like the Gestapo. Can't any- 
one be driving late? He 
stopped me for drty/Ing 30 miles 
per hour, which Is the speed 
limit. Then hernade me do a 
few tests and let me go. What 
If someone has to go to the 
store to get milk and bread? 
StxDuld he stay home Instead?- 
See LIPSERVICE page B23 



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UPSERVICE , UkelANd Newspapers Auqusr 19, 1994 



i 

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d 

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jr 
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e 



Is- 

Dr- 

ire 
jht- 
to 
on 



of 

\ is 
me 

icts 
iny- 

He 
illes 
aed 
lo a 
That 

the 
.ad? 
3d?. 



tT 







It*^ tIhe ta 

Get It pff youR cIhest 



oF tIhE TOWN 

(708> 225-^075 




">- 



Lakeland 

Newspapers .. 



From page B22 . 

Bear hbne 

What happened to life's a 
bear?' It was there, I just didn't 
see-it? You tried runriing It but 
you found It had no fotlowlhg? 
There wasn't enough room for 
Ihe redjly Important news so 
you had to drop something. so 
you bounced the bear. Or, Is It 
none of the above? It Is really 
good stuff. Let there be' bear. 
Editorial note: It must have 
boon tt)oro and you didn't soo 
It. It njns ovorywook In our 
Lakollfo soctlon, and It doos 
tiovo a following. 



money; :.. If It were you over 
there.- you Would hope some-- 
or>e would help you too. I 
t<now there are people In need 
over here, but we are not as 
poor as Rwanda. . 

Padded pockets 

Ttie Lake Villa Sctiool Board Is 
complaining about too many 
students coming from new sub- 
divisions. So why sell water 
rights that will bring In more 
kids? This Is just to "pad the 
pockets of two board mem- 
bers. One- Is q realtor and the 
other sells horriearid cd; li^sur- 
arx;e. Wake up, cdrhmunlty. 



tuition toward his doctoral 

degrees and he has quite a 

hefty package. Howmany act. I regulariy attended the 

people In this community meetings in the pasf. What 



News and am appalled at ttie would get, taught that lesson, 
article on the open rrieetlngs" .We;worl<ed for our things, why 

dcih't you try It? Voudre just 



Overthrown 

I'm surprised to read that 

someone thought the superin- 

tenderit oif Gavin Schools was 

one of the lowest paid In the 

area. Not true. You ought to tips'for"me 

take d look at his contract. He 

is very we'll paid and has. a Gorboge COntrol 



Training in progress 

rrri trying to potty train my 2- 
year-oid son, unsuccessfully so 
far. I was wondering If any par- 
ents out there had any helpful 



have that kind of package? 
I believe the school board is 
concerned about giving the 
chlidreh the best education 
possible. I -am more con- 
cerned when people try to 
exaggerate the facts. Why Is. 
It every time someone brings 
up an opposition against the 
, superintendent, it is noted as a 
persorial vendetta against 
him? Are you sure he doesn't 
have a personal vendetta 
against them. Are you sure 
you don't have a vendetta. 
Remember, the board'ls elect- 
ed to represent the communi- 
ty, not to become personal 
tokens of the superintendent. 



great benefit .package. The 
freedorn of .information act 
allows anyone to look at his 
contract. I also know many of 
the school bo.ard members. 
Two of the new members ques- 
tion what Is 'goir>g on In the 



I'm upset.y^th the. trustee in 
Round Lake Heights who Is 
upset with, ttie garbage .com- 
pany. She may have a prob- 
lem virfth the garbage compa- 
ny, but after 35 years of living In 
this village, r have never had a 



school district, isn't ttiat why problem. They have always 
we elect them? Maybe the ^^^^ courteous. If the village 

goes out for a contract based 
on the complaint of one 
trustee, I thlrik that Is a terrible 
way to dO:buslness.' I will never' 
vote for anybody who votes 
against Waste Marragement. I 
don't have a firranclai Iriteretst 
In tiTCit company. Itls just one 
,of the few things that work right 
In this community. .It, would be 
d shame If we change now. 



super!ntender»t ; , , Is upset 
because his dictatorship Is 
over. 

Come as you are 

Thislsjn resRor>5e to..vMass dls^. 
approval.' VVho are you-to 
Judge what people wear? Not 
everyone can afford to. wear 
'nice clothes. Mdybe those 
people you were referring to 
were wearing ttie best clothes 
they have. God did not make 
clothes, people did. We were 
rxiked before that. The point Is 
that golrvg to- church is to wor- 
ship God, not to be concerned 
about other people's clothes I 
attend Fox.Lake Baptist church 
where everyone Js loved ar\d 
weicorne no matter what they 
look like. 



Help them all 

i cannot believe ttie caller from 
lost week was complalNng last 
week about ttie 
those countries. In need. How 
can you be so Insensitive? How 
can you watch the news cov- 
erage and see people dying 
by the thousands daily and not 
be compelled to help tt>6m? 
Our government wastes a lot of 
money on frivolous things. But 
helping people In need Is an 
excellent way to spend our tax 



Token vendettas 

The person who claims that 
the Gavin Superintendent has 
one of the lowest salaries In 
the area needs to have their 
head examined. Where had 
this space cadet been for the 
past five years, or) Mars? the 
previous superintendent he.Id 
the position for 21 years 
before retiring with a yeariy 
salary of $65,000. The present s 
superintendent picked up the" 
stick at that polrit and In the 
U.S. helping P^ist five years has received!;' 
rriore than 50 percent In 
increases. Add to this the 
benefits which Include health 
and dental with . no 
deductible, and d life Insur- 
ance policy that Is paid up. 
He had a generous retire- 
ment, travel reimbursement, 
four weeks vacation, paid sick ■ 
and personal days, and paid 



Marquardt 

Oldsmobile 

Huge Inventory ofAutantobUes 
ONK MUCt DEAUR 

DIMOSAU-yCAREND 



B 



Oldwnobile 



Take A New Look! 




Garbage call 

I just read the Round 



Lake 



kind of lawyer do they have 
representing them? isn't he 
supposed to tell them how to 
run it? About ttie article on the 
gariDoge contract, I have been 
with Waste Management for 35 
years and have been very 
happy. Is this because" the 
mayor's father owns a busi- 
ness? Let thie village tiear from 
the people what you want, 

Electronics theft 

This Is fdr the lazy, ■ Ignorant 
losers who took- a laser detec- 
tor, the CDs, and ttie .CD player 
from the cars in our driveway. 
Yes, ttibse of us with lives do 
sometimes forget to lock, our 
doors. Thanks for teaching our 
kids how unsafe the worid Is 
long before we hoped- the 



lucky you 
Get d Job. 



didn't get caught. 



Revenge is sweet 

One of my best friends just got 
. jumped by a bunch of people. 
You know who- you are. if is 
comirig back to you. 

Biased bill .: 

This Is about the tax' relief in a 
bill that Is to be submitted to 
the governor for the middle 
and low income seniors. The 
house approved an addition to 
the bljrthat allows Inmates to 
prove racial bias. This would 
".put qn end to fhe death perial- 
ty. " The Congressional Black 
Caucijs Is' Insisting that this 
remain part of the bill. We ore 
ail overtaxed. ' 




A hose who are looking for mortgage 
money often "shop around" for the best 
rates. That's fine with us because we feel 
our rates are competitive. We'd like you to 
call us and we'll show you it's true. We 
can sit down together and talk honestly 
about how much you can borrow, 
methods of financing and Interest 
rates. We want to help you buy 
a home, so when you're ready, 
call us. first. 



FIRSTfEDERAL BANK FSB 



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MAIN OFFICE 
Madison at County St. 
Waukegan, IL 60079 
(708) 623-0084 



LEWIS AVENUE OFFICE 
1428 North Lewis 
Waukegan.lL 60083 
(708) 249-6307 




GURNEE OFFICE 
5384 Grand Avenue 
Gumee, IL 60031 
(708)249-6312 



Insured F.D.I.C. 



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^1 CREEN'UP UkElANd Newspapers AuqusT 1 9^ 1 994 



micBiit 




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• Lakeland - 

'•Nnrepapcre ^ 



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Beauty of mighty oaks overwhefftis hikers 



■ Walking through Ihe forest preserve 
last, week, we came upon a beautiful 
oak grove and Its beauty was over- 
whelming as we sat down and leaned 
on the mighty trunks of these trees. 
Looking up Into the carx)py of a tree, 
several stout branches seemed to be 
growing parallel to the ground. Several 
corky ridges emerged on the stems of 
this oak. This particular tree was about 
40-feet high with an equal spread. The 
bark was deeply ridged with a 
grdylsh-brown color. This 
burr oak was truly a 
specimen and 
would be a great 
tree for a park sit- 
uation. 

- ■ The burr . 
dak Is difficult 
to transplant, 
however ■ If 
done at an 
Qarly age, (1 
1/2, to 2-Inch 
caliper), then 
protected against 
bores, can one day 
achieve its majestic sil- 
houette for all to enjoy. 
Ite rate of growth Is 
slow and prefers full 
ajn and will toler- 
ate very differ- 



ent soil conditions. One of my favorite 
oaks, and a native tree in Lake County. 
Some other great oaks that are eas- 
ier to transplant than the burr oaks are; 
Quercus blcolor-swamp white oak. As 
the name Indicates, found In the wild In 
low lying or swampy areas. I^equires 
acid soli and is quite hardy for the Lake 
County growing area. 

The Quercus Imbrlcaria— shingle 
oak, like many other oaks doesn't have 
the iol^es of an oak leaf 
and therefore is 
many times iden- 
tified Incorrect- 
ly. The leaves 
are aiter- 
rrate, slrrv 
pie, 
obfong or 
lanctolate, 
2 1/2 to 6- 
Inches kxg 
and 1 to 3- 
I nches 
wide. 
The oak 
can achieve 
50 to 60 feet In 
height with a 
spread as equal or 
more. The bartc is 
grey-brown 
and . the 




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leaf color Is reddish when unfolding In 
the spring, turning a lustrous" dark green 
In the summer with russet-red colors In 
the fall. Uke ottTer oaks, the older leaves 
may persist through winter. Transplants 
easier than many other oaks and Is 
used for lawn, street, park and golf 
course areas. The wood of shingle oak 
was used to make shingles; hence. Ihe 



common name.O 

fvlost oaks are best moved In the 
spring, however If they need to be 
planted In the. fall, the later, the 
better.— by, MIKE GRECO, landscapo 
arctiltoct/ownor of Mill Creok Nur$ory, 
Wodsworth. 

•Footnote; "l\/lanuel of Wood Land- 
scape Plants' by Michael A. Dier. 





Mill Creek 
Nursery 



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-BusIness BRiEfs 

Fields buys InlBniti dealership 

BIGHIAND PARK— M.E. Fields » Ina has 
announced the purchase of its 10th automobile dealer- 
ship. Six of those dealerships arc on the north shore, 
including the newest location In Highland Park. The 
dealership, formerly known as Performance Inflnltlat 
2300 Skokie Valley R(J, will carry the Fields of Lake 
County'namcplatc. The other Fields Inflniti location in 
Lake County is In Glcnvlcw. At its various outlets In 
Illinois and Florida, the company carries lines from 
Infmiti, Saab, Cadillac, Jeep/Eagle, and BMW. 

Realtor offers video to sellers 

ANTIOCn— Ccntury-21 Epifanio & Assoc, is using a 
.new marketing strategy that can benefit sellers in the 
northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin areas. ITic 
company has joined with Lake Effect Films of Bristol, 
Wis. to produce a video tape called "Sell Your Home- 



ANTIOCH PUBLIC LIBRARY DISIR|Gri9, 1»94 UI^EUNd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Antioch. IL 60002 





Faster." The approach vM be to follow the format of a 
home remodeling show. "Before" and "after" pictures 
of a typical house will indicate what sellers can do to 
make their houses easier to sell. 

SmaU business lowDoc loans 

CmCACO— The U.S. Small Business 
Administration's (SBA) Chicago Dist. OfTicchas 
announced the names of lenders approved to partici- . 
pate in the new LowDoc loan program, according to 
John L Smith, Chicago DIst. Dir. The LowDoc program 
streamlines the SBA loan application process for guar- 
anteed loans under $100,000. LowDoc relies heavily on 
the banker's experience and judgment of a borrower's 
credit history and character to expedite the loan 
process. The program was launched in Illinois In late 
June with 23 banks attending a training session. 
Currently, 200 banks arc registered to utilize the 
LowDoc Program. To date, 67 loans have been 
approved totaling $3.5 million. Lenders still need the 



financial Information typically found In loan applica- 
tions to ensure repayment ability, but the diminished 
SBA paperwork requirements will greatly reduce the 
administrative l)urdcns on lenders and borrowers. To 
apply for the program, Smith said, business applicants 
should first approach their own lender. If the lender is 
not participating in the program, they should call the 
SBA at 312-3,53-5401 

Abbott donates to Rwanda 

ABBOTT PARK— Abbott Laboratories health care 
products are being donated for relief efforts in Rwanda 
on an ongoing basis; Last week, the company con- 
tributed three scmi-trailcr truck loads of intravenous 
solutions, I.V. administration sets and Pedialyte, an 
oral electrolyte maintenance solution that restores 
fluid and minerals lost in diarrhea and vomiting in 
infants and children. Abbott contributed these prod- 
ucts through MAP International, a worldwide relief 
organization based in Brunswick, Ga. 








Ivakeland 

Newspapers 





Business 
Personnel 

People on the move 
PAGE G2 




Murpnyon 
Real Estate 

lihprdvihg your home 
for sale PAGE C^ 




V New tome choices 
PAGEC5 

0$M Series 

lake County Chiefs 
f do battle in Minn. 
RplBC21 

STOCKMTCH 



ChaQge Dlv. 

+23/4 says: 



company Prices 

AbbollV 301/4 

Ailslate 25 1/4 -5/8 $0.72 

: Anierltecli42 1/2 +11/8 $1.92 ■ 

AT&T : 53 5/8 ^l/aV $1:32^ 

Baxter 27 1/2 ; -1 3/8 $1.05 

Brunswick 22 1/2 +1/2; $0.44 

Com. Ed. 24 1/8 +1/2 $1.60 

b.WlUer 395/8^-1/2 ; $0.50 

Kemper 6U- ■-'-1/4 $0.92 

McDonalds 26 -1/2 $0.24: 

Motorola 53 -1/2 $0;28 

Peoples En. 25 1/2+1/4 $1.80 

; Qkr. Oaks 76 3/8 +33/4 $2.12 

Sara Lee 227/8 +21/8 $0.64 
Sears ; 46 1/8 -5/8 ?. $1.60 v 

UAL ': 101 1/4 +1 1/2 $0.00 { 
Walgrcen!i37 1/4 +1 1/4?$0;68 ; 

WMXTcch.28 5/8+l/a $0.60 

Cheny Corp. 14 +1 $0.00 

. , Stocks were mosUy^ tiighcr 
,' this .week after the Fed's fifth 

rate hike this year. Also higher 
, were Quaker Oats on renewed 

speculation about a takeover. 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seldenberg of Edward D. 
u Jones St Co., Grayslake. 



Pamper pet at home when you're oiwacation 



NEAL TUCKER 

Staff, Reporter 

^ Pet owners face a common 
dilemma when considering a 
vacation. The stickiest detail- is 
not where to go, what Hotel to 
stay in, or what sights to sec. 

The most difflcult decision 
usually comes down to what one 
should do with the family pet. 
Hotels that accept pets arc not 
prevalent Family members may 
not live close enough to watch 
them and, with the growth in . 
Lake Coimty, people do hot know 
their neighbors as well as they 
once did. 

The decision pet- owners 
many times face is to relegate 
their beloved animal to the 
pound. This is as emotional for 
the pet as it is for the owner. 
However, it does not have to be 
this way. 

A new Millburn business, 
Pampered Pets Sitting Service, 
has joined the growing trend in 
helping pet owners keep their 
aniinals in the comforting envi- 
ronment of their own home. The 
primary mission of the company 
is to give pets individual attention 
while relieving them from the 
stress of adjusting to a foreign 
enviroruncnt without their own- 
er's presence. 

''I worked one summer In a 
keimcL I saw how many animals 
did not receive that one-on-one 
attention." said Tammy 
Rasmussen, president of the 
company. 

Her venture into business was 
an evolutionary process. 
Rasmussen says she has always 



loved animals and over the years 
began : bringing pets that 
belonged to friends and acquain- 
tances home when asked. 

Wlicn the house began over- 
flowing with cuddly critters, her 
husband, Larry, asked her to con- 
sider turning the tables by taking v.^ 
care of pets in their own homes. 



Rasmussen took the suggestion 
to heart and a new business was 
bom. 

Wlicn one considers 
Rasmussen's services, the first 
meeting is in the form of an inter- 
view. The session, which lasts 
about one hour, gives the owner 
and the pet a chance to become 



acquainted with her. 

Rasmussen says the Interview 
generally goes well, especially 
with tlie pet. When an 'owner 
goes to sign the contract for ser- 
vices, they notice it does not stop 
at taking care of the pet 

The contract has check boxes 
See PETS page C4 




Tammy Rasmussen, presldont of Pampered Pets Sitting Service, poses witti Rocky (left) and Zeus, 
while colling for Bullwlnkle to loin the photo shoot. The Millburn business offers a sitting sen/Ice In the 
pet's own home while the owner Is on vacation, sparing the animal tlie stress of a kennel or an ani- 
mal pound.—Photo by Neal Tucker 



Mulder to head First Chicago's Antioch branch 




Tlie First National Bank of am confident that growth and 
Chicago announced that Jeffrey B. success will continue under his 
Mulder, a tliree-year veteran of the leadership." 



First National Bank of Chicago, 
was named president of its branch 
at 425 Lake St, Antioch. 

Mulder, who joined First 
Chicago in 1991 as a sales manag- 
er, succeeds Carl McWherter, 
who now heads the bank's 
Wilmette branch. 

"Jeff has piaycd a vital role in 
the success we have had in cstab- 



"I am excited about the 
opportunity," said Mulder. "I 
look forward to continuing First 
Chicago's commitment to the 
community." 

Mulder is .active in the 
Antioch community, serving as 
chairperson of the facade commit- 
tee of Community Action Now 
(CAN). He recently was appointed 
to the Antioch Economic 

by 



J Jeff Mulder 



lishing our prcseiicc in Antiocli," 

said Thomas Ghana, j)residcnt of Development Commission 

First Chicago Community Mayor Marilyn Shienflug. 
Banking Group division that A native of Antioch, Mulder 

includes the Antioch branch. "I graduated from Antipch High 



School and received his bache- 
lor's degree from Western Illinois 
University. He also earned a 
Certified Financial Planner (CFP) 
certification from the College of 
Financial Planning in Denver. 

First Chicago's Antioch 
branch is one of the more than BO 
branches of the First National 
Bank of Chicago, which provides 
leading edge banking products 
and services to retail and busi- 
ness customers through the 
Ctiicago metropolitan area. The 
First National Bank of Chicago is 
the 10th largest hank in the coun- 
try and a subsidiary of First 
Chicago Corp. 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UltEM NewspApcRS Atiqusr 19; 1.994 



t - - . H# I 





WXLC FM 



^Flags 

Glij AMERICA 

A TImi Wvnar EnttitAiniTwnt Comptny 
Gum**, lUnolt 




S 

.[1 





! 



REGISTER TO WIN A TRIP FOR 4 TO 
CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA 

• round trip airfare 

•3-night hotel acGomodations 

•3-day car rental 

•tickets to the Kennedy Space Center 

All entries must be received by September 2, 1994 






TAKE YOU OUT OF THIS WORLD 

Official entry form— no purchase necessary. Registration ends September 2, 1994 



Please print: 
NAME 



STREET ADDRESS 
CITY 



STATE, ZIP 




DAYTIME TELEPHONE ( ) 

EVENING TELEPHONE ( ) 

Deposit this entry form in the entry box at Mission Control at the Six Flags Space Shuttle America*' ride or at HOT 102.3. 3250 Belvidere Road, 
Waukegon; Illinois. ' • ,' 

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. To enter complete an official entry form found in Friday editions of Lakeland Newspapers through August 26, 1994 
and deposit entry in th entry box at Mission Control at the Six Flags Great America'" ride OR put your full name, address, day and evening phone 
numbers on a white, 3x5 postcard and mail it to: HOT 102,3. 'TAKES YOU OUT OF THIS WORLD". 3250 Belvidere Road. Waukegan. iiiinois 60085. One 
entry per household street address. Grand prize winner announced. Tuesday, September 6, 1 994 at approximately 7:13 a.m. on HOT 1 02.3. 

Umit one entry per person. No mechanically reproduced entries permitted. No purchase necessary. Entry deadline is September 2 1994 See 
complete rules at HOT 102.3. Void where prohibited. ' ; . ' 



i 



'; 



^BF 



'^^^^^^^v^' ^i r ^--'^^^^ ^ ^i w a ^a^TS^aAMt iS^v-giW-'W^-^?i 



TT'r*.'>hA'*^^\t::^ 







AuqusT 19/1994 LAkElANcI Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 




! 

1 






I 






1 







Person neI 



Takaoka, R.D 

Award 

nominees. 

North Chicago 
Veterans AfTairs 
Mcdtcal Center 
had three nomi 
nccs In three dif- 
ferent categories 
in the Chicago 
Federal Executive 
Board's 37ih 




in business administration from 
Northwestern University In 19B4. 
Bctltl and his family reside In 
Princeton Junction, N.J. 

famesJ.Bakula 

James J. Balcuia, 
vice-president and 
general manager of 
Brunswick Billiards, 
became the 39th 
president of the 
Billiard and Bowl- 
ing Institute of 
America. He and his 
wife, Linca have 
four children and reside in LlndcnhursL 




Sally Bullen 



Pope 



Annual Federal Employee of the Year 
Awards. Toshlico Taicaoka, R.D., was 
nominated in the category of out* 
standing professional employee; 
Chris Brown was nominated in the 
category of outstanding technical or 
program support employee; and 
Nanctla Pope was nominated in the 
category of outstanding 

secretariat/clerical employee. 

Michael L. Meyer 

Michael L Meyer 
has been promot- 
ed to director of 
human resources, 
Lake County, In 
the corporate 
human resources 
division at Abbott 
Laboratories. 
Previously, he 

was manager of 

human resources at the Abbott diag- 
nostics facility in Dallas, Texas. 

Leo T. Belli! 

Leo T. BeliU, a resident, of 
Mundelcin for 21 years, has been 
named president of Church & 
Dwighl's newly formed industrial and 
precision cleaning business unit. The 
new business unit Is part of the com- 
pany's specialty products divisions 
and has been cslahlishcd to focus on 
(he domestic and International 
Industrial and precision cleaning 
markets. Bclill graduated from 
Central Michigan University with a 
bachelor's degree in education in 
1964. He camcd his master's degree 



.iK-i 


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f:^^H 


m\ 


If ^. ^^ 


V-'': '' -^'J'MM 


11^ 



Gurnee resident 
Sally ' Bullen, 



director 
employee 
pcnsation 
benefits, 
elected a 



of 

com- 

and 

was 

vice 




president of the 
Kemper National 
Insurance Com- 
panies In Long Grove. Bullen joined 
Kemper National In 1981 iti the salary 
administration unit 

Nancy Gam, M^. 

Nancy Garn, 
M.S., assistant 
dean and director 
of the Learning 
Resource Center 
at Finch Univ. of 
Health Sciences 
/The Chicago 
Medical School, 
has been promot- 
ed to the position 
of vice president 
for learning resources, Gam has been 
a member of the university staff since 
1973. 

Bob Kaullg 

Bob Kaulig has been promoted to 
vice president of 
sales at Raybestos/ 
Brake Parts Inc. 
in McHcnry. 
Kaulig has been 
with Echlln, Inc., 
BPI's parent com- 
pany for 16 years. 
He resides with 
his family In 
Crystal Lake. 






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*Based on S1500 down, non-alrbag. 5 spd„ 46 mo. lease 
plus tax, title, D.O.C. fee, first pmt. and sec, dep. 



Curt lAwlnske 

Curt Lowinskc has been appoint- 
ed to the position- of executive vice 
president ofElrlch Machines, Inc. In 
Gurnee, where his duties will include 
the management of alt the company's 
business activities for North America. 
Lowinskc's 25 years of management 
experience In the food, beverage and 
blotcch areas will provide EIrlch 
Machines with experienced leader* 
ship as it consolidates its North 



American operations. He and his 
wife, Sherry and sons Ross and Justin 
will be moving to the Gurnee area. 

Daniel J. ArendC 

Daniel J. Arcndt/ CIC of Lalcc 
Zurich has. been honored by the 
Society of . Certified Insurance 
Counselors for his more than five 
years of "steadfast commitment to 
continuing education." The Society is 
a national organization that for 25 



years has provided a comprehensive 
program of instruction for Insurance 
professionals. CltlngArendt as among 
the top one percent of all insurance 
professionals in America, the CIC tes- 
timonial called attention to this local 
individual's leadership and ckcel* 
Icncc stemming from the pursuit of 
continuing education and to his 
"achievement and demonstrated 
level of professional competence In 
all areas of the Insurance business." 




This Is a llinlted view of Stack-On Products' 103,000 square-foot warehouse adlacent to Its man- 
ufacturing facility In Wauconda. The tool box manufacturer was honored by Wal-Mart Stores, 
Inc. earlier this year as a Vendor/Partner of the Year for its quality and excellent service 
record.— Photo by Nil Doimody Jr. 



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BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UkcUcI NEwspXpEKS AuqusT 19/1994 



ReaI Estate News- 

Country Club setting 

WADSWDRIH-Fivc single-family home designs arc now on dis- 
play at Brandcss Pointc atMidlane, featuring designs wlilch comple- 
ment tlic rcsort-Iikc setting of Tlie links at Midlanc, a new golf course 
immunity in Wadsworth. AUhougii tlic liircc model homes planned 
for the community will not tx: completed until flail, prospective home 
buyers can view the model homes by m(^ins ofviitual reality video 
tours. A 50,000 square foot dub house witli a private dub atmosphere 
offers formal and informal dining as well as banquet facilities and is 
the site for special events and celebrity entertainers. Tlic community 
also features a 100 acre nature preserve. The sales center for Brandess 
Pointe at Mldlane is located on Yorkliouse Road, one-half mile west of 
Ddany Road. Call 623-5060 for more infonnation. 

Country Lane half sold 

WADSWDRTH— Sales have passed the 50 percent mark at 
Country Lane at Wadswortli Lake, 126 Victorian-style single-family 
homes near Wadsworth, Sixty-five homes have been purchased at 
Country Lane. Grand opening of six models occurred in May, 1993. 
Just west of the Midlanc Country Club, Country Lane offers home 
buyers a two-tier price and size structure. Wlicn completed, the 
"Main Street" series will consist of 04 two- to four-bedroom homes 
featuring three home styles, ranging in size from 1,442 to 1,905 
square feet, and in price from $154,900 to $189,900. 

Land sales resume at Olde Grove 

VERNON DHLS— Ccntuiy Management and Devdopment Co. 
has resumed sales of the final finished home sites at Olde Grove Farm 
in Vernon I DUs after an interruption created by nearl)y highway con- 
struction. "We all but had to shutdown because of the extensive road- 
work on Rtc, 83 and Westmoreland Drive. It was not only a major 
inconvenience to those 25 or 30 families wlio have already moved into 
their custom-built homes but a major obstruction for constmction 
workers and even potential buyers," noted bwin Berkley, chief execu- 
tive officer of the Skokie-bascd devdopment company. Berkley said 
he is confident that the remaining nine lots in the custom home com- 
plex just east of rustic Long Grove will move more quickly with the 
resumption of normal trdflic in the vicinity, lliosc remaining lots, a 
tolal of 59 in the private endave, arc all finL-ihed and ready for develop- 
ment They arc priced from the low$60,000s to $1 24,000. Several lots 
have frontage on the community's 20-acrc nature preserve and pond. 

Cunningham Square opens 

GURNEE-Ncwly opened Cunningham Square at Hunt Qub in 
Gumee has enjoyed brisk actiinty in the first month of prc-construc- 
tion sales with nine homes sold. The community fcaturcs 52 coach 
homes and townhome-style condominiums, Vkitti prc-construction 
prices ran^ng from $120,900 to $132,900. Cunnln^am Squarc at 
I lunt Ciub is being developed by Northb rook- based Brandess 
Homes, a company known and respected as a builder of luxury cus- 
tom and semi-custom homes for more than 32 years. Cunningham 
Squarc at Hunt Qub is located on Hunt Dub Road, one-half mile 
north of Rtc.120. Call 816-0543 for more infomiation. 



Pets 



From page CI 

for services like taking in the mail 
or watering the household plants. 
This also serves to improve secu- 
rity. Another security measure 
comes in the form of a solar 
switch which, when screwed into 
a lamp, turns on a light during the 
hours of darkness. 

People are sometimes leery of 
the pet sitting service because of 
cost. A person making personal 
visits to the home must be expen- 
sive, they conclude. 

"I had one man call me 
because he was not comfortable 
with taking his dog to a kennel. 
He discovered the price for two 
visits per day was equal to what 
he would be paying for the ken- 
nel, so he went ahead and added 
a third visit." Rasmusscn said. 

People do not need to schedule 
a vacation to require pet sitting ser- 
vices. Rasmusscn has a contract 
with one woman to visit her dog 
daily because of the length of the 
owner's commute. Senior citizens 
who cannot exercise their animals 
have also used her services. 

To let the owner know how 
things went in their absence, 
Rasmusscn keeps a daily log of 
activities. She even has an emer- 
gency pager so owners can con- 
tact her after hours. 

The animals respond well to 
love and attention, and 
Rasmusscn considers herself 
somewhat of a fanatic when it 
comes to loving animals. 

The business phone number, 
356-LOVE, even implies the care 
Rasmusscn delivers. She can Ix; 
reached 9 am. to 5 p.m. during the 
weel^ 8 am. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. 



MuRphy ON ReaI Estate 



TerrI Murphy 



Improving your home with windows, doors 



We all know that we only 
have one chance to make a first 
impression. Tlie same applies to 
homes and their curb appeal. 
One of the most important facets 
of curb appeal besides landscap- 
ing is the attractiveness of the 
windows and doors. An impres- 
sive and unusual door or window 
arrangement can create an Inter- 
est, setting a home apart from 
others In the ncigliborhood. 

According to Rich Dlemke, a 
sales representative for Morgan 
Door and Anderson Windows, 
who informed us recently In an 
interview of how the attitude 
regarding windows has changed 
over the past 20 years. 
'T*reviously, windows were strict- 
ly a functional item for a home. 

Today, 'windowscaping' is as 
Important to the architecture of a 
home as 'landscaping' is to the 
exterior of tiie home." The small- 
ish, square windows of the '50s 
has been replaced by the 
Palladium window styles of the 
•90s. 

The Palladium style is a half 
circle glass window constructed 
over another window, giving an 
elegance with a contemporary 
touch to both the interior and 



tlve windows on the roof allow for 
natural lighting in hard to light 
areas like bathrooms and are 
equipped with remote controls 
for real usability operating In 
both open and closed positions. 
There Is hardly a reason for an 
older home to have a too dark 
area with the several new ideas 
that the window and glass indus- 
try has provided. 

The most common problem 
is "seal failures" in patio sliding 
glass doors. Generally ther- 
mopancd with two panes of glass 
with dead airspace in between, a 
broken seal causes the door to 
cloud up and look dirty. 
Replacement is a necessity and 
makes the home look maintained 
and a prospective buyer much 
happier. 

Tlie other modernization of 
windows is the vinyl-clad con- 
struction. The windows are 
wood, covered In a vinyl material 
circumventing scraping and 
painting every few years. 

Doors play an important part 
In the drama of a home. When 
the front door of a home has an 
interesting and different 
designed door or sidcli^ts, the 
first impression is one of interest 



exterior of the home. Our guest and appreciation. 



for more open floor plans, and 
the use of more natural light 
assisted the popularity of this 
change in consumer tastes. 

Mr. Lincoln Kniglit, a repre- 
sentative for Konslcr Ltd. in 
Libertyvillc, informed us of the 
"roof window" which replaces 
what we previously know as "sky- 
lights." The former plastic bubble 
protruding from the roof is a 
thing of tlic past. Tliese innova- 



"Sidcllghts" arc those glass 
areas on cither side of tlie door 
that allow for light and brightness 
in the foyer. New ideas here 
include eliminating the "plain" 
glass look and replacing it with a 
beveled, stained glass or "glue 
chip" look vwhich allows for light, 
but diffuses the clarity of the glass 
for privacy. If you arc considering 
updating your present older 
home prior to marketing It for 




i-;i'>jyikl£ia3ii;iH-iifk^itt"tf£^ 



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MAIN OFFICE 



LEWIS AVE. OFFICE 



^ 



Madison at County Si. 

Waukegan, IL 60079 

(708) 623-0084 



1428 NWth Lewis 

Waukegan, IL 60083 

(708) 249-6307 



GURNEE OFFICE 
S384 Grand Avenue 
Gurnee,IL 60031 X^ 
(708) 249-6312 mWi 




sale, a good 

investment 

can always 

be new 

windows 

and doors. 

Slx-pancl 

pine or oak 

doors will 

add real 

value and 

elegance to a tract home, setting 

It apart from the several other 

similar models. Front doors arc 

the first thing a buyer sees, so 

check out the prc-hung doors 

available. 

A reasonable investment in 
updating and maintaining your 
home can reap major dollars 
when your home is in competi- 
tion with others for the sign 
marked "SOLD." 

Editor's note: Questions or 
comments may be directed to 
Terri Murphy, Box 6234, 
Uberlyi/iUe, IL 60048. 



WeIcome 
WAqoN 

Helpful Civic Informaiion to ac- 
quaint you with your community. 
Cali tiio Welcome Wagon represen- 
tativo so that she may visit you. 

Antioch 

Karen 
356-6377 

Fox Lake/lngloside 

Gena 
• 973.0920 

Fox Lake/Spring Grovo 

Sherry 
587.1626 

Qrayslake 
Lake Villa 
Wildwood 



VIoia 
336-5971 



Linda 
223-1607 



Gurnee 

Palt! 
223-6498 



Inglesida 

Gena 
973.0920 



Linda 
735-0650 



Lindenhurst 

Kris 
356-3881 

Lake Zurich 

Ann Jeanette 

540-5790 438-9049 

LIbertyvllle 



Sally 
680-1599 



Lincolnshire 

Letty 



945-3161 



Long Grove 

Klldeer 

Hawthorn Woods 



Bonnie 
540-7981 



Mundelein 

Karen Marta 

566-4263 405-9130 

Round Lake Area 

Phebe Karpel Priscilla 

223-8504 740-3163 

. Vernon Hills 

Letty Maureen 

945-3161 949-6926 

Wauconda 
Island Lake 

526-7509 

You are entitled to a complimentary 
subscription from your hometown 
newspaper. To receive your paper, 
contact your Welcome Wagon rep- 
resentative or call Lakeland News- 
papers at (708) 223-8161. For in- 
formation about positions with the 
Welcome Wagon call Maria at 
(708) 577-3637. 



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AuqusT 19^ 1994 LAkdANd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE' 




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PUBLIC NOTICE 
. ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Trail's End Pizza 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE . 
BUSINESS IS TO BE^ 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 522 

Washington, Round Lake 
Park, IL 60073. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. 
CON-DUCTING OR 
T R AN S ACTING 
BUSINESS: Edward , 
Lehocky, 311 Grandvlew 
Dr., Round Lake Park, IL 
60073; Debra Lehocky, 
.311 Grandvlew Dr., Round 
Lake Park, IL 60073^ 
STATE OF ILUNQIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that the 
undersigned lntend{8) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the . 
locatlon(s) indicated and 
that the true or real lull 
name(3) of the per8on(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Edward Lehocky 
Deljra Lehocky 
August 3, 4 994 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me . by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this. August 3, ' 
1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Carmen E.Toro 

• Depijty County Clerk 

Received: August 3, 1994 

Linda lanuzi Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0894B-052-RL 

August 12, 1994 

August 19, 1994 

August 26, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF'BUSINESS: 
Znalezniak Construction 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 22030 'W. 
Washington St., 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING. 
CONDUCTING. OR 
TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: John J. 
Znalezniak, 22030 W. 
VVashlngton ' St., 

Grayslake, IL 60030. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) Indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the parson(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
John J.- Znalezniak . 
August 10, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person{s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this August 10, 
1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Eva M. Rivera 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: August 10, 19fW 

Linda lanuzi He is 

Lake County Cl€ k 

0894C-059-GL 

August 19, 1934 

August 26, 1994 

Septembers, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Case No. CV94-d3361 
Dept. No. 9 

Second Judicial District Court 
Stale of Nevada, Wathoe County 

FAUSTIN CARL ROMERO and 
.SARA L ROMERO, husband & wife, 
Plaintiff, 

vs. SUMMONS 

LYNN E. PURCELLvTrusteo for • 
MARIO E.GILDONED.D.S. LTD. 
PENSION & PROFIT SHARING TRUST, ot al. 

Defendants 
TO: DEFENDANT JOSEPH F. CLEMENT: , 
TO THE DEFENDANT: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE 
COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR 
BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 
DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW VERY 
CAREFULLY. 

A ctvit complaint has been filed by the plaintiff against 
you for the relief as set foith In that document (see com-, 
plaint). When sen/ice is by publication, add a brief state- 
ment of the object of the action. See Rules of Civil 
Procedure, Rule 4, (b). 

1 . If you intend to defend this lawsuit, you must do the fol- 
lowing within 20 days after service of this summons, 
exclusive of the day of sen/ice: 

a. File wHh the Cleifc of this Court, whosis address Is 
shown below, a formal written answer to the oomplaint, 
along with the appropriate filing fees, in acconjance with 
the niles of the Court 

b. Sen/e a copy of your answer upon the attorney or 
plaintiff whose name and address is shown belowl 

2. Unless you respond,. a default will be entered upon 
application of the plaintiff and this Court may enter a judg- 
ment against yoU for the relief demanded in the com- 
.plaint ' 

Dated this 1st day of June, 1994. 

Issued on behalf of plaintiff or plaintiffs attorney: (SEAL) 

Judith A. Otto, Esq. JUD! BAILEY, CLERK OF COURT 

Name: HENDERSON & NELSON by V. Stewart 

AddnaGs: 164 Hubbard Way, Siie B Deputy Clerk 

Reno, NV 89502 Second Judicial District Court 

Phono Number: 825-7000 75 Court Street 

Reno, Nevada 69501 



Case No. CV94-03361 
Dept. No. 9 . 



FILED 

'94 JUL 25 P3;15 
JUDI BAILEY, CLERK 
* BY: V. Stowert, Deputy 
IN T>f E SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE 
STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF WASHOE 
FAUSTIN CARL ROMERO and 
SARA L ROMERO, husband 
find wifo 

Plaintiffs, ORDER FOR PUBLICATION 

vs. OF SUMMONS 

LYNN E. PURCELL,Tmsteo 
forMARIOE. GILDONE 
D.D.S. LTD. PENSION & 
PROFIT SHARING TRUST; 
MARIO E. GILDONE; 
JOHN DeWITT and ELEANOR 
DeWITT; JOSEPH CLEMENT 
and JOANN CLEMENT, also 
known as JOANN WOODRUFF; 
and IRENE SCHUEGEL, 
Defendants. 
Upon reading the Motion for Publication of Summons 
and the Affidavit of Due Diligence filed herein, and good 
cause appearing therefor, ^e Court finds: 

1. That Defendant, JOSEPH F. CLEMENT, cannot 
be found within the State of Nevada; 

2. That the Summons and Complaint heroin cannot 
be sen/ed upon Defendant, JOSEPH F. CLEMENT, in 
person; 

3. That the last known address of Defendant, 
JOSEPH F. CLEMENT, is 17340 Woodland Dr., 
Grayslake, Illinois 60030. 

4. That it appears from Hie Complaint on file herein 
that a cause of action exists in favor of Plaintiff and 
against Defendant and that said Defendant is a neces- 
sary and proper party herein; 

5. That the Gmystake Times, a newspaper published 
in the City of Grayslake, State of Illinois, is circulated in 
the Cjty of Grayslake, and is the newspaper most likely to 
give notice to Defendant of the pendency of this action; 

NOW, THEREFORE, IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that 
the Summons in this suit be sen/ed on Defendant, 
JOSEPH F. CLEMENT, by depositing a copy of the 
Summons and Complaint in tiie United States mail, 
directed to said Defendant at his last known address, 
17340 Woodland Dr., Grayslake, Illinois 60030 and by 
publication thereof in the above-named newspaper, and 
that said publication be made for a period of four weeks, 
and at least once a week during said time. 
DATED this 25th day of July, 1994. 

Mills Lane 
DISTRICT JUDGE 

0894B-046-GL 

• August 12, 1994 

August 19, 1994 

August 26. 1994 

September 2, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE ! 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Notice Is hereby given by the Board of Education of 
School District No. 37, In the Gounty-of Lake, Stale of 
Illinois, that a tentative budget for said school district for 
Ihe fiscal year beginning July 1, 1994, will be on file and 
conveniently available to public Inspection at Gavin South 
School, 25775 W. Highway 134, Ingleslde, Illinois, In this 
school district from and after 8:00 o'clock A.M. on the 
18th day of August 1994. 

Notice is further hereby given that a public hearing on 
said budget will be held at approximately 7:00 P.M. on the 
21st day of September 1894 at Gavin South School In 
this School District No. 37, In the County of Lake, State of 
Illinois. Kristine Johnson, Secretary 

. Board of Education 
Dated this 1 1 th day of August 1 994 
0894C-066-FL 
August 19, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE , 

PETITION FOR ADOPTION FAMILY DIVISION 

OF PAIGE ELIZABETH KRALY 
A MINOR FEMALE CHILD CASE NO. 94 E 1910 

ADOPTION NOTICE 
To Tamara Louise Matthles 

TAKE NOTICE that a Petition was filed In the Circuit 
Court of Lake County, Illinois, for the adoption of a child 
named Paige Elizabeth Kraly; therefore, unless you, 
Tamara Louise Matthles, file an answer to the Petition In 
said suit or othenwise file your appearance therein, in the 
said Circuit Court of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit, Lake 
County, Illinois, In the City of Waukegan, Illinois, on or 
before the 16th day of September, 1994 a default may be 
entered against you at any time after that day and a judg- 
ment entered In accordance With the prayer of said 
Petition. 



(SEAL) 

DATED July 27, 1994 

AT Waukegan, Illinois 



Sally D. Coffelt 

CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT 

UKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

0e94B-0p6-GL 

August I2i 1994 

' August 19, 1994 

August 26, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

GRAYSLAKE AREA PUBLIC UBRARY DISTRICT 

148 CENTER STREET 

GRAYSLAKE, ILUNOIS 60030-1590 

ORDINANCE NO. 94-3 

ANNUAL BUDGET AND APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE FOR 

GRAYSUKE AREA PUBUC UBRARY DISTRICT FOR THE 

RSCAL YEAR COMMENCING 1 JULY 1994 AND 

ENDING 30 JUNE 1995 

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE BOARD OF LIBRARY 

TRUSTEES of the Grayslake Area Public Library District: 

SECTION I 
It is found and detennined by the Board of Library 
Tmstees of the Grayslake Area Public Library District (the 
"District^: 

a. The Tentative Annual Budget and Appropriation 
Ordinance of the District for the fiscal year 1994-1995 has 
been made available for public inspection for at least 30 
days; 

b. Pursuant to notice published at least 30 days in 
advance, a public hearing viras held on the tentative 
Budget and Appropriation Ordinance. 

SECTION II 
The amounts herein set forth, or as so much tf^ereof 
as may be authorized by law and as may be needed, are 
hereby budgeted and appropriated to defray the expens- 
es and liabilities of the District, as set forih in Section III 
for the fiscal year 1994-1995. 
A. 



1. 



2. 



Lakeland Classllleds 
Get the Job Done! 
Call (708)223-81 61 . 



NERAL UBRARY FUND 


BUDGET 


APPROPRIATION 


library materials 






a. Books 


$30,000 


$45,000 


b. Periodicals 20,000 


30,000 




c. Reference/Standing 






Orders 


27,500 


41,250 


d. Other Print Materials 


700 


1.050 


e. Audiovisual 


12,000 


18,000 


Operation expenses 






a. Gas 


$2,000 


$3,000 


b. Electric 


10,000 


15,000 


c. Telephone 5,000 


7,500 




d. Water 


800 


1,200 


e, Garbage disposal 


1.000 


1,500 


f. Postage 


2,000 


3,000 


g. Insurance 


26,000 


39,000 


h. Maintenance 


8,000 


12,000 


i. Stationery 200 


300 




]. Supplies 


9,000 


13,500 


k. Promotkinal 


6,000 


9,000 


1. Publishing 4.000 


6,000 




m. Legal 


12,000 


18,000 


n. Binding 


500 


750 


0. Equipment, building 


5,000 


7,500 


p. Equipment, office 


2,000 


3,000 


q, Professional meeting 






expense 


5,000 


7,500 


r. Memberships 


800 


1.200 


8. Educatkin 


500 


750 


1. Other expenses ' 


1,000 


1,500 


u. Programming 


1,500 


2,250 


V. Automation 


40,000 


60,000 



$445,200 

12.000 

$805,950 



APPROPRIATION 
$50,550 



APPROPRIATION 
$34,050 



3. Personnel . 

a. Salaries $296,800 

b. Other contmdual services a.OOO 

. . ' $537,300 

Cash on hand al Ihe end of fiscal year$0.00 
•B. RETIREMENT FUNDS 

1, jBinois Municipal Retirement 

a. Receipts 
(1 ), Cash on hand at beginning 

of fiscal year $0.00 

(2). Property Tax 

Revenue ^Sj23Q. 

Total receipts ^9,230 

b. Expenditures BUDGET 
(1). Payment to Illinois Municipal 

Retirement Fund $33,700 

2. Social Security 

a. Receipts 
(1 ). Cash on hand at beginning 

of Ttseal year. $0,00 

(2), Property Tax 

Revenue $20.676 

Total receipts $20,676 

b. Ei^ndttures BUDGET 
(1). Payment to Social 

Security $22,700 

Cash on hand at end of fiscal year $0.00 

C. PUBLIC UABILITY FUND 

1. Receipts 

a. Cash on hand at beginning 

of fiscal year $0.00 

b. Property Tax Revenue $10.439 

Total Receipts $10,439 

2. Expenditures- ■ " BUDGET APPROPRIATION 
a. Payment of Public Uabllity 

Insurance Premiums $8,000 $12,000 

Cash on hand at end ot fiscal year $0.00 

D. AUDIT FUND . 

1. Receipts 

a. Cash on hand at beginning 

of fiscal year $0.00 

b. Property Tax Revenue $4.175 

Tola] receipts $4,175 

2. Expenditures . BUDGET 
a. Payment of audit $3,000 

Cash on hand at end ot fiscal year $0.00 

E. BUILDING AND SITES 

1. Receipts 

a. Cash on hand at beginning 

. 6) fiscal year SO.OO 

b. Property Tax Revenue S2i2Si 

Total receipts $29,230 

2. Expenditures BUDGET APPROPRIATION 
a. Payment of building 

fund $25,000 S37.500 

Cash on hand at end ot fiscal year $0.00 

SECTION III 
Summaiy ol Budget and Appropriation by Funds; 



APPROPRIATION 
$4,500 



FUND 

I. General Libraiy 

II. Retirement 

III. Public Liability 

IV. Audit 

V. Buikiing and Sites 



APPROPRIATION 

$805,950 

$84,600 

$12,000 

$4,500 

S37.500 

$944,550 



are 



BUDGET 
$537,300 
556,400 
$8,000 
$3,000 
$25.000 
$629,700 
SECTION IV 
The folknving detenninations have been made and 
hereby made a part of the aforesaid budget: 

a. The cash on hand at the beginning of the fiscal year ts 
$5,421,341. 

b. An estimate of the cash expected to be received during 
the fiscal year from all sources is 3942,520. 

c. An estimate of the expenditures contemplated for the 
fiscal year is $1 ,640,000. 

d. An estimate ot the cash expected to be on hand at the 
end of the fiscal year is $4.723,661 . 

e. An estimate of the amount of taxes to be. received dur- 
ing the fiscal year 

Real Estate Tax . $901,969 

Personal Property Replacement Tax " $4.000 

$905,969 
The balance in the Woridng Cash Fund is $276.631 . 

SECTION V 
This Onlinance shall be in full force and effect imme- 
diately upon its passage, approval, and publication as 
required by law. 

Passed and approved: 9 August 1994 
YEAS: HALSEY, KRUEGER, SHAY, RICH AND 

STAR2EC 
NAYS: ■ NONE 
ABSENT: MCGUIRE AND NORDHAUS 

Kent Rich, President 
Date of Enactment: 9 August 1994 
Effective Date 9 August 1994 

Date of Posting: 11 August 1994 
ATTEST: 

Sharon Kmeger, Secretary 
GRAYSLAKE AREA PUBUC LIBRARY DISTRICT 
146 CENTER STREET 
GRAYSLAKE, ILLINOIS 60030-1590 
CERTIFICATE OF SECRETARY 
I, Sharon Kmeger, Secretary, do hereby certify that I 
am the duly elected, acting, and qualified Secretary of the 
Boanj of Tmstees of the Grayslake Area Public Library 
District, Lake County, Illinois; that as such Secretary, I am 
the keeper of the official records of said library districL 

1 do hereby certify that ^e attached copy of the 
Annual Budget and Appropriation Ordinance of the 
Grayslake Area Public Library District for the fiscal year 
beginning 1 July 1994 and ending 30 June 1995, Is a full, 
complete, correct, and compared copy of the original said 
Ordinance, now on file in my office, passed by the Board 
of Library Tmstees of the Grayslake Area Public Library 
District at a legally convened meeting held at 148 Center 
Street, Grayslake, Illinois, 60030-1590 on the 9th day of 
August 1994. 

Sharon Kmeger, Secretary 
Board of Library Tmstees 
Grayslake Area Public Library District 
Lake County, Illinois 60030-1590 

0894C-065-GL 
August 19, 1994 







i RV CAMP UkdANd Newspapers AuqusT 19, 1994 



liill wmmm w^Smi^m^mmmF 





Kramer's Kampers Inc. 



New and 
•Fold Downs 
•Travel Ti'ailers 



Pre-rowned 
•Fifth Wheels 
•Truck Campers 



•Travel Supreme 

•Hornet 

•Shadow Cruiser 

•Coleman 

•Palomino 

•Challenger 



Parts & Accessories Store - LP Gas 



38401 N. SHERIDAN RD. 
WAUKEGAN, IL 60087 

(708) 623-3989 

1/2 mile S. of Illinois Beach State Park 



OPEN 7 DAYS 



SUBVERT 





comin 



IGRMAMERICm 







I 



August 17th thru 

10 AM to 8 PM/Sun. 10 AM to 6 PM 



HUNDREDS OF: " Motor Homes ' Vans 
Mini Homes Travel Trailers * 5th Wheels 
Fold Downs « Park Models ^ truck Campers 
Also Many Exhibits on Display! Parts, 
Accessories and Sundries. 



OVER 
400 Units on Display 



'SkShJW V k A A -^^J# Li'il 



IDon'i Miss 
This! 



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THERE WILL BE SPECIAL APPRAISERS ON HAND, SO BRING YOUR TRADE. 
DEALS MADE ON THE SPOT, DRIVE THEM HOME AND CAMP THAT WEEKEND. 



r-c"-'— 






FOR MC3FiEnNF,ORMATtON-. 
CALU .;. (708) G23-39S9 



LARCEST USED fIV & 
CAMPER SELECTION 

Just some of the major brands on display at 
this year's show: 

Winnebago, Cobra, Southwind, Pace Arrow, Rockwood, Jayco, Tracker, 
Falcon, Ultra, Explorer, Starcraft, Mark III, Nomad, Shadow Cruiser, 
National RV, Sun, Line, Palomino, Coleman, Surrey, Award, Ultra, Al-jo, 
Skamper, Laton, Safari, Itasca, Terry, Viking and many more. 



H\iT[\!\(. 

vT im 

ROl It <JS> 

i,R\)yl\KE 
n JiT >rJt TH 
OFCRm 
\\\iKI(\ 




FREE PARKING 



Senior Citizens -Wednesday, Thursday, Friday -An additional Sl.OO off admission price ' 

• Children 12 and Under Free Each Day • 
■ Door Prizes Each Evening • Discount Coupons To Great America * 



I 



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^DISCOUNTXOUFO 



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One Coupon Per Paid Admission a One Coupon Per Paid Admission 
I Admission Price $4.00 g Admission Pj-ice $4.00 

,; FREE PARKING 8/17-8/21/!>4 „ FREE PARKING 8/17-8/21/94 n 



.•.:-iS.i<.':'>'4c/'ii:;:t.'-,tU.x,4-iM,t,i»/S' 



foisooUNj^couPor^i 



!SAVE*1"*^SAVE*1*" 

n One Coupon Per Paid Admission One Coupon Per Paid Admission 

a Admission Price S4.00 , S Admission Price $4.00 

L FREE PARKING 8/17-8/21/94 » FREE PARKING 8/17-8/21/94 | 

a ►ra'iff eosa oesq sxszi CBSsi fsxa rtiKxsMiKaa tassa Kssea casoi esor^ lasss taaa cosul 



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AuqusT 19, 1994 UhM Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE. 



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ANDY 



McKIE 

FOX LAKE, IL 






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^e 're Back In Full Swing So. 
Swing On In For Some 



great MONEY-SA 




SERVICES 



Quick Lube 
30 Minutes or Less 



Cooling System ServicP 






$ 







S3 





Complete chassis lubrication. Genuine Mopar oil 

filter, new oil (up to 5 qts. cars/6 qts. trucks) and 

check of all fluid levels. 

(Vehicles requiring spcciol/cstra oil and dicaci fillers slightly higher) 
Price does DOl include Tec for cnvironnwntal disposal ofused fluids and batteries. 

I DODGE TRUCK PRICES MAY VARY 

_ Ofl«f g<x><]b««MmJbV2S, t&M,an(tAiMuat2l)J904.Pr*Mntcoi49«n«t)*notdMliMtn«i. Cannotba _ _ 

H uawlwltiinr Dlharc<upcnioitp*d«l*.T«K«an«llndud«l. ■ ■ 







m 



•Inspect hoses and belts 
•New Mopar antifreeze (1 gal. max.) 
•Pressure test system 
•Complete cooling system flush 

(Chemical flush, V8 cagtacs and additional parU/labor extra) 

IVicc does not include fee for cnvironincntal disposal of used fluids and batteries. ~ 

DODGE TRUCK PRICES MAY VARY 

Offfigood tMtwMn JJy 3S, 1994, mi Augutt 2fl, 1M4. PrtMnI coupon atMn otdw I* wiinsn. Cvntt b* 
um4 with any ofMr ctx^Mia Of ip«d<l*. Tun* not hdudcd. 



Wheel Bearing 
Repack 



^^ Engine MairHenaTu^'^'l 

Tune-Up 



n 




^i^ 




'^i 



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►Repack bearings (non-driving axle) and install 
new grease seals if needed 

•Inspect front pads/rear linings 

DODGE TRUCK PRICES MAY VARY 

OtfM good b«tWMn July 2S, 19M, and Auginl 24. 1 9M. Pl*M«t coupon tt»n ordtf h wHnen. Cannol bo 
UMd witi my olh«rcoupan$ or tpadali. Taxa* not Indudtd, 



'40.48 
'51.02 

'64.00 



LOnMgoodb«tw»M Julf 25 J9M, and AugiMin.lBM. Pi*M«t coupon wn*nord*fnwnnen.c«u»i bo h mt oir« 

UMdwiti inyolh«rcoupan$or>p«diili.Taxa*nollndud*d, ■ ■ uMKi 



4 Cylinder 
6 Cytindet 
^ Cylinder 
•Mopar/Champion spark plugs 
•Inspect emission componcnls 
•Set liming, adjust idle speed (if applicable) 
(vehicles equipped with greater than 2-BBL 
carb and std ignition slighll;f higher) 
•Additional labor/special spark plugs extra 

DODGE TRUCK PRICES MAY VARY 

OITat good bchnon July ZJ, 1604, md August 20, 19d4.P(eMnlaoupo«intien ordwii wrtBen. Ccmottw 
UMd nAtt any oltwr ooivoni or ^>«dalt. Tuai not ndudod. 



1 i)©4 Fi¥l«S¥Ml 

SERVICE QUALITY AV/ARD 



SANDY McKIE and SONS 



CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH DODGE AND DODGE TRUCKS 



SHOWROOM 
Open Monday Thru Thursday 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
' Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. • CLOSED SUNDAY 



IcKiE 



SERVICE PARTS 
OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. lo 5:00 p.m. 
CALL 587-6471 " 



Q^opori 

CUSTOME/?CARE 



91 South Rt«. 12 



»X LAKt. IL 



709-587-6473 



L^ 




1 OBITUARIES lAl<ElANd Newspapers AuqusT 19, 1994 




Griejhotesi 



James Gunner Osterman 

' Age 53 of 503 Mary Knoll Ct., Twin Lakes, WI and 
fonncrlyofWauconda, IL passed away Thursday morn- 
tng,AugustU, 1994 at his home following a long Illness. 
He was born on August 30, 1940 in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota, ttie son of the late Gunnar and Gunhild 
Almeren Osterman. On June 28, 1969 in Rockton, IL He 
was united in marriage to Mary Flsli. Tlicy lived In 
Wauconda, IL until moving to Twin Lakes In 19B1. He 
worked as a truck driver for tlie Echo Like Produce Co. 
in Burlington, WI. 

Mr. Osterman is survived by his wife Mary, one son, 
Erik Gunner Osterman of Twin Lakes, WI; two brotliers, 
Bob and Bill; three sisters, Betty, Clara and Florence. 

There will be an open house from 2 to 5 p.m. 
Sunday, August 21, 1394 at the Osterman Home at 503 
Mary Knoll Ct., Twin Lakes, WI with a Celebration of Life 
at 3 p.m. Memorial remembrances may be made to the 
Lakeland Hospice, P.O. Box 1107, Elkhorn, WI 53121 or 
the Kenosha County Dept. of Social Services-Child 
Abuse, c/o Seymour Adler, 714 52nd St., Kenosha, WI 
53140. The Haase Funeral Chapel of Twin Lakes is serv- 
ing the Osterman Family. 

Joseph W. Koukol 

Age 76 of Waterford, WI died August 13, 1994 at 
Memorial Hospital in Burlington, WI. He was born on 
July 13, 1918 in Chicago, IL to John and Mary (Kubes) 
Koukol. He spent his early life in Antioch, IL On March 
6, 1943 he married Frances M. Paiaske at St. Peter's 
Catholic Church in Antioch, IL He was then a resident 
of Chicago until he moved to Waterford, WI in 1947. He 
was a Tool and Die Maker for J.I. Case Co. and Snap On 
Tools. He was a member of St. Clare Catholic Church in 
Wind Lake and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He also 
served In the US Army Pacific Theatre during World War 
II, receiving the Purple Heart for injuries received. 

He Is survived by his wrife Frances M; one daughter 
JoAnn Oohn A.) Krcsken of Burlington; two grandchil- 
dren Barbara (Dr. Joseph) Krlen of LaCrosse, WI and 
John {his fiancd Margie Hlnz) Kresken, also of 
Burlington; four brothers-in-law Theodore (Jeanne) 
Paiaske of Florida, Daniel (Doris) Paiaske of Florida, 
Philip (Audrey) Paiaske of Canada, George (Alice) 
Paiaske of Antioch; two sisters-in-law Alice (Edward) 
Podboyof Waukegan and Bernice (Earl) of Antioch. He 
was preceded In death by his parents and a brother 
John. 

Visitation was held Monday," August 15, 1994 at 
Mealy-Koenig Funeral Home in Waterford, WI. Funeral 
services were at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, August 16 at St. Clare 
Catholic Church in Wind Lake, WI with Rev. Joseph L 
Baran officiating. Interment was at St. Charles 
Cemetery, Buriington. In lieu of flowers, memorials 
would be appreciated to the Memorial Hospital 
Foundaiionr 252 McHenry St., Burlington, WI 53105. 

John P. Peters 

Age 66, a resident of Rolling Meadows for 39 years, 
died Sunday, August 14, 1994 at Northwest Community 
Hospital In Arlington Heights, IL He was born June 1, 
1928 In Chicago, IL He was a retired plating foreman 
and a Wodd War II Navy Veteran, 

Survivors include three daughters Susan (Bob) 
DePrat of Yorba Linda, CA, Cindy Peters of Port St. 
Lucie, FL and Debbie (Neal) WiHie of Paladne, IL; two 
brothers Eugene (Bunny) Peters of Green Acres, FLand 
Frank (Kathy) Peters of Grayslake, IL; two sisters Louise 
(Norrls) Slebert of Round Lake, IL and Linda (David) 
Kardoff of Grayslake, IL He was the grandfather of Rob 
and Scott DePrat and Ryan and Sarah Willie. He was 
preceded in death by his wife Opienc In 1987. 

Funeral services were at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, 
August 17, 1994 atAhlBrim& Sons Funeral Home, 201 N. 
NordiwestHwy., Palatine, IL Burial followed at Memory 
, Gardens Cemetery in Arlington Heights, IL Visitation 
was from 3 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, August 16 at Ahlgrim & 
Sons Funeral Home. For information, call 708-358-7411. 

John G. Skutas 

Age 77 of Antioch, IL passed"-away Wednesday, 
August 10, 1994 at his home. He was born August 16, 
1916 in Chicago and had lived in Milwaukee before 
moving to Antioch In 1981. He was a member of the 
General Electric Quarter Century Club of Waukesha, WI 
and the International Association of Machinists and 
Aerospace Workers. Mr. Skutas retired in 1981, after 48 
years of service with General Electric Medical Systems of 
Waukesha, WI. 

Survivors Include one sister, Bernice Skutas of 
Antioch, IL; two nieces, Fausta (Charles) Reynolds of 
Salem, WI and Joanne Oohn) Buck of Chicago, IL; tWo 
nephevtfs, Joseph Krupinskl, Jr. of DoUon, IL and Joseph 
Skutas, Jr. of Chicago, IL. He was the great uncle of four 
and the great-great uncle of two. He was preceded in 
death by one brodier, Joseph Skutas and one sister, 
Fausta Krupinskl. 

Graveside services were held at 12 noon Friday, 
August 12, 1994 at the Lithuanian National Cemetery. 
Justice, IL There was no visitation. In lieu of flowers, 
those desirltig may make contributions to the Antioch 
Rescue Squad In his memory. Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch handled die arrangements. 



c/dfcuia-' tsrufvettcLowAc^iel, ^zZcC. 




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Fourth Generation Family offering 
gineerity sensitivity fli con\fort in yo^^ 
time of need, ' , 

We work with your best Interest In 
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We encourage you to leant more about 
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Inquiries ewe always welcome. 



•Pre ■rranfiementi 
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Tcrsoiud caring for over 90 years 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Grayslake 
223-8122 



Death Notices 




AUAN 

Audrey Allan, 59, of ' 

Antioch, IL Arc Memorial 

Service will be held on 

Sunday, August 21 at 5:00 

p.m. at Mueller's Harbor 

Heights, Antioch, IL 

BEAVIS J-. . 

Cleo Faye Beavis, 79,"^of 

Libertyvllle, IL. Arr: 

Burnett Dane Funeral 

Home, Libertyville, IL 

BROOKS 

Robert R. Brooks, 47, of 

Mlllbum, IL Arr: Marsh 

Fjjneral Home, Gurnee, IL 

CHAPLESKV 

Marlon P. Chaplesky, 78, 

of Mundelein, IL Arr: 

Kristan Funeral Home, 

Mundelein, IL 

DREYER 

Mr. . Raymond E. (Ray) 

Drcyer, 84, of Ingleslde, 

IL. Arr: Fox Lake Fire 

Dept., Fox LakQ,IL 

GREENE 

Matilda E. "Tillc" Greene 

(nee Zieman), 88, of Lake 

Villa, IL. Arr. Marsh 

Funeral Home, Gurnee, IL 

KENNEDY 

Maud V. (Ruth) Kennedy, 

95, of Fox Lake, IL. Arr: 

K.K. Hamsher Funeral 

Home, Fox Lake, IL 

LARSON 

Allan V. Larson, 77, of 

Vernon Hills, IL. Arr: 

Burnett-Dane Funeral 

Home, Libertyvllle, IL 

MOORE 

Norman Moore, 72, of 

Round -Lake Park,iL An: 

K.K. Hamsher Funeral 

Home, Fox Lake, IL 

OELKERS 

Elmer F. Oelkcrs, of Lake 

Villa, IL Arr: Ringa Funeral 

Home, Lake Villa, IL 

RANADE 

Sharayu Ranadc, 77, of 
Libertyvllle, IL. Arr: 
Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Libertyville, IL 

RIORDAN 

John W. RIordan, 50, for- 
merly of Mundelein/ 
libertyville, IL Arn Private. 

SCHULER, SR. 

John R. Schuler, Sr., 50, of 
Ingleslde, IL Arr; K.K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home, 
Fox Lake, IL 



SIATTERY 

Gerald P. Slattery, 60, of 
Round Lake, IL Arr: 
Justen's Round Lake 
Funeral Home, Round 
Lake, IL 

SORENSON 

. Ulllan M. Sorenson, 78, of 
Lake Villa, IL Arn Strang 
Funeral Home, Antioch, IL 




PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
NAME OF BUSINESS: 
Resource Dynamics 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 226 

Windjammer' Lane. 
Grayslake, IL 60030. 
NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Matthew H. 
Hulbert, 226 Windjammer 
Lane, Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that tho 
undersigned ]ntend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business, 
are correct as shown. 
Matthew H. Hulbert 
August 15, 1994 

The foregoing Instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this August 15, 
1 994, 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Barbara Erskin 

Deputy County Clerk 

Received: Aug. IS, 1994 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lake County Clerk 

0894C-075-GL 

■ August 19, 1994 

-August 26; 1994 

September 2, 1994 



■ ^-7^-.-T.'v>^-*&.'«;>j 



W. 



'>x/< 



In tke Daily Rusk of Tkings.., 

It makes sense to consider all aspects of planning for tKe 
future. Preplanning final arrangements assures you the peace 
of mind that comes witK knowing your wishes will be honored. 
Our staff is availatle to discuss tKe variety of options ^. 

lilable. 



avail 



% % thfamsfier 

JunerattHome Ltd. 



Jtr"^ 



12 W.'PIttakea Lake Road, Fox Lako, Illinois 

yihe Chapel ott the Lakp 

Serving O^ou Jinytime . . . Mnya/ftere 

Phone: (708) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 



LEGAL 
NOTICES 

I^akeland Newspape 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Grass Lake School 
District #36, 26177 W. 
Grass Lake '. Road, 

Antioch, Illinois 60002 will 
entertain* bids for carpet 
for one classroom. 
Dated: August 10, 1994 ; 
0894C-062-Gen 
August 19, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAf^E OF BUSINESS: All 
About Cleaning Service 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE 
BUSINESS IS TO BE 
CONDUCTED OR 

TRANSACTED IN THIS 
COUNTY: 10 St. Paul St. 
Apt.. 3, Grayslake, IL 
60030. 

NAME(S) AND POST 
OFFICE OR RESIDENCE 
ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, 
CONDUCTING OR 

TRANSACTING 
BUSINESS: Dale L. 
Sphatt, 10 St. Paul St. 
Apt. 3, Grayslake, IL 
60030. 708-223-4507; 
Susan A. Sphatt, 10 St. 
Paul St, Apt. 3, Grayslake, 
IL 60030. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the 
location(s) indicated and 
that the true or real full 
name(s) of the person(s) 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
are correct as shown. 
Dale L. Sphatt 
Susarr A. Sphatt 
July 26, 1994 

The foregoing instrument 
was acknowledged before 
me by the person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 
business this July 26, 
1994. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Dawn Runyard 

Notary Public 

Received: July 26, 1994 

Linda lanuzl Hess 

Lako County Clerk 

0894A-021-GL 

Augusts, 1994 

August 12, 1994 

August 19, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE. 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

THE VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH Is accepting sealed bids 
for the purchase of one (1) 1995 3/4 Ton 4-Wheel Drive 
•Pick Up Truck. 

Separate sealed bids wilt be received by the Village of 
Antioch, Illinois at the Office of the Village Clerk, Candi L. 
Rowe, Village Hall, 874 Main Street, Antioch, Illinois 
60002 until 2:00.Pf\^, Thursday, September 15, 1994, and 
then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. 

Specifications for the 1995 3/4 Ton 4-Wheel Drive Pick 
Up Truck are available during reqular business hours at 
the Office of the Village Clerk, Village of Antioch, 874 
Ivlain Street, Antioch, Illinois. 

The Village of Antioch reserves the right to reject any 
and all bids and bidders and waive all technicalities. The 
Village reserves the right to award all or any portion of 
this bid. 
Candi L Rowe 

VillageClerk 0894C-074-Gen 

Village of Antioch August 19, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

Separate sealed BIDS for the improvement of Anita 
Avenue between Green Briar and North Avenue will be 
received by the Village of Antioch, Illinois at the office of 
the Village Clerk, Village Hall, 874 Ma\n Street until 2:00 
P.M., August 30, 1994, and then at said office publicly 
opened and read aloud. 

The Village of Antioch resen/es the right to reject any 
and all bids and bidders and waive all technicalities. All 
proposals submitted shall be valid for a period of sixty 
(60) days. The Village resen/es the right to award all or 
any portion of this bid. 

All CONTRACTORS will be required to comply with the 
Equal Employment Opportunity Clause of the Illinois Fair 
Employment Practices Commission and the Wages of 
Employees on Public Works Act of the Illinois Revised 
Statutes. . . '>' 

The CONTRACT DOCUIWENTS may be examined at 
the following locations: 

AnKoch Village Halt, 874 Main Street. Antioch, IL 60002 

Clarit Dietz, Inc., 4235 Green Bay Road, Kenosha, WI 53144 

Complete sets of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may 
be obtained at the office of Clark Dietz, Inc., 4235 Green 
Bay Road. Kenosha, WI 53144, at a cost of $25.00 per 
set, non-refundable. 

■ Each BID must be accompanied by a BID bond pay- 
ment to the OWNER for ten percent of the total amount of 
the BID. 
•Candi L. Rowe 

VillageClerk • ' 0894C-067-Gen 

Village of Antioch August 1 9, 1 994 




Auqu5TT9, 1994 UkelANd Newspapers ClASSIFIED 




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Auctions 

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Hdp Wanted Rut-Time 21? 

Hdp Wanted FuU-Tlme , 220 

EnqjIoymcntAgcodes,.,.. „ 221 

BuslQessOpportinltles „ 225 

SllutUoDS Wanted „ ., 228 

Child Caie ...,.„ .240 

Scbooi/Instnictlon „ 250 

Antiques .„.„..„ „ 301 

App||2I]CCSl4ll«l«k*l44l4444»t4il«« 4* 4M4l*l If 4*P*44l<4 *■»■■*• 3^4 

Bartei^radc 308 

Bazaxis/Cnfts , .....310 

BuUdtagMalerlak .,..314 

Business/Dfflce Equipment „ ; 3ig 

ElectroolesAComputers „ 320 

FUXll UUIUC4f**tll*tl4lf«tl<IIMHHIHMa»4tlPHMf*<Mtt4*l44« »t4**l4*l(« !■■ ■'■ jZ^i 

niorood „'....|..",.......,..„ „ 328 

Gaiffle'RunMiige Sales „ „ 530 

Good Things to EaL „ 334 

Hones ft Tack. „ „ 338 

Household Goods/FunMture. „ 540 

Jcwdiy. 344 

Lxwn^arden „..,.-,„ „...,.,..„ 348 

Miscdhnoous , „ „ 350 

Medical Equip/Supplies „ 354 

Musical Instnuncots 358 

PebftSuppUes 36O 

Restainmi Equipment. 364 

Tools ft Machineiy. 368 

Wanted To Buy. ..,.370 




Homes For Sale.,,.. , 500 

Homes For Rent „ „.,.504 

Homes Wanted.,... „ ,„.508 

Homes Builders 510 

UVUQQr 1 UWU llu[IK9 «4l*rM4l44«*l44lt«*«a4a4««*l4MM4f«M»MMIMN**<«IH*f«H4M4*4)l'l 

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Apartments For Rent .» ...,.,.....„„„ 520 

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RooQB For Rent „.. 530 

Buildings ., „ „ , 533 

Business Property For &de -..,™««.1t.......... 534 

Btclness Propeny For Rent „ 538 

lovestroeol Properly... 540 

Mortgage Services „ 544 

Faims „..„ « .„.. 548 

Vacant Lols/Acre^gc „„ „ 560 

Resofts/VacaMon RenUds „...„.„.,.„„,........„.....,..„...............564 

Cemetery Lots „ ...; 570 

Real Estate Wanied..™ 574 

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BoatsflHotois/Elc. 710 

Caiqibg ,..« «... 714 

TrweWacatlon 718 

Sporis EquipmeDl ..,«,.„.,.. »..'. .720 

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Rental/Leases ..» 808 

dasstc/AoilqueCus „ 810 

Service & Parts „ ,..„ 814 

CarLoaoVInsunnce »....t. 818 

Vans :.„.....™..- 824 

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Heivy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles » „. - 844 

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AppUaoces Repair S03 

Bladaop..,. ;. SO6 

Bdlders , SO9 

CupeoUy " SI2 

Carpet deaolng 515 

Coocretert:emenL S18 

DryWaU SI 

EducatlOD/Iostiuctloo ....S24 

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UundiyAleaniog • S45 

Legal Servlces.......,«H.H»:Mi»n S48 

Medical Seivlcei ...„..., S51 

Moving/Storage S54 

Palntlng'Decoraang., ; ^7 

PanLegal/rypfag Services SbO 

rtumbtag , S63 

Pools « i »6 

Pressure Washing - ......S69 

ProEesslooal Senlces ■; S72 

Radlo/TV Repair. S75 

Remodelli* S78 

Resumes , S8I 

Roofiog/Sldlog S84 

Storage ■ SB7 

TaxSertce. S90 

Trees/Plants W 

Wedding. S96 

MtscdLmeous Services S99 



disTRibuTioN 



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Kcnofiha 
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Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Antiocli News-Reporter • Round Lake News • lake Zurich Enterprise • 

lake Villa Record • Mundeleln News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Hmes • Fox lake Press • Gurnee Press • lindentiurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 



HOW TO PUCE A CUSSinED AD 



® 




BY 
PHONE... 

BY 
MAIL ... 

IN 
PERSON ... 



Call(708)'223-816| 



Lakeland Newspaper* 

P.O. Box 260 
Grayslatce, IL 60030 



30 S. Whitney St., 
Grayslake 




BY FAX ... (708)223-8810 



DEADLINES 

' Direct Line .Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mori.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm Friday 



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Lakeland 

Newspapers 







125 


Personals 



125 


Peisouls 



110 


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110 


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110 


Nottccs 



A MEMORIAL SERVICE for 
Audrey Allan will be hold Sun* 
day, August 21 si, 1994 at 5:00 
PM al Lupa's Resort located 
at 25276 W. Grass Lake 
Road, Antloch, IL 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

. ADVERTISERS 

M you have placed claulflcd 
advertising with the Lake 
land Newspapern you may 
receive a misleading state 
ment Tram anoUier Urm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. Tb receive prop' 
er credit to your account 
all payments Tor your Lake- 
land Newspapers adverUslng 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newipapen 

po B«x aea 

30 8. WUtney St. 
OnyalAke, IL 60030-0208 



OISNEY/EPCOT/UNIVERSAL 
STUDIOS FLORIDA. Diacovar 
.Kliiimmee-St. Cloud this fall 
and winter with discounts of 
up to 50% at many cantral 
f^torida attractions and lodging 
properties. Savings at attrac- 
tions such as Walt Disnoy 
World's® Pleasure Island. Sea 
World®, and Universal Stu- 
dios Florida®, as well as 
already affordable accommo- 
dations, are offered through a 
a free discount coupon book. 
Call 1-800-3S2-KISS. . 

Enjoy BRANSON Music 
Shows and SILVER DOLU^R 
CITY Crafts. Festival. FREE 
reservation service for beauti' 
tul Table Rock Lake resorts. 
Indian Point Chamber of 
Commerce 1-800-888-3313. 



would like to express their sincere thanks for all the prayers, 
cards and flowers during Joe's illness. He is recovering at 
honte and doing well. Once again, we would like to 
THANK the Fox Lake Rescue Squad, Police Department 
and Fight for Life for a job extremely well done l 

7^ /tUaia 7amcfy 



CONGRATULATIONS 

LARRY MARSHALL! 



^ 



Winning 1st Feattire in his 3rd week of Racing In 
1 994 with a S: 1 1 Track Record in Street Stock Class 



WAY TO GO! 



fe 



From the Dillons 






SWEDISH STUDENT INTER- 
ESTED IN SPORTS, READING. 
OTHER SCANDINAVIAN. 
EUROPEAN, SOUTH AMERI- 
CAN. ASIAN HIGH SCHOOL 
EXCHANGE STUDENTS AR- 
RIVING AUGUST, BECOME A 
HOST FAMILY/AISE. CALL 
BARBARA (2171243-8463 OR 
1-BOO-SIBLlNG. " 

$50.00 FREE GIFTS 

Start Christmas Shopping 

Nowl It's very simple, Just 

Invite some frtentte over 

for a relaxir^g evening of 

shopping. Amy, your 

ChrlBtmms Around Th» 

World Demonstrator 

(708) 4B7-7743. 

PARENTS- rOUG^OVE a 
support group for parents of 
troubled children/teens, 
meets each week, at Round 
Lake Area Park Dtst. room 
114. Located on Hart Rd. 
and Rte.134, Round Lake. 
GET THE SUPPORT 
YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING 
FORI Or call (800)92&-KIDS, 
For intomrattah. 

SINGERS NEEDED. CON- 
TEMPORARY CHRISTIAN 
CHOIR, "TELL THE 
WORLD-, NEEDS GOOD 
VOICES. Hlghschooi Fresh- 
man Ihru Late 30's. No Pay 
BUT Lots of SATISFACTION. 
CHURCHES: BOOK NOW 
FOR 1995 SEA50NI Call for 
Details, ask for Wall or 
Miriam. (708) 526-6306. 

WANTED. eS PEOPLE to 
k>se up to 30lbs. 30/day pro- 
gram, Start for under $100. 
(706) 360-0690. 



115 


Losl&Fotffld 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST inserliofi date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible for 
ONLY the FIRST Incorrect insertion. The newspaper will be 
responsible for only the portion of the ad that is In error. 
Please notify the Classified Department In the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to properly clas- 
sify ail advertising, edit or delete any obiectlonabie wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that In any way violates the Human 
Rights Act. 

Payment in Advance is Required for These Ads: 

•Advertisers out of l-nl<e1and circulation area 

•Business Opportunities •Mobile Homes 'Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers •Garage and Moving Sales 

'Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pets will bo considered for giveaway. 

WE ACCEPT: rngftsa 



FOUND AUGUST 9TH In 

Building #324 Parking Lot, 
Great L^kes, 2 Keys on Mitsu- 
bishi Key Rin (708) 6aB-5501 
to Idenllfy. 

FOUND- BLACK LAB. Near 
Savage Rd., Antloch area. Call 
(708) 746-81Z7, 



120 


Free 



120,000 BTU FURNACE, 

15 year old. Must Got 
(708)497-3903. 



125 


Personals 



SWF WHO LOVES THE 
OUTDOORS, TRAVEL 

AND COMPANIONSHIP. 

corrospond/eslablish a friend- 
sh^. with someone with simi- 
lar interests. Write Me: 304 
S. I3lh Ave., Sl.Charies. IL 
60174 or call mo (708) 
584-2956 after 6pm but be- 
fore 10pm. 



ADOPTION- PLEASE 
HELP. Loving prolosslonal 
couple happily manled for 14 
years desperately wants to 
complete our family. Our only 
chianco is you. We can tulllll all 
the dreams you tiave lor your 
preckius baby. Ttie baby will 
have a lltellme of k>ve and 
happiness and a devoted full 
time Mom arxl an adoring 
Dad. We live in a beautllut sub- 
uiban home with tots ol kkls 
arxl park nearby. We will pro- 
vide an excellent education 
arKJ linarKlal security. Confi- 
dential, medical, counseling, 
and court approved living ex- 
penses pakj. Please he^ by 
calling our attorney at 
(708)957-6843. 

ADOPTION- A LOVING 
ALTERNATIVE. Dr. Dad and 
crealh/e, at home Mom thank 
you for considering the gift of 
life. We understand this is a 
tough time but your concern 
nils our hearts with love and 
hope. Our loving, secure 
home is just waiting tor the 
laughter ol children. Medical, 
legal, counseling, and court 
approved living expenses 
paid. Information confkientlal. 
Please call our attomey at 
(708)957-6446. 

ADOPTION-TRUST US 
WITH YOUR GREATEST 
GIFT. Let us help you to give 
your predous baby everything 
you could wish for. tt for any 
reason you are unable to raise 
you baby yoursell- please 
trust us to tulllli your hopes 
and dreams. Your tnist and 
wishes will be honored. The 
baby will have a itiellme of love 
and happiness with a full time 
Mom and adoring Dad. We live 
In a beautiful suburban fwme 
and will provide an excellent 
educatbn and financial securi- 
ty. Confklential, medical, legal, 
counseling and court ap- 
proved living expenses paid. 
Please let us he^ by calling 
our attomey at (708)957- 
6843. 

DIVORCED SECURE 
MALE seeking friendship/cor- 
respondence. Enjoys home 
life, twating, minl/reguiar va- 
cattons. Write: BOX 36, RING- 
WOOD. ILL. 

FINANCIALLY SECURE 

COUPLE wants to adopt 
newborn. Gall Debbie and 
Steve collect (708)295-9515. 

IF YOU LOVE TO COOK, 
hate to cook, or Just need new 
Ideas, share a PAMPERED 
CHEF KITCHEN SHOW With 
your frienrjs! It's funi Call tor 
details (312)761-9148. 

ADOPTION: Abundant love, 
laughter, secure life await 
your newborn. Peace of mind 
for you. Loving father, stay- 
at-home mom. Expenses. 
Wendy and John 1-800-727- 
9662. 



POWERFUL PRAYER TO 
THE HOLY SPIRIT. Most 
Holy Spirit, You Who soVe all 
problems, Who lights my path 
so I can reach my goals, You 
Who give me the divine gHt to 
forgivo and forget the vnong 
that Is done to me arxl You 
Who are with me. I, in this dla- 
kigue, want to ttuink You tor all 
You have given me end to 
conllrm that I never want to bo 
separated from You. I wan* to 
t>o wllh You in Eternity. Thank 
You lor Your mercy towards 
me and mine. Persons must 
say this prayer 3-llmes for 3- 
conseculive days. Your favor 
will be granted even though It 
may appear difficult. Publish 
this prayer immediately after 
your favor is granted without 
mentioning the favor. H.S. 

ADOPTION- A FAMILY 
DREAM. One of the reasons 
there is a little extra surtshlne. 
laughter and ftapplness In tfie 
worM Is because of children. 
Because we are childless, 
there haveni been too marty 
sunny days. We krtow you can 
brigtiten our world wlih a child 
that will be guided with love 
and tenderness, and guar- 
anteed security. Medlcal/Le- 
gal/Counseling/Court ap- 
proved livtrtg expenses paid. 
ConlkJentia). Contact our attor- 
ney at (708)957-6835. 

Adoption: All the love a baby 
will ever want with a de- 
voted, financialty secure 
couple. Maybe we can help 
each other. Call Sandl and 
Bob 800-750-2450. 

WEIGHT LOSS BREAK- 
THROUGH Free 3 day sarrh 
ple and video. Call (708) 
580-1 108 or(70B) 872-5729 



130 



Auctions 



RICHARD DIAMOND AUC- 
TION SERVICE- -AUC- 
TION- SEPT.24, 1994. 
Round Lake. 7/wooded aaes, 
total seclusion, 3/car garage 
on this like new ranch home. 
Beautllut property on the edge 
ot town. Short drive to toltway. 
Will you b« the high bid? 
Opportunity Knocks! Call 
tor Rrochuren f708)356-9500. 

EMplOyMENl! 



219 



llelpWuiled 
Part-Time 



LOSERS WANTED! 5 to 

500t)S. Fast, Quick and Easy! 
Guaranteed. (708)548-SLIM. 

NEEDED 93 PEOPLE TO 
LOSE WEIGHT NOW. No 

will power needed. Newly pat- 
ented products, 100% natural, 
100% guaranteed. (612) 
388-8732. 





i XUSSIFIED ' l^ictlAr^l NwspAjMiRS^Auqijjf 1 9, 1 994 




219 



lldpWanlcd 
Part-Tlrac 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



FRIENDLY TOYS AND GIFTS 
has opBDlnge for damonstra- 
tori. No cash Inveetmnnt. 
Part ttmo hours wfth full lime 
pay. Two catalogs, over 700 
Itams. Call 1-800-4aa-4a76. 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 

$35,000 potential. 

Details 

|Call (1) 805-962-8000 
ExtB-4458 



HELP WANTED 
PART TIME 

Car Porter 

Call Troy or Tom 
(708) 680-7001 

Enterprise 
Rent-A-Car 




^' nORSE LOVERS ^ 
WANTED: 

Drivirrs for [lony deliver- 
ies to local {licnic!). Also, 
experienced harscdmwn 
tinyridc drivers. Teams 
needed to lead ponies 
weekends llirn October. 

PATCH 23 

rig 336-0120 :j1 



I PART TIME 
MAILROOM 

Thursdays in our 

Grayslake office. 

Perfect for retirees, 

married couples or 

someone wanting to pict<| 

up a little extra money. 

Call Bob Schroeder 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Ncwepapcrfi 



" WANT TO ' 
$HOP'TILL 
YOU DROP? 

If you were born to shop, 
then Peapod is for you! 
We are looking for cus- 
tomer oriented people 
to join our team as part 
time Personal Shoppers 
for our Lake Forest loca- 
tion. Shifts available: 
7:30AM - Noon & 
2:30PM -7:00PM. If you 
want to have fun and get 
paid great wages, tlien 
call us at 

(708) 866-1858 

<Z 51 



SENIOR 
CLERK 

EVENINGS/PART-TIME 

THE COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY seeks a clerk to 
assist in the administration ol 
exams, respond to inquiries 
and monitor progress of stu 
dents completing nursing 
checks. Ttiis is In the 
Learning Assistance Center, 

QUALIFiCATiONS Include 
high school diploma or GEO; 
6 months of office experi' 
ence; excellent communlca 
tion and strong organizational 
skills. Experience In working 
with the public and adminis- 
tering exams is higtily desir- 
able. 

COMPLETED application, 
resume and required typing 
test (given by appointment 
only) must be submitted by 
August 23, 1994. 

FOR MORE Information 
contact Personnel at 
708/223-6601 xt2216. TDD 
No. for hearing impaired: 
708/223-5615. 

COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY. 19351 W. 
Washington, Grayslake, IL 
60030-1198 {a.a./e,o.9.) 



219 



Hdp Wanted 
Part-time 



Part Time 



1 6-20 hours per week 

CALL TOM 
(708)740-0204 



Part Time 
RECEPTIONIST 

25 hours/week 

Part Time 

ASSISTANT 

20 hours/week 
Please send resume to: 

Dental 

P.O. Box 218 
Gumeo» IL 60031 



Para Optometric 
Assistant 

needed for busy 
optometry practice. 
Flexible 20-25 noufs per 
week, tvledlcol experi 
ence heipful but will 
Iralrv the right person. 

Cill Msrda t Ctnnli 
(708) 362-3444 



^ EXPERIENCED ^ 
FLORAL DESIGNER 

iq:00iuii - 2:00pm 
5 days a week 

Saljiry commcnsuralc 
with experience 
Apply Within 

Pope's Florist 

2304 Grand Ave. 
Waukcgan, IL 

i!i(708)863-POPE:f 



DRIVERSl 
WANTED I 

We ore looking fork 



exceptional people toC 
Delivery Drivers for J 



work as part timei 



our Lake Forest loca-^ 
tion. $7/hour, PERk 



DELIVERY bonus, C 

! 

fun I Must have ownS 



PLUS tips and lots of| 



car, proof of insurance ij 
and valid license.^ 
Shifta available: 9AM -k 
2PM; 4PM - 9PM. Coll J 

|(708) 866-I858S 



DOYOH ENJOY 

WORKINCiWIIH 

ANIHALS? 

We are seelting a 
penmanenl-, qualified 
person for five hours 
dally A\on.-FrL Must- 
love animats, animal 
experience helpfliL 
Cleaning, some 
plione work and 
routine medtcotfon 
with dogs and cats 
In a cheerful, no kill 
facility. Call 

8IS4S9-0990 

9 am - 5 pm 



PART-TIME RURAL CARRIERS 



Rural Carrier Associatss aro needed to provide service on established regular 
rural routes In the absence o( regiiar rural caxriors or to ptovide service on aux- 
iliary routes. TTils Is a pon -career position with no guarontoad work hours. Rural 
Cantor Associates are selected irom a register ol eligibles established as the 
result of an open compotilwo rural canier oxairtnalion. 

POSITION REQUIREMENTS 
1 ) Quality on written oxamination 4) GOOD Dfll VING R ECORD A MUST 

S) Valid state drivers license 5) Use ot personal vehicle 

3) Two years driving experienoa 6) Meet porsora) & medical 

suiiability requirements 
After 1 year as a Rural Carrier Associate, an employee nviy apply for lulMima 
rural carrier positions, as vacancies occur. 

•EXCELLENT HOURLY WAGE • S9.29 AN HOUR 
^litif roii, "GAS ALLOWANCE 

*'^^- * How toApply: Obtain art application Form 2479A/B 

from Spring Grove PostOtfica, 2410 Westward Dr., 
Spring Grove, IL 60081 , Applicants will be contacted 
concerning examination scheduling. 




Clerk - Typist 

35 hours/week working M-F 1 1 am-6 pm. Hca\y tjping minimum 

60 Vipm, (Mmputer experience using Microsoft Word, phone and 

customer senice ey^Krience a plus. Salaiy $7.00. 

Apply in Person 

Round Lake Area Park District 

. 814 Hart Road 
Round Lake, IL 






^ 



brtvori/School ,^. 
Bui 




If'sliofifust 
Kid 5 turn 



We Make Driving A School Bus 
Fun & Rowwdingl 

m 

\ Gnal Port'Ttme Opportvnitlti W/Full-Time Bentfihl 
\ AM'S&AFIUtNOONS 

: $8.K)PirHour 

S HOAAEMAKERS, RETIREES, STUDENTS, anyone 

■ who relales well I okidsond enjoys conventenlReable 
* morning and aflemoon scheduling! In return for yoor 

■ enthusiasm, we offer: 

■ Paid Training 

■ Paid Holidoys 

■ Monthly Bonus 

■ Credit Union 
H Company Paid Life Insurance 

■ Stock Purchase Plan 

■ Tuition Aid 

■ low Cost Medical Insurance 

Indh/iduats must be ot least 21 years old with a good 
driving record, drug tesJinq required Coil Today For 
Your Personal Interview! EOE AA/F/DW. 

708-680-9305 



■ 
a 



■ 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 




219 



Kdp Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Ip Wanted I 
'art-Tfane \ 



Be 

Part 



PART TIME 

WORK 

2 days a week 
hours are 1-5 

CaLI SANdy AT 
f708> y46^941 1 



Earn Up To 
$15 per nour 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

Complete training, 

paltl liotlctays. 

flexible part- lime 

hours. 

CoU 
Lynn Kopfcr 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

NcwepnpcTB 



GENERAL 
OFFICE 

Part-Tlme/Evenlngs 

THE COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY seeks a parson to 
be responsible for providing 
clorlcat support for the offlco 
ol Adult Continuing Education 
and Extension Services, 
assisting volunteers, students 
and staff. 

QUALIFiCATiONS Include 
a fiigh sctiool diploma or 
GED, one year of office expe- 
rience, 50 wpm typing. Word 
processing skills are higtily 
desirable. 

COMPLETED application, 
resume and typing test (given 
by appointment only) must bo 
fiubminod by August 23, 1994. 

FOR MORE Informalloo, 
contact Personnel at 
708/223-6601 xt.2216 (TDD 
No. for tiearlng Impaired Is 
708/223-5615). 

COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY. 19351 W. 
Wastilngton, Grayslake, IL 
60030-1196 (a.a^o.o.e^) 



ORDAT COfllinUniTV HIGH KHOOl 

h cuRitci«<Tly suldNq CANdidAiE Ion iIie lollowinr, position; 
*PART TIME CAFETERIA 

Hours: 1 1:00 aw ttJOpM 

MoNdAy ' FnidAy 

PlcAse Apply \h pCRsori Irom 8:00 am ' 10:30 am 

GfQAl Cofflmunltii Hloh School 

285 E. GRAND AVE. 

FOX IAKE,IL 



4lut, 

Jain the. Pizza Hut Team 

Part Tlme/Posalble Full Time 
Days and Evenings Available 

Waitresses, Cooks* Management 

'Flexible hours 'Benefits 
'Advancement Opportunity 
*Earn Competitive Wages 
Apply Within 
1414 N. MUwaukee Ave. 
LlbertyvUle, IL 60060 
EOE 



Now Hiring For 

Cashier/Stocker 

Full or Part Time 

2nd, 3rd Shifts & Weekends 

Will train. Stop in your local J&L 

and the following Union 76 locations 

for an application: 

Gurnee Grayslake 

18450 W. Grand Ave. 331 99 N. Highway 45 

Antioch Lake Bluff 

251 1 2 Rt. 1 73 21 8 Waukegan Rd. 

Inglesidc/Fox Lake 
500 E. Rollins Road 



Ryder Student Tromportatlon Services 



MRT-TIME 
CAREERS 

If you are at least 26 iand have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could qualify for a career in the 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits include: 

*Pension Opportunities 
*Discouiit Shopping Privleges 
*Paid Training 
*Edycational Benefits 
*f ree Uniforms 
*One Weelcenii a Montii 
*Two Weeiis per Year 
*iiO BOOT CAMP 

This is an excellent opportunity for you 
to put yourcivilian experience to work. 

^^ For more infoimatlon; 
Rich Hoffman 
RviMifsEiivl 708-088-3773 




219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



lEASING 

ICONSUITANTI 

Por liTge ipntmcnt com- 
plex In Northern Like 
County. Sjt. & Sun. work 
required with employment | 
I nexlblllty during the week. 

Coll Mflria 

Mon.-Fri. lOdm-fipmat 

(708) 356-1550 or 

(708) 356-5010 



Part Time 

ATrENDATfr 

Needed for Fox Lake Supcrwash. 

Work Mon., 'Hies., Woi 8am-5pm, 

Sunday Sam • 1 2pm. 

Mast be dq)CfldabIc and 

good with people 

BcUrccs encouraged (o apply 

Apply in person 

Fcidaiy fir Saturday - 

Sam • 5pm 

Fox Lake 

SUPERWASH 

136 V^shlnston 
Fox Lake/Ingleside 

(Aaoss rrom Dog N' Suds) 



The Village of Round 
Lake Park, 203 E. Lake 
Shore Drive is accept- 
ing applications for 

Part Time 

GENERAL 

OFFICE 

with full time possibili- 
ties. Some accounting 
anti computer experi- 
ence preferred. Apply 
In person. No appllca- 
Uons will be accepted 
after Friday, August 
26th. 1994 at 4:00 
P.M. 



BBtSSBHHBHBBBHHDn 

s PHOTO a 

S STRINGERS 3 

ll Lakeland Newspapers g 
nhas openings on itsB 
^expanding editorialB 
jpstaff for photog 
nstringers. Will handle an 
Evariety of assignments. 3 
nMust have a reliable g 
Dear, camera equipmentn 
Gand be able to worki 

Bunder deadline situa-g 
tions. For interview! 
appointment contact 9 
D Rhonda Vinzant 
E EditoNn-Chief 

1(708) 223-8161 g 

BsgHyBHyHSByoggi 



Antioch 
Community 
High School 

Has a need for 

suBsnruTE 

TEACHERS 

For tfie 1994-95 scliool year. 

A Bachelor's degree Is 

required and teaching 

certificate is deslreable but 

not required. Interested 

applicants should contact 

Ms. Nohlechek at 
(708) 395-1421, Ext. 239 



Receptionist 

Part-Time Afternoons 

Busy, growing manufacturer 
needs a sliarp, enttiusiaslic 
person with great communi- 
cation skills to work in a 
shared position environ- 
ment Typing, phone 8c com- 
puter skills a must. 
Familiarity with WordPerfect 
or Word essential. Send 
resumes to: 

Administrative Manager 

28457 N. Ballard Drive 

Suite C 
Lake Forest, !L 60045 

Equal Oppoftitnjiy Employer 



219 



ildp Wanted 
Part-Time 



m 



SECREIMY 

20 hours per week 

9:00 am - 1:00 pm. 

Paid vacation & sick time. 

Send resume & 

salary requirements. 

Lutheran Church 
oFAuSAnm 

5800 Stale Park Rd. 
- Fox Lake, IL 60020 , 



JB 



For Fox Lal<e and Lake 
Zurich areas. Must 

have valid CDL with 
school bus permit. 

Callus 
Trinsportitfonjnc. 

(708)726-8131' 



PART-TIME 
CAREERS! 

Washington Inventoiy Service, 
a nationwide leader In profcs- 
alonnl Invcntoiy services, has 
Immediate part-time careers 
avtdlable In your area. 

Our employees, who emptmslze 
our higti standards of perfor 
mance and atylked customer 
service, wlU enjoy a compeilUvc 
part-tline Income as wcU aa 
available benefits including 
401k. Reliable transportation a 
must For Immcdlale consider- 
aUon, coll our Job HoUlne at* 

1-800-888-8210 
Box 630 

WASHINGTON INVENTORY 

SERVICE 

(■ Huffy Compuiy) 

eoe m/r/d/v 



SRastaurant ^ 

icoariTER help; 

j Part Time : J_ 

J Day hours - Mon.-Fri.," I •: 

1 11am • 2pm, $6 per hour. « 
I I 

J Night hours - Mon.-Frl., 5 • 

A pm - 8pm, $5 per hour. { 

i i 

1 Must be able to work i 

2 some weekends. ! 
{ Apply In person J 

I Subway \ 



i 

i (next to Walgreens) V 



1249 S. Rand Rd. 
Lake Zurich 



220 



BelpWMlcd 
FtaU-Tlme 



DRIVERS Fox Mldwatt Trans- 
port Inc. Klat a new pay and 
incsntive packago *No East 
Coast *Home Weekly 
'Quarterly Bonuses 800-333- 
2268 

ATTENTION DRIVER TEAIV1S 
«15,000 IN BONUS Paid 
monthly, quarterly & yearly 
PLUS TOP (WIILEAGE PAY 
401 (k) Plan. iSOO SIQN-ON 
BONUS . Ottier paid benefits. 
•Vacation -Health and Life • 
Dead Head -Motel/Layover. 
Loading & Unloading. COVE- 
NANT TRANSPORT 1-800- 
441-4394. Solos and stu- 
dents welcome. 

LICENSED LIFE & HEALTH 
AGENT NEEDED. Quality 
products, high commissions 
with advance before Issue, 
lead system, and benefits. 
(Must qualify lor advances & 
benefits) Call: 1-800-262- 
2681. 

HAROLD IVES TRUCKING 
hiring drivers. Free Driver 
Training. Students welcome. 
Experience pay up to 2BC par 
mile. 1995 conventional KW's 
here. Excellent benefits: 1- 
800-842-0863. 

DRIVER-NO BULLI JUST THE 
FACTS) ASSIGNED EQUIP- 
n/IENT. HOME EVERY 10-14 
DAYS, 95% NO-TOUCH 
FREIGHT, EXCELLENT 

PAY/BENEFITS-CALL DECKER 
TRANSPORT: 1 •800-634- 

6150, "ASK FOR STEVE". 
EOE 



LV:i'» W.JSiiajjrt;«l'.fi>. J^-A.» urMT 



a 

9 

it 

V 
IS 

a 



•1 

'I 



Ic 



« 
i 
i 

! 
! 

I 

! 
! 

V 



TEAWS 

; Paid 

yearly 

i; PAY 

IGN-ON 
onefits. 
1 Life • 
.ayovor. 
COVE- 
1^00- 
id stu- 



AuqufT-19^ 1994 UkMNcwspApERS 'CLASSIFIED 





HelpVMted 
FiiU*Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fnll-Tlme 



220 


HelpWaaled 
mUrTlim 



220 



Help Waited 
FtaUrTlme 



WflBttlda ' Transportation 
Attn: OTR. Taami, 0/0, & 
Recant Driving School Gradill 
1-800-373-2g67 axt. 183 
•Wo Offor-tlll Aiilgned 
Units, Teami, & SIngts. Pafd ' 
Vacation. Porformanca 

Awards. Family Medical & 
Dental. Strong Hometlme 
Policy, Outstanding Equip* 
ment. Sign on Bonus. 22 .Yrs 
of Age. Tuition Reimburse- 
ment Prograni. 

DRIVERS FOQLEMAN 
-TRUCK LINE Is loDklng for 
' qualified OTR drivers. Your 
option, run SE,. NW, or 48 
state. Dedicated area -In NE, 
New pay package' • 26C/ml. 
To start. Home often, no 
touch freight, great benefits 
plus much morel If you have 
1 yr. OTR.axp. and verifiable 
lob references call for more 
info. 800-333-9009 dept. 
AA-2. . 

DRIVER-HIT THE ROAD WITH 
THE RISING STARI 
OTR/Shorthaul opportunittes, 
home weakly (shorthaul), 
assigned late model equip- 
ment, 9750 experienced lign- 
on bonus. BURLINGTON 
MOTOR CARRIERS: 1-800- 
JOIN-BMC. EOE. 

DRIVERS If You're Looking 
to Change Jobs.'..WB'r« 
Looking For You. J.B. Hunt, 
one of America's largest and 
most successful trucking 
companies, is looking for 
people Interested In learning 
to drive a truck or for people 
who have verifiblo . over the 
' road experience. After com- 
pleting the required training, 
you 'can look forward to 
earning over $2,000 per 
month.- plus comprehensive 
benefits. . Call: 1-S00-345- 
2197. Experienced drivers 
call: 1-800-36B-8S3a. 

EOE/BubJect to drug screen. 



ENGINEER 
TOOL ENGINEER 

WMh 5-10 yri. exp. In ln)«1>on 
looting, Hoi Runnar & CAD 
knowlodgo ttolpful. Good ml. & 
b«n«ffli, rehxallon u«i«lanc« aveiL 
PLASTIKON INDUSTRIES, 30260 
Sanluod CI., Hayward, CA (MS44 w 
FAX: 610-47&-76e0. 



ANDRE'S 
STEAK HOUSE 

•Dining Room Walt Staff 
•Banquet Walt Staff 

PUftSE CaU 
(81^)678^2671 



ISECUItnYl 

JTaking applications fori 
Isecuritjr (Public Safety E 
jPeraonnel). Musi beO 
loble to work weekendBl 
land holidays. Full &\ 

Part rime. ExcellentB 

benefits. 

[Apply in penon pleaie I 

IVacatiloa Yillage| 

6800 Slate Park Rd. 
Fox Lake 

(708) S87-4409 



"RiSTAURAIMT 

Homemakers, Students, 
Seml-Reilrees & othara. No oxp. 
necsssaryl Earn that exlra 
Income, itex schedules, supaf 
work onvlroninenl. Se HabIn 
Espanol. Apply to; Burger King, 
233 Northwest & Hwy. 59, 
708-381-1610. EOE M/F. AA for 
Andvor Jgannla, 



ASSISTANT 
CASHIER 

THE COLLEGE OF. LAKE 
COUNTY seeks someone 
with a minimum of one year's 
experience in a high volume 
cashier operation to process 
payments and fees and assist 
cashiers In their dally duties 

QUALIFICATIONS: High 
school diploma or GED; 
excellent cashiering skills: 
ability to operate adding 
machine; clerical aptitude arid 
aptitude (or figures. 

COMPLETED application 
must bo submitted by August 
30 '1994, 

"for more Information, 
contact Personnel at 
700/223-6601 .xL22 16. TDD 
No! for hearing impaired Is 
708/223-5615. 

college of lake 

COUNTY. 19351 W. 
Washington, Grayslake, IL 
60030-1198 (a.a7e.o.e.) 



PRINT SHOP ASSISTANT 

Decorel, a fast growing picture frame manufacturer, is 
seeking a well-motivated individual with 1-2 years 
experience operating a Mullilith 1950 and 1250 two- 
color off-set press. Some camera knowledge a plus, but 
not necesisary. Apply in person or send resume to: 
Personnel Dept,, Decorel, 444 E. Courlland, 
JMundelein, IL 60060. 




KinderCore' 

Nmv hiring for our new "State of the Art" 
KinderCare in GurtJee, Illinois 

TEACHERS 

Interested Applicants Please CaU (768) 360-1135 



TL 



JX 



31 



Full/Part Time 



Self motivated, people oriented, 

friendly & hard-working. 

Building product knowledge helpful. 

Apply in Person 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 

Rt. 83 Grayslake, IL 



I 







LEGAL 
SECREIARY 

experienced only, friendly 

non-smoldng olBce, 

WordPerfects;!. 

(708)234-6680 



FLOOR CARE 

Experienced floor 

care for health care 

facility in McHenry 

Co. Must be 

responsible & 

dependable. 

Call Vivian 

(815) 344-2600 



CASHIER 

Full or Part Time 

Days, Evenings 

And Weekends 

Contact Diane or ]<^n 

PETRANEK*S 
PHARMilCV 

Libedyvllle, IL 
708-362-2005 



Ctonatal 

JOB FAIR 

Olstm 1« flying KIgh as Ihs leader 
in tonnporary fttamng. Conw lo our 
Job Fair and (and a great assign- 
ment In Iha UtjortyvlKo, Buffalo 
Grove and Grayslaks anas. 

Light Industrial 

Eani<8'*8.72/hour 

Pleaw bring two fofrm of 
Idefn'EflcaUon to quallf/ 

Holldsy Inn 
6161 W. Grand Avanu« 

TliAsday, August 23rd 
from 3pni - 7pm 

We also tiove assignments fon 

Ckrical 

Data Entry 

General Office 

Customer Service 

Word Processlirg S«cr«tarie9 

If unaljle to attend, please call; 
70a/ai6-B707 



AN 



Olsten 

staffing -Services' 



equal opportunfty employer 



RALLY'S 
;HAMBUR6ERSi 

Com/ng to W^uliwgan 

Rally's, the leader In 
►drive thru fast food has< 

exciting opportunKles 

^ for Assistant Managers^ 

arxl shift leaders. 

Immediate openli^gs 

available, 

PiBQSB call, Mon-Fri 

9am' 5pm 

:(312M04jl840: 

ASSISTANT 

If you are enlhusiastic, 
motivated, .and enjoy the ■ 
elderly, tlicn wc liave the job 
for. you. Join our Aclivity 
. Department team aitd look 
forward to a rewarding 
career In long tenn care. 

Call 
Jerri 

M-F9-5 
|(708) 438-8275J 



DATA ENTRY I 

Immcd. opening, 2nd shift. Fast-pared pos; requires heavy 
data entry, production & time keeping entry cxp. pncf'd but 
not rcq'd. Will train qualified candtdalc. Must be able to woric 
independently & verify ovm work. 1/2 yrs. exp. in some cler- 
ical office funcUbns rcq'd in rclalton to production control 
Must apply tn person: 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland, Mundclein, IL 

EOE . 




IS NOW HIRING FOR 
THEFAIiSEASON. 



Day and Night shift hours are available. 

Schedules can woric around school. Premium 

pay for dayshift and closers. We also have 

management opportunities available. 

If interested apply at: 

20 S. Route 12 in Fox Lake or 

118 W. Rollins Road in Round Lake Beach 




\ 

i) 

¥ 
I* 

4 



04d Country Store 

IS HIRING -- 



•4 Servers 
•1 Cook 

DAY, NIGHTS 
& WEEKENDS 

•Great Benefits 
•No Tip Sharing 
•Weekly Paycheck 

Come by Mon.-FrL 

CRACKER BARREL 
GURNEE 

(708)244-1512 

An Equal Oppnrtunlly 
Employer 






«I^A^ 



i 



220 



IhlpWmled 
PuU-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
mn-Tlme 






220 


(HelpWMited 
'lUlTllfne 



TELEHARKETEIlf 1 

LOCAL iELIVERY 

'' Earn$200+/weelc. ' 
.'.; Cash paitj daily, 
No experience, will train. 
Apply today, start lodayl 



I 



(70«) 949-f 140 



^•HAMBERQER HAMLET t 
•S BAR&QRia* i 

5 Vernon Hills- J 

^ ImmedlBtQ Openings (on X 

* 8«rv«r («xoeH tips), * 

* UiM Cooks. Hott Staff, * 

J Full/Part Time, Flex hrs. J 
2 Apply In person dalfy. J 

* lOOOL^kevlewPrkway * 

* (tM ml. W. o( Hawthorn Mafl) * , 

5 (708)918-0505 { " 
^ EOE M/F ^ 

**************** 



• TBACHER5 • 

PLBASB RBAD 

Round Lalce aieachild caie 
is looking for energetic, 
responsible teacher for two 
and foiir year old cl^us. 6 
hours of early childhood 
courses and 2 yeais of col- 
lege will qualiiy. For more 
infonnalion call Tina al 

708-546-3383 

Retail Oppo«unlll« 



SHEET 

UlEiAL 

SHOP 

seeking a responsible 

person with experience 

setting up Amada 

Brake Presses. 

Please Call 

(708) 473-1047 



WANTED; 

POMCEOFnCER 

for Park City 
Police Department 

Apply in person: 

FAMCCITY 



3420 Kehm Ellvd. 

Park Gty. IL dOOSS 

tot 



P 



Personnel €}onsultants 

Superior Perspnnelis expanding! Our - 

growth will provide an opportunity for 3 new 

candidates to join our team of licensed 

employment professionals. Interview, test 

and maintain client base for our client 

companies..We offer complete training, 

licensing, salary + commission. 244-0016. 



Public Relations Assistant 

for association headquartered in Central Lake County. 
Experienced In Media Relations, Newsletter 
Production, Mac Desktop Publishing, Novice 
Photography; will assist* in phone recepddn and public 
contact and will be familiar with area communihes. 
Must have flexible time schedule. Submit resun\e to: 

BoxUU 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Grayslake, IL 60030 





THERE IS ONE CURE FOR THE 
SUMMERTIME BLUES... 

(The kids arc heading back to school, 
and the dog days of summer are fast 
disappearing. Want to take advantage 
of the extra time on your hands and 
chase away those summertime blues? 
Gander Mouritain's got the flexibility 
you need. 

...AND THAT'S 
AUTUMN AT 
GANDER 
MOUNTAIN. 

Sales Associates 

• Full and part-time positions. 

■ Knowledge of archery, hunting or clothing and foonvear. 

• Must be available to work weekends. 

Cashiers & Order Counter 

• Full-lime positions. 

• Must be available to work weekends. 

Inbound Telephone Sales Reps 

Work full or part-time, day, evening or night taking phone orders from our customers. 
A pleasant phone manner, friendly personality and basic typing/keyboard skills are all 
you need. Additional positions also available for bilingual individuals. 

Product Information Representatives 

• Full-time, day hours. 

• Must have detailed knowledge of hunting, fishing, camping," archery or reloading 
arid the desire and ability" to share that knowledge with others. 

Warehouse Associates 

Full and part-time, flexible schedules are available. Perfect for anyone with free eve- 
ning hours or anyone looking for a second income. 

Order Pickers Return Clerks 

Order Packers Receiving 

Stockkecping 

Ours is a refieshtng change of pace after a long, hot summer, with excellent advantages 
including: 

• Paid holidays and vacation • 20% merchandise discounts 

• Paid training • Medical/dental/life Insurance for full-time 
•401K 

Head on over to The Mountain and we'll fill you in on the details. Apply in person at 
our employment office, which is open Monday-Friday, 7 am-5 pm at P.O. Box I28f 
Hwy. W, WUmot, Wl 53192. Or stop by our booth in d\c Conmuirce Bldg. at die 
Kenosha County Fair! Equal opponuntty employer m/f/d/v. 



s^; 




ClASSIFIED UkeM Newspapers Auquw 19^ 1994 




220 



lldpWiDlcd 
Nl-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FnU.Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fdll-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
RiUrTime 



220 


Help Wanted 
FtaU-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
F^rTlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



CONSTRUCTION/HANDMAN 
SUBCONTRACTOR 

Must luve btilc knowledge of 
electrical, plumbing, cirpentry. 
Need own tooli, tnniporUUon 
and Iniurince. Part time ind 
rttiK«i wtlcome. CiU 

}81-6966 



SIDERS 

Experienced. Good 

I truck & equipment vlnyi| 

$60/square. 

Call Rich Tudor 

(815JW;2004 



TRAVEL AGENT 

Experienced Full 

time. Immcdiato 

poaUion avadlablo. 

Sabre qualified. 

Ask for Sharon 

(708) 395-2772 
ill inericailhTel Doner 




MACHINE OPERATORS 

Work Mon.-'Hiurc. & 

Enjoy 3 Day WMkandi 

Itxfustrial manufartuflng company In 
Lake Zurich »eKs Individuals lo 
train as Machine Oporators (or 1st & 
2nd sMits, Musi hjws good compre- 
hension dcllls. Qreal pav and bono- 
fits. For constderatlon, please call; 

(706)362-9305 
eoE 



•STORE CASHIERS 
• BARTENDER 

Bald Knob Marina 
(815) 344-5223 



ZndShipt 

4 pmll 30 VQ local (mlUne convatiY 
looldii£ for I tvntliic imcliiiu opcnlois. 
Will Iriln, picas s^y In peoon al: 

Anducan 
Narkbting Sexvkb 

9SS Campus Dr. 

Mundetdiit IL 

(708) 680-4545 

Bettcrtn 9mt- tlpm 
md t pmtoipm orcstl 



Englnoerlng 

PROJECT ENGINEER 
PROGRAM MANAGER 

Seeking Individual w/54- yrs. 
exp. In" plastic procssslng, 
tooling and electronics oxp. a 
plus. Position Involves high 
visibility w/customers. Send 
resume to: 

FAWN INDUSTRIES, INC. 

3200 Qreenfiold sto. 210 

Dearborn, Ml 48120 
WO PHONE CALLS PLEASE 



WAREHOUSE MANAGER 

POSmONAVAILABLE 

Tbny's Pizza Service, a growing 
distributor of high-quality 
pizza products, has an open- 
ing for a Warehouse Manager 
at our Wheeling, ILlotatlon. 
Responsibilities Include man- 
agement of: Inventory on the 

trucks and In the freezer, 
depot maintenance, and tlie 
loading/unloading of route 

trucks and semis. Night 

• hours. Storting salary 

S40O/wckly. Profit sharing. 

paid vacations, insurance, 

employee discounts, and 

more. Must be at least 21 and 

be eligible for CDL license. 

Now InterviewlnB. 

For more Information, call 
1-800-257-4886 

EOE 



Olan Mills 



Is looking for 

dependable 

hard-working 

people to Join 

the Olan Mills 

Family. Full time - 

no experience 

necessary. 

We will train. 

Ask for R-ose 
708-843-7001 



OtTice Clerical 



* NcwKXMpfng^)FAe««ontfor * 

SHIFT 
MANAGERS 

Good Starting Pay 

& Benefits 
Apply In P»r$on 



* 



*■ 

* 
* 
* 



: TACO r%i 
j'BELL ^ 

* . * 

i 322 Rt. 173, Antioch ♦ 

* 708-395-0080 * 
{ BMkforDon « 



EfiQlnoer 

MANUFACTUR1NQ 
ENGINEER 

El)ay DMskin ol CodarapkJs, Inc., 
a loading mtg. of rock processing 
oqulpt. l3 accopUng appllcallons 
(or Individuals w/5-8 yrs. oxp. a> a 
MonufBCtutlng Englnoor (o con- 
tribute towatiJ product and process 
Impravomonls o( our manutactur* 
Ing ladnty. Those Improvomonls 
will Irivolvo concufronl englnoor- 
Ing, suggestion program, pracoss 
planning, timo standards, methods 
lost and equipment & facllltfos. 
Canddatos must hove prior exp 
wofVlng with sandscasUngs, heavy 
fabrications, robotics & numorical- 
ly controHod machines. Must hove 
provon people skills and be able to 
v«rt( In a loam onvlrofimonl com- 
prised ol supenrisora & operators. 

Eljay is a co. with high quality prod- 
uct reputation, toam-orientod, with 
a positive employee philosophy 
envlronrnonl, offering a comp, 
waga & full tsenefll pkg. Relocation 
assist Is avail. If you fool you meet 
the above stalod qualifications, vra 
would like to hear Irom yoo. Roaso 
send rosumo lo: 

Eljay Division of 
Cedarapids, Inc. 

P.O. Box ,607 
Eugene, OR 97440*0607 

equal oppty. employer . 



•••POSlMiJOBS*** 

$12.26 per hour to start plus 

benefits. Postal carriers, 
sorters, clerks, maintanance. 
For application and exami- 
nation Information: 
CALL 
1-219-736-4715 XP9509 
earn to 8 pm, 7 days 






2ND SinfT-WEtPER 



EXrCRlENCIIWrniMlG& 
TIG WELDING AND SHEET 
MEULFTTUPNBCESSARV. 

Autiyifl: 

American 
Process Systems 

3815 GfUidvUle Avetiue 

GameCtlL 60031 
Phooe: 708-336-2444 



I 



WARtltOU^t 



LIGHT 



INOU^TRIAL 



IIWBIF 111 RS ! ! 







acompaiQr 
aroundMOOO 



Tliey make the call. 



h'* 



At Arnerilech, customers 

are paramountl And to meet our 

commitment lo 100% customer 

satisfaction, we are seeking 

highly motivated, frifendly people lo 

' ' join bur teatfi as: 



DIRECTORY ASSISTANCE 
OPERATORS y 

Full Time Term Positions 
(Up to l,year) 

Arnerilech operalo'rs provide Information to 

callers requesting business, government or resi- 
dence telephone numbers. Customer contaci 
experience Is required. /' 

Arnerilech olfers completa' training 
andcompetilivecompensalion. Tliese 
positions are conveniently located 
In your area. For immediate attention, 
giveusacatlTODAYI 

AMERITECH JOB LINE 
1-800-966-3241 ExtEAC-BU( 

Arnerilech Representatives are available to 
speal< with you 7 days a weel< (rom 7am lo 1 tpm 
CST. Pre-employment testing wifl be scheduled 
for qualified candidates. 




Choose the JOB FAIR location nearest you: 



leritech 



Amefiied) ■ an equal opportmity employer 





1^, /./r-^.-A.Sl .Vkl^m 





The Best Western Hotel M Holiday Inn 
3S0HWV.173 iuimu^J iRte.45&83 



ANIKKH^IL 



MUNDELEIN, IL 



Tamara Royal Hotel 
4100 Highway 31 

McHENRY, IL 

(Nb(f (0 the Norttori Anb Miidicaf 
Carter; M/?mte30utfi of >20J 

• 50 IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!! 

• TOP PAY {J7-$8.72/Hour) 

• S$% OVERTIME $$$ • ALL SHIFTS 

T/icjc ate temp-to-hfre jobs for major companies 
In the northern Lake County area. If you're unable 
to attend any of the fob fain, but would like to be 
considered for a position, please call: 

LARRY • (708)244-0889 

INSTANT LABOR, INCI 




How To 

Sprvlve 

The Job 

Search 

By Naiu^'Sakol 



Tlilt li An Imiiluyer PdicI Act 



Q: Dear.. .Search: Last month my employer decided to relo- 
cate his corporation to another state, leaving me and all but 
three co-workers without jobs. I have registered with my 
local unemployment office and the slight income helps. I 
have been on on avid search and am finding it difftciilt to 
find a job right now and so I have been considering picking 
up some temporary work in the meantime, I figure this wilt 
allow me the flexibility lo interview for jobs while earning 
some money. My question is, will this effect my unemploy- 
ment benefits if I do? B.H. - Fox Lake 

A: Dear B.H. You will want to check with the unemploy- 
ment representative you registered with. Typically the state 
would love to see you get a new job whethier tt be permanent 
or temporary. For your general knowledge, if you take on a 
temporary assignment you are able to earn a perdentoge of 
your weekly benefits without it affecting your status. In 
some coses once an assignment would be finished, you may 
be required to re-file for benefits. Work is work, and the 
more exposure in the work place plus the possibility of a 
temporary assignment leading to something permanent, cer- 
tainly does outweigh, the slight inconvenience of re-filing. 

Q: Dear...Search: Almost one year ago today I took a thrce- 
monih medical leave of absence from my company for which 
I have been employed six years. During my absence my boss 
left the company and was replaced by someone internal. I 
came back to find I now report to someone •' , j I never real- 
ly got along with. I should be up Tor a review soon and find 
it difficult to believe that I will be looked upon objectively 
and dicrcforc '"jcl that perhaps I should go to our personnel 
department uU request my review be done by someone else. 
Do you agrue? F.R. - Libcrtyville. 

A: Dear F.R. Slow downlll First of all, you do not mention 
whether or not you have been approached about this review. 
It sounds as though you are assuming quite a bit and expect- 
ing the worst! Personally speaking, I would let nature take 
it's course and see what happens. Your feelings may or may 
not be justified. However, going over your boss' head and 
straight to the personnel department at this time would be a 
big mistake. Trust me! ^ 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professional 
and President of .Superior Personnel in Gumcc. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at SlOl Washington St, 
Gumee.IL 60031. 



MEdicAl Opportunities 



Utdletl 

PHARMACIST - BERMUDA 

U.S. '50.900 por annum. 39 
hrsiwif, Must tw a graduaio from 
an accredited colEsgo ol ptiarmacy 
& currently reg'd. Pret 
qualiftcations incl. a mtn. of 3 yrs. 
axp, In Fotall phannacy. To appl/i 
FAX or malt Hamilton HM12 
Bermuda, 1-B09-295-3318. 




Medical 

PHARMACIST 

Pyramid Diagnostic Services, Inc., 
a -distributor ol radiophanTfaceutl. 
cats, offers an Immod. opening (or 
a stafj Nuclear Phafmacist In the 
Louisville, Kentucky area. Duties 
Incrd dispensing unit dosa radio 
pharmaceulicats, Inventory mgm't, 
quallly control & radiation safety, 
Incl'dg hazardous waste mgm't. 
B,S. or Pham D. degree req'd, 
Exp. In nuclear phaimacy desired. 
Sal./bens. ars comp. Send rasumo 
6 sal. history lo: Admin,, PYRA' 
MID DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES 
INC. 5909 Shelby Oaks Dr,. Sle. 
226. Memphis, TN 38134, 



HMlOicars 

DIRECTOR OF NURSING 

3S.b«d !lc. lor intermedlBla and iklllad 
cars lacll. logkf a proteiilonal lor 
kbova poilikin. Applicant musl poiMis 
nucilng hm. & Bdnm. iklUs iiii^|5<rionnel 
& govL ragulat:oni. CompalDlvo ul * 
b«ni I nd. hsalm In 1, holiday/tick tv, vac , 
QIC, Send lasuma ot can: Jail Sirubl* . 
Admn.. NIOBRARA COUNTY HOSPI- 
TAL. P.O. Boi 7B0, LuiH. WY 82225. 
(307)33<-271l EOEM/F 



Check this 

Section Each 

Week!! 



y 



Medical 

TalladdQa Rohab, Clinic Is oflerlng 
an oxci&rra earaar oppty for ttie right 
Occupational Therapist. This 
position will provide mgm't & super- 
vision lor ttw already well-estnbl'd 
depl. The benofits listed below are 
complimented by beaut, working 
area & exc Admin, suf^rt Sign-on 
Bonus, Exc. Sal.. KealttVDental & 
Llls Insur, 28 annual pd leave days, 
401 K plan. For mora Inlo. ploaso 
contact Judith A. MIxon, Admin., 
TALLAOEQA REHABIUTATION 
CLINIC, 6t6 Chalfoe St., Talladega, 
AL 35160. {205) 3624119 or (Zds) 
362-9500. 



Medical 

HEALTH CARE 

OPPORTUNITIES IN 

INDIAN All! 

Progressive Community Heallh 
Canlsr, w/3 separata primary care 
clinic loc's In the Indiana area, has 
openings lor PHYSICIANS, PA'S. 
NPS, NURSES, HEALTH EDU- 
CATORS, «SW'S. Must ba 
tlc./allg. In Indiana. Board 
Cartl./ellg. prel'd. For mors Info 
send resuma w/coverlettarlo; P.O. 
Box 441601, Indianapolis, IN 
46204. EOE, 



Haaithcang 

BE/BC PSYCHIATRISTS 

Nasdsd lo provKJs clinical leadatship. Sal 
at opproi. SllO.OOivVr. w'ganarous ben. 
piig. dapanding en quaiificationt & eip, 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSES 

MSN Of BSN ¥ii/eiilafl(lve up. Sal ranga 
$38-42,000 deFendng On Qual. and oip. 
10 lUn a muli)i]iy:lp<jnarv iqam respon- 
sitita lor 24 hr. a day crJus coverage, 
sva'jallon & Iraaurvint, & plan ovIpmL 
ServBS a CUMC, tdrving a 3-counly 
ealhehment araa naar Hooslon. Varod 
ihtlti & iwVnd coveraga leqd. For mora 
ifllo call: Irving Bate - M.D. Medical 
DIr., TRI-COUHTY MHMR S«rvlc««, 
P.O. Box 30CT, Conroa, TX TT30S or 
call (409) T9»-a331, EOE 



ACTIVITY DIRECTOR 

SiahlRI iipiriinciJ DIraetar of Activity Sirvieit fir li\-M Ktrlh 
Sbtri fiirlitric fiellitr. Siltetti Ii^IvUbiI mutt bin iiipirvittry nft- 
rliiti h4 tlis ihllity Iq tff«ellv*ly etmny'ileii* tti erfiitzi viikli 
lelivMr iimleit fir «ar riilJolt. Cirtifleitlai irrifirriJ. Campitillva 
iilary i«j tawaflt fiekija. Conliet R. Jabaioi at J9S-590O. 



llcdllh Care 



CNA/NA 



We are seeking CNA's for all shifts F/T & P/T, Flexible sched- 
uling available. Sign on Bonus, Facility will reimburse for 
certification. Contact M.McAdams at 295-3900. 

Lake Bluff Health Care Centre 



NURSES RN/LPN 

We arc looking for caring individuals who arc willing 
to give quality care and support to our residents and 
families. F/PT hrs - flexible sched/benefits. Current IL 
license required. Contact M. McAdams at 295-3900. 

Lake Bluff Health Care Centre 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




DIRECT 
CARE 

NIGHT 
SHIFT 



<^===^ 



THE RESIDENT IS 

AT THE HEART OP 

AIL WE DO! 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Pull or 

Part Time. 

Willing to 

tialnlbr 
poattlona. 

VUmam Mfttocl GtM B«dbMP 

(708)438-5050 



RN/LPN 

Immediate 

opening. Nl^ts 

9pm - 5:30ani. 

Contact 
Candy Sabay 



Muvi 



vvi-i-Ki-mh 



li. nt .Ik 

I > II >;| j. 'I tl>.<|.|'l. 11 





CNA's 

1. Are you looking for flexibility in your schedule? 

2. Are you looking for a facility that is progressive 
and that offers competitive salaries? 

3. Are you looking for benefits and health packages 
- that are optional and fit your needs? 

If you answered "yes" to any of the above, we would 
erqoy the opportunity to meet with you and discuss 
your future with MAPLE HILL NURSING CENTER. 
CaU Suzy for further details on how you can become a 
member of our team. 

(708) 438-8275 



CNA or NA * 

Employment Opporhinitv 

Full and Part Time Positions Available 

OR/PR Available 

All shifts, with PM and Night differential 

Training on sight. Classes available 

Terrific Summer Employment 

Excellent Starting Rate, 
For more information call: 

Debi Jung, 

Director of Nursing 

708^526-5551 

Care Centre ofWauconda 

176 Thomas Court 

^ Wauconda, IlUnois 60084 w 



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■V), 



Aii^iisT 1% 'Wf 4AlAkEUNd'NEWs|iA|i£Rs< ClASSfllED. 





HelpWioted 



220 



BelpWtQled 



CHILD CARE 
I TEAM TEACHER I 

FosHhn avaUabfe at 

The Urtde'nbunt Barly 

Chltdhood Center 

• Full Time, Benefits 

• Degree Required 

• Experience Preferred 
for in tntervitw pleaie alt 

(708)356.2288 



ACTlVriY 
ASSISriANT 

No Experience Necessary. 
. '-We Will Train, ' 

Immediate positions available. 

Care Centre of Wauconda 

(708) 526-5551 

Ask for Bob Coon 



PACKAGE HANDLERS 

PERFECT rail COLLEQESnJDEMTS 
RPS, a small package delivary 
service, hires package han- 
dlers to load & unload trucks. If 
you are not afrakJ ol hard work, 
ere at least 16 yrs oki and can 
work 4-5 hrs. per day, Mon.- 
Frl., 4;30pm-9;00pm, tom-2am 
or 2am-7am, then RPS has an 
oppty for you. We offer you up 
to $7/hr. + $1/hr. tuition assis- 
tance. Apply In person: ROAD- 
WAY PACKAGE SYSTEMS, 
2945 Shermer Rd., Noithbrook, 
IL 60062. 

708-272-4310 

EO/AAE. 



Speech and 
Language Therapist 

School Year 94-95 
Master's Degiee Required 

Full Benefits 
Apply to Dr. Rebecca Volkeit 

(708) 546^3t 
Round Lake Area Schools 
Special Services Building 

"""■"3 Panther Blvd' 

Round Lake, IL 60073 



[t"J 



I*J 



• TELLERS • 

NBD Has What 

You're Looking Fori 

NBD Bank, a respected and well- 

estabJistied financial Institution 
offers talented individuals a com- 
petitive safaiy and benefits in a 
friendly and professional work 
environment. Opportunities are 
now a(vailable In: 
• Arlington Heights ■ 
• Lake Zurich 
Full i Part-time 
Our Bank Tellers are detail-orient' 
ed professJonaJa wHh excellent 
people skills and pleasant person 
alities. Heavy cash handling 
experience and a strong math 
aptitude are raquired. 
Make your move today, call for an 
Intwvtew appointment; 

Human Resources 

(706) 364-3330 

NBD 

ooe m/f/d/y 



CENTRAL 
EXPRESS 

Accepting AppllcalionJ From 
Quollfied Truck Drivers NOWl 

Join ow Team and Enjoy; 

• Nevh/ Company Owned 

Equipmenf 

• Starting Pay S12.80/hr. - 

Top Rate $17.55/hr. 

• Rjtl Benefits Package 
Including Profit Shorirtg 
(for regular employees) 

• No Layovers - Homo 

Every Day 

• Employment Wltti the 
Premier Overnight LTL 

Market Leader 

• MEDICAL BENEFITS 

ARER90DAYS 

COX CorvWay Centrd 

Express requires: minimum lyeor 

vertfioble troctof Irdler expert- ' 

ence: CDL Endasamenfs 0^ or X 

ond 1); D.OI physteot drug 

screen. Appfyof: 

CCX Con-Way 

C*ntial Expf«M 

957 Towtr Rood 

Mund*Mn. IL 60060 

CCX (ton 
Equal Opportunity Emptoyer 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Tbne 



INSURANCE 
OFFICE 

needs good typist 
with neat appearance. 
Congenial and willing 
to learn. 

Please Call 

(708)587-7714 



SPOTTER/DRIVER 

Oum«« ATM Loc. ' 

On site Tankwosh Driver poisi- 
flon. Prefer to have CDL, 
HAZMAT & Tank endorse 
ment. Full'tlms permanent 
posillon, flex, hrs., excetl. 
hourly rates, co. benefits. Call 
lorappi. 

708-5d4-2200exL314 



Courtyard By 

Nairiott/Deeifield 

•Deskaerk-FT 
•A.M. Servers 
•Night Auditors 

Competitive pay. 

Excellent working 

environment. . 

Best Benefits 
In the Business! 

Please stop by to fill 

but an application 

800 Lake Cook Rd. 

Dcerfield,IL 

(708) 940-8222 

EOEM/F/V/D 



s 



Developmental 
Trainer 

Full time, entry level, 
willing to train indi- 
viduals with develop- 
mental disabilitiea, in 
skills, oral hygiene, 
domestic,- pre-work 
and community. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

(708) 438-5050 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 



'i iitiiiMMniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiim nimiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHuiniiiiiiii ■» 



LOOKINC FOR A CHANGE? 

We arc a new modem full service salon looking for experienced 

STYLISTS ANPNArLTECHNIOANS 

with clientele ptefemed. Paid vacation & paid education. 

Can {708} 546^247 

. and check us outi 



aiitii HiHiiimnmiiiiiitinimiiiiiiHumiiitniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimn 



% 1 Full time, 1 Part tinre. Medical facility seeks front ^ 
J office support. Meet-Greet and .Schedule Appts. J 
J C708) X44-00t6 $ 

^ Customer Service "^ 

A North Suburban picture frame manufacturer is. seeking a 
highly motivated independent individual for our fast paced 
Customer Service Department This position is Entry Level 
and requires basic General Office and coinpuicr skills. 

Send Resumi to 

DanMarquez 

Human Resources 

444 E. Courtiand St 

Mundelein^lL 60060 

a EOE JSi 



GENERAL 
FACTORY 



a 

B 

a 

a 



D 
D 

c 

S Transformer mfgr. needs men ft women for assembly, g 
n Inspection, and paddng assignments. We need ener-g 

n 
n 

D 
D 

a 
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n 



ggetic, self-startere & team players! 

•4 Day - 40 Hour Work WMk, Moni-Thurt. 
*Ufe, Health & Dontal BMofltt 
•401 KRatiramont Plan 
•Paid Vacation & Holiday! 

Apply in Person To: 

ACTOWN ELECIROCOIL 

2414 Highview St. Spring Grove. IL 60081 
(815) 675-6641 



D 

n 

D 

n 

D 
D 

D 
D 

n 
n 

D 
D 
D 

D 



a 

n 

3 

a 
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J 

I* 



Nostalgic Gift Shop 

Needs 

SALES AND CASH 

PERSONNEL 

We ore looking for Nights and 
Weekends In our unique gi?t shop. We 
need entlwslastie. confident, customer 
oriented, adaptable, outgoing, and 
cheerful people now. 

FuU Benefits Package 

Come by Mon.-Frl. or 

CaU: 708-244-1512 



I 



Cracker Barrel 

5706 Northridge 
Gurnee, IL 

(Near Great America) 



i 





I 



HdpWiated: 
FnU'Tlme 




HelpWaokd 
Fnll-Tline 



INSURANCE 
AGENCY 

Needs lomeone 10 help maiuge 
Propeitr & CatuIty'lnturaiKX 
agency. Dulles Include sales arid 
service of exiittng and new 
dlcmi. Computer & typing ncc- 
esury. Pbone expcrlenoe beneA- 
cla]. Salary based on experience 
Beneflu Included. WUl train If 
necessary, dene call: 

(708)548-5800 

or page 
(708) 379-2253 



RETAILSTORE 
MGR/SALESPEOPLE 

Full or Pari lime 

Hourly plus commission. 
Cellular and paging 
experience helpy. 

Can 
Maria 

(312)585-4781 



MAKE YOUR OWN HOURS! 

Nalloiul cakilog company seeks full and part time 

CUSTOMER SERVICE rcprcsentalives. Excellenl 

oommuniatlon skills necesary. Attractive wagolxnent package. 

Flexible hours, days, evenings and weekends - you diooscl 

CALL SILVIA: (708)615-2110 



CNA'S 



FULL & PART TIME POSITIONS 

Long term care facility is now accepting applica- 
tions for Full & Part Time Positions. Dulles con- 
sist of primary care whtcii Include dressing, 
grooming, personal hygiene, toileting, bathing, 
passing of meal trays and hand feeding resi- 
dents, interested parties should contact Mary Ann 
at Libertyville Manor (708) 367-6100. 



LIBERTYVILLE MANOR 

610 PETERSON RD. LIBERTYVILLE, IL 
708-367-6100 



SECRETARY 

WARREN TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL 

Candidate must have excellent typing skills.^ back- 
ground in Word Processing and computer use, 
excellent communication skills and ability to work 
as part of a team. 

Salary commensurate with experience 
9 1/2 month position 

Please send letter and resume' by August 30, 1994 to: 

Dr. Patrick McMahon, Superintendent 

Warren Township High School 

SOON. O'PIaine Road 

Gurnee, IL 60031-2686 




Red^ 
Lobstei; 



LAKEHURST HAS A UNE 
ON FUN & FlBaBIUTV 

BUSINESS IS BOOMING!!! 




*D 



9 



WE ARE 

TAKING 

APPUCATIONS 

FOR ALL 

POSITIONS 



Please apply in person 
900 Lakehurst Rd. Waukegan 

Wc are an tqual opponunlty emploj^r 



Security 

National Manufacturer located in 
the North Suburiis is seeking a 
full time security guard for shift 
work. Applicants should have at 
least 2 years experience. Duties 
include making hourly rounds, 
receiving visitors, and phoife 
coverage. We offer a full bene- 
fits package, including profit 
sharing and insurance. Send 
resume with salary history to: 

Box W 

c/o Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 

Qraysiake, IL 60030 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




Help Wanted 
FDU-Tbne 




HeipWMted L 
' iPaU-Time I 



FulPoPParPTime 

Must be bright, jfrieridly and work 

accurately with figures. 

Please Apply In Person 



Rt. 83 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



Grayslake, IL 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 




LOOKING FOR CHANGE? 

SCHWAN'S ICE CREAM has sales 
opportunities available. Guarantee plus compilssionj| 
excellent benefits, and advancement opportunilies.f 

Must be at least 21. Now Interviewing. For an 
appointment, call 1 -800-336-7569. EOE 



I 



WANTED 

2ND & 3RD SHIFT 

PRODUCTION MACHINE OPERATORS 

Shift Premium 

2nd Shift - .35 per hour 

3rd Shift - .50 per hour 

Wo are the leading manufacturer of after market brake parts 
In search of hard working Individuals who are looking tor good 
pay and bonellts for their labors. - 

The positions require machining and Inspection of heavy parts 
while working on an Incentive bonus program. Machining 
experience is preferred but we will provide in-house training. 
It this Is what you are looking for then WE WANT YOU. Apply 
In person to: 

HYDRAULICS INC. 

1600 N. INDUSTRIAL DRIVE 

McHENRY, IL 

MONDAY-FRIDAY 

7:30 A.M. • 3:00 P.M. 

EDE Hl/F/V/H 







Exocuiiw. fhe oandklele wnll be responslile for field 
sales calls, developing a key area in LaKe County 
artd must possess excellent skills in interpersonal 
oomnHmication, croativity and personal responsibility. 
TTw candUale must also be self molrvaled wkI ab(e 
Id wodt with minimal amount of supervisnh, enjoy 
variety arxl be able to handle multiple tasks. An auto- 
mot>ile is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professional, energetic and pos- 
sets al of the above charactenstics we are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A caixfidate shouM have previ- 
ous sabs experienoe. Please send resume or call; 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 223-8161 




Center 



(OPEN 24 HOURS) 

ONE STORE ONE STOP 
ONE GREAT IDEA 

We are looking lor applicants lor positions In the following areas: 
^OVERNIGHT GROCERY STOCK 
*OVERNiQHT FASHIONS 
Part Time 
niTILITY CLERKS 
^GROCERY STOCK 
^CUSTOMER QREETERS 
*LUBE TECH 

^AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE WRITER 
*PHONE OPERATOR 
*DELI SERVICE 
*CHECK-OUT SERVICE 
'JEWELRY 

Experienced Part Time 

*CAKE DECORATOR 
•SEAFOOD 

Mte Enooursge Appiications From All Intereslad Senior 
Citiiopa& Students Wanting Full or Pan-Tims Employment 

EXCELLENT STARTING WAGES AND BENERTS 

APPUCATIONS WILL U TAKEN Kti 

S413 N. Milwaukee Ave. 
Vtfnon Hills, IL 60061 
Apply at the Layaway Department 
Moii.-Sat. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
(n the Interest ol safety and to promots a sole production worit 
anvlronment K-Mart stores conducts a pre>empIoyinent drug tatt 
An Equal Opportunity Employer. 




'ClASSIFIED LAkElANtl NewspApcRs AuqusT 19, 1994 










220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 



Help Vantcd 
FtiU-Tlme 



NIGHT AUDITOR 
FULL TIME 

Apply wilhln: 

Waukegan 
Thrift Lodge 

222 Grand 
Waukegan, IL 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

REPRESEKTATIVE 
(Cashier) 

; Fun Ume all shifts, Full time i 

, b&ncfils include; 

[•Medical 4 LHa Insurance 
•PaldVacatioo&Hofidays 
•Educational Assistance Prograin | 

i -eo Day Review 

AMOCO 
FOOD SHOP 

•QURNEE 

350 N. Hunt Club Rd. 

•GRAYSLAKE 

34225 Rt 45 
& Washington St. 

•MUNDELEIN 

2029 W. Maple Ave. 

•LAKE ZURICH 

450 S. Rand Rd. 



WAREHOUSE 
POSITIONS 

Ton/s Pizza Service, a 

growing distributor of high 
quality pizza products, has 
full-time warehouse posi- 
tions available at our 
Wheeling, IL location. 
Duties include loading 
products to route trucks 
and helping unload semis 
in a freezer environment 
Night hours. Benefits, 
profit sharing, employee 

discounts, and more. 

S6.S0/hour to start. Must 

be at least 1 8, with own 

transportation. 

Now Interviewing. 

For more infonnation, call 

1-800-257-4886 

EOE 



Cooks 

Full Time 

Cooks for 
Dietary Dept. 

Contact 
Vol Johnson 

Mount 
St Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 



Manufacturing 

Siaclc-On Producu Company, a 
leading tnanufaciurer of steel tool 
storage units, Is seeking qual [tied 
applicants for manufacturing 
positions on all three shIfU. 

SpotWelders 
Machine Operators, 

Including brake 

presses and coil/sheet 

fed punch presses 

Assemblers, Packers 
and Material Handlers 

Shift hou 17 are; 
tsl Shift - 7.-O0am - 3;3t>pm 
2nd Shift ■ 3:30pm • )2:00am 
3rd Shift • 12:00am - 7:00am 
We offer a competitive hourly 
wage and benefit package which 
Includes medical and life Insur 
ance, 401(k} Plan, holidays and 
vacations. 

Please apply in person M>B 
8:30ain - 3:30pm at: 

Stack-On Proflucts 
Company 

1360 N. Old Rand Road 

Wauconda.IL 60084 

No Phone Calls Please. 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Tlme 



TEACHERS/ 
ASSISTANT 
TEACHERS 

Please Readl 

Excoplional top pay, caraar and 
personal orowtn opportunitioe 
now civaifabie ot NW suburbs' 
iflodlng child caro looming c«n- 
t«r8. Wa will tmln. Full timo/parl 
tlm«.$8-$10 per hour. 

Call De«n3 

at our Personnel Office 

1-a00-720<0250 



RAPIDLY GROWING 
PLASTICS 

Manufacturing operation 

has Immediate FT openings 

for expsriencod 

MOLD-MAKER. 

MACHINIST, 

INSPECTORS and 

SETUP/MOLDINQ 

TECHNICIANS 

Send resume or apply in 

person Mon-Frl Bam-Spm. 

HEINE PLASTICS, INC. 

107 N. Henderson 
Freeport, (L 61 032 

• EOE 



F^^ * - ' i r » 

SVMICALl 

ASSISTANT 

New Grayslake Oral 

Surgery Practice, 

looking for full or 

part time assistant 

' Experience preferred, 

but will train. 

Please call 

Lj7M)548.880aJ 



TURN YOUR 

CONTACTS INTO 

$1000'S A WEEK! 

FINDERSsM 

THE CONTRAaORS NETWORK 
Can you talk to contrac- 
tors and enroll Ihem in our 
network? Do you have 
contacts? Experience? 
Managerial /Hiring 
Skills? We are building 
our District Manager 
Teams in Chicagoland. A 
true ground-floor oppor- 
tttnily with both advance- 
ment and opportunities to 
open new markets for a 
new company. 8A - 6P, 
{708) 548-3463. EOE 



EXPERIENCED FORKLIFT DRIVERS 
2ND SHIFT 

Dccorel, a \eadme manufacturer/distributor of home fastiion 
products, is seeking full-time experienced reach/sland-up 
larklift drivers on tlie 2nd stiift for our Waukegan distribution 
center. Must be able to operate reach/stand-up forklift - a must. 
Excellent compensation/benefit package. 

Apply in Person 

DECOREL, INC. 

444 E. Courtland, Mundclcin, IL 60060 
M-F8-10AM. E.O.E. 



r 



DIRECT CARE 



^ 



Staff neetded to work in a specialized program 
w/adolescents w/autism. 2 yrs. exper. working 
w/the developmentally disabled & prior behavior 
mgmt. exper. required. College degree preferred. 
Pay negotiable dependent on exper. & education. 
Send resume to: BLARE House, Inc., 4010 Lake 
I Park, Park City, IL 60085. EOE. No phone calls. I 






Growing Tclccommunicutions Company needs 

experienced out£ide sales personnel in N & NW 

collar coundes of Chicago. We offer an attractive 

compensation package with company, benefits and 

training. Call or send resume to: 

Carl Meyer, RADICOM, INC. 

2604 N. Chapel Hill Rd., McHenry, IL 60050 
Phone: (815) 385-4224 Fax: (815) 385-4368 



Tractor/Trailer Drivers 

Earn the Big Bucks - $15.15/Hour & .375/Mile' 

We are an international, multi-location seven-day a week reslau 
rant food distributor. Duo to continued growth In our customer 
base, wa have Immediate openings for additional delivery/line- 
haul drivers at our local distributor center. Wa have doubled the 
size o( our local work force over the last three years. Current 
Class A COL required. Must have throe years of verifiable safe 
driving experience in tractor/trailers. Excellent salary ('rata 
above Is top rale after 160 working days), full benefit package 
plus paid layover and meal expenses. Only 2 to 3 nights away 
from home each week. 

Apply in person or send qualifications to: 

The Martin-Brower Company 

202 N. Ford St. 
Qridley, IL 61744 

No phone calls will be accepted. 
Equal Opportunity & Affirmative Action Employer M/F/H/V/D 
Drug Free Employer 



ASSISTANT DEPT. MANAGER/ 
LEAD PERSON 

1ST AND 2NDSfflFTS 

Due to u-emendous growth, America's largest mfg of picture 
frames and framed art has immediate openings for Asst. Dept. 
f^anugers/Lead People on the Isi & 2nd shifts. Musi be expe 
rienced, self-motivated individuals working in a high-volume, 
fast-paced environment. Qualified candidates wilt be respon 
sible for 2 assembly production lines containing 25-30 pro- 
duction workers. Salai^ range $8-$12/hr plus benefits. Send 
resume to: " 

Decorel, Inc. • 

444 E. Courtland, Mundelein, IL 60060 
Attn: Dan Marqucz 

EOE 



220 



Help Wanted 
FnUrTlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FaU-Tlme 



CUSTODIAN 

3rd Shift 

THE COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COiJNTY seeks someone to 
perform general custodial 
work Including mopping, wax- 
ing and buffing floors with 
automatic floor cleaning 
machines. 

QUALIFICATIONS: gener- 
al cleaning knowledge and 
ability to follow Instmctlons. 

NORMAL HOURS: 11pm 
to 7am Monday thru Friday. 

SUBMIT completed appli- 
cation form to Personnel,' For 
more information or applk;a 
lion form, contact Personnel 
at 708/223-6601 ext. 2216 
(TDD No. for hearing 
Impaired is 70B/223-561S). 

COLLEGE OF LAKE 
COUNTY. 19351 W. 
Washington, Qrayslako, IL 
60030-1198 (a.aye.0.8.} 



Production 
Assistant 

A full servlco . Direct 
Mail Marketing Co. Is 
seelcing an entry-level 
production assistant. 
Qualified candidate 
must have excellent 
organizational and 
communication skilla. 
Will be trained to coor- 
dinate all aspects of bur 
clients' Direct Mail pro- 
grams. Send resume to: 

Attn; Jan 

Ahericjin 
MAHKimNQ Services 

955 Campus Dr. 
Mundeleitb IL 60060 



Secietaiial Support 

Libertyville, IL based Eagle Finance is seeking 
an Executive Assistant with demonstrated 
typing and clerical skills. This experienced 
individual will work in a fast-paced environ- 
ment. We offer excellent salaiy and benefits. 
Call (708) 549-5831 ext. 520 anytime to com- 
plete an automated telephone application. 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
ASSISTANT 

Responsible for providing adcninisU'ative support to the 

l3irector &. Community Coordinators of Lake County 

FIGHTING BACK. This full time position requires a 

typing speed of 60 wpm," thorough knowledge of 

MULllMATE, D-BASE IV and LOTUS 1-2-3, & 

strong organizational and communication skills. 

Send resume to: 

Carol Yates, Director 

■ Lake County HGHTING BACK 

31979 N. Fish Lake Road 

Round Lake. IL 60073 



BANKING 

North suburban bank has ihe following positions available for 
responsible individuals with excellent interpersonal skills: 

Teller - FT - Gurnce/Waukcgan - heavy cash handling expe- 
rience with excellent balancing- record, computer. literate 
helpful. 

Proof Operator - FT - Mon-Fri - Waukegan - 2+ years 
experience in single pocket proof. Excellent keystroking 
accuracy ability. Other duties include nticrofilming, 
research, etc. 

Good salary and benefit package 

Bank of Northern Illinois, N.A. 

Call 708-623-3800 for Interview appointment 

c/o/e m/f 



JCPenney 

Lakehurst Mall ONLY 
Now Hiring 

For Full-Time and Rirt-Time positions 
throughout the store including: 

•Commission Sales *Styling Salon 

•Non-commission Sales •Loss Prevention 

•Stockroom •Display 
•Catalog/Credit . 

Check out our new starting salary 
Apply in person Monday-Saturday 10 am- 

145 Lakehurst Road 
Waukegan, Illinois 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



aiRHEGllNlllS 

Customer Service Representative 

People needed to work in our information booths. 
Individuals will be assisting our customers with any 
questions, selling mall gift certificates and shopping 

bags. Must have a positive attitude. Evening and 
weekend hours available. 

Apply in person at the Gurnee Mills information 

booths located near Entries A & E. 

■■■'■' 

For more information call (70B) 263-7500, ext. 2446. 

E/O/E 



220 



HelpWaated, 
FkiU-:Tlmei 



220 



He^ Waated 
mll-Ttme 



HARDEE'S 
OF GRAYSLAKE, 
ANnOCH,&ZION 

Are looking for Assistant 
Mgrs, to help run their lop 
class operations. Pay la 
between $16,000 & $22,000- 
based on exp. Good bonetita 
(Insurance, paid vacations, 
bonus plans avalD. Call 70B- 
213-5250 anytime. Lv. phone 
number & name or apply at 
IHardse's of Grayslake. on 
Hwy. 83; Hardaa'a of Antloch. 
on corner of 63 & 173. 



PAYROLL CLERK 

IHTRUPA MANUFAcniniNa CO. 
has Q futl'Urrw position available f« 
a Payroll Clerk. WorMnn undar mtnl< 
(Tial supervision, the soMctKl candl- 
dato wllt porlorm a vailoty of routlna 
dflrical dutlos necossflfy to procoss 
and malntaJn payroll rocords. Includ- 
ing calculallng pay, doducltons arKi 
rjfit pay. Wo sook a high school grad- 
uato with a minlinum o( 3 years auto- 
mated payroll expflrianco & knowl- 
edga of total payroll procesa Includ- 
ing year ood dosing & W-2'a, PC 
o)tpor1anco and sprsadshoel ability a 
plus, IntarsBtad candidates may 
apply In person from 8am-Spm at 

IKTRUPAMANUFACTURINQ 

95 S. Route 63 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Equal Oppoftuolly Employw M/F/V/0 



MAINTENANCE MECHANIC 

Dccorel, Inc., a leading manufacturer and distributor of picture 
frames and frame art is 'currently seeking a reliable individual 
to join our maintenance department on the 2nd shift. Candidate 
must have their own tools, sU-ong electrical background, and 
good mechanical ability. Experience with automated equip- 
ment a plus. Have knowledge of building maintenance and 3 to 
5 years experience in niaintenahcc field. 

Apply in person M-F 8-10 am 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland, Mundelein, IL 

EOE 




,. NOW HIRING 
S FOR FALL 

W Across from Great America 
Starting up to $5,00/hour;/: 



PART TIME DAYS & NIGHTS 



PERFECT FOR STUDENTS - FLBXIBLE HOURS 

3-4 hour shifts available - Weekdays Monday-Friday 

At Our Gumee BURGER KING— 

Across the street from Great America 

5300 Grand Ave. 

(708) 336-3427 ^^^ 



COME JOIN US, 
WORK WITH THE BEST! 

For over 40 years, Dfinny's has been America's 
choice for a full-service family restaurant. 

OPENING SOON 

DENNY'S 

IN KENOSHA 

IS NOW HIRING,.. 

•SERVERS -HOSTS 

Wages from S5-S10 hour 
•flexible schedule 
•Insurance & vacation benefits 
•full or part-time 

APPLY DAILY 

Danny's at Day's Inn 

Hwy. 50, Kenosha 

EOE 



POLICE OFFICER 

Winlhrop Harbor Board of Police Commissioners will 
be testing for the position of police patrol officer. 

Applications will be available 
August 8, 1994 to August 25, 1994 

at the Winthrop Harbor Police Department 

1707 Main Street (7th Street) Marina Plaza 

Winthrop Harbor, IL 

A $10.00 NON-BEFUNpABLE APPLICATION FEE CHARGED 

PHYSICAL AGILITY TEST IS AUGUST 28. 1994 2:00 Pf^ 

Qualifications: U.S. Citizen, Ago 21 to 35 yrs and 

Residency 5 mllo radius within 1 year of employment. 

Starting salary $24,000 after probalton Salary $26,000 



SHEET METAL 
DEPARTMENT 

Musi have minimum 3 years experience in sel-up and 
operation of CNC turret punch press, press brake and 
shear. Able to make a' variety of set-ups and check parts 
working from detailed drawings and verbal instructions. 

-Slan$lL04/bour. 

•Automatic increases to $12.01 in one year. 

-Opponunity for advancement to higher paying positions; 
wagesrangcfrom Sl4.43/hour. 
-Group medical and life insurance plan. 
•I / holidays. 
.rff01{k)plan. 

APPLY IN PERSON 
9:00 AM TO 3:00 PM 




SlTHE GRIEVE CORPORATION 

500 Hart Road > Round lake, IL 



AuquCT f 9, i95lJi'UfclANd NE>wt>ApERS CLASSlWi&.' 




r/i «.vj 



I 










220 



lldp Wanted 
FiiU-Ttmc 



220 



HelpWnitcd 
FnllrThne 



HOMEMAKERS 

Would you like to be Involved with 

helping peopla? Do you enjoy 

woridng with Senior CitJiens? Wa 

ars looking for homemakera & 

housekeepere & olher qualified 

appficants to wotk with our clients 

In thflliike County Area. 

We Offer: 
* Bonuses and Pay Raises 
• Freo Training 
One year experience [s required. 
Must have a car with Insirance. 
Please call for an immediate Inter- 
view, We have many positlore 
available In your area. 
Call Susan: 
KAT10N/U. HOME CUE SYSTEMS 
(708)965-9269 



m 



^ 



Assistant 

Full Time Activity 

Assistant needed for 
L.T.C. Nursing Home 
Facility. Energetic and 

enthusiastic, experi- 
ence working with the 
elderly helpfult Some 
evening and weekend 

hours required. For 

more information, 

contact Jenifer. 

Hillcrcst Nursing Center 

(708) 546-5301 

[« a 



CHILD CARE-RELATED PROFESSIONAL 

OPPORTUNITIES AND EDUCATION 

YWCA of Northesatem llUnoh 

Child Cure Resource and Referral Prognm: 

'Program Director (Director Qualified) 

'Child Care Provider Training and Recruitment 

'Corporate Specialist ^ 

|arly childhood experience, BA degree, excellent oral and written 

kiKs; must meet JL-DCFS rcqufrcmenls. Salaries commensurate 

^ith qualifications. Resume to: YWCA of Northeastern Illinois, 

(133 Bclvidcre, Wnukcgan/IL 60085, attention Lee Ann or Mary, 



COPY REPRESENYATIVE 

1 part time (20 to 25 hours) person needed In Vernon Hills med- 
ical lacHity. Dutios will Inciudo logging, copying, Invoicing and 
mailing confidential medical records, Must bo professional and 
servtee oriented. Previous medical clink; experience a plus. Day 
time hours, paid training. Please send or fax resume to: 

SIUIART CORPORATION 

131 W. Layton Ave. #208 

Milwaukee, Wl 53207 

Fax 414-483-2248 



Jaks Fifth Avenue, The Clearinghouse 

lis looking for friendly energetic people to fill the following 
entry-level full-time and part-time positions: 
• Cashiers 
• Customer Service Representatives 
• Loss Prevention Detective 
, Our positions include day, night and weekend hours, we 
.cquire flexibility when scheduling. Please apply in person at 
\ the store located in the Gumce Mills Mall, Suite 421 (right 
across from Waccamaw). Our phone number is 
(708)662-0988. We are an E/Q/E, M/F. 






BURGER NOW HIRING 
KING FOR FALL 



In the Gumee Mills MaU Is now hiring for the following shifts 
DAYSHIFT UP TO $S.50/HR. - 
NIQHTS AND WEEKENDS UP TO $5.00 HR. 

Iflntorested apply In person In the Lake County Fair 
Food Court In the Mall • Enter through Entrance C. 



iWji 



MAINTENANCE MEGllANIG/ELEUrRICAL 

Folding carton manufacturer In Mundeleln has 
an opening on second shift for a maintenance 
mechanic with electrical skills to maintain and 
repair plant equipment and building mainte- 
nance. Excellent benefits. Contact Human 
Resources Manager at 708-566-3173 or fax 
resume to 708-566-5032, ATTN: HRM. 



if 



MANUFACTURING 
PRODUCTION WORKERS 

1st and 2nd shift. Ehic to tremendous growth, EJccorel, Inc., a 
leading mfg of picture frames & framed art, has immediate 
openings available in our Mundelein mfg facility and for order 
Ipickcrs & packers in our Waukcgan disuibution cir for 1st & 
2nd shift. 

Apply in person M-F 8-10 am 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland, Mundelein, IL 
and 3860 Sunset Ave., Waukegan, IL 



TEACHERS 

•Kindergarten •Preschool 

•After School 

YMCA is looking for responsible, 

energetic, and professional people to 

teach at our Lake Villa child care center. 

Must be DCFS certified. Part time and 

full time available with benefits. 

Please call Andrea 
(708) 356-4000 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



Experienced 

HOSTBSS & 

WAITRESS 

Full time position 

TowNEB Square 
Restaurant 

UbcrtyvlUe 
(708) 367-9144 



Dtnny't U nmo hfriitf 
• SERVERS • HOST 

Flexible tiours, Full & 
Part time. Apply In person; 

DENNITS 

2063 Skokle VaUer.Rd. 
BlghUnd Park 



LOCKER ROOM & 
CART ATTENDANTS 

for rest of season. Avail, 
weekdays. Right people will 
have oppty. next year. Call 
Highland Park CO. 

708-433-9015 

Ask for Matt or Tom 



ASSEMBLER 

For hcaty indiLstrial equipment 
Must read blue prints arid fur- 
nish ami tools. Test required. 
Apply tp: 

American 
Process Systems 

381$ Grwid\-ille Avenue 
. Gumee, IL 60031 
Phone 708-336-2444 



LIGHT 




Located in Fox Lake, 
no experience neces- 
sary. $4.30/hr. to start. 
Health Insurance. 
Best suited for sec 
ond Income eatr^er. 
Excellent work envi- 
ronment. 

REMINGTON 
INDUSTRIES 

(708) 973-2234 



WAREHOUSE 

OPPORTUNlirES 

Intrupa Manufacturing Co. is a 

leading manufacturer/distributor 

of rsplacement parls/accessoriea 

to the lift truck Industry. We are 

currently seeking IndivkJuals for 

full & part-time openings In 

naaitjy Grayslake. Positions 

required dedication, good figure 

aptitude, ability to lift heavy 
objects and verifiable references 
& stable work history. Previous 
warehouse experience preferred. 

For conslderatioo, apply in person 
from9am-5pmat 

INTRUPA MANUFACTURINQ 

COMPANY, INC. 

95 South Route 63 

Grayslake, IL 6t}030 

Equal Opportunity Ennployer M/F 



ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE 



The Village of Round take 
Beach Is seeking a responsible 
individual to act as reception- 
ist, secretary, & must be able 
to perform administrative 
tasks of a confidential &. sen 
sltivc nature. 

Must type 35 wpm and /or 
take shorthand. Ability to 
use/ learn PC Word process- 
ing programs. Strong verbal 
& written communication 
skills & ability to deal with 
the public. 

The hourly rale SS.OO/SIO.OO 
per Pir. bidtviduals should 
apply in person at 224 W. 
Clarendon Drive. 



BE HOME AT 

NIGHT WITH 

FAMILY 

Tired ol woFktng at night? Clean 

with Meny Maids Mon-Fri, 

daytitne hours. Weekly 

paycheck, paid vacation and 

holiiJays. Hiring Immedialely for 

regular full/part-time. Need car, 

insurance, valid driver's license. 

Call or stop in to apply. 1840 

InduslriaJ Dr., Ubertyville, IL 

Merry Maids 

(708) 367-0800 



220 



Wanted,] 
I.Tl mc I 



Help Wanted, 
FtiU, 



OFFICE 

SUPPORT 

PERSON 

We are seeking a person with 
dth/e and ambition to fill an 
entry level otrica support 
position at our Northbrook lab- 
oratory. Good telephone and 
data eniiy skills a plus, If you 
want good pay and have a 
desire to work in the exciting, 
fast paced fiekl of Radon, 
send resume to: 
Mr. Myers at 
P.O. Box 121 
Northbrook, IL 60062 



225 



Busintss 
Opportnnltles 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS. 
GREAT PART-TIME OP- 
PORTUNITY. VERY 
FLEXIBLE. LEARN HOW. 
U2=$100. ($100. for 
you). Call C708)263-6236. 

INCOME TAX FRANCHISE 
OPPORTUNITY. WE OFFER A 
PROVEN OPERATING SYS- 
TEM, PROPIETARY SOFT- 
WARE. AND A NATIONWIDE 
ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC 
RELATIONS SUPPORT PRO- 
GRAM, CALL JACKSON 
HEWITT l-aoO-277-FAST. 

OUTQOINQ PEOPLE 

WANTED: Earn big $9 / have 
fun. Fantaev Unlimited wants 
vou to Join our party plan 
shtowing quality lingoria, 
Jawolry. lotions. No Invest- 
ment, 1-800-989-6606, 9-S 
(EST). 



228 


SiliuUoDS Wanted 



IN-HOME CARE for aldor- 

ly will do cooking, cleaning, 
laundry, etc. 6/yoars experi- 
ence. Have Rolerences. (708) 
395-6051. 

NURSING ASSISTANT 

WANTED. Live-in homo 
health caro afd, for mate quad- 
rapleglc In Gumee townhome. 
Dulles can bo scheduled ar- 
ound your full/part-time job. 
(70aj 747-2592, 



240 


Child Care 



-HONEY BEE'S* Day Care 
provkles quality chlM care. Lo- 
cated In LIndenburst. Degreed 
In EarV ChiWhood Educatton. 
fT/PT. Substitute temp. Rea- 
sonable. Call Melissa (708) 
356-3953. 

'LITTLE CASTLE" DAY- 
CARE- Grayslake. Conveni- 
ent school bus route. School 
DIstrlst «46. Meals Included. 
Full-time am/pm. (708) 
54B-1138. 

BEFORE AND AFTER 
SCHOOL CARE, And also 
part-time opening available In 
LICENSED GRAYSLAKE 
HOME. "Dally activities, 
games. Meals provMed. Call 
(708) 223-3006. 

CHILD CARE NEEDED 
Part-time In my Round Lake 
area home for toddler, flexble 
hours, experioTKe and refer- 
ences required. Call evenings 
only. Chris: (708) 740-7439. 

CHILDCARE NEEDED IN 
my Grayslake home, 1/chlld, 
Mon.-Fri., Ftexbl© hours. Noiv 
smoker, (70B) 223-6427. 

DAY CARE & AFTER 

SCHOOL CARE- In my Wau- 
conda home. Ages 3 and up. 
Snacks and meals provkJed. 
(708) 526-6833. 

FUN ACTIVITIES AND LOTS 
OF TLCI College educated 
Mom will care for your child. 
Just 0(1 Grand Ave., Gumee. 
(708) 662-4997. 

JOHNSBURG- NON- 

SMOKING mother ol 3, will 
babysit lull-time or pait-tlme 
evenings. Meals and kits ol 
quality lime. ( 815)363-9412. 

L0N5 lake; INdiLESiDE 
AREA. LICENSED QUALITy 
DAYCARE has openings. 
GAVIN South School. (Grant 
School dist.) Olferlng 
games, stories, and educa- 
tional activities for your child. 
Non-smoker. Meals, snacks 
Included. (Federal Food Pro- 
gram) Wall aqutppad for 
FUNII Call for Intenrlew. 
(708)740-1957. 



240 


CMiCuQ 



LOOKING FOR EXPERI- 
ENCED person lo care for 
our t5/month oki child, Grays- 
lake, Part-lime/ lull-tlmo. (708) 
223-3267, or (708) 
223-8616, eves. 

LOVING PERSON NEED- 
ED to caro for our Omonlh old 
boy. Your homo or ours, 
Brooksldo-Qumoo area. Can 
after 6PM.(708) 855-0806. 

TEACHER SEEKS ENG- 
LISH SPEAKING WOMAN 
TO CARE FOR OUR WELL 
BEHAVED 3 YEAR OLD IN 
OUR LAKE BLUFF HOME, 8- 
4, MONDAY-FRIDAY. SUM- 
MER & SCHOOL HOLIDAYS 
OFF. (708) 234-3813. 

MADELINE'S PLAYHOUSE 

has openings, full-llme, iyr. 
4oldor. Meals, snacks provkl- 
ed. Pombnsok Area, Qumoo. 
(708) 662-6828. 

MOM HAS CHILDCARE 

openings. Spring Grove 
home. Full time. Meats/ 
snacks. (815) 675-2532, 
after 6pm. 

MOTHER OF (1}WILL care 
tor your chlM In my Gages 
Lake home, tull-timp open- 
Ings. Sandy. (708) 223-7269. 

NANNY NEEDED 2/daya 

Week. (24hr., lAyoek) In my 
Grayslake Christian home lo 
watch 3/gli1s (IBido. 4,6yrs.) 
Must have own transportalk}n, 
be rollable and references. 
Non-smoker prelered. (706) 
548-8510. 

SPRING GROVE MOTH- 
ER has 2 openings In her 
home. Fenced in yard, 
snacl^meals Included. Non- 
smoking environment. CPR 
Cerllltod. References. Lots ol 
TLC. Call Joan for Interview. 
(708) 973-1549. 

WANTED- PERSON TO 

BABYSIT In my Gurrwe home, 
Mon., Wed., Friday, alternat- 
ing with Tuo3.,Thurs and pos- 
sibly 1/Saturday per month. 
7:30am-4;30pm Must have 
own transportation. Non- 
smoker. Sandy (708) 
855-9343. 



WAUCONDA 
PARK DISTRICT 

Is lootdng (at site supervisors 
and comuelcns to work at ibc 
Before & Afta-^iioQi Day-care. 
Must tx rdlatilc and hive experi- 
ence working with gnde school- 
age chlkiren. Houn are 6r30- 
8:30 am and/or 2;30-6;00 pm. 
Please call Lisa @ 
(708) 356-3610 



J "lV^^'jj. f r "^-f^ ^ \ 



MARkEiGuidE 



301 



Antiques 



ANTIQUE DEALERSI 
RESERVE your space Now 
for New Antique Mall on 
Sheridan Road Opaning 
SOON In downtown ZIon. 
Call (708) 731-2060 or 
(708)244-5933. tor details. 

ANTIQUE MAHOGANY 

WOOD buffet. $250 China 
cabinet, with serving table, 
$200 (815) 344-1882. 



304 



Applluccs 



NEW IN BOX Jenn-AIr mi- 
crowave oven and Jenn-Atr 
Convenllonal Oven. Built-in 
dual. Bost otter (706) 
949-5187. 



Refrigerators, 

Washers, Diyers 

all reconditioned, all 
guaianteed. Also new 
and used parls for most 
major appliances. 

(708)949-1110 



310 


aintars/Cralls 



ATTENTION CRAFTERS: 
St. Theresa Medk:al Centers 
In Waukegan will hokj Its ard 
Annual CraH Fair Friday, Oc- 
tober 21, 1994. Call #360- 
2639 and leave your name 
and phone nurptier arKl Intor- 
matfan will be mailed to you. 

CHAPTERS WANTED- Grant 
High .School, 6th Annual 
Cratt Fair, Fox Lake. October 
15th, 9am-4pm. Spaces 
available. Rasarva NOWl 
(708) 587-2561 

(414)473-7016. 



318 



Btislncss 
Office Equipment 



DISPLAY CASE, Ideal (or 

commercial use, Glass door 
front entry, wood storage 
boHom. Lighted, Aprox. 411+. 
tall xsn. (anglh, 18'deop. 
Sacrlflca: $ ISO/Best otter. 
(708)740-1384. Round Lake 
Area. 

GESTETNER. 231 6C 

PHOTO copier, 6 1/2x11 to 
11x17 paper, film reduced to 
48%, enlarged to 205%, only 
27,000 copies. Cost $2,300, 
$750 or bost otter (708) 
546-9411. . 

KIMBALL OFFICE EQUIP- 
MENT, oak like new. Two- 
38'X72' ex. desks, 2-ox. desk 
chairs, 2-pulhup chairs, 4 shelf 
bookcase, conference table 
3O*x60'. Four drawer til© cabi- 
nets legal and kitter, 2-deluxe 
steno chairs with arms, 2* 
30')(72" folding tables, 2.42' 
round oak tables w/chrome 
base, 2-matchtng 5 shelf 
bookcases, 1-largo 1-small 
microwave ovens, Bloomlleld 
commercial coffee maker. 
Sharp SF7200 copier. Days 
(708)263-8500, Evenings 
(708)295-3211. 



320 



Electronics 
(^rapulers 



ZENITH EASY PC with 3.5 
Incj drive, hard-drive, DOS 
WINDOWS Included wHh 
24pln Epson Printer, 
$40Q/best. (708) 623-0569. 



330 



Garage 

Rummage Sale 



ANTIQUES, STUDENT 

DESK and CHAIR, stereo 
equipment, clothes, artwori<, 
furniture and Morel Satur- 
day, Sunday 9am-3pm. 
B08 FoxMoor, Lake Zurich, 
Quentin to Pheasant Rkige, 
to FoxMoor. 

ESTATE SALE- THURS. 
thru Sunday, gam-7pm. 
EVERYTHING GOESIII 
Household Items, Dining set 
(Irom Norway), tumlture, com- 
puter, WordProcessor, ETC. 
MOVING OVERSEASI 
1901 Bun' Oak, Undenhurst. 
Otf Grand Ave. (Rte132). 
(708) 265-1798. 

GARAGE SALE- SATUR- 
DAY AUG. 20lh. 9am-4pm 
2805 Tyler Ave., Waukegan. 
off N.McAree. left on Dana, left 
on Wall, Right on Metropolis, 
on CORNER. 

GARAGE SALE-Sofa. love- 
seat, enbd tables, comforters, 
Schwinn ladies lOspeed, toys 
and stuff. 1116 KESWICK, 
MUNDELEIN, 8AM-2PM 
ONLY, SATURDAY-AU- 
GUST 20TH. 

HUGE GARAGE SALEdonI 
miss stopping byl Tons of 
stuff. THURSDAY 8/18 9-5, 
FRIDAY 8/10 O-S. SATURDAY 
8/20 &-5, 1080 LARKDALE 
(S.W. CORNER RT. 12 &BON- 
NER ). Wauconda. 

MOVING SALE Chain-Link 
fence 70tt. with gate and acce- 
sories $250.00. Swing set with 
basketball net 570.00, large 
Italian solkl pine hutch (glass 
and wood lop) originally 
S1500.00 asking $800.00 and 
much more. Saturday August 
20 and Sunday August 21 
9A.M.-4P.M., 3720 B Tennes- 
see Ct. (Fonestal Village- 
Great Lakes. (708)685-1505. 

YARD SALE- 234 LEM DR. 

Cambridge Trailer Courts. Oil 
Rte.134/Falrfleld..Thiir8. FrL 
(1Blh,l9th) 9am-Spm. 

Sat. (20lh) 9am-1pm. Mi- 
crowave, sewing machine, or- 
gan, ck)th6S and MORE. Cash 
Onlyl Rain dales Monday, 
Tuesday & Wednesday^ 



330 



Garage/ 
ftunmage Sale 



'H'»--* 



MOVINQI 3-j)l«oa SEC- 
TIONAL SOFA, $300/be3t. 
MORE Misc. Furniture, Satur- 
day lOam-Spm., Sunday 
10am-4pm. (708)473-2541. 

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE 
SALE- Hunter Ridge Subtflvf- 
slon. 1224 Meadowlark, 
Grayslake, Saturday (8/20) 
9im-4pm. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- 
Oaklree Subdivision, Otf Rol- 
lins. SAT. A SUN. Qam- 
6pm. Bikes, books, clothes, 
toys and olher Misc. 1925 
OaMree Trail. " 

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE 
SALE- SATURDAY MO, 
9am-5pm. 5078 Glendale Dr. 
Qurnee. (lAlock north of 
Rto.132, 2/block3 west of 
Rt6.21) Dining room table wtth *" " 
leaves, pad, e/chairs, S^lece 
antique bedroom set, other 
furniture, 2A]lkes, colieclfcles, 
Misc. 



338 



HOCMS& Tacks 



16-HH APPEX rag. Ouarler 
bourse Mare, 7yrs. old. Goes 
English or Westem. Nice 
mover. Has shown. (708) 
526-5397 




llousdiold Goods 
Furniture 



Fox Lake Noon Lions 



Rummage 




Aug. 26th, 27th, 28th 

9:00 am till 5:00 pm daily 



Next to: Fojtik Pharmacy in Fox Lake 
(11 E. Grand Ave.) 

Proceeds to aid the blind and handicapped 
. For donation dropoffs call 
Wayne Witt - (708) 987-4404 9:00 am tiU 12:00 pm 
Irma Kelly - (708) 587-6784 3-.00 pm Uil 6:00 pm 

(Daily) 

Hope to see you at the sale! 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 
Loveseal. Blue, Mauve, 
Cream, $550. LEATHER 
sofa and toveseat, $950. Ex- 
cellenl condition, MUST 
SELU (708)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete Si, 100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. Cher- 
ry. OAK bedroom set 
$1,200. ALSO Sleigh bed- 
room set, $1,745. All In PER- .p ,. 
FECT condition. MUST ^ 

SELLI (708)548-1045. 

7-plece BEDROOM SET. 

medium Oak, Queensize, 
Very good condition. Paid 
S7,000 asking $3,000. (708) 
395-423 7. 

ALU EXCELLENT CONDI- 
TION! 5/pleces Heywood Wa- 
kotiekl dinette, lO^iece Ttxi- 
masvUle formal dining room 
lumiture, NoritakI China, 
2/plece Flex-steel blue uphof* 
stored sofa/chair, like new 
queen sleeper, gray/brown 
tweed, Walnut audio/visual en- 
tertainment center. wtth 
5/components. Schwinn bike, 
swivel upholstered chairs. Rat- 
tan ctiairs with matching glass- 
top colfee table. Sewing ma- 
chine, chaise lounge, book 
case, pool table. (708) 
746-0015. 

BLACK AND GOLD Brass 
funriture. Dining set, entertain- 
ment center, student desk 
with chair. Make otters. (708) 
244-4491, Kim, leave mes- 
sage. 



DINING AND COFFEE TA- 
BLES, solid Maple, both with 
2/drop leaves, Ljarge surfac- 
es, ideal for entertaining. 
$150/each. (708)223-2332. 

DINING ROOM SET, QUEEN 
ANN, Cherrywood, 9-pleco, 
excellent quality, sacrifice. 
31,850. PertectI (708) 940- 
8865. 

DININGROOM TABLE 
WITH chairs and china cabi- 
net, S300 call any lime 
(708)548-0428 or (708)548- 
1350. 

FRENCH PROVINCIAL 

SOFA AND LOVESEAT, 

white, wood trim Asking $500 
(708) 546-6367. 



-iBjt; fli f" f <»i ^ i lTWB Vi WTyi W * « ; 



xsar 



lA^ 



:>- ■ > w »fc< 



£:£:==9!e«gte;s 



■ jassCTJU' i fw » ■ i n 



- IW j L l ul l 1 1 



^____ ■■'ivr.rinn-?* --?^.!-:. 




CLASSIFIED LAklANci Newspapers August 19, 1994 




340 



Household Goods 
Fumllurc 



GRANDFATHER CLOCK, 

Now Howard Mlllor Signature, 
mahogany case, 86-1/2 
X25-1/2 X15-1/4. Valuo 
$5,450. Selling: S4,500/bast 
offer (70a) 662-2178 or 
(708)244-2656. 

LARGE GREEN OVAL 
AREA Rug, $20; Hydraulic 
Boauty Chatr, $40; Exordso 
rowing machine, $65. 
(708)244-5450. 

MATTRESS SALE- Decora- 
tors' Top Quality; Sprlng-AIr, 
mattress and box spring. 
Never used. $270/queen 
size. (Other sizes also avail- 
able). Will deliver. (708) 
374-0203. 

MATTRESS SETS, ANY 
stze, never used, retail, $500- 
$1,100. Sacrifice; $135- 
$295. (708) 913-8965. 

MEN'S GOLF CLUB SET 

with bag. Groat staitor, $40. 
Ck}mp(ete golt set, $60. (708) 
367-6188. ■ 

MOVING MUST SELLI Re- 
tired couple from 11/room 
4,300sq.tt. to smaller quarters. 
Almost all must gol Including 
9x12 oriental rug, matctiing 
custom tapestry sofas, misc. 
fumtlure, paintings, china, sil- 
ver pieces, linens and 
MOREI Must see to appreci- 
ate value. (708) 746-3356, 
for appoint rrrnt. 

TABLE- GLASS 42 Inches 
by 72 Inches, 6 black laquer 
chairs with cushion seals. Like 
new. Ashing $1,000 (708) 
587-7517. 



i*^V^ ' "^^^ iV^-AVA* A* VA 







S39 



Ilousckocping 



MEAN MAIDS- WE HATE 
AND TERMINATE DIRT I 
HOUSECLEANING: weekly, 
bi-weekly or whenever. Move- 
Ins OR Move-outs. Refenanc- 
es. CallTllty. (708)746-2245. 

WILL CLEAN YOUR 

HOUSE, GONDO OR APART- 
MENT. EXCELLENT REFER- 
ENCES. (708) 839-0648. 



S42 



Uodsapiug 



*LAWN SERVICE AVAIL- 



ABLE. 

PRICES. 

SERVICE. 

39&-S063, 

B7B-1755. 



REASONABLE 

DEPENDABLE 

(708) 

or(414) 




MOVING?? CALL BOB The 
Mover. Furniture; pianos; 
safes; restaurant equipment; 
Light machinery. Lift gate 
van artd small crane trucks. 
PACK RAT Enterprises. 
(700)662-1956. 



S93 


Trees/Plants 



TREE 8c STUMP 
REMOVAL 

Land Clecaing 
Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Ttee 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

706-526-0858 



S96 


Wcddtng 



S99 



Miscellaneous 
Services 



PERMANENT COSMETICS. 
Brow, eye and Dp color. 
BeaulKul Foreverl. Eltctroly- 
als By Sherry. IS years ex- 
perience-certified. Wauke- 
gan. Lake Villa, Lake Bluff. 
(708)244-1640. 



340 



Ilousdiotd Goods 
Furniture 



MOVING SALE 3 ploco 
couch with end rocllnors, con- 
tor section has puil down tray 
and matching iovosoat, cokir 
blue/green. Also 1 oak and 
glass end table wtlh matching 
coffee table. Everything 1 year 
old $1,200 or offer (708) 
367-1244. 

MUST SELL. GRAY and 

black sofa and loveseat. Eta- 
gere, Coffee table, 2/ond ta- 
bles. Matching set. Excolkint 
condition. $550/beal. (708) 
680-9351. 

TRIPLE DRESSER AND 
MIRROR, Maple, l^no, 
■MUST SELL'. $200 (708) 
438-6761. 

WALNUT DINING ROOM 
SET, from 'SO's/60's. Round 
42' table plus leal, hutch and 
buffet. $400 or best offer (708) 

356-2025. 

WASHER, DRYER. BED, 
dresser. Sofa, Chair, carpets, 
lawn mower, Exercise equip- 
ment. Other Items. (708) 
520-3704 

WILDERNESS OAK BUF- 
FET, buffet ctosed hutch, din- 
ing table and 4 chairs. $1,750 
tlmr.(708) 244-0423. 



344 



Jcffdiy 



1/4 CARAT DIAMOND EN- 
GAGEMENT SET. Uke Now 
$700/best. (708) 587-6932. 



348 



Lawii/(!ardcn 



16HP INGERSOLL CASE 
LAWN & GARDEN TRAC- 
TOR Utility Blade. Mower and 
Lawn Vacuum Unit, with 
Wheel Weights and Garden 
Trailer. AsMng $2,000 (708) 
623-9605. . 

8HP TROY BUILT Super 
Tomahaw Chipper/Shredder 
$750(708)526-8951. 

MUST SELLI KOHLER- 
MAGNUM GT6000 riding 
lawn tractor, 6-speed, 18hp, 
44/IrKh cut. Looks and starts 
like new. Sl,950A)e3t. (708) 
623-1026. 

SNAPPER RIDING 

MOWER 30' mower dock. En- 
gine rebuilt 2 years ago $400 
or best offer (708) 438-3271. 



350 



Miscellaneous 



-ROMANTIC CANDLELITE 
WEDDINGS* Smoky Moun- 
tains *Ordainad Mlnia- 
tera * Elegant 

Chapal'Photographa'PlorsIt 
*Limot*Vidoos*Bridal Suttei 
with Jacuizla'No waitlng-No 
Blood Teat'Gatllnburg, Ten- 
nea8oeM-800-933-7464. 



350 


Misccllfliicoiis 



SPIRAL STAIRCASE $500. 

4lt. BAR with built-in sterao, 
$100. 1985 COLT Vista 7- 
passengor, $1,500/bost (708) 
587-6460. 

WANT MORE PRIVACY?? 
Do It With TREESI No fence 
or permits necessary with our 
beautiful thick Blue Scotch 
PInos. We guarantoo, deliv- 
er and plant for FREE with 
orders of 10 or/more trees. 
4ft.-5ft. Ses/each; 5fl.-6tt. 
$85/each; 6ft.-7ft. 
S120/e3cli. Larger trees also 
available. Nursery Grown. 
Thousands to choose from. 
(815) 338-3348. 

WEDDING GOWN - Off the 
shoulder brushed satin with 
beaded lace steeves, beaded 
bodice and hem. Cathedral 
length train and beaded veil. 
Size 8-10 $2,000 value tor 
$500 (708) 872-1036. 



SPAS& 
HOTTUBS 

Factory outlet 
Save ttiousonds. 
Complete 8 final 

fall liquidation 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



358 



Musical InslrumcQls 



BASS GUITAR AND amplifl- 
er. Greal for the novice. Hardly 
used, with case. New $300, 
sell $150 (708) 244-3843. 

KEYBOARD/SYNTHE- 
SIZER NOT A toy, perfect for 
beglnnars/intermedla. Can 
record. Casio HT-3000 $550 
now. S250 (708) 265-0965. 



360 



Pels & Supplies 



1993 OCA CURRACO Ja- 
cuzzi 7-person, (2) pumps, (1) 
blower, excellent condition 
$4,400 or best offer (708) 
546-6523. 

CANNONDALE T-600 

ROAD Bk^cle. 60cm, Bottles. 
Computer, Bag, Pump, Excel- 
lent condition. $450/llrm. 
PENTEX ME super 35mm 
Camera, 1.4lerra, Vlvitar Zoom 
lens, speed winder, l/owrter. 
$400/flmi. (708) 587-8608. 

FOAM CONCRETE FOUN- 
DATIO FORMS Best offer. 
Doughboy 2 pool filter new 
$150.00 (708) 546-3817. 

FULL LENGTH MENS 
Racoon coal. Large- extra 
large, has been stored. 
S750/best. (708) 740-4260 
9am-1pm or 7pfn-9pm. 

HOT TUB, 3 months oM, 255 
galk>ns, round, all access and 
chemicals IrKluded. Paid 
$3,200 asking S2.500 (706) 
731-3534. 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS. New Commorcial- 
Home Unita. From » 199.00/ 
Lampe-Lotions- Accessories. 
Monthly paymants low as 
418.00. Call Today FREE 
NEW Color Catalog. 1-800- 
462-9197. 

NINTENDO SYSTEM +40 
games. $150. Gam* Genie, 
$20. (708) 54^1486. 

TEN VENDING MA- 
CHINES, Easy Part-time 
Business. $1 ,995 Takes all. 10. 
(708) 249-8209. " 

TREADMILL, 6/months 

old, under warranty, Pro- 
Form, S350. QueensIze wa- 
teited, with headboard. Real 
good condition, $150. Comma- 
doro 64 Co[T|)uter, with disc 
drive, lots of accessories. 
Great for Student. $175. (708) 
689-3026. 

Brand New Colby A Colby 

5/8' Thermopane Double 
Casement Window with Fixed 
Center Glass, Aiun^num Clad, 
Low E Glass, 4' Square with 
Mutton Bars, $200 (708)497- 
3903. 



WHAT'S SO DIFFERENT 
ABOUT THE HAPPY JACK 3- 
X FLEA COLLAR? IT WORKS) 
Now available for catal CON- 
TAINS NO SYNTHETIC PYRE- 
THROIDSI At teod & hard- 
ware stores. 

2 YEAR OLD Lab/Shepard 
Mix needs good owrwr. Would 
be good companbn/protector. 
Call tor more Information. 
(708) 356-0423. 

AKC ROTTWEILER PUP- 
PIES, 5 males, champion 
bloodlines, parents on promis- 
es, all puppies guaranteed 
$50Q-$6QQ (708) 662-7089. 

BIRD FAIR - SUNDAY AU- 
GUST 21ST - 10:30-5 In the 
South Hills Country Club Barv 
quet Rooms. 194, Frontage 
Road, |ust north of Highway 
20, Racine, Wl. Donation: 
$1.00 EXOTIC BIRDS OF 
ALL KINDS, CAGES, 
FEED, ACCESSORIES, 
ETC. Informallon call Gene 
(414)694-6889. 

COLLIE PUPS (Lassie- 
type). 4 -rare white and 
4/sabte. Bred for Show, Brains 
and Companionship. (414) 
878-2220. 

MALE AND FEMALE Fer- 
rets, neutered and litter 
trained. Young and friendly. 
$100/each. (708) 244-2141. 

MUST PART WITH Male 
German Sl>epherd, 7/months 
old, great with kids. Needs 
someone wtw will q)end time 
with and room to nin. (Good 
Home.) (708) 395-6234, after 
12pm. or(708) 356-3535. 
6am-12, Kathy. 

REGISTERED SHIH-TZU, 
AVAILABLE for Stud. Call 
(708)746-6767. 

SIBERIAN HUSKY 

9/months old, male, no pa- 
pers. To good home with 
fenced yard. (708) 785-8436. 

SUN CONURES, LOVE- 
BIRDS, CANARYS. Hand 
Fed, bonded pairs. All cotots. 
Various prices. (708) 
487-0047. 

YORKSHIRE TERRIERS 
AKC Femalea, born 6/10. 
Famllylype fuzziee. $400. 
1 694-4709. 



370 



Wanted To Buy 




500 



nofiKS For Sale 



504 



Homes For Rent 



500 



Homes For Sale 




Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANV CONDITION- or Parts. 
Alto JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, NIckttodeon and 
Coke Michlnei. Piylng 
CASH! Call (708)985-2742. 



ANTIOCH BY OWNER- 
Must SmI open HOUSE, 
12-5pm 3-bedroom. 2-bath 
brick and cedar ranch on cul- 
de-sac. Great room with fire- 
place and trench doors, bay 
window, eat- In kitchen, all ap- 
pliances. Full basement, cen- 
tal air, 2.Scar attached garage. 
Dramatic deck overiooking 
pfotessionaily landscaped 
yard. Charming decorating. 
Ready to move In. $162,500. 
915 SummBrhlll Ct. (708) 
395-2719. 

OPEN HOUSE- Saturday 
and Sunday, 12am-4pm, 
THROUGH AUGUSTI Wau- 
conda. 4-bedroom, 

1-3/4bath, on 4/acres, Horses 
allowed. 2/acres bulldable. 
Much more. 27102 N. Mack 
Dr. Off RI.176. (708) 
526-6872 or HELP-U-SELL 
(708)516-1200. 

LINDENHURST- MOVE 

RIGHT tN and ENJOY this 
Picture Perfect 4-bedroom 
ranch with 2/baths, 2.Scar 
garage, and full finished 
basement. This home 
boasts many upgrades and 
is taste luly decorated In neu- 
tral colors. Other assets ir>- 
elude a large lot and LOW 
taxes $140,000 OPEN 
HOUSE- SAT. &SUN. 2- 
5pm. 1907 Plneertflt Ln., 
off Hawthorn. (708) 
356-2101. 



500 



Homes For Sdc 



ANTIOCH MARRIED? SIN- 
GLE? and hioklng to buy a 
home under 100K? Thb Is Iho 
house for you I 2-bedroom 
ranch, completely romodeled. 
For Sato By Owrwr. Oakwood 
Knolls Subd., 408 Edgowood 
Drtvo. (708) 395-7257 

BARRINGTON- Northwest 
Hwy. 3-bodroom, 2-bath, on 
1/3acre. Appliances, cenirai 
air, 2.5car garage. Enorgy oltl- 
clont. Rustic cedar shakes. 
Just reduced: $ 1 6 O| QO NOW 
$184,000. Contract, sale or 
rent possfcle. (708) 526-8306. 

BEACH PARK- 12795 W. 
29th St. 3-bedroom 2-bBlh. 
tri-levol, finished basement. 
2.5/car attached garage. 
$136,900.(708)746-9009. 

CRYSTAL LAKE Schools. 
DEAL DIRECT WITH BUILD- 
ER I 4-bedfoom, 2-stoiy. 2.5- 
baths, dock, energy otlk:lent. 
River rights on wooded lot. 
DRY basement has poten- 
tial. t1 1 |BOO $189,900. 
(708) 526-8306. 

LOW MAINTENANCE 
LOW PRICE lOyr. old 3-bed- 
room ranch wHh cathedral ceil- 
ings, laundryroom olf large 
eat-In kitchen, large closets. 
Well maintained nicely land- 
scaped. $75,900. (708) 
740-9168. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3- 
bedroom, 2-bath Ranch, fire- 
place, full basement, central 
air, HUGE 6/car heated ga- 
rage (great for camper and 
boat storage). Located in 
quiet neighborhood vrilhin 
walking distance from shop- 
ping and restaurants. 
$129,500. Twin Lakes, Wl. 
(414)877-9109. _^^ 

FOX LAKE- LARGE Deluxe 
Cedar/Brick 2-story with Eng- 
lish basement on 1-acre + 4- 
bedroom, 2.5bath, }acuzzl, 
fireplace, 3-car garage. TOO 
MANY UPGRADES TO LISTI 
Ready to move-in. Financing 
available. $269,900. DEAL 
DIRECT With BUILDER and 
SAV E. (708) 526-8306. 

You CAN own your own 
home I No downpayment on 
MileE materials, attractive 
construction financing. Call 
Miles Homes today, 1-800- 
343 2884 flxt. 1. 

DISCOVER YOUR AMERICAN 
DREAM Is the rising cost of 
housing keeping you from the 
American Dream of owning a 
homo7 Then you may want to 
consider choosing a modern 
manufactured homo. For mora 
Intorrnation call the Illinois 
Manufactured Housing Asso- 
ciation at 1-800-252-9495. 
YOU CAN'T AFFORD NOT TO 
MAKE THIS CALL. 



OAK LOG HOME. 2-large 
bedroom, exposed beams, 
more living space In base- 
ment. TLC, Close to state- 
line. Only serious buyers. 
$87,000 (414) 697-1752. 

McHENRY- RAISED RANCH. 
3-bedroom. FInlshod lower 
level, deck, energy effk;k)nt, 
2-car garage. Many up- 
gradosi River rights. Avail- 
able August 1st. Contract 
Possible. $131| 00Q i 

$127,900. (708) 526-8306. 

NEW 2,000flq.n HOME, 4- 
bodrooms, 2.5baths, tonnal 
dining room, family room with 
fireplace, full basement, 2/car 
garage with blacktop drive. All 
for $149,900. (708) 587-2904. 

NORTH CHICAGO- BY OWN- 
ER. 3-bedroom, l.Sbath, 
basement, 2/cBr garage. 
Near Navy base and 
Schools. Drive by: 2244 
N.Wallace Ave., off M.LKIng 
Dr. Mld-$80's. (708) 
673-5068. 

LAKE FRONTAGE MU- 
NDELEIN/DIAMOND Uke. 
Cedar home, 4-5 bedroom, 3 
1/2 bath, hardwood floors, 
steel seawall, pier, all decked 
at lakelronl $309,000 (708) 
949-5581. 

LAKEFRONT HOME. LOVE- 
LY 3-BEDROOM house on 
the Ct>aln with private pier, 
new kitchen, full basement, 
2.5car garage New well on 
3/4-Acre. Not In Flood 
plalne. Reduced to selll 
$187,900 (708) 740-7653, 



SOUTH SIDE KENOSHA 
4518 87lh PI. Newly remo- 
deled 3-bodroom ranch, 2.5- 
baths, ceramic tito, excoltont 
location, parilally finished 
basomonl. (414) 697-0205 

TWIN LAKES, WISCON- 
SIN RANCH.convenlent to Il- 
linois Country. Club Trails, 3- 
bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths, full 
basement wtlh finished don, 
Immodlato occupancy. 
$123,900, (414)877-9446 No 
Brokers Ptoaso. 

WILD WOOD. HOME FOR 
sak) by owner. Raised ranch, 6 
bodrooms, surrounded by 
maple trees and deck 
$144,900. After 5pm (708) 
223-5305 or leave message at 
(708) 223-1744. 



1/2 MONTH FREE RENT - 
2 bedroom Cottage on Lako 
Potlla, $550/Month + Security 
+ References (708) 395-5045, 

FOX LAKE AREA- 2-bod. 
room largo basomonl, at- 
tached garago, largo dock 
and yard. $750/fT»nlh +securi- 
ty +ulililk)3. Alter 4pm. (708) 
894-9239. 

FOX LAKE CUTE cozy 1- 
bedroom house on channel 
noar NIpporsInk Lake. Very 
peaceful $600/month -i-utlli- 
lles. No pots. (708) 
403-4547, leave message. 



WATERFRONT 
HOUSE/APARTMENT 

FOR RENT- on west sWe of 
Minoola Bay in Fox Lako. Ap- 
pliances included. $525/monlh 
plus security. (708)543-2958. 



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Case No. 93 C 5172 



Ingteside New Construction 

3 Bedrooms, 1.5 baths. 

Eat In kitchen, large family 

room, 2 car garage. 

Central air and more. 

$176,300.00 
(708) 550-9709 



IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 
NORTHERN DfSTRICT OF ILUNOIS, EASTERN DIVISION 
HOME SAVINGS OF AMERICA, 
F.S.B. as BUccesBor to HOME 
SAVINGS OF AMERICA, F.A. 
Plalntlff{s), 

V. 

TONY M. MINCEY, TONDA H. 
MINCEYand LAKE BARRINGTON 
SHORES COMMUNITY HOMEOWNERS 
ASSOCIATION NO. 12 

Defendant(8). 
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment 
of Foreclosure entered in the above entitled cause on January 
27, 1994, Mr. Robert Ssnechaile will on September 21, 1994, at 
the hour of 8:30 a.m. at the Lake County Courthouse, 18 North 
County SUeet, In the City of Waukegan, Illinois, sell to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to wit: 

Commonly known as: 756 Goll Court, Unit #983 

Lake Barrlngton, Illinois 60010 

The property is improved wilh a 2 bedroom, 2 bath, condo- 
minium unit located on the second floor. 

Sale terms: 10% down by certilied funds, balance within 24 
hours, by certified funds. No refunds. 

The Judgment amount was $155,587.16. 

The property will NOT be open for Inspection, 

Upon payment in full o( the amount bid, the purchaser will 
receive a Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a 
Deed to the premises after conlirmation of the sale 

For Informallon call Luann Reda. McBrldo Baker & Coles, SOO 
West Madison Street. 40lh Floor, Chicago, Illinois 60661. (312) 
715-5748. 



Michael Lescher 

Your Link to the Chain" 



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A BOAT ON THE CHAIN... 

■ - jjl SZtsonfyonalefitUBdlho4befliOQm2ticry on 1 icrg intti«n«west 

' \''''i ■-•<'" ^^i<^^ (Je«lopn>«nt In Foa Uks. The horn* b sel on i wooded 
r"*~1 :.;.'-:,HknQi.|iaia«pi(t»nlh«la)M»ndih»dedlivhooeMhlw«.aito(y 
V.'-XT'.. /jS lofii has oaklbaindsJilrialUig. F»miVroomfMli«jm*ilil*fli»- 
-'t^t. ' plac« and wnni^td iTctefs \o deck. M«s)Df siilg haa wth-ki dou) 

sast,too 



L; •-/"' , ' 'i.Vi.'^ *nd »*l(lpool talh. 3 car garage ind tJI fjr^'jfied 
(r=''_jr._..*^;A' i^^j Wl tJow to ysid proMa (5enty o( room lot joys. 



4 BEDROOM LAKEFRONT 

Pfh/acy of Riversldo island on Nippersink Lake, 
Completely remodeled wilh ceramic floors, oak 
cabinetry, ceramic baths & maintenance free 
exterior. The bonus Is the In-ground pool, 
enclosed lor year-round use. $109,900 ' 



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IN TOWN 3 BEDROOM RANCH. 

Just blocks from schools, trains and shop- 
ping. Fresh paint & carpet sliders to deck & 
fenced yard. Even a 1 car garage for only 

$79,900 



RIVERFRONT BARGAIN... 

In McHonr/s nicest rivertront neighborhood. 
3 bedroom home with brtek fireplace, newer 
siding, roof & kitchen cabinets. 712 Country 
Club. Call Michael Lescher. $124,900 



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I CHANNELFRONT 3 BEDROOM 

I Channellront - 1 house off Mineola Bay In 
I downtown Fox Lake. 3 bedroom cedar sided 
[ranch. Freshly painted & carpeted. 
$99,900 



SULLIVAN LAKE MOBILE HOME 

One of the nicest sites in the park. Sit In your family room or on your dock oveiiooWng the 
■pond & nature area. Dramatic custom carpeting, dry bar In family room & lots of storage 
In crawl space. Enjoy the pool, beach, club house & tennis courts. $S4,900 



Re/Max Advantage Realty 

(708) 395-3000 




■». IT 1" 



Au'qusT 19, 1994 UkEtANci Newsp/vpERs CLASSIFIED 





504 



Homes For lent 



ROUND LAKE BEACH- 3- 

bodroom 2-balh, loncod yard, 
2.5car garago. Close to lako. 
SOOO/month. Contact (708) 
657-0344. 

ROUND LAKE PARK - 3 

bedrooms, Ranch, 

5685/montti +.'80curtty dopoa- 
It. Available m (700) 
223-0902. ■ 

CUTE 3-BEDROOM Homo 
with garage. Round Lako 
Boach. S715/fTionth. 1st, Last, 
and security required, (70S) 
973-0832. 



TWIN LAKES, WISC. Fur- 
ntahed lakolront 4>bodroom 
homo available thru May. 
$e7SATWr^lh (615) 675-6504. 

WAUKEGAN- 2+b«(lroom, 
1 .Sbalh, 1/car garago, fenced 
yard, finished, baaemont. 
$715/mon1h, +utllltiBs, No 
pots. (708) 336-1665. eves . 

ZION- 4-bedroQm 2.5car 
garago. Carpeted, Fenced 
yard, Available 8/23 
S7flS/month +soajrlty, 4UtlltI- 
tles. CrodH check roqulrod, 
Sociton 8 tiNavallable, (708) 
296-7867. 



VENETIAN VILLAGE- 
Clean 3'bedroom, I.Sbath 
with full basomont, loigo yard; 
In qulot neighborhood. Imme- 
dlato Occupancy. $825/month 
•fseojrlty. (706) 223-1010, ap- 
polntmont. 

FOX LAKE, lakefront- prop- 
erty. Rent wtth option to buy 
with 6/month tease.' 10/1/94 
thm 3/31/05. OOOsq.n houso. 
1A)ath,-2A>odroom. fumlshod. 
Oak cabinets with pantry, 
dock, (2lx24lt), eloclric heat, 
$600/monlh, water and gas In- 
cluded. Owner will hold mort- 
gage or contract. (706) 
450-9539. 



500 



Bomcfl For Sde 



500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Sale 



Custom 
Homes 



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0164,300 

(on your tot). 

Wa tska ipacial tttantion to datail, and It 
you'd lika lo add your tp»cial touch to any 
basic plan, it's no pmblami Evary homa Is 
built by axpart craftsman and only with nama 
brand products. 



L 



Compara Uwm standard faaturaa: 

• 1 2* of R38 o«Jling inautaiion 

• 2a exterior wailt R-20 standard 

• Celllngt and Interior wails are gypsum board 

• MainieruuKe free vinyl sfding, standard 

• Cedar or other sidings, optional 

Welcome 

HeniB 

TO OVER 90.000 
. FAMILIES 






•Gaskxctdairhut 

• Peachtree InauUtad metal dad Mlrance door 

• ThOfTTuI wood trnndom with mainlonanoi fiM 

exieitordadwnn)''^'^ 

• A Mn^pMa honw^ pahi^ stainad and caipsiiA 

Prtoa does nx Irciida parmlEs, sufvsy and engl- 
ne«(ing bt cfearing sawar and wstar or aaplic 
and well, cglv«rts, drimrays. waits, landscap- 
ing orrnandng (ThMS and oihar sks improve- 
ments avaWtts. Lowar hvali on 6i-lev«ls and 
Tri^-sbnoifinfahMl). 



OOUNTY UNE BUOIXSIS 

21 6 Janet Drive 
Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



300 N. Milwaukee Ave. Ste. A 
Lake Villa 

708-265-0230 







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VINCENT 

Tho Vincont Is a duplex arrangoment that Is attractive and olllclenL Many people are taking 
advantage ol the investment possibitiilos and other bonofits ollorod by having a duplex to use both 
as a residence and a rental property. A number of up-to-dato lealuros make it doslrable (or renters 
as wall as the owner-resident. 

Each Includes a one-oar garago wide enough to accommodate a washor and dryer. Placement 
of tho garagos In front o( the units allows them lo sorvo an additional lunctlon - that at a sound 
butfor. 

Ramps at the front and back onlrancos make both ot those units whoelchalr-accesslblo. Tho 
lower floor plan croates an easy traffic How by tho placement ol a central eating bar. This allows 
moats to be served castjalty horo. Sliding glass doors at tho tar end brlghton tho spaco and allow 
access to a small patio where friends and family can gather tor a barbecue, woaihor pormiiilng. Moro 
formal occasions dictate the use ol tho adjacent dining room. A small bodroom, tucked In the corner 
of tho first floor, can be put to use as a den, sowing room, library, etc. A full bath complotes the lowor 
floor plan. 

The stairway.lo the second floor loads to tho stooping area. This house design Is ideal for cou- 
ples with small children. Tho landing ts open to below, allowing Mom and Dad to koop an oyo on tho 
goings-on. Tho modest master sulto Is situated at Iho front of Iho hopso, with the other two bedrooms 
closo by. A full bath and extra storago spaco concludes the second floor. 

For a study kit of the VINCENT (402-07), sand S9.00, to Landmark Designs. P.O. Box 2307-LP60. 
Eugono, OR 97402 (Be sure to specify plan name & number). For a collection of plan books ioatur 
Ing Landmark's most popular, home plans, send $20 to Landmark. ' ' ' 



504 



Homes For Rent 



GRAYSLAKE- 1/2 block 
from lake, boat access, ciito O* 
bedroom 1-bath house with 
. fireplace, . appliances. 
S850/month +socurHy +utlll- 
tles. Purchase available. Days: , 
(708)867-0550 eves and' 
woek-onds(312) 202-08&2.' 

KENOSHA- NORTHSIDE 
HOIUIE. With poof and hot tub, 
1st and last months rent. 
Sl,000/monlh +8ocurtty. (414) 
551-7561. • 

ROUND LAKE BEACH - 3 
bedroom with full basement 
on qulot street. Available Oc- 
tober 1st S795/month plus 
$1,000 socurity deposlty (708) 
945-5217. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 3- 

.bedroom ranch, 1-bath, par- 
'ilaliy fumlBhed, new carpel, 
new paint. S675/month, 18- 
month tease. (708)740-3483 
- or (708)3563440. Leave mos* 
sage. " 

HOUND- LAKE BEACH, 
available Immediately, 3-bed- 
room, ranch. I.Sbaths, full 
basement, 2Jcar garage. 
Saoo/month, plus Bocurlty de- 
posll(708) 356-6268 



RENTALS - 
lAKE GENEVA 

2 Bedr. Duplex:- 

$600 

2 Bedr. Mobile Home: 

$475 

A/C, No Pehj- 

Sec Dep. Required 

248-3831 



508 


Homes Wanted 



RESPONSIBLE FAMILY 
LOOKING (or 3-4 bedroom 
1. Sbalh house on water, or 
country tocatlon.' Will pay 
aprox. Sl,200/wtth llexible 
move-In. dale. We have refer- 
ences and . rx> pets. (708) 
679-4172. 

STOP FORECLOSURE- ARE 
YOU FACING BANKRUPT- 
CY- DIVORCE- PROBATE- 
UNEMPLOYMENT. W* Buy 
HousM. W* Loan Money. 
All Caih or Terms. Fast 
Settlement. Scott: (708) 



514 



CoDd(VToi«n Homes 



ANTIOCH- DUPLEX for 
Rent, In town. 2-bedroom, 1- 
bath, $695/month -^utilities. 
(708)395-2761. 

FOX LAKE- VACATION 
VILLAGE- 2-level 1-bed- 
room renKxJekKJ condo. Spiral 
staircase to bedroom and 
bath. Beautiful view of Marina 
from patio and balcony, ideal 
year nDund IMng or wookend 
getaway. Central air, new car- 
peted .living area, parquet 
ftoorlrtg In tiedraom, new kitclv 
en sink and counlertop, New if- 
rHtliums, now hot-water boat- 
er. Pool, clubhouse laundry 
facility, tennis courts, etc. Marn 
aged by owners. Complete, 
outdoor maintenance pro- 
gram. 24/hr. Full security. 
$34,900. (708) 587-^029. 



LOViLY 



Lots of T.L.C.t 

3 bedroom with brick 

fireplace. Deck overlooking 

beautiful wooded view. 

Owners anxiousl 

Call Debbie Christensen 
(708) 336-2600 



514 



Cofldo/Tcnra 
Homoi 



FOX LAKE LAKEVIEW. 
CONDO, furnished 2-bod- 
room, 1/bath with garage, 
g/month lease only 
$600/monlh, +Socur)ty. (708) 
426-^312, 

FOX LAKE' LAKEVIEW. 

CONDO, furnished 2-bod- 
room, 1/bath -with garage. 
0/month lease only 
5600/month, +Securtty. (708) 
426-4312. 

RENT IT or BUY ITI 1-b«d- 
room Condo, Fox Lako. VA- 
CATION VILLAGE ail utili- 
ties pakl. $540/month -t'Socurt- 
ty OR $3S.000/own. CHAIN 
O'LAKES REALTY. (706) 
587-6233, Unda TImm. 

FOX LAKE, LARGE 1 -bed- 
room Condo InVacalkin Vil- 
lage. Lakefront rear. Newly 
decorated, air, celling fans. 
Lots ot ExtrasI Must tael 
Asking $35,000 (708) 
924-1742. Pattl. 

GURNEE" Beautirul pond 
. setting. Townhome Stwws like 
a model. 2-bodroom, 2.5t>alhs 
-Mien. Full basement, attached 
garage. Lots of Upgrades. 
$132,900. Gene Sherman, 
broker/owner. (708) 
263-6013. 

GURNEE-OPEN > HOUSE 
SUNDAY 8/21 HAM-SPM. 
34098 WHfTE OAK (WOOD- 
LAND HILLS SUBDIVISION). 
Quality , boautilul, private 
view, faces woods. 2-bed- 
room, loft 1.5-balh3, neutral 
decorating, all appliances and 
window treatments included, 
bay window, famtly/dinlng- 
room. 2-car garago. Many up- 
grades. $129,900. By Owner. 
(708) 855-0305. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



14»70n. WITH 7x22 Exten- 
ston. 2-bedroom. 2-bath3. In- 
cludes; stove and refrigerator, 
celling fans arxl Jacuzzi bath 
$15,500. (708) 244-0412. 

2-BEDROOM, DEN, I.Sbath. 
14x70. Deck, shed, central 
air. $9,000 (708) 731-1934 
or (708)244-8204. 

MOBILE HOMES- SINGLES 
and Doubles. 2-3 bedrooms. 
Lake County and Kenosha' 
County. Bank loans and ap- 
praisals. 5% Down on Any 
New Homo Financed. (708) 
662-1965. 

WAUCONDA- 1 -bedroom 
1-bath mobile home, central 
air, deck, washpr/dryer. 
$545/monlh -fsecurity. Sep- 
tember 1st. Located In Adult 
community. (708) 526-5000. 



Your Noiir 
Home Now 

(Call for selections 
& styles) 

(414) 857-2891 

Rainbow 
Lake Manor 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake 
Villa. $545 and S6SO/month.. 
Heat water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. 

LIBERTYVILLE. 2-bed- 
room DUPLEX, washer, dry- 
er, dishwasher, disposal, ga- 
rage. Close to train. 
$865/month Available 9/1. 
(708)549-7741. 

MUNDELEIN- 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTin 4-unlt buikl- 
tng, stove, relrigorator carpet- 
ing, blinds, laundry facility. 
$580/month +Securlty da- 
posit. (708) 834-2100. 



BUILDER motivated to sell 

New townhome, choose colors, 3 bedroom, 2 
car garage, basement. 11/2 to 2 1/2 baths, 
10x10 balcony with french doors from living 
room, 1531 square feet, 10 year warranty, 
Amana appliances, Merrilat Cabinets, Stain 
resistant carpet, all included for 
$122,500.00. Located In Antloch, one J?lock 
west of Jewel/Osco. Please call for appoint- 
ment with builder. , 

(74)8) 769-8300 voice mail, 
or (813) 334-5100 



520 



lApaftmcnts For Rent 



520 



Apartments 
For Rent 



NEAR NAVAL BASE Clean, 
lurnishod, 1 -bodroom apart- 
ment, $405/month. Free heat 
and water. No Pets. (708) 
662-4760. • • 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- 3- 
1/2 miles west ot CLG on 
Washington SI. 2/bodrooms, 
balcony, laundry facility. No 
pels. No waterbeds. Loaso. 
Sseo/month. (708) 
328-6674. 

WINTER IN ARIZONA- 
SUN CITY. Golf. Tennis 3- 
pools and More. Room Avail- 
able Novombor-March. 
$500/monlh with Privileges. 
(708) 362-2608, for details. 

ROUND LAKE VERY large 
2-bedroom apartment; 
$605/month. DIscountod- rent 
+utintles and security. No pots. 
(708) 546-4862. 

SPRING GROVE. IL 4- 
ROOM upstairs apartment. 
Newly decorated, carpeted, 
tiled bathroom, air condi- 
tioned, stove, refrigerator, 
heat and water included. 
Ample parking. $550/month 
plus deposit. (815)675-2860, 
leave message, or call 
(414)763-2939. . 

EASTStDE ZION- TAKING 
APPLICATIONS! Largo EF- 
FICIENCY with new carpet, 
full Wtchen, S375/month +oIeo- 
trie. REMODELED 3-Bed- 
room, Sept.ist, $645/month 
+€ledrfc. Heat included. Wash- 
er/dryer available. Close to 
town/train. No pots. Sectton-8 
Not available. (708)831-5388. 

FOX LAKE WATERFRONT 
1 Bedroom Apartment. Carpet- 
ed, nmdem, heat and gas In- 
cluded. 31 S. PIstakee Lake 
Road $560/month (708) 
362-7318. . ' 

GRAYSLAKE- 2-bedroom 

apartment with balcony, 
freshly painted, adults pre- 
ferred, lyr. lease, security de- 
posit, no pets. $595/month. 
(708)729-3767. 

GRAYSLAKE- LARGE 2- 

bedroom apartment, upper. 
Newly remodeled. No pets. 
$600/monlh -i-securlty deposit. 
(708) 223-4664 or 
(706)223-0830. 

OURNEE- 2-bedroom 2- 
bath, appliances, fireplace, 
air. No pets. $715/n>onth. 993 
O^X)t Road, (708) 336-1665 
evenings 

HAINESVILLE- 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS, new 6/unlt 
buikling, carpeting, and laun- 
dry facilities, S625/monlh 
+securtty. Taking applica- 
tions r>ow for Immediate oc- 
cupancy. No pets. Call (708) 
546-1474. 

ISLAND LAKE- 1-1/2 
miles southwest of water tow- 
er. 817 Porlen Rd., 1-t>edroom 
country living, near Fox River, 
$65/week (815) 365-3857. 

WAUKEGAN- 2 BEDROOM. 
cottages, Victorian setting, 
otf street parking, Available 
now. S650-S750/month. 
(708) 336-0144. 



UNION QROVE, Wl: 2-bed- 
room apartments'. FREE heat. 
New carpel. Celling Fan. >^lnl 
blinds. Close lo schools. No 
pets. From $490/month, (414) 
878-4809. - 

WATERFRONT STUDIO 
apartment, ail ulilltk>s Includ- 
ed. Fox Lako 31 S.Pbtakee 
Lake Rd., Available Od.l. 
$430/month (706) 382-7318. 

WAUCONDA- ONE BED- 
ROOM Apartment, nowly 
decorated,' living room, kitch- 
en and small spare room. Car- 
peted, yard, stove, refrigera- 
tor, heal and hot water Includ- 
ed. $515/month, lease and se- 
curity. No pets. Available im- 
modlalely. (708)433-0891. 

WAUKEGAN AREA- Freah-'^' 
ly remodeled, kitchen ap- 
pliances, secure 2.-ftaL; .- 
OOOsq.fl. 1/bedroom Counl»y2|lK 
setting. S550/month -fdoposil.' 
(708)336-1482. - 

LAKE VILLA- 3-n>om9, 1- 
Bedroom, Includes stove, re- 
Irtgeralor, storage. Very quiet ' 
street. $455/month -nteposN. 
All utilities included. Imme- 
diate occupancy. (708) 
526-9687. 

*(ngleslde -*■ 

i( Security Deposit it 

• on i, 

J One Bee/rooms j 

* tSpaclous i 
^ •Private Balconies J 
^ •Short term leates avail, ^ 

i LAKEVIEW 2 

2 Apartments 2 

I (708)587-9277 I 

'itc 'qualiTted applicants, lyrleaia •ft 



j^i3D^ 



MUNDELEIN ^ 

Spacious, lovely 1 &2 
licdrooin aputments. 

Secure building 
Manager on premises. 

Uundryfaclliiies. 

A^iDable Imniodiatcly. 

Minutes to shopping. 

CAU 

J (708) 566-2700, 



WESTWIM) 

nUAGB 

APARTMENTS 

2200 lewis Ave. Zlon 

renung from $395 

AppIUncei • Custorc Blinds 

Oq-^Muu^ 

NoPetj 

CtAlRickorJHmntmt 
(7I)8)731-1804 

or Bear Property 
Management 
(414) 697-9616 

t&. 




Water's Edge Apts.^ 

•FREE heat, cookiag & %vaier 
•Central Air 

•Spaciously designed apts. 

•Picture window kitchens 

•On-site management/maintenance 

(708)587-6888^^ 

, {=} FoxLake/Ingleside 



=;irn 





PEBBLESHIRE 
PHASE! 

Spacious, modem 1 & 2 bdmi 

apts from $573 

FREE heat & cooking jias. 

•PLUSH CARPETING 
•MODERN APPLIANCES 

•LAUNDRY FACILITIES IN 
EVERY BUILDING 

•ON SITE MAINTENANCE 

MINUTES FROM 

HAWTHORN CENTER 

708-367-4S04 

695 Westmoreland Di. t2j 



,'.-> 









^^g^g^^B'^m 




CLASSIFIED UkElANcI NcwspApERS AuqusT 19, 1994 



ii 



k 



1^ 

i- 

f 



i-- ■ I 






520 



Apanmoits 
For Rent 



ttm 






STATIOi\SIDE i 
i VILLAGE 

= 5215 imi AVENUE ; 
I KENOSIlA, WI I 

Luxurious Using 

i Apartments &Townho uses 

I 2 Qcdrooim • 2 Ratb 

Mini nllnd-i 

Appliances 

Ganges A^nllihle 

FJcvalon 

No Pels 

I Call (414) 656-1010 | 

nn»n»ii ii mini i inm i 



•Microwave Ovans 

•Dishwashers 

•Washers & Dryers 

•Vaulted Ceilings 

•Patios or Balconies 

•Convenient Location 

(708) 356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 
Uke Villa, IL 

On Roule 132 {Grand Ave.) 
Just east of Route B3 at tha 
south sido ol Doep iJiko 
Ptctialenillf 

^^% ntimgidif 

^SJ ytntgtmtM 

Hukfpinmtt 



Antioch's 

linosl 2 bedroom 

aparltnenns. 

Ibaihon 1/2 baths. 

Balcony or patio. 

Exita storage. 

No Pets, 

Ask about sonior 

citiien incentives 

(Alilar/ clauso. 

Rent '620!mo.+ sec. 

I (708) 838-0555 

I Anita 
Q Terrace li 



538 



Btisiness Propcrtif 
For Root 



GRAYSLAKE- FREE 

STANDING 2-room ofllce 
building, 262 Betvldere 
$400ATwnth (70B) 367-0888. 

GURNEELiGHT INDUS- 
-^ TRIAL, 3300SQ.FT., at 

$411.. Call Property Manage- 
ment Plus (708) 244-6155, 

ISLAND LAKE BUSINESS 
DISTRICT. 24 X 32 shop. 14 X 
^ 14 ovorhaad door. 

$500/month plus security. 
Available Immediately. 708- 
526-1135. ■ 

MUNDELEIN- Orflce 
SPACE FOR RENT, SCO 
OR eOOsq.n. DOWN- 
TOWN LOCATION. IMME- 
DIATE OCCUPANCY. 
(7QB) &4&-9446. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH- Rol- 
, Hns Rd. High- Visiblltty. Partdng. 

Retall/otlice. ALSO Loading 
dock. $4.00 to SlO/sq.tt. Call 
Bob. (708) 381-6966. 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



560 



Vacajil lot/Acrcagc 



1.5+ ACRE IN BEAUTIFUL 
NEARLY COMPLETED AM- 
BERFIELD LAKES SUB., 
LAKE VILLA. ASKING, 
SBS.OOO (708) 223-0884. 

LARGE LOT- OVER 3- 
ACRES (n Hunt Club Farms. 
Groal lot to build your dream 
homo. 509,900. Call (708) 
244-1642. 

FREE color brochura of LAK> 
BARKLEY, KY bargoins. 2.11 
acrat-$5,900. Ntcely woodcc 
w/lal(0 access, near statt 
park, On country rd w/utils & 
protectiva covenants. 1 + 
acre lakafront from $39,000. 
Perfect for vaca- 

tion/retirement home near 
lake. Excellent financing. Call 
now 1-800-858-1323, e*t 
823 Woodland Acres. 8:30- 
8:30, 7 days. 



• ACRES raiHE 
tEVELOPHENT UND 

•Ion«d 1-6 Ifulti-Famlly 

•Miximun of KB Uniu 

•Cose to Shopping, 
Transportation antj 
Great Lakes Naval Base 

Ralph 
DcPasqualc 

Grubb S Ellis 



o 



GnibbcHlia (708) 390-8050 



564 



Resort/Vacation 
RcntaLs 



winter Fun and Sun Value? 
Panama City Beach. "Florida's 
Closet Baacti*! Modern Gulf 
Front KitchonottoB at afford- 
able monthly rates. Free 
Brochures. Bright Star Mote) 
(800)421-1295. Sea Witch 
Motel 1800)322-4571. Sky- 
Way Motel (8001807-4879. 

GOT A CAMPGROUND MEM- 
BERSHIP OR TIMESHARE7 
WE'LL TAKE IT. AMERICA'S 
MOST SUCCESSFUL RESORT 
RESALE . CLEARINGHOUSE. 
CALL RESORT SALES IN- 
FORMATION TOLL FREE 
HOTLINE 1-800-423-5967. 



568 



Out Of Area 
Property 



BRANSON MISSOURI 
INVESTMENT PROPERTY 

12 Unit apt. complex + 10 ac 
for additional development 
Invest In the area of the home 
of the country stars. 
Mel 417/272-8200 
or 417/538-2463 



WASHINGTON 

Supof custom homo, 160' no bank 
wateriront, home across from 
Seatdo on Peuget Snd, 3000 st, 
3BR, 2BA, dock, weslom oxpo- 
suro. $689,000. JOHN L. SCOTT 
R.E. Sonny Woodward: 

(206) 297-7500 



WYOMING 

Good standard of living In a no 
Uood/low crime area, 1 hr. 
Choyenno/Scatis Blutf (has 1 of 
bast hospitals In area) 35 min. to 
Torrington. 2200 si home. 3+BR, 
4.SBA. tols ot xtras. $180,000 by 
owner. 

(307) 834-2460 for Info 



FREE COLOR BROCHURE OF 
LAKE PROPERTY BARGAINS 
IN TENNESSEE! Wooded; 
t Beautiful views. Paved roads 
w/utiiities.- Price from $7,500. 
Excellent financing. Call In- 
dian Showdows Today. 800- 
239- 8323, ext. 1186. 

LOTS, LOTS, LOTS- 1 

acre to 4.5 acres. $29,900- 
$67,900, 0% (inancing. First 5 
.- kits sokll Call for plat and de- 
tails on these gorgeous wootf- 
ed, roiling or tevel tols. Town ot 
Burlington. Wl. Hwy 142 SE lo 
Brever Rd., 1.5 mites. Bulklers 
and brokers welcome. 
(414)421-8582. 



MICHIGAN 

Lako Columbia (1000 ac. private 
lake). 140'tmlg, novar (loodod. 15 
min. Jackson Mich. 2300 sf home, 
3BR, 3 lull 0A. Ion master suite, 
calh. cell, oak panolg. One o! a 
kind lighting. Much morel S267,0OO 
by ownor. For details call: 

(517)592-8613 



BEAUTIFUL TEXAS 
HILL COUNTRY RANCH 

321 acres, 30 ml. S.W. of 
Austin. Remodeled 5BR, 3,5 
balh home. Pool/hot tub, 2-1 
guest house, 2 barns, etc., 2 
wells, game fenced, satellite, 
many extras, homosile sur 
founded by Onion Creek (2 
dams). Owner motivated, 
Cash or terms. Call Barry 
Gllllngwater for info & details, 

(512)454-3844 



568 



OtitOfArcfl 
Property 



AZ, SEDONA 

Oak Crook/Rod Rock 
Views. Spoc, Spanish stuc- 
co w/4br, 2 lull bihs, red tile 
roof on 3.7 panoramic 
acres, $320K. Call Naomi, 
RE/MAX SUNWORLD 

RLTY. 1-B00-747-6B04 or 
602-639-1431 for delails. 



ARKANSAS, Rogers 

ao acres NEW 4,000 s.f. 
home, 6 car gar., aocludod, 
lakefronl overlooking Beaver 
Lake w/2 stall boat dock. 
S429K. By Owner 

501/925-2765 pp 



TEXAS • WtNNSBORO 

168.S acros, 5-4-a, FonrvBls, 
approximatoty 0500 si Horso bam 
w/ofc, lack, load nn. Second 
house approx. 1B0O sf. Eight 
Broiler houses, PRIME PROPER- 
TYI $1,395,000, CENTURY 21 
Rogililo 

(903) 342-3747 



MONTANA 

Flathead Valley, New 2 1/2 yr 
home on 14 ac overlooks Flathead 
Lake & Valley. Outstanding views 
ol Swan Mtn, Range. Fum w/some 
oxcoplions • S53SK. See July 
Issue "Wear magazine, "Markedly 
Monlana". Call Jean Sullivan. 
Broker (406) 837-5442 (or dotalls, 



WASHINGTON N.E. 

300 ac. Mostly Tlmber/Walorfronl 
hm. $950K; 27 ac custom hm. 
Paslura x-fnced„ 2 wells, stream, 
hwy Imig, S225K toms; SBR, 3SA 
daylight rancher on Colvlllo Mtn. 3 
bay gar. Prestigious noighbnf, 
$225 K. Realtor 

(509) 442-3266 



KANSAS 

4200 sf home on 200 acres. 6 
stall barn & arena, 5 ac. pond. 
Must sea to appreciate. 
$1,100,000 By Owner. For 
into call: 

913-856-5221 



VIRGINIA 

Hanover Horse Fami, 27 ac., 20 
min. Irom dwntwn Richmond. 5 BR 
classk: Victortan faimlise shaded In 
centuries old oaks. Compl. horse 
ladt. w/many oak lenca paddocks 
3 bams & a covered mini arrana 
For sale by owner, $550,000 ^; 

(804)798-7328 



IL.-Oal* C«. Dairy Farm, 

28S ac, 2 hrs from Chicago. 
Near Oregon & 3 state parks. 
Land & bWgs. Family getaway 
w/cash 1k)w & tax advantages. 
•629.200. Call: 815-732-21 24. 
LONG'S WHITE PINES 
REALTY, 110 Washington St., 
Oregon, IL 61061. 



MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST 

Potential Hotel & Gaming 
Site. •250,000 CASH. 
Includes: options, pro tormas, 
studies, preliminary plans & 
permits, M, 500,000 Buys the 
Land. Must Mova Quicidy- 
(818) BB3-98B9. 



IDAHO (S.E. Country 
CtUt*. 2 1/2 hrs. to Sun 
Valley Jackson Hole, Wyoming 
3800 s.f., 5 br, Irg shop, 7 acres 
nr some o( world's BEST 
sitilng/horse bac1<riding. M95K 
(200) 522-6944. By owner. 




704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



GMC MOTORHOME 1976 
Sleeps 6, self-contained, low 
mites, very good condition. 
$6.500(815)385-3970. 

MONITOR, 197S Molor- 
liom«, fully equipped. 
$7.SO0ybest (708) 362-1306. 

MOTOR HOME, 2611. 1979, 
Journey, Good tires and 
brakes, very clean. 

S5.50O^bosl. (708) 587-0036. 

ONE 1994 LEFT. 18N. lito 
weight double axel travel trail- 
er, with full bed, dinette and 
bunk. Two-way rolrlgerator. In 
and out stove. 22/doors .and 
drawers. Pull with mlnivan or 
mid-car. Sato priced. Ar- 
lena's RV. (708) 526-0555. 

POP-UP COLEMAN 

CAMPER- sloops 7. 
sink.stoye, +CANOE, ISn. 
Excollerit' condition. 

S3.2QCjtKl1h. (708) 265-1798. 

VALOR POP-UP Camper, 
1982 sleeps 6, stove, sink, 
good condlllon, $800, (708) 
356-€935. 




708 



Snowmobllcs/ATV's 



710 



Boats/Motors/ 

Etc. 



HONDA, 19B6 250R 3- 
whookir. Ready to Race. Guar- 
anlood to scare yout Voty fast. 
S 1,000 In spare parts. Mint 
Bike. All (or 51,200 (708) 
973-2855, (Pager 88&-9320,) 



710 


noat/Molors/Elc. 



10FT BOMBARD RAFT 
never used, 4 person wllh 
oars and pump. Now $1,400 
Will sell (or $1,100 or best 
otfor (708) 244-^843. 

16n. ARKANSAS TRAVEL- 
ER Aluminum Soml-V, 75hp 
Evinmdo, 3-in-llno, Rigid tral^ 
or, Now larp, plus extras. 
S2,600 (414) 694-2688. 

16n. BOAT, TRAILER 75hp 
Johnson, New paint job. all re- 
done, Good condition, 
$900jbO3l. (414) 657-4655." 

ALUMACRAFT TRI-HULL 
1SFT FIBERGLASS. 65hp 
Johnson with tralter, pedestal 
seats. Open Bow, trolling 
motor optional $1,500 (815) 
385-2047. 

ALUMINUM BOAT LIFT 8tt 
Wide (inside measurement), 
$1,000 (312) 565-2251 Can 
see In Lake Vlita. 

ALUMINUM V-HULL 14rt. 
Rowboat, oars, seats, wllh 
trailer. Seats 5. $350, (70B) 
973-1319. 

BROWNING FIBERGLASS 
21 n. BOAT, I/O. V6 Bukk on-, 
glne. OMC outdrive, tandem 
axle trailer, must sell, will sacri- 
tlce $2,000. (708) 249-1783. 

CARVER SANTA CRUZ 
26FT 1980, Ity' bridge, load- 
ed, loran, air conditioning, 
clean with trailer S15,500 
(708) 356-3253. '^ 

CHAMPION 19n. D.C.R. 
1991 Bass boat, 2O0Morcuty 
E.F.I. Motorguld© E.S.P. X50. 
cover, bra, ' Extra Clean. 
S18.7S0 (815) 385-0724. 
(615)338-5042. 

CHRIS CRAFT ^ 36FT 
1963, double cabin, excellent 
condlllon, twin 350's, 
Sl5,000/best oiler (312) 
376-2255 (708)369-4513. 

CHRYSLER 17FT SPEED- 
BOAT 1976, 115 Evinrndo, 
exceltont stiape on trailer 
SI. 200. 1969 HUSTLER 16 
speed boat, 90hp Mercury, all 
new Interior, on traikir $1,000. 
Best olfers. (708) 367-6334. 

DONZI RAGAZZA CUDDY 
CABIN 23FT, 160 hours, 
350 GM/Cobra with tralter, ex- 
cellent condllton. $15,900 or 
best otter (708) 367-0431 . ' 

FOUR WINNS CUDDY 
Cabin 19tt. Low hours, good 
condition. $6,800 (70 8) 
395-7498. 

GREAT "l8l TIME". BUYER 
BO ATI 16tt. 120hp I/O 1982 
RENKEN, New cover, trailer, 
very ctoan. Must see. $3,500 
best offer (708) 498-2948 or 
(414)889-^701. 



PADDUE BOATS I 

& CANOES 
& JOH BOATS 

Factory Outlet" 
Rnal flail clearance 

6 liquidation. 
Saw& Hundreds! 

Woodland Piep I 

1-800-846-7128 



OMC CORSfCA SUNBIRO, 
1989 195, Bowrfdor, am/fm 
cassette £teroo with amp, 4.311- 
ter, 2V Cobra engine, gafvan- 
tzed trailer. Clean. Good con- 
ditkm. Low hours. S7,600Jbost 
(708) 356-6908. 



POKTOON 
BOATS 

Complete 6 final 
fbit clearance & 

llquldatiork. Nev/ 6 used 
No reasonable ofPer 

refused. Save hundreds, 
even thousandsl 

WooDUND Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



BASS & FISHING 
BOATS 

Complete 6 final 

. fall b tlquidotlorv 

Procraft • Starcratt 

Monark • Glassport 

TUiry e Morel 

Save hundreds, 

even thousandsl 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



LAKESCRAFT " PONTOON 
24(1.. 1974 wllh 85hp Motor, 
noods work, best offer. 20(1. 
CARLSON 20n. 1976 Jot- 
Boat with 455-Oldsmoblta mo- 
tor. Noods wori<, best oiler 
(708) 395-3120. 

MARK TWAIN 16FT 
BOAT, 05hp Mercury wllh 
trailer, $1,950 or best otter 
(708) 249-0734. 

MASTERCRAFT TRI- 
STARigaa, lO.Sft. Excellent 
condlllon. Must solll 
$12,900. (708) 893-5726 or 
(708)351-4768. 

OUTBOARD MOTOR 

1977, 25hp Johnson (414) 

658-4454. , 

SAILBOAT INTERNATION- 
AL 470, compkite with Spin- 
naker gear, trapeze, cover 
and trailer $1,800 (708) 
234-5725. 

SEA RAY CUDDY 19B6 ca- 
bin, 18(1. 140hp MorCrulsor, 
2/sels full canvas, low hours, 
htas pier space at Munson 100- 
Club. Rt.l2, Fox Lake. S6,500 
(815) 675-2419. 

SPEED QUEEN 16FT, 
55hp Mercury, noods tiooklng 
up, no trailer $375 (708) 
587-5040. . 

STARCRAFT INVADER 
20fl. 1977. 1401V MorCruls- 
or I/O, S3,000/best (708) 
973-1354 

SUNFISH 14FT SAIL- 
BOAT wHh Dllly trailer, excet- 
lent condltlon$9po or best 
offer (708) 367-7672.. 

BAYLINER IflFT 1994, 
175hp, I/O, 9 hours used, 5- 
year warranty on ermine (708) 
307-2477. 



MERCURY & FORCE 
0U1B0AR0S 

Connplete & final fall 

clearance 6 tlquidatlorv 

No reasonable ottsr 

reftjsed. Alt sizes. 

Rush - save hundreds ■ 

b even thousandsl 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



714 


CanqiiDg 



POP-UR CAMPER Sleeps 4 
comfortably, total weight 800 
lbs., $450 (414) 843-3822 
Call after 7PM. 

iRANSpORliOlf 



804 



Cars for Sale 



"SPORTS CAR!" 19B7RX7 
TURBO. Champagne metallk;, 
tow miles, l/drtver, exceltont 
condlllon. Alarm, extras. A 
Special Car! $7,950. (708) 
938-8393. 

'GOING BACK TO 

SCHOOL • MUST SELLU" 
Chavrolat Baretia GT 
1989, low miles on r>ew en- 
gine, has power: steor- 
Ing/brakes/windows. Air, 
am/tm radio cassette, sun- 
roof, excellent condlllon 
$6,400/be3t otter (815) 
675-9227. 

BUtCK RIVIERA, 1983, 

Runs good. (708) 223-6535. 

BUICK SKYHAWK 1906, 
$2,500; tall microwave cabi- 
net, $50; Ben Franklin stove 
wtth new chimney $200.(708) 
740-1568. 

CADILLAC FLEETWOOD 
1916, garage kept, clean 
$6,000 (708) 546-8662 bet- 
ween 4-ePM. 



804 



Cars Tor Sale 



CHEVROLET BERETTA 

1989, white, automatic, 
power windows/locks, till 
steering, am/lm cassette, air, 
$0,000 or boQt olfer (708) 
223-8075, 

CHEVROLET 060 1981, 
high/low, 4-speed, 16lt box 
tnjck, now Urea, now brakes, 
now paint ]ob, runs groat 
$3,600 (700) 546-2737. 

CHEVROLET CAMARA 
IROC-Z 1987, rod T-lops 
and 'all the toys*. Under 
20,000 milos, super clean, ga- 
rage kopi, $9,500 or best olfer 
(815) 075-2146 PM. 

CHEVROLET CAMARO 
Z28 1979, 350, 4-barrol, au- 
tomatic, runs groat, noods 
minor iiody work, ready for 
rosloratlon $1,500 (708) 
362-9533, 

CHEVROLET CAVALIER 
WAGON 19B5, mns good, 
$650 or best otter (706) 
546-6671. 

CHEVROLET MALIBU 

CONVEHTiBLE 1964, 

white. 6-cylinder $3,000. T- 
BIRD CONVERTIBLE 

1964, rod, new top and tires 
$5.500. (815) 385-2903 

CHEVY CAMARO RS. 

1990, Must selli Everything 
power.- Alitrm Included. Only 
40,000/mll6s. Excelienl condi- 
tion, Interior and exterior. 
$7.000. (706) 244-3059. 

CHEVY CAPRICE STA- 
TION WAGON 19B3, com- 
plete maintenance and repair 
log, since now. Must see! 
$1,500' or best (706) 
587-8848. ' 

CHEVY, 1989 EUROS- 
PORT WACOM, Power every- 
Ihlng, Ihrid seal, Groat family 
car. S4.595/bosl - (708) 
249-8200. . 

CHRYSLER 1989 LEBAR- 
ON CONVERTABLE. loaded. 
air conditioning, power wind- 
ows, power door tocks. power 
top, power steering and 
brakes, air bag. Vipor alarm. 
Bra and boot. Well maintainod. 
Asking $6,000. (708)587- 
3141 LEAVE MESSAGE. 

DATSUN 2B0ZX 1983, sll- 
vor with t-tops, exceltont con- 
dittonf. A must see. GREAT. 
CAR $3,000 or best offer 
(708) 263-9606. 

DODGE OAYTONA ES 
1989. blue wtth gifiy interior, 
sunroof, am/tm cassette ster- 
eo, new brakes, now air condi- 
tioning. $5,300 (708) 
367-9344 Atler 4:30 pm. 

FORD COUNTRY SlQUIRE 
1979, high mileage, no rust, 
garage kept $850 (708) 
587-0057. 

FORD ESCORT WAGON 
1992, 26,500 miles, air, 
am/lm stereo, automatic, ex- 
cellent condition, great gas 
mitoage $7,000 or twst otter 
(414)551-7334. ■ 

FORD MUSTANG 1968, 
runs good, $1,200 or best 
must seel (708) 740-2533. 

FORD MUSTANG 1986. 4- 
cylinder, 4-speed, standard 
transmlsston, power steering, 
power brakes, oxcollent condi- 
tion. $1,800 or best otter. 
(708)587-4911. 

FORD PROBE GT, 1990, 5- 
speed turbo, 20',S00/miles, 
adult driven, garage stored. 
$8.500 (708) 356-3546. 

FORD, TEMPO, 19BS. 4 
door. Brown. 5 speed, 140k, 
runs. Some rust. Original own- 
er. $500 /llrm. (708)746-8767. 

JEEP CHEROKEE 1987, 
red, 2 way drive, exceltont con- 
dition, listing price $4,900, 
asking price $4,200, cash final 
sato $3.900 (708) 244-4177/ 

LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 
EXECUTIVE SERIES 

1991, silver rose, tow mile- 
age, asking $14,000 (708) 
566-0848. 

LINCOLN TOWN CAR 1983, 
Signature Sarloa, trtple-bluo, 
$1,900. Good condlllon. 
(708) 438-0771 

MAZDA RX7 1987, only 
46K miles, 5-spoed, sunrool, 
loaded. Saphira blue. Only 
One very particular owner. 
$6,600 (708) 549-0399. 

MERCURY COUGAR 

1969, loaded, 76,000 miles. 
(414) 658-4454. 




MERCURY MARQUIS 
1977, under 22,000 vortliablo 
milos, V-8, $3,500 (414) 
877-2002. 

MERCURY MARQUIS 1983, 
80.000/mltos. Excollont nin- 
ning condition. Well cared 
for $2,000 Ingtosldo. (708) 
587-2673, . ■ 

MUST SELLII One Car 
Owner, Qutek Skyhawk 1986, 
hatchback, good condition 
$1.100(815)385-1801. 

OLDS 1986 CUTLAS CU- 
PREME 4-door, V6, air, pretty 
good body, ExcollenI Insldo, 
cmlso control, roar window do- 
(rostor. $1,000. Call Botwoon 
BAM-4PM Weekdays. (708) 
662-729B. 

OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS 
1982, clean, $1,100 or best 
otfor (708) 546-5088. 

OLDSMOBILE CUTLASS 
CIERA 1985, 4-door, 94,000 
miles, $1,200 or best offer 
(708) 265-0693 anytime. 

PONTIAC FIERO 1984, 4- 

cylinder, 10,000 miles on new 
engine, sunrool, loaded 
$3,300 or best (414) 
537-4691. 

PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 
1979, sunroof, new tires, has 
some rust $1,000 (708) 
546-3261. 

PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 
SE 1991, (ulty loaded j tooks 
and runs groat. Very sharp, 
$9,000 or best otier (708) 
546-5035. ' • 

PONTIAC LEMANS STA- 
TION WAGON 1979 with 
trailer hitch, good condttton. 
$1,200 or best otfor (708) 
949-5599, ' 

PONTIAC SUNBIRD 1992, 
automatic transmission, air 
conditioning, am/lm- cassette, 
power tocks, automalto,- new 
tiros, 38,000 miles .$7,600 
(414)763-7500. 

PONTIAC TRANS AM 1979 
black with black Inlerlor, T- 
tops, tinted wIrKJows, Ptonoer 
pull-oul stereo, prolessloruilly 
robiiilt 350 Turbo' transmis- 
sion, Excellent runner, 
$3,500ybost (815) 385-6085. 

PONTIAC TRANS AM 
19B3, 251h Anniversary Umlt- 
od Edition, Daytona 500 Pace 
car. tow miles, air, aulomatto, 
T-tops, good corxlilton. Asklrtg 
$5,000 (414) 652-4747 After 
6PM. • 

SHARP LOOKING, GOOD 
njnnlng. FORD ESCORT 
GT 1987, 5-speed. power 
steering, power brakes, new 
tires, air, am/tm casssette/ra- 
dio, 82,000 miles $3,000 or 
best offer (708) 567-5055 
alter SPM. - 

VOLKSWAGON CABRIO- 
LET CONVERTIBLE 1988, 
tike new. 5-speed, 47K, near 
new tires, red llash/btack, 
$8,250.(708)680-6070. 

VOLKSWAGON CORRA- 
DO SLC 1992, VR6. 5- 
speed, red, (oaded except for 
leather, 13,000 mile. $500 
botow NAOA, $16,000 or best 
otter (708) 356-8084 ' leave 
message. ■ 



• U.C.UsFiRsri 




:i3DAY/ 
EVENT 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday 
RLMftWasMnghmSt 

i Huge Selection 
^ Huge Savings 
•'esUsedCarsinStocldt 
Otdsmobites, 
HyundaisandVWs 
94'sanii9S'slNSTOCi<l 

Marquardt 



*5i 



^iJt 



OnRL41at 

Washington SL, East exft 
Gurnee, IL 

• (708) 249-1 300i 




Auqusr ;'1.9;.1tf 4 UI(eIanc1.Nevv^apeik ClASSIFIED 





Vao5 



828 



Four Vhod Drive 
Jeeps 



834 


Trudts/Trailcrs 



844 


Motorcydcs 



844 


Molorcydo 



804 


Cirs for Site 



810 



Cbsslc/ADtiqucCars 



WIFES BEAUTIFUL Old- 
amoblle 1964 4<door Do)ta 
88. Extra whools and tiros. 
$3,650 (708) fl72-e044. 




Professional 

Auto Detallingj 

Service 

Professional, expert ^ 

detailing, interior sham-j 

poolng,liandwash&. 

wax, engine steam 

cleaning, vac & more. 

• Experienced 
efficient crew 

• Your convenience 

• Your home or 

business 
Call for Estimates 
(708) 546-6746 

U ^1 



BEAUTIFUL WOM- 

EN/BEAUTIFUL CARS. 

Now \Mfo says toy must gol 
1965 Black T-bIrd Corwertblo. 
Be$i Reasonablo Offlor (70S) 
623-2719. 

SALE OH TRADE- 1964 
CHEVY IMPALA Tonnesaoo 
car. Too much to fet. $2,500 
(708) S46-0127. 



814 


ScnIcc&Fails . 




CHEVROLET 1Bfi2 Impala 
SS 283 ©nglnoTran8.Bo8l 0(f- 
er.(414) 857-2274 

CHEVROLET SHOP AND 
PARTS MANUALS 1957, 
1961, 1964 shop. 1964 Acces- 
sory, 1938-1965 parts both 
volumos. All original. $180. 
f70B) 5B7>^60a. ■ 

CHEVY. FORD PICK-UP Bod- 
ies. Factory-naw, guarantead 
from 9 1 300.00. Door« From 
989.00, Fandora From 
$50.00, Bods From 9800.00, 
BedlinorS' 9169.00. BUMP- 
ERS. GRILtis, REPAIR PAN- 
ELS. PAINTS, ABRASIVES, 
WINDSHIELDS. RADfATORS. 
Delivery. MARK'S 217-824- 
6184. 



12FT CUBE VAN 1076, ilw 

minum box, panoted, Insutat- 
od ttoorlng, now front 
tlrssAirBkes, new battory, al- 
tomator, windshield, hood, 
lendora, runs great $3,000 
(708)356-^6462. 

CHEVROLET ASTRO VAN 
CL 1985, B-passenger, V-6, 
runs wol, good body, no rust 
$3,300 or best orter (815) 
344-6673. 

CHEVY WINDOW 3/4 TON 
VAN 19B1, G-passengor, 
groal running woilc van, 
$1,ooo/b08t otter, Honda 
750 custom, must see, asMng 
$1,500 (708) 223-9517. 

DODQE RAM CONVER- 
SION VAN 1992, Ve, 

wheelchair accessible, au- 
tomatic wheelchair lift for 1 
person to handle alone 
$25,250 (414) 654-0559 
(414)654-8312. 

FORD AEROSTAR 1991, 
7-pa8Songer Mini Van, Asking 
S9.600 (708) 507-0085. 

FORD AEROSTAR 1991, 

7-pa5songer Mini Van, Asking 
$9,600 (708) 587-0085. 

FORD CONVERSION EX- 
TENSION VAN 1986, very 
ckian, no njst, 61,000 highway 
miles, fully loaded, dual gas 
tanks, flex steel captain chairs 
and tiench, oak trim, plus 
much. more,, asking $9,000 
Karen (708) 623^108. 



CHEVROLET BLAZER 
FULL SIZE 1988, 4-wheel- 
drive, good condition Inside 
and outsMe. StNerado pack- 
age; fuel Injection, low miles, 
loadod, new or newer tires 
$9,950 or bet offer (708) 
567-6560. . • 

CHEVY BLAZER 1984, 
while with gold trim, needs 
'stajler, has new transmission, 
A wheel drive. Asking $2,500 
(708)244-2141. 

GMC JIMMY SLE 1992, 
fully loaded. Asking $18,250 or 
best offer (414) 654-0559- 
(414)654-8312. . 

JEEP CJ5 1976, good 
shape- four-wheol-drfve. 
$1,500 or'besl offer Days 
(815)385-0856 Evenings 
(815)365-1614. 

SUBARU JUSTY 1988, 4- 
wheel-drive, cnilso, satter 
driving, 49K stick, novor used 
Ijy children or smokers, show- 
room cloan In and out. $3,500 
(706) 587-5040. 




FORD PICK-UP a/4 TON 
1983, 73,000 miles, cap, 
rack, Reese hitch, some rust 
on t}ody $2,000 or best offer 
(708) 636-2552. ^^ 

FORD RANGER 1984, Ex- 
cellent condllton, many new 
parts. $1,500. (708) 
473-1357, or (708)686-3613, 
wk. 

HIGHBOY FOUR WHEEL 
DRIVE F250 197B 
$2100mEST (708)817-6677 
Pager (708) 266-0112 after 
3PM. ^ 

LANDSCAPERS BIkera, 
race enthusiasts. '1992 Wells 
Cargo with Drop down drtve- 
'om up roar door and 2/s)do 
doors. In brand new condition. 
Used twice, $8,200. (708) 
740-7350. eves after 7:30pm 
onlyptoase. 

1993 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER 
V-6, AM/FM STEREO CD 
PLAYER, LEATHER, ALL 
OPTIONS, 27,000/mllaB, 
StSPEED. $23,000. (708) 336- 
6730. 



844 


Motorcycles 



834 


Tnicks/Trailcrs 



(2) INTERNATIONAL 

DUMP TRUCKS 1978, 

Four-Wheeler, 355 Engine, 
Good Condition $1,400 each 
or Trade (708) 360-0543 
After 6PM. 



HONDA V45 SABER 
700CC, liquid' cooled, only 
8,400 miles, showroom condt- 
tlon. Must selll $1,600 (708) 
546-0514. 

KAWASAKI 1000 1980. 
very fast, dean, black-rt-sober 
with a kit of chrome, Vance 
Hanes p^e, $2,000 or best 
, offer (708) 740-9448 Mike. 



1992 GSXR 7S0 Motorcy- 
cle, pipod, lotted, flilerod, 
goarod down, 2nd took seal. '. 
Magonta black & blue. '2 , 
matching twimols. Very nice. 
$5,000 firm, (708) 546-7232. 

CRUISER, 1911 KAWASA- 
KI KZ440 LTD., black artd 
chrome, with just enough red. 
Beat this prV^. $600. Bany 
(708)265-^9492. 

HARLEY ' DAVIDSON 
TRIKE, 1957. Electric and 
klckstait, everyting new 
$8,000 or best offer (708) 
740-7350 Evenings after 7:30 
PM Onl/ Please (Just b\ time 
for summer tun and slurgla). 

HARLEY DAVIDSON, 

1972, chrome. Too much to 
gsti $8,500.(414) 657-^732 

HARLEY-OAVIDSON • 
FLHTCU 1989, black, new 
nibber, new bell. Must seDI 
$12,000 or best offer (414) 
876-«)96. 

HONDA CVR 600' 1993, 
less than 3,000 miles, jet kit, 2 
brothers ' $4,200 (708) 
872>0523. 

V HONDA PRELUDE 1985, 
moonfoof, tuggage rack.-IOOK 
miles, radio, air condllionlng. 
Reduced $2,875 or best offer 
(708) 234-7147 (708)234- 
9447. 

HONDA StLVERWINQ 

1982, cokir maroon, good 
condltton. $2,100 or best otter 
(708) 438-3770 after 11am 
Ask for Mis. Torres. 



KAWASAKI eSOCC 197B 

for salo (708) 949^722. 

KAWASAKI QPZ1100 

,1984; many extra's, extra 
clean, $2,500. or best offer 
(708)546-3760. 

KAWASAKI GPZSOO 1986, 

exoefleni condition, low trOo- - 
age, lady owned, must sell 
$1.400 (706) &46-5t04. - 

KAWASAKI, 1983 Sptctra 

550, Shan (frtve, air shocks. 
Great shape. $1,000. 
(81 5)653-4581 i - or (815), 
365-1944. ■ ; 

SUZUKI KATANA 600 
1994, black and purple. 
$4,800 or best offer (708) 
655-1466. 

SUZUKI KATANA 600. 1992. * 
Less than 2.000/miies. OCR- • 
GEOUSI $3,600 or best. 
(706)546-0569. 

YAMAHA SECA 750-19B1, 

great shape, 15,000 mites, ^ 
shaft drive, good tires, runs 
groat. Will trade tor 60's, 70*3 
mopar- car parts. $1,250 or 
best offer. (706)567-8670. 

YAMAHA XS-1100, 

S800/BE5T; Cherokee parts, 
like new; Toyota 4x4 parts; 
1967 GT Cougar parts. Leave 
Messafle .(414) 862-2754 



848 



Wanted To Buy 



WANTED: USED CARS In 

need of Minor Repair. Junk 
cars Towed away. Call (706) 
395-0759. 



Duraclean ^ 

Rated best by 
Independent tests 



Carpet & 
Furniture 
Cleaning 
CALL 
TODAY! 



BEEPERS!! 





Sal0Si&SiHvIc6 



MOTOROLA 
;BRAVO 



• OiM MontK AMflW • Met*I cair 

Action Beeper Corp. 
546^9090 

PO0} 47*T7aM : : HeundUteBMCh 



DUNCAN 
PAINTING 

MinonJExMofs • FFEE ESTIMAIBS 

Insured Quality Work 

References - Top Line Material 

Wf DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call 
(706) 566-1002 



WJk. SOD PARNJ' 

Wisconsin Grown & Inspected 

#1 Kentucky Bluegrass Blended Sod 

Peat or Mineral 

Forklift Delivered 

FAXt<414»»S-74M 



SB? 



& CONCRETE 

•Backhoe & Bobcat Excavation 
■Gravel Driveways 
■Landscaping & Decorative 
Rock Constructton 
•Troe Planing &. Removal 
•Lot Clearing 
•Drain Tlias • -Truck Hauling 

CONCRETE 

'Removal 'Installation 
Fully Insured 
708-356-3050 

no job tea Itrgi to ntinutt or too •ml lo tppridpli 



I 



BUYING 

Aluminum Cans 

*COPPER *BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 
aEAD ^ALUMINUM 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-0788 

•or- 

10O0RandRd{Rt.12},UnH212 

WaucondaJL 

(708) 526-0760 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Frl. 

9 a.nri.-5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m.-t p.m. 



SCHNEIDER 
BUILDERS 

•Additiom •Kh ( Bads renvodtitd 

*6v3fei ■Donntn 

•Hiffldfnnn $enrk» 'Frtt Daipi 
•Cutfont Built Dtdu aid Gutlw 
FREE EstImatcs 
CaU Toby AT 

(708) 5*«-41tl 




RENOVATIONS 

•Kitchens •Baths 
•Basements •Decks 

From DesiqN To FlNish 
PAiNjisq Afvd Trim 

"ONI CALL DOCS IT AU' 

REASONABLE AND INSURED 

FREE ESTIMATES 

1-000-9C3-S879 



B 



Adult & Pediatric Allergy 



DR. DANIEL YAIVISHON 





'ASTHMA 
'HAY FEVER 



'HIVES 

'HEADACHES 



*ECZEMA 
•FOOD ALLERGY 



FREE ALLERGY SCREENING 



Alpine Family Phyiicians Buffalo Grovd fecund Lakt Batch 
15 S. Old Rand Road 150 Half Day Rd. 2 East Roitina Rd. 
(708) 550-9300 (708) 91 3-0300 (708) 54&-5eOO 
24 Hour Ana. StrvJcfl (312) 989-8729 




Closed 12-12:30 



PRCmiCR 
MUCC CO. 

(708) 933-0338 

Custom Cedar • Chain Link 
Free Estimates 




•Top Quality Profiaalonal Work 
«V«ry Rtaaonibk RatM 
•Fully Intuftd 
*Cirp«ntry p 
•OrywalVTapIng 
•Rtmodaling 

CALL NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATE 
1-000-246-2720 




BORSIC A SONS 
LANDSCAPING B 

Landscape Con f raciors & ■ 

Mafnfenancc 5 

Slit Seeding • Complete fienovaflon {[ 

•Seeding •Sodding . ■ 

. •Trees •Shrubs S 

•topsoil •woodchips ■ 

FREE ESTIMATES ■ 

(708) 662-3134 S 



| i m i iiMMinii i imi ii mmi 



•Drivesx/ays 

•ResLirPacing 
. •Repairs 
•Parking Lots 
•Seal Coating 

Ro^donttal Specfallsts 
Bondod and Insund 

FREE ESTIMATES 8 
(708) t49-9858 
(815) 344-84 1 



iini i i ii imm i m i mnmi 



Home Servkt 



Wc T*'^^'''^ (■ TOW hoac Mcdi okca: 

•yoa'rt Ui^-ltp ud Von NMd Sobu Bnudi 
Dnw: Boom MkMni. h* (OKI, BinU, Ml), 
Bona fteWOwten Tcndloc mil nta - 
R»«OllM«ii»aBi.»Oeoc«Tlwt 




i 






tiS^mmJB 






SMtttm/m 



7 PdlNUNG 


/^ 




1 , 


SEMVING YOUK r/UNTlNC 
AND DECOMATiKG NEEDS. 

CoRipku IflUnof/Eitcnor 
AlwMunli/Qutini Woik 
QuiUiy Wok • Neuly Done 

FREE EsiTMAiES 

AffordabU Prku 

"Have IHB JOB DONB UOHll" 

€■11(708)229-2656 


i 



Protect Now 

Before 

Summer 

Sun Damage! 



,v^^"- '-;?.. k^... 



WE SEAL DRIVEWAYS 



...and amaU patUng folt 

• •Seal Coating •Patchwork •Cracl< Filling 

PtotQct and Preserve • i^eosonablo raies. Call for a Fl?e£.estimat9 

(708) 740-4051 or (708) 359-1911 

ABiERICAN SEALCOATING BY GEORGE 



mmggmSBOmmmmBmw^f'swmss-rf'rrmsT?:^. 



• JU> ^f«J..r^P~i 



ClAS^tPIED UkElANd Ntws|>Ap6Rii' AuqiJsr 1 9, 1994/ 



•J u rt t i 



V ■ » 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



j^ 



TO PLAGE 
YOUR AD HERE 

708-223-8161 



m 



a! 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



LEGAL SERVICES 

WILLS 

LIVING TRUSTS 

REAL ESTATE 

COURT REPRESENTATION 

ATTORNEY RONALD RUNKLE 

(708)356-9905 

36871 N. ROUTE 83 

LAKE VILLA, IL 60046 



Ii=: 



T C 



T €f C MEIAL CO. 

W o recycle aluminum cansl 
W« also buy •iniulated WIro 

•Copp«r 'Brau •Lpad •Stainless 

.Alurrtnum Siding -BaHQiles -Zinc 
•Auto Radlafort • •Catalytic ConvQrt«r» 



Buyors of non-f©r:ouf m«tals. 
Indmtflal accounh wlcomo. 



37B Pralrio St. 
Cryttal la ke. IL | 



|si 5-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Fil. 8-5; Sat 3-1 



1 Block S. of Hwy. 176 
Behind J & L Gds Station 



JSSSSSSSSSS 



LetUtDoYouriyphigt 
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AuqusT 19, 1994^ 'UkdANcI 'Newspapers SPORTS/LEISURE* 




Knights' defense to show way as *94 season begins 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

It is easy to understand why Al 
Clark Is cntlmscd about the upcom- 
ing scml-pro football season. 

For starters, look at the 
turnout, with 45 players ready to 
do battle Saturday and Sundays 
through October in the 
Chlcagoland Football League. 

Then there is the defense. 

"Our whole defense is Intact 
from last year. We will mn a 4-3 
or 4-4 as a disguise. Against the 
Thunder in our exhibition game, 
we only allowed them two com- 
pleted passes," Clark said. 

Linebacker Dan llalverson, a 
Carmel graduate, moved from 
outside to inside linebacker. 
Cornerback Craig Freeman keys 



the secondary. 

"Tlie biggest change this year 
may be on offense. You won't be 
able to recognize our offense 
from last year," Clark said. 

Sam Toia is the offensive 
coordinator and quarterback, 

"He is so experienced In the 
league. He wants to pass all the 
time, but I have to put a choke 
hold on that," Clark said. 

With that ironed out, the 
Knights went out end outscorcd 
the Thunder 26-13 in that exhi- 
bition opener. 

The Khights promise a well- 
balanced attack for tlie 7 p.m. Aug. 
20 season opener against the 
Chargers, The game will be played' 
at Hansen Stadium in Chicago. 

Nate Body, a 5-foot, 9-lnch 



190 pounder Is at one running 
back. He scored a touchdown on 
a run and added a two-point con- 
version against the Thunder. 

Also in the backGcld, who ran 
for a TD against the Thunder, Is 
Brent Stackhousc of Waukcgan. 

Arlcc Williams of Waukcgan 
is at one widcout Ray Jones, a 
Waukcgan police officer, Is at 
another receiving position. Doth 
caught touchdown passes in the 
Thunder contest. 

"Our line Is Inexperienced but 



ond to none," he said. "It is a 
game of chess. You hope to pre- 
pare them properly, then it is up 
to them." 
., The Knights practice at Bcav- 
icr Park at McCall School hi 
Waukcgan Monday and Thurs- 
day nights, on Saturday morning 
on off weeks. 

Clark said he would like to get 



"We have improved safety 
and curriculum," Clark said. 

All told, some $500,000 could 
be contributed to the scholarship 
fund. 

The Knights schedule: Aug. 
27, 3 p.m., home at Hansen vs. 
South Side Hitmen; Sept 11 visi- 
tors at Hansen vs. DuPage; Sept 
25: home at Hansen vs. Pantlicrs, 
I p.m.; Oct 2 visitors at Hansen 



a home game In Lake County so 

fans could sec his Knights, but vs. Chargers, 1 p.m.; Oct. 9, visl- 

therc have been no takers. tors at Luther South vs. South 

By day, the Gurnce resident is Side Hitmen; Oct 16, home vs. 

proved themselves against principal at Creiger High in Eagles at Northern Illinois 

Thunder. We arc very quick. You Chicago. The school is a recipient University, 2 p.m.; Oct 22, CFL 

don't try and outmusclc a 300- of funds from an Oprah Winfrey playoffs at Hansen, 4 and 7:30 

pound lineman," Clark said. movie which will go to underpriv- p.m. and Oct 30, title game at 

Qarklsmnnlngthcwtiolcshow ilcged youth seeking a college Hansen, 1 p.m. The DuPagc 

this year, the team's fourth season. education. They must maintain a Eagles have won four of the last 

"Our defense should be sec- - B average. five league titles. 



SPORTS/LEISURE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



xt:^ 



y 







•■':'*.,*<?;•,• 





Racing heats up 



m 



n 



PAGEC22 




r {Mike Dikta bowls ^ 

for charity 
PAGEG25 

Vikings set for 
:^!ro;ad contest 

ilie Lake County Vikings 
semi-pro football team takes 
^to the road Aug. 20 for a 
Midwest Football League 
game. The Vikings, p-2 on 
the young season, battle the 
Indiana Renegades at Crown 
Point Ind. at7:30 p.m. 

The Vikings won ; their 
season opener, but dropped 
a 13-12 decision to the Palos 
Orland Park Force. Reggie 
Lawrence scored a 44 -yard 
running touchdown - and 
Frank Ruiz caught an 85- 
yard TD pass from Wes 
Quist. 

Golf clinics offered 

The College of Lake 
County will offer courses for 
beginning and intermediate 
' ^golfers at the Sunset Valley 
Golf Course in Highland I 
Pairk beginning Aug. 25 for ^ 
■^fivc .weeks./:.- ■• ::-:■■•;/;• ■■■'■:':]^^■^l■. ' 

Both "Beginning Golf ^ 
p(GST 034) and "Intermediate 
>Goir (GST 033) wiU be ; >: 
Uaught on Thursdays begin- 
5;; ning Aug. 25 or Saturdays 
beginning Au& 27, with the; 
beginners course from TO to 
d0:50 arn. and the inter- • y 
mediate course from tl to 
ill:50^a.m. Students will \ 
trecelvc individual and group 
instruction from a PGA golf 
; proffissional. Golf clubs and 
>ball^wUi be provided. ■ 
\1lie cost is $65 per 
course. For iniformatlon and 
registration, call CLC's 
Southlakc Educational 
Genter^t 433-7884. 



Baseball future is bright for Lake County Chiefs 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

After two days of rain and 
downright cold temperatures for 
August, shade was a necessity 



Thursday in Minnesota. 

The Lake County Chiefs 12- 
and-undcr baseball team re- 
flected on a 46-win season, sec- 
ond place in the state tourney 













a 







1-T: f,-^ •'' «»,'. -.■* V-':,v.;.: 



J 



Mac Mansovogo of tho Lako County Chiefs puts down a bunt 
against Rhode Island. Rhodo Island handed Lake County a 4-2 
loss. Chiefs finished 4-2 In the Amateur Athletic Union tournament. 

Nation's top horse riders 
compete at Temple Farms 



and a respectable 4-2 showing at 
the national AAU tourney. This 
followed a 6-0 loss to powerful 
San Diego team which eliminated . 
the Chiefs. 

The Chiefs gave each team 
more than it bargained for in the 
sbc contests, and two Chiefs, 
Jamie fankowski and Mike 
Bruszcr, came home with tro- 
phies for Individual contests - 
Jankowski for outfield accuracy 
and Bruszcr for home runs. 

The Chiefs had their chances 
even against the San Diego team. 

Down 1-0, the Chiefs had a 
runner reach third base as Josh 
Boock walked and John Glatt 
reached on an error. But a forced 
out, a fielder's choice an'd a 
strikeout snuffed the Chiefs best 
scoring chance. 

San Diego, which had shutout 
the other team to beat the Chiefs, 
Rhode Island by an U-O count 
earlier, had to earn its win. The 
telling blows were a first-inning 
home run which cleared the left- 
ficld fence by several feet and a 4- 
run fourth inning. 

Mansavagc believes the team 



learned much from a week play- 
ing against the nation's best 

"The guys have memories for 
the rest of their lives. They 
learned baseball is a attitude. You 
have to want it," Mansavagc said. 

Afterward, Manager Art 
Mansavagc rcQcctcd on the trip 
to Bumsville;^ Minn, and told of 
plans for next year. 

Mansavagc's comments on 
key players: 

On Mac Mansavagc 
(Riverwoods): "As a lead-off man, 
-your job is to get on base. Mac 
had extra pressure on him 
because he Is my son. As a pitch- 
er, he Is not the fastest, but he 
knows how to mix them up." 

On Steve Ruh (Northbrook): 
"He was under a lot of pressure 
because his Dad (Rick) is the as- 
sistant coach. He played for the 
Palatine Travellers and made 
great improvements. As a pitcher, 
he handles it well. He can play 
third or second base." 

On Buszer (Deerfietd): "He is 
a powerhouse guy. He is very 
strong with a smooth swing." 
See CfllEFS page C23 



The nation's top young riders 
are meeting head-to-head with 
international competitors to vie 
for individual and team gold, sil- 
ver and bronze championship 
medals at the Pedigree® Brand 
North American Young Rider's 
Championships. ,Tlic prestigious 
annual event, the pinnacle of the 
Pedigree® Brand Young Riders 
Program, is being hosted by 
Tcmpcl Farms, in Wadsworth this 
week. 

Over 100 riders between the 
ages of 16 and 21 from the United 
States, Canada, Bermuda and 
Mexico, who competing in the 
Olympic disciplines of dressage, 
show jumping and three-day 
eventing, will participate in this 
year's championship. The 
Pedigree® Brand 

Championships arc a proving 
ground for America's young rid- 
ers. Only candidates who have 
successfully completed the 
demanding regional selection tri- 
als in their respective disciplines 




are eligible to compete 

Previous U.S. winners at the 
12-year-old championships 
include MoUy Bliss, the youngest 
rider in three-day eventing at the 
1990 World Equestrian Games, 
and Greg Best, a member of the 
1908 Olympic Games team and 
an individual silver medalist in 
show jumping on "Gem Twist." 

"It has been the Pedigree® 
Brand's long-standing goal to 
support young athletes in this 
country. Young riders are our 
future in maintaining the tradi- 
tion of the equestrian sport," 
notes Alice Nathanson, External 
Relations Manager for Kal Kan 
Foods, Inc., makers of the 
Pedigree Food For Dogs. The 
brand's sponsorship of the Young 
Riders' program shows its contin- 
uing commitment to assisting 
young athletes in their pursuit of 

the Olympic dream, Pedigree® 

Brand was an Official Sponsor of Young Riders from throughout the notion are competing at Temple 
the 1992 U.S. Olympic Team. Farms In Wadsworth thrpugh Sunday In the Pedigree Brand North 

See RIDERS page C23 America Young Rider's Championships. 




SPORTS/LEISURE Ukclwl NtwspApERS AtqusT 19, 1994 






Speedsters give a wet, wild, wacky night at Wilmot 



MICHAEL H. BABtCZ 



when his top wing collapsed, 
came back for the second restart, 
but finished back in the field with 
no wing panels. 

Fred Zack paced the first half 
of the Modified Main which saw a 



Cofrespondent 

Larry Marshall of Kansasville, 
Wis., became the seventh differ- 
ent street stock feature win this 
season as Aug. 13 proved to be 
lucky at Toft Auto Racing's red come out on lap four when 
Wlimot Speedway. Mike Dubs flipped in turn one. 

Kenosha, Wis.'s Allen Winker Dubs was checked out for a pos- 
scorcd the win in a hard fought sibic knee injury. 
25-Iap Spring Main which saw The second red came on lap 1 1 
two red flags for flips. as two-time defending champion 



Kenosha's Dennis Spitz scored 
his fifth modified feature win and 
second in a row as two red flags 
for slips also flew. 



Lenny Ostrowski Jr., who was 
running third and using the high 
groove, went over hard in turn 
three. Ostrowski was conscious 



Larry Surlcta of Round Lake and transported to the hospital 

won his third 20-lap sportsman for further evaluation, 
main. Two laps after the second red, 

Marshall put his home-built Spitz worked his Carmin 

D&L Chassis/A-1 Conveyor Constructlon/JD Race Engines/ 

Camaro at the drop of the green NAPA Auto Parts mount into the 

and stayed their in a record lead as Zack hobbled just enougii 

breaking non-stop street stock coming out of turn two. 
main, "Fred's a tough guy to get 

"The track was fast, the car around, but he got out of shape- 
was set upright after wc changed just enough for me to get undcr- 
cvcrythlng and starter Chuck neath him and then gave me 
Olson did a good job of using the enough room to race," comment- 
courtesy flag for the lapped traf- cd Spitz. "I thank Fred for that. It 
fie," said Marshall, whose first was a good, clean race." 
feature win in four years was in Jim Bennett jumped into the 
5:11.74, taking eight seconds off sportsman feature lead, holding 
die old mark. it until the hallway point when a 

The spring main got off to a caution flew just as Surlcta was 

rough start as the red flew when challenging in lapped traffic. 
Joe Kristan got upside down in On the restart, Surlcta put his 

two just after the caution had Daimler Autohaus/Hurlburt 

come out for a front wing which Engincs/Jadc Construction 

broke off in turn four. Camaro inside Bennett down the 

Kristan was not injured, and backstrctch. The pair ran side by 

after quick repairs and a hammer side for two laps until Surlcta 

job on his crumpled top wing, he took command of the point on 



came out for the restart. 

Winker put his Long's 
Trucking/Quality Auto 

Restoration & Rebuildcrs/ 
Kenosha Tire Winker Edge 
Chassis m front until lap eight 
when Todd Daun took the lead as 
the two worked lapped traffic. 

Tommy Sexton, who had 
flipped in the first heat and came 
back to make the main by fmish- 
ing second in the "B" Main Last 



lap 13. 

Despite track crews being 
unable to get on the one-third 
mile oval until 3 p.m. due to all 
the rain, the track was fast. Frost 
won the five-lap Biene 
Excavating Dash in record time of 
1:13.04, knocking one second off 
the old mark. 

Despite the reds and delays, a 
total of 18 races with 70 cars in 
competition, the program was 



Chance Qualifier, flipped again, completed before at 10:45 p.m. 
Sexton was not injured, but had The Miller Genuine Draft 

enough and called it a night Kenosha Fair Championslups 

A persistent Kristan, who had come to "Wisconsin's Clay 

pitted prior to the second red Center of Speed" on Saturday, 



^^.. 



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Aug. 20, with an open competi- 
tion spring car program paying 
$2,000 to win the feature. 

Mini-sprints arc also on the 
program and both divisions time 
trialing. First race is at 7 p.m. with 
time trials at 6 p.m. 

On Aug. 21, the always popular 
Demolition Derby comes to the 
front straightaway. Two sessions 
are planned with preliminary 
rounds starting at 2:30 p.m. and 
the finals at 6 p.m. 

Grandstand admission to 
Wilmot Speedway on Aug. 20 and 
21 is free, included In the fair 

admission. 

Toft Auto Racing's WITmot 
Speedway - Wilmot. Wis. 
Summary- Saturday, Aug. 13 
Budwclscrllaclng Scries • 



Sprints 

25-Lap Feature: 1. Allen Winker, 
Kenosha; 2. Todd Daun, Kenosha; 
3. Dennis Spitz, Kenosha; 4. Dick 
Colburn, Muskcgo, Wis.; 5. Mike 
Frost, Zlon; 6. Dave Bliss,. 
Harvard; 7. Tim Cox, Park City; B. 
Gary Zobel, Brighton, Wis.; 9. 
Chip Bell, Trevor; 10. Craig 
McKlnney, Zlon. 

15-Iap Last Chance Qualifier "B" 
Main: Zobcl; Tomy Sexton, Antioch; 
McKlnney; Paul Tctrault, Bradley; 
Scott Grissom, Wlnthrop Harbor. 

First 10-Lap Heat: Scott Young, 
Union Grove, Wis.; D. Spitz; Bell; Kris 
Spitz, Kenosha; 2nu heat: Tim 
Ammon, Kenosha; Cox; A Winker; 
Bliss; 3rd heat: Joe Kristan, Beach 
Park; Daun; Frost; Raymond Henslcy, 
Lake Villa. 

Blcnc Excavating 5-Lap Dash: 
Frost; A. Wtnkcr; Coiburn, Wis.; 
Young (NTR-1.13.04, oId-1.14.04 by 
Daun on July 16), 



Modlflcdi} 
Feature: 1. Dennis 



20-lap Feature: 1. Dennis Spitz, 
Kenosha; 2, Fred Zack, Glcndatc, 



bpilZ, 
;,Wls.; 
3, Jimmy Utlcch Jr., Kenosha; 4. Gary 
Dye, Genesee, Wis.; 5. Todd Ilcpfner, 
Sussex, Wis.; G. Keith Olsen, Round 
Lake; 7. Allen Winker, Kenosha; 8. Jon 
Bchnckc, Mllirtraukcc; 9. Bob Dodd, 
Beach Park; 10. Danny Smith, 
Wlnthrop Harbor. 

12-lap Last Chance Qualifier "D" 
Main: Tom Larson, New Berlin, Wis.; 
Smith; Joe Palmlsano, Franklin, Wis.; 
Vlncc Hcywood, Richmond; Jim 
Brock, Waukcgan (NTR-3. 19.63, old 
3.25.94 by Zack on July 16). 

First 10-lap Hcau Uttcch; Dodd; 
Zack; Mike Dubs, Russell; 2nd heat: 
Lenny Ostrowski Jr., North Cape, 
Wis.; Joe Graumcnz, Wheatland, Wis.; 
T. Hcpfncr; Olsen; 3rd heal: Kurt 
Winker, Kenosha; D. Spitz; Bchnckc; 
Dye. 

J&L Ol! 5-)ap Dash: Uttcch; Olsen; 
Larson; Zack. 



''Read It & Reap 



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must contact Lakeland Newspapers' CIrcutatk)n Department by the foltewing Wednesday of publlcatjon, 12:00 noon, and 
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TD!HT2!0 YfiAPeU 01 JPU^udwr 19, 19f4 l^kElANd Newspapers SPa 




WfiUo ni;> 






Family support 

Former Chicago Bears Coach, and Hail of Fame member Mike Dikta visits with Joe Marconi, 
Sara Marconi and daughter, Katie, 2, at the Joe Marconi Memorial Pro-Am Bowling 'Strikes 
AgalfTst Leukemia' Tournament. DItka was hortofary chairman of the event which was named 
In honor of his former teamrnate Joe Marconi who was d leukemia victim. 



From page C21 

Riders who qualify for the 
Pedigree®' Brand 

Championships will be awarded 
a USET Young Rider Crest at the 
competition, recognizing them as 
representing the U.S. in Interna- 
tional competition. Top U.Sr fin- 
ishers in each discipline will also 
be recognized as Pedigree® 
Brand USET Young Rider 
Charhpions. . _ 

The championships are held, 
under the auspices of the 
International . equestrian 

Federation (lEF), the American 
Horse Show Association (AHSA), 
and the national equestrian fed- 
eration of the United states. This 
is the seventh year that Tcmpcl 
Farms has been host to the cham- 
pionships. 

The American Horse Shows 
Association is the regulatory' 
body for Olympic equestrian 
sports and 20 other breeds and 
disciplines of equestrian com- 
petition. The AHSA has 55,000 
members and recognizes 2,500 
competitions each year. It gov- 
erns all aspects of competition, 
- educates and licenses all 



Judges, stewards, and technical 
delegates, and works to pro- 
mote equestrian sports in the 
United States. 

The U.S. Equestrian Team 
(USET) is a non-profit organiza- 
tion that ofTiclally represents the 
United States in international 
equestrian cornpetition. The 
USET Is responsible for selecting, 
training, equipping and financ- 
ing equestrian teams to compete 
in tlie Olympic Games, Pan 
American Games, World 
Championships and other inter- 
national events. 

For more information on the 
schedule of events and tickets, 
caU 244-9207. 




From page C21 

On Boock (Chicago): "He has 
improved 100 percent as a catch- 
er. He came to us at our winter 
canip. He docs whatever you ask, 
never complains." 

On Glatt (Riverwoods): "John 

^ is a classic example of a guy who 

'^* earned a spot on the roster. He 

improved tremendously. He is s 

switch-hitter." 

On Jamie Jankowski- (Lake 

Zurich) "He won the playoff 

"igame with Waukegan, or we 

would not have been here (at the 

iAAUWorid Series)." 

On Matt Bonuso (Arlington 
Heights): "What a workhorse. He 
is a quiet guy. He can run like a 
deer." 

On Austin "Tex" Turner 

(Buffalo Grove): "He is a great 

infielder. He has a lot of ability. 

- He knows how to mix up his 

pitches." 

On Matt Rollins (Chicago): 
"He came to us at the winter 
camp and is a solid player. He has 
a nice swing but needs more 
experience." 



On Jason Baker (Green Oaks) 
: "He was our second catcher last 
year. He has a great deal of skills 
and is a great hunter. 

On Dustin Dohslaf 
(Deerficld): "Hie is a good pitcher 
"who always stays within the team 
concept" 

On Mike Crane (Lake' 
Zurich): "He deserved more 
playing time as a rookie, but in 
the-toumamcnt,, you have torgo 
with your experienced players." 

On Dan Raneur (Llbcrtyville) 
: "He is a strong guy, good hit- 
ter." 

On Chris Luccntc 

(Northbrook): "He has come a 
long way. He could be a pitcher". 

Also adding depth was J.J. 
Lubicky of Ubertyville. 

The -. baseball season is not 
totally put to rest, as the Chiefs 
wind up play In Wausau, Wis. 
this weekend. ' 

Mansavagc plans to offer a 
13-year-oId team next year and 
vows to have his team well pre- 
pared, After all, April is only a 
mere seven months away. 




ELECTRONICS PROGRAM 



s 



■m 






•^^ 



-^' 



"^4 .«^ 



College of Lake County prepared me 
for a career I like in afield that has 
advancement opportunities.^* 

Curt Hall ':, . 

Smwr CAD J^plicatum Engineer, Motorok^^^^ 

Celiuiar Subscriber Group, Ubertyville 



'7 chose CLC because I heard about the excellence 
ofCLCs electronics program from my high 
school teachers. TIjey told me about the college's 
good reputation with area industries, I was 
amazed at how in-depth CLCs program was 
and how knowledgeable the teachers were. 

^'CLC nurtured my interest and prepared me for 
a good life. If you're interested in a technical 
field, electonics is the way to go. Wat's where the 
future is.^' 

learn more about CWs 
electronics program. 

Call 223^6601j ext. 2498 




lUfiEf 

roi/' 

mm 
mm,. 

Brought 

To 
You By 



MICHAEL FOHRMAN 
OF FOHRMAN DODGE 

Can you imagine a big league 
baseball player leading the league 
in making the most errois; In being 
struckout the most times; and in 
hitting Into the most double 
plays-and still being voted Most 
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happened?... It was 19"42... Joe 
Gordon did all those things, yet won 
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There's a lesson to be learned from 
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• * • 

How do you figure this one... Only 
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Hero's a golf question that may 
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• * * 

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Fohmnan Dodge's Award Winning 
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[iAVEiiFATroft TooHhI 



COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY 



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