(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Antioch News 08/05/1994"

':*r';'-r(r-'=^ 



"■■■ I 




E(( yiB 



S' Lakeland Newspapers Welcomes 1 78 NEW Subscribers This Week 



Mf^l 





Lakeland 

Newspi^ers 

01994^A Sch roeder Publication 



VOL, 1 08 NO. 5 1 



ANTIOCH AUGUST 5> 1 994 



FOUR SEGTIONS-84 PAGES 



50CENTS 



M 








COMMUNITY 



^ Train aeiiient 



. by Metra train 
R\CEA5 



isz^OijNW^HSiif 




fci ■-■"•;:' 






tbrestore 



RAGEB6 



LAKELIFE 




,,^I,ambKhostfr-FpUt Music- 
Fest RAGE: Bib 




SPECIAL SECTION 



Back to school 

Good Begiiinihgs Never 
End PAGE Dl 



'.^V 



INDEX 

BusiNESS ! CI 

ClAssifitcl C8 

CouNiy News Bl 

CrossworcI ^....^ B24 

EdiTORiAl/OpiNloN B4 

Creen'Up C27 

HEAlihwATch B25 

Horoscope B24 \^ 

LakeIiIe.. d/ 

LeqaINotjces A10,C6. 

LipscRvicE B27 

OblTUARJES G5 

Summer SaIe Bl 1 

SpoRTs .C25 

WkREToEATOuT B21 



auUNGIS PRESS 

A 5 S O CI A I I D IM . . 
Saving onripaiiirt Bica IS6S 




1994 Award Winner 



Assessments rise, 
notices in the mail 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



ReglonalEdltor ■ 

Antioch Township residents 
should receive their assessment 
notices within the next week and 
the news can be good or bad, 

' Waterfront property is 
jumping aiiover tt\e 
piace. People wiil pay 
a higt) price for 
waterfront no matfer 
wttat the condition.' 

—Clitton Houghton/ 
Antioch 

depending on your point of ^ew. 

Homeowners who are looking 
at their property ^ as an 
investment may be pleased to 
sec the value rise. From 1987'to 
1969, the township value 
increased by 28 percent. From 
1989 to 1993, the value jumped 
by niore than 46 percent. This 
means a property owner's 
investment has risen at a much 
higher rate than the same 
investment would have received 
in a sayings account. 

However, Iipmcownors who 
arc thinking about their tax bill 
will be disappointed in the rising 
assessment. . 

"The plain fact of the matter 
is you couldn't invest that money 
elsewhere and get that kind of 
return. But you still have to come 
up with the money for the tax 
bill," said Antioch Township 



^•■: 



Assessor Clifton Houghton. . 

In the 1994 Quadrennial 
Assessments,, the value of 
property in Antioch Township 
has risen by an average of 8 
percent, with some areas 
showing increases of more than 
■ 10 percent 

Urbanization, development 
and a demand for waterfront 
property are the factors which 
influenced the increase in 
property value. Waterfront 
property is especially in high 
demand with some areas rising 
25 percent or more in value. 

"Waterfront property is 
Jumping all over the place," said 
Houghton. " People will pay a 
high price for waterfront no 
matter vAi^t the condition." 

' The value of a piece of 
property is market-driven and 
the assessor determines that 
value by comparing sales of like 
property in the geographic, area. 
The assessor bases" the v^lue of 
the property on sales data in the 
three years preceding the 
assessment. The assessor also 
takes into.' account major 
improvcmchts such as adding on 
a room or adding a garage. 
Houghton pointed . out 
maintenance improvements are 
not factored into the value. The 
Assessor's Office is required to do 
an on-site assessment of each 
property in the township at least 
once in four years. 
Sec ASSESMENT pageAlO 




Going for a spin 

Matt Cplemdn and daughter Nicole, 2, take a.rlde on thi9 
merry-go-round dt the Lake County Fair. With autumn fast 
approaching, cooler weather and the end of summer 
break will mean fewer chances to enjoy the great 
outdoors. —Photo by Bill Dormody Jr. 



Waterway will take official no-wake vote 



TINALSWIECH 
Staff Reporter 

The Fox Waterway Agency 
will vote on an ordinance 
cstablisliing an 150-foot no-wake 



zone for the shoreline of the 
Chain O' Lakes at its August 
meeting. 

The board voted 5-1 in July to 
draft the ordinance siding with 




1 



public opinion. 

At the Aug. 1 1 meeting, the 
board wjli cast their votes on the 
ordinance Attorney John Roth 
has drafted. 

Ilie no-anchoring policy was 
approved at the last meeting said 
Karen Kabbes, executive director 
for the agency. 

Residents in the Pistakee Day 
area of Fox Lake were happy 
about the approval which will 



make the south, and west portion 
on the bay no-anchoring for 
former party boats which parked 
in front of their homes. 

Kabbes said she doesn't see 
why the vote on the no-wake 
won't pass, although there was 
one member who didn't agree at 
the last meeting. 

Bruce Bossow of McHenry 
County voted against the idea 
Sec VOTE page AlO 



Something for everypjue 
at Lions BBQ and auction 



Handling the hdnd-made 

Rosemarie Hevrdejs of Loon Lake Inspects some of the 
hundreds of croft Jterps for sale at the Northern Illinois 
Conservatk:>n Club's craft fair. —Photo by Bill Dormody Jr. 



MARY FOLEY 

Staff Reporter 

On Aug. 7, the Antioch Lions 
Club and Rescue Squad will be 
sponsoring a BBQ and auction at 
Williams Park. The auction is 
scheduled to begin at noon, but 
plan to get there around 11 am. 
because the chicken will be 
ready. 

Don't let the fact that you 
have never attended an auction 
keep you from this, one. When 
you arrive at 11 a.nt you need to 
sign up and get a bid number. 
This bid number will be on a 
paddle. When the auction 
begins, participants simply raise 
the paddle if Interested in 



bidding for an item. 

The event is a cash auctioli 
and items must be paid for in 
cash that day. The person who 
casts the highest bid gets the 
item. Some of the items willbe 
on display at local banks in 
Antioch. 

• Some of tlie more Interesting 
things available include a pig, 
steers, canoes, outboard motors, 
decorative watcrfountains, a 
totem pole, Hector the Dragon, a 
weathervane, Bears tickets, gas 
grills, furniture, and so much 
more. 

The auction will be 
conducted by Herman Bchm and 
See AUCTION page AlO 



COMMUNITY UkclANd Newspapers Auqusr 3, 1994. 



,fii^^V. 










iscAPE TO wiseiSiiSiiir 

3 badroomOolt House on an acre, laigo livjng^dinlng 
worn, large country kitchen wilh new oak cabinets, 
newer fumaoe; water healer, electric service, plurrnng, 
sHIno. & wmdows. Localod 1 mile from the border. 

Now onvM 24,900 

Catt Mike Culal at 838'MIKE 




&:\ 



te-.^tf^'V** ••f**tt.W*^ 



^mm] 



■ -t,, <^ . %■, .•'4: ..-V; 






iiiiiiK^'t^n 



SPRING GROVE ... 
NEW CONSTRUCTION 

3 bedrooffl rabed ranch on a beautiful wooded acre. 
Oak cabinet kitqhen, moster bath, large tamay room, 2 
& 1/2 car garage. 

utod At M 49,900 

CaU Mike Cuiat at 838-MIKE 



%< :.Z'A-^t 



J ' V.' .5- 



4ls>?-.i-Vj.:. ■ i^ 






b^jf*. '•■^ 



1 



k 



i 



t' 






LAKE VILLA ... 
WATER RIGHTS _ 

Tliis 3 bedroom ranch leatures a large master bedroom 
with prh^ale balh. Large living/dining room. lauirfry 
rDomV«wened porch, 2 4 1/2 car dnve-through 

85S"^ j„,LM«i.t*139,900 

CaU Mike CuUu at 838-MIKE 




^^^^^ 



m sM 



X 



;i?',>»:jvz:T 



ANTiOCH ... 
WATER RIGHTS ^^. , 

Tha BxIrerrwV wel-cared Tor 3 bedroom ranch boasta 1 
& 1/2 btlhs, eat-in Mchen, tamiy roon\ covwad palio, 
2 & 1/2 car garage, paved drive, 10 x IB storage shed, 
all on m proAtsionally landsoapad lot. Cbs* to paita & 

juttiisM 11*135,900 

CaU Mike Cidat at 838-MIKE 



'mm 

'".•'^-^-S 









t^C 



=?^_-^iiSt, 



L^ 



ANTIOCH ... OVER 1/2 ACRE| 
OF WOODED PROPERTY 

3 bedroom, large living room, remodeled bath, dining 
room, mafcilooarwe-treo axtenor, f«wed yard with rmny 
mature trees. Phis „. »«-^^ '^^^ i 

w^erriflhtstoth. ^,^^ M09,900 ' 

CaU Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



»^. 



■t/ 



■H 






.'i^ 



'/Y^ ^U 



■^i=e?Yi 



GRAYSLAKE ... 

3 bedroom semi-cuatom quad-lev«t. Cathedral oeiEngs, 
dining room, targe living room, family room with brick 
fireplace, 2 full & 1 halt bath. Screened deck & 
central-air. _.^ ^. ■ , v ■-.-.. 

Mom In tod« for only *1 62,900 { 
CaU Mike Cidat at 838-MIKE 






NEW CONSTRUCTION... 

3 bedroom ranch with targe master bedroorrj, laundry • 
room, large living room, city s«wor& wrater, »« nghto. 
Close to parks, schools, & shopping. Listed at •B3,900. 
Call now to pick your .»-. :»^a 

'^^- LltUdat*83,900 

Mike Culat m-MlKE 

muER PUNS & wmiom AVAiiABm 



c^»- 



i^'J^^.'.' 



CHAIN^O-LAKES 

3 bedroom contemporary w«h 2 fuH t»«lhs, wtiirlpool, 
large kitchen, dining room, loft oveitooMng Sving room ■ 
with stone fireplaoe. central air. Attached garage & large 
deck overkMkfng the water and wiUtite area. 

Litud at M 99,900 

CaU Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



■ 0- 



.Miii^-^ 



^CHANNEL FRONT 
TO PiSTAKEE 

THis 2 bedroom beauty has been almost oomptetc^ 
remodeled. Large living room, dining room, eeramc 
bath, laundiy room 

jwtiirt^rt •114,900 

CaU Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 



WISCONSIN... 

Cedar log home on 2 & 1/2 wooded bis, 2 bedrooms, 
living room with stone fireplaoe, remodeled bath, new 
carpeting, huge family room writh vauHed oeiing, 2 & 1/2 
car garage. Great comer location with city sewer. 

LlitMiat*82,900l 

CaU Mike Culat for ptivate 
showitut at 838-MIKE 







iig^/^im^ss^m^'^:^*^ 



SUPER STARTER ... 

■nils 1 bedroom b«uty has beentotaiy updated. New 
furnace. aHing, kitehen, well & septic 4 mor». Nice 
fenced yvd with water righte to Chain. 

uM.t*64,900 

r^ll Mike Culat at 838-MIKE 






a 



»V»l^^"irf^|**Vi* SJ I 



j • ; -is^fi f— Vf •fJceJ 



GREAT INVESTMENT. 

This 3 bedroom 2-stoiy feature* a full bas emarrt. ry wef 
windowe, laroo Irving room, dinkig room, nardwMd 
I floors. 2 & W oar garage, fenced yard, on an «dr« 

laigeM. 

LMat*69,900 
CubMt at 838-1 




kWaterfroiit 
Prop. 




WATERFRONT 
CONDO... 

2 badroons, woodfkxtra in Utehen, fireplace, laundry 
room, garage, patio ovMlooidng the waUr. 



juifDr*98,500 



VACANT LAND 

SPFIINQ OROVE ... 4 aaes of wooded vacant property 
high on a hiN. Former apple orchard surrounded by 
pine*. Just listed at '79,800. 

SPRING GROVE _. 3 buiUing sites dose to maior 
highway. Each 1 + acre. Startmg at '45,000. 

ANTIOCH ... 1.3 acres' of beautiful hIKop wfth views of 
Wilmol IWtountain. •55,000. . 




M 



I 



i 



it.v 



m 






I 



I 

! 



! 
5 



\ 



ii, 




AuqusTf, Iff 4 LAkEUrd Newspapers COMMUNITY 



Ball room dancing 

Meghan Hoskia 4, of Antloch sinks herself Into the Undenhurst Early Chlkdhood Center's newjy- 
acquired ball play yard. —Photo by Bill Dofmody Jr. 



Batman grafiBti leiads to teen's arrest 



CIAUPIA M. LENART 
Regional Editor 

A 17-year-old grafnti artist 
could spend time in jail if con- 
victed, after allegedly painting 
tfie town with a Batman slogan, 

. . j\ trail of 12 incidents of graf- 
fiti led police to Jeremy Fielz, 17, 
of '497 Maplewodd Drive, in 
Antloch. file graffiti occurred at 
around 11 p.m., Monday, July 25, 
and police started getting calls 
that evening and on the follou^g 
morning, according to Lt Charles 
Watkins of the Antioch Police 
Department 

'Bail" was found on the vil- 
lage water tower, village storage 
facilities, Antidch Upper Grade 
School, Antioch Lower Grade 
School, at Ben Franklin and many 
other businesses, as well as on 



stop signs. 

Watkins said it was obvious 
the graffiti was painted by the 
same person because of the con- 
tent as well as tlie airbrush tech- 
nique and the paint After taking 
down all the reports, the police 
obtained ilnformation from an 
Informant who suggested looking 
intoPletz. 

Watkins and Detective 
Geoige Broecker went to Pletz' 
home ^cre after some ques- 
tioning PletK confessed and 
showed police where the spray 
paint was. Police found spray 
paint and Batman comics in a 
suitcase. 

"He said he was bored and 
was sitting home watching 
Batman reruns and wanted to 
baffle police by spraying 'Ball,' " 



recalled Watkins. 

PletE went before a judge in 
Lake County Circuit Court on 
Thursday, Jidy 28. His bond was 
set at $20,000 on four counts of 
felony criminal damage to prop- 
erty and other charges of criminal 
damage to property. He was 
released on a recognizance bond. 

Pletz was charged with felony, 
'crhninal damage for defacing 
government buildings. A Qass 4 
felony carries a 1 to 3 year sen- 
tence. 

Watkins said the end of sum- 
mer is especially prone to graffiti 
incidents as kids start to become 
restless. 

"^e' ve been pretty lucky with 
graffiti. Certaiidy, makhig an 
arrest quickly puts the lid on it," 
said Watkins. 



Lakeland (^^^^ 
Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1836 

Offin of Pub»e«tio(v: 30 South WhHncy SL, 
Qrayiriaha, IL 80030. Plwtw (700)223-8161. 

PuMbhwl WMMy, Moond datt poatan* |wU at 
Qraytteto., IL 6O03O. 

HUl!sut»cripHon fWw 119.50 Per Yht by lyUll 
pcldiln advaiK* in Lak», Cook. Kenosha and 
McHtnry Countiaa; aliMrbar* 127.00 Par Yoaf 
by Mai paM in advanoa. 

Poahnattan Sand addraat ehangaa to Anikxh 
Nam-Hapoitar. 30 South WNtnay Sliaai; P.O. 
Bos 260, Qriyilalga, llinoit ttXKM. 

(708)223-8161 

MbAHmnf^tpo^ QunMPrMS 

Uki Zurich EiftorpnN Round LaktNwi 

UUVtliRKont WawondiLNdv 

MuikMni Nmi ' uMnyvlii Nm 

FotUkiPmt «teiM4lnportPMi 

iwnonnwfipn 

H.R.SCHROEDER 

Foumtar^lMM-loee 

WIIXIAH H. SCHHOE PER 

PiMWMr/PiMidiiv 

WIlUMm. SCHROEbER 



Church, community mourn 
teen killed in car accident 



CLAUDIA M. lENART 



SHARON ZASADN. 



JLLDtfMQUttE mSCHROEOB! 



HMtLMSOnB 









Rogional Edlfor 

Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church was filled with mourners 
last Saturday who came to pay 
their last respects to an Antioch 
High School teen who was killed 
in a car accident 

Heather Dartelson, 18, was on 
her way home from a job at the 
new JC Peimy Outlet in Gumee 
Mills, July 25, when she swerved, 
lost control of the car and struck a 
tree on Crawford Road, near Old 
Mill Creek. Bartelson was flown 
by helicopter to Froedert 
Memorial Hospital in Milwaukee. 
. She died there July 27. 

Bartelson was bora , in 
Waukegan, but lived In Antioch 
all her life where she was very 
Involved in the Antloch 
Evangelical Free Church. 

Anita Brant, church secretary, 
described Bartelton as a veiy 
thou^tfiil penon. 'She was the 
kind of peison who would do Ut- 
ile things for people. It wsas her 
way of showing them she caied,' ' 
said Brant ' f^ 

Brant said Bartelson Uked 
. „belQg.wilh littlftdittdrea and vol^ ^ 




istricts rea 
unit district decision 




ALECJUNGE 



unteercd to help out \>ith pro- 
grams for children at the church. 
Brant believes Bartelson would 
have gone into a field "w^ere she 
could work with children. 

Bartelson's hobby was col- 
lecting monkeys and her nick- 
name was "Monkey," given to her 
by her grandfather, Joe Krai. 

"She had quite a sense of 
humor and Uked to tease, but she 
could take teasing too,* said 
Brant 

Bartelson & survived by her 
parents: Alan and Judy Bartelson; 
.one sister, Alyssa, and one broth- 
er, Scot; her grandparents Joe 
and Dorothy Krai of Paddock 
take, Wis.; and grandmother 
Thebna Bartelson of Gibson Qty, 

ni 

Pastor David M. Groleau and 
Pastor Steven Sward officiated 
ceremonies at Antioch 
Evangelical Free Church. 
Arrangements were by Strang 
Funeral Home. Inteiment was in 

. Salem Mound Cemetery. 

tO»iitributions can be made to 
Cedar Campus Christian Can^, 
P.O. Box 425 Cedarville» Micfa.» 



Staff. Reporter 

Area school district leaders 
shared their views on last week's 
decision regarding the unit 
schoot proposal, 

The objectors were pleased 
the Lake ViUa unit school propos- 
al was rejected by Ed Gotiwa, 
Lake County Superintendent, but 
admitted their districts will all 
have to plan for growth if the 
state superintendent rejects the 
plan as well. Dr. Joseph Spagnolo, 
state superintendent of schools, 
must make a decision 30 days 
after Gonwa registered his. 

"The unit district would have 
spelled disaster for the Millbum 
School District," said Jim 
Blockinger, Millbum superinten- 
dent *That was a major factor in 
Mr. Goiiwa's decision." 

"I think It was courageous and 
the correct one," said 
Superintendent Daniel Burke, of 
Antioch Elementary School 
District, of the unit district deci- 
sion. . 

Both Millbum and Antioch 
Elementary were objectors to a 
proposed K-12 unit district in 
Lake Villa Township. Antioch 
High School, Grayslake High 
School and Lake ViUa District 41 
were neutral towards the deci- 
sion. All districts admitted the 
impact on their districts if the 
unit district foils is plaiuiing for 
the residential growth In the area. 

"The problem is really in the 
Lake Villa and Antiodi area, the 
high schooltAntioch) is already 
crowded. One elementary school 
district's kids are going to three 
high schools. The public still has 
to address the issue In the 
future," said Ray Novak, 
Grayslake High School District 
superintendent 

Novak said his district would 
have lost ^out 200 students if 
the plan was approved by voters. 
He said the plan would have 
more impact on the district 15 
years from now. 

The unit school supporters 
are attempting to gain support 
and approval for a K-12 district 
covering most of Lake Villa 
Township with the exception of 
the Gavin, Enmions and Round 
Lake Unit Districts. If they reach 



BrIeFs 



the ballot in November, voters 
would decide if they wanted to' 
approve the district, finance a 
high school and choose a school 
board. 

Richard Kolze, interim super- 
intendent at Antioch High School 
district, said the school board was 
going to stay neutral on the issue. 
He said much is still uncertein 
depending on the outcome of the 
state superintendent's decision. - 

"It's difficult to plan not 
knowing what the outcome is. We 
don't know what will happen 
until the state superintendent 
decides. As conditions exist, with 
the uncertain status of unit dis- 
trict, we plan for the status quo," 
Kolze said.. 

If the state superintendent 
rules in favor of the unit district, 
the issue will appear on the ballot 
in November. If he ^rees widt 
Gonwa's decbion, the plan won't 
msdce the ballot In November and 
only an adininlstrative review 
could reverse the decision. 

"The board and die faculty 
will work together to handle die 
growth we know is coming," said 
Blocklnger. 

Burke said his district had two 
problems with the unit plan as 
submitted. He said he didn't 
object to the plan or the people 
presenting U, he said the state 
laws governing the unit plans 
were InsufDcicnt to gives voters 
all the information they needed. 
Also he said the unit plan would 
have cost the district $2 million in 
the division of assets. 

"Unforttmately the la%vs for 
unit school district were never 
written for this type of consolida- ' 
tioiL They don't give all the infor- 
mation, so people would be uni- 
formed. It's not fair to the school 
districts and the taxpayers," 
Burke said. 

Burke said his district will 
begin forming a strategic plan- 
ning committee comprised of dt- 
izens, faculty, board members 
and administrators on a five-year 
plarL The plan will consider how 
growth impacts the district and 
plan for it accordingly. . 

Blocklnger, and Burke feel it's 
unlikely the state superintendent 
will overrule the regional super- 
intendent 



Women, children i 



to lunch 



Mothers, children (ages 7 and up) and fiiends are invited to 
the Antioch Cfiristian Women's Club luncheon on Aug. 18 from 
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at The Waterfalls, 24436 Rte. 173. The 
Wonderful World of Oz will be presented by Carleen Wurster. 
Donna Gates will be singing. The speaker, Karen Langstraadt of 
Indianola, Oliio, has chosen "Chooshig the Path to Emerald 
City" as her topic. Nursery services provided for children age 10 
and under. For reservations call Pam at 223-6085 or Jan at 395- 
0763 by Aug. 11. Reservations must be honored, canceled or 
used by a friend. 

^The Foreigner' jplays at Globe 

PM & L will open its production of "The Foreigner" Aug. 5 at 
7 p.m at the old Globe Department Store. The production is 
being staged in the vacant building due to construction at the 
tiieatre. For ticket information call 395-3055. 

Youth basebaU sets elections 

Antioch Youtii Baseball v/Ol accept election nominations at 
a meeting set for Aug. 30 begUuUiig at 7 p.iiL In the Antioch 
Senlw Center. Positions up for election Indude: president sec- 
retary, vice president fields dlrectort concession director, staff 
director, equipment director, AA director, Junior glris director 
and traveling team director. 



,.•'*(•(• 




COMMUNITY UkeUNd Newspapers Auqtisr !^, 1 994 



BrIeFs 



Mail-in registration 



Antioch Community High School is encouraging students to 
mall in their registration forms. A late fee of $10 per student 
will be charged for all students registering after August 9. More 
late registrations dates have been added: Aug. 18 from 12:30 to 3 
p.m. in the auditorium, Aug.l9 from 9 a.m. to noon in the audi- 
torium, and on Aug. 23 from 7:40 to 9 a.m. in the cafeteria, 

School begins soon 

According to the official calendar for Antioch Community 
Consolidated School District 34 , sciiools will officially open on 
August 29. However, the first day of school for students will be 
August 31. Kindergarten begins September 1. 

ACHS even sooner 

The first day of school for students at Antioch Community 
High School will be Aug. 23. According to school officials this 
will be a full day. Freshman orientation will be held Aug. IR at 9 
,a.m. in the auditorium. 

Other schools begin too 

St. Peter's School opening day will be Aug. 23. Parents will 
receive necessary information In the mail. Grass Lake School 
opens on August 23 for a half day. 

Board member sought 

As a result of the resignation of Cynthia Marquart.Grass 
Lake School Board of Education Is seeking a new board mem- 
ber. Interested applicants Uvuig In the district should send a 
letter to Grass Lake School, 26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Antioch, 
IL 60002. The deadline for applications is Aug. 26. 



<■.! 



Technology on its way to Dist. 34 

The Antioch Community Consolidated School District 34 Board of 

Education has approved a dedication of .5 percent of the education 

fiind budget towards the purchase of computer hardware, software, 

iand computer labs. The dedication will continue over the next three 

years. ■ 

The goal of the board is to ensure the future success of students bi 
this incrcasin^y technical society. "Understanding and being familiar 
with technology and how it worics is one of the most important lessons 
we can offer students today," explained School Board Member Mike 
Pcrrone. "Not only will it help them in high school, but tliroughout 
their adult life. These kids arc going to be living, working, and ruimlng 
our conmiunitics in the 21st century." 

According to Pcrrone, tlic special funding formula will allow the 
district to increase students access to learning technology while the 
district continues "to wisely manage financial resources." 



S BEDROOMS 




Spacesaver Complete w ^9^9 
Many Colors Available 

FUTON BUNKS 

13 




Available 
Red, 
White, 
Blue, 
Black 
Mats 

Optional 



Special Price 



$249 



95 



UL YOUR INTIRIOR INC VL. 

e00E.Rout«4S 
Mundtltin; It 60060 

566-2S24 ^ ji 

INtlOE PEI»»M WATENIEDa 

Man. • f ti 10:30 *.m. to i p.iit. 

8«t 10 •.m. to pjm, • Iwn. Itoon to i p.m. . 





%? Jfl « tf^ 



Soquoit Prido will rofrie off a $225,000 homo to bo constructed by Soxonlan Bulldors at 630 Asbury Ct. 
InAntloclt. 

Sequoit Pride to raffle off new house 



Sequoit Pride, Antioch High 
School's booster club, is an- 
nouncing an exciting house/cash 
raffle. The house, with an esti- 
mated value of $225,000, will be 
constructed by award-winning 
Saxonian Builders, Inc. of Lake 
VUla. 

A maximum of 4,000 tickets 
will be sold at $100 each. The 
house Is to be built at 630 Asbury 
Ct. in Antioch. A minimum of 
3,000 tickets must be sold in or- 
der for construction to begin. If 
less than 3,000 tickets arc sold, 
then half of the proceeds will be 
awarded as a cash prize up to 
$75,000. 

The profits from the raffle will 
be designated for equipment 
and needed supplies in areas 
such as academics, fme arts and 
athletics. 

Saxonian Builders, Inc., 



owned by Karlhelnz Zimmcr- 
mann, is a well known builder 
of superb quality custom 
homes in the northern Illinois 
area. Recipient of three awards 
in this year's Lake County Tour 
of Homes, Saxonian Builders 
takes pride in constructing 
homes of exceptional crafts- 
manship, such as those in 



Falcon Hill Estates in Antioch. 

"I am pleased that I have the 
opportunity to be part of this 
fiindraising effort benefiting our 
local school district," said 
Zimmermaim. 

Tickets may be obtained at 
many local business establish- 
ments and from members of the 
Sequoit Pride Organization. 



Group to discuss Tarenting — ^myth versus reality' 

Will day-to-day parenting be what you expect? Will breastfeeding 
make parenting easier? "Parenting: Myth Versus Reality" will be the 
topic discussed at the next meeting of the Statcltne La Leche group on 
Thursday, Aug. 18th at 9:30 a.m. The Stateline Group meets at the 
Paddock Lake Baptist Church. 

. La Leche League International is a non-profit, non-sectarian orga- 
nization established by volunteer mothers in 1956 to providebrcast- 
fccding information and support Ali interested women and their 
babies are encouraged to attend. 

For more information about La U^che League International or 
about the Statelme meeting, call 395-5288; 414-862-2709; or 414-642- 
2208. 



Well Give You A New One! 

When you purchase The Keeper^'^ coverage from the 
Country Companies, you get 100% repair/replacement coverage 
for your newer car or pickup - even if the cost of repairs exceeds 
your vehicle's current market value. 

Call us for complete details about The Keeper^^. 

Policies issued by Country Mutual Insurance Company, Bloominglon, IL Availability period and coverage 'may vary by stale. 



'%&' 



Country Companies 
of Antioch 

ED MACEK 

RICH FRANKSON 

SCOTT SODER 

906 Hillside 

Antioch, IL 60002 



(708)395-4100 

iinrrooiiiRMiE& 

(Insurance Groupi 



.i . 






^ 



i 






V 



\ 



I 



-, 



\ 



\ 



PolicE Beat 



AuqusT$, 1994 UkelANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 




Persons charged with a crime are Innocent until proven 
guilty In a court of law. 

ANTIOCH 

Sitter nips fire before it spreads 

On July 29, an alert baby sitter smcllcd smoke in one of the 
bedrooms of an apartment she was sitting for. According to 
police, she found a plastic bag of clothhig in the center of a 
drained waterbcd. The bag was smoldering. Police reported that 
the sitter closed the door to keep the smoke out of the rest of 
the apartment. When the Antioch Fire Department arrived, fire 
officials watered down the smoldering clothing and put it out- 
side. It was discovered the waterbcd heater had not been 
unplugged when the bed was drained, causing the liner and 
mattress to niclt and smolder. There was no damage to the 
apartment. Damage to the clothing, mattress and liner is esti- 
mated at $250. 

Police nab drunk driver 

On July 27, police observed a vehicle running off the road 
three times west of Johelia on North Avenue, Police arrested 
Michael Simon, 30, of Antioch, for DUI. He was released on a 
recognizance bond after posting his dnver's license. He is 
scheduled to appear in Waukcgan court Aug. 16. 

Driver flees after pumping gas 

On July 29, an employee of Unical 76 on North Avenue 
reported observing a driver in a red sports car with a black top 
pump $14.47 of premium gasoline into his car, enter his car and 
flee on North Avenue. The employee reported that the driver 
had a Wisconsin license plate, and the last three digits were 896. 

Man stopped for multiple offenses 

On July 29, police stopped a vehicle trnveling on Anita Ave. 
for having no registration. The offender admitted he was an 
unlicensed driver and the vehicle was uninsured. Police arrest- 
ed Luis Reyes, 21, of Waukcgan, for no valid license, no valid 
registration and driving an uninsured vehicle. Reyes was 
released on a $2,000 recognizance bond. He is scheduled to 
appear in Grayslakc court Aug. 10. 

Police arrest 2 for public drinking 

While on routine patrol July 30, police obsenred two subjects 
drinking at the Jewel parking lot at 5:56 a.m. Each subject had a 
.12-ouncc can of Icehouse beer that they tried to hide when 
■police arrived. Police arrested Williams Wans; 21/ of Waukcgan, 
and Edward Dawson, 22, of Lake Villa. Both, were charged with 
drinking in a public place. Released on recognizance bonds, 
each arc expected to appear in Grayslake court Aug. 24. 



Newlywed killed 
in train/car wreck 



TINA L SWIECH 



Staff Reporter 

A 22-ycar-old woman was 
killed instantly Wednesday after a ' 
Metra train traveling at a high 
rate of speed hither car while she 
tried to cross the tracks in. Long 
Lake. 

Stephanie Basile, reportedly 
only married about a year to Jesse 
Basile, may have been on her way 
to work, according to ofTicials, 
when she attempted to cross the 
Main St. location to get to Rtc. 
134. 

Fox Lake paramedics received 
•'a rescue call at 7: 15 a.m. Basile of 
35013 N. Augustana Ave., Long 
Lake, was dead on arrival. 

Fire Chief Stu Hoehne said 
.according to one witness, Basile 
"pulled smack in front of the 
tram. She didn't think of stop- 
ping." 

The chief agreed it was early 
in the morning and the driver 
may have had other things on her 
;mind when she was crossing. 

The train was traveling 

iictwecn 65 and 75 miles per hour 

and dragged Basile a quarter of a 

mile east to Fairfield Rd. before it 

stopped, said officials. 

'nicrc are no crossing gates at 



the Long Lake sitc; but warning 
lights reportedly did go off when 
the train was near. 

Koehnc said he lived in Long 
Lake not far from the tracks sev- 
eral years back, and recalled 
there were a number of train 
accidents even then. 

Mike McNally, one of the 
assistant chiefs of the fire depart- 
ment, said, "We think it would be 
a safe idea to have crossing gates 
there." 

Grant Township Supervisor 
Gordon "Gordy" Kiesgen agreed. 
"I would like to consult with the 
board about writing a letter to 
Metra (regarding putting up a 
gate)," said Kiesgen. 

Commuters were delayed 
more than ari hour and a half 
before clean up could be done. 

Basile's white Ford. Probe was 
towed to A-1 Tire in Round Lake. 
Her body was removed by the 
Lake County Coroners Office. 

A sad note was told by offi- 
cials. Apparently Basile's hus- 
band Jesse heard she was 
involved in an accident and was 
transported to Northern Illinois 
Medical Center in McHenry. He 
reportedly went there only to find 
out she had been killed. 




eUs 



Lakeland Newspapers wonts to hear news of local 
sporting events, clubs, organizations etc. Black 
and white photos are also welcome. Please send 
news items to Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. Whitney, 
Grayslake. 60030 or call 223-8161. 



Preserve close to blowing ball fields 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter .,. / 

A proposal for baseball fields 
at the Sun Lake Forest Preserve 
received a favorable response 
from the Lake County Forest 
Preserve as the development 
committee recommended the 
fields to the finance committee. 

The process next goes to the 
finance committee on Aug. 12. If 
an intergovernmental agreement 
can be finalized by then, it could 
be ready for the full board after 
that date, according to Suzi 
Schmidt, County Board member. 
Lake Villa Township Baseball 



League has been trying to get 
approval from the forest preserve 
since 1991. The league, which has 
more than 650 players from the 
township, Antioch. Grant and 
Warren townships, desperately 
needs the facilities to keep up 
with youth Interested in playing 
baseball. 

"Recreation should be one of 
the missions of forest preserves," 
Schmidt said. 

"This is family recreation. 
Everyone, parents, kids and 
grandparents, are involved. It is 
something that is going to benefit 
the whole community," 



Lake Villa Village Board has 
taken an active role in the project 
Village Planner Lane Kendig pre- 
pared the site plan and the village 
Is willing to sign an agreement 
with the forest preserve to ensure 
the site is cared for. 

, The plan calls for three dia- 
monds, a public address system, 
a concession area and a parking 
area on a 3-acre site on the Sun 
Lake Forest Preserve on Grass 
LakcUoad. 

The league would finance the 
construction and the mainte- 
nance of the fields. 



Woods of Antioch gets approval for Phase 1 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



Reglonol Editor 

Antioch , Village Board 
approved the final plat for phase 
1 of the Woods of Antioch 
Planned Unit development and 
the developer and builder, John 
Green of Shaw Homes, said he 
plans to start construction this 
year. > 

The Woods of Antioch is locat- 
ed in the farm fields along Tiffany 
and North Avenue. Ihc complet- 
ed project will contain 155 homes 



with a density of 1. 7 homes per 
acre. Phase 1 which is in the 
southerly portion contains 42 
lots. 

The developer has agreed to 
donate 14. 9 acres of land for a 
park south of Scquoit Creek. The 
land donation goes into effect 
after the construction of water 
and sewer lines which pass 
through the property and before 
occupancy permits are issued for 
any of the homes. 

The developer will also donate 



$700 per home to the village. 
Developer, donations to Antioch 
High School and Antioch 
• Community Con-solidated Grade 
School District will be $2,500 foi 
each three-bedroom- home and 
$3,000 for each four-bedroom 
home. 

Village Planner Bob Silhan 
reminded the developer that aftei 
three or four model homes are 
built, the village will not issue a 
permit until, certain public 
improvements are made. 




MART 



STORE HOURS 

MON 10-8 

TUE 10-8 

WED 10-8 

- THUR 10-8 

FURNITURE T.V. APPLIANCE SV 3Si 

LAKE VILLA 265-0655 sOn 11:4 




iniE'iri CUT PRICES S yore wide 



Hey, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? WE HAVE FREE DELIVERY 
FREE IN-HOME SET-UP • FREE FINANCINO * FREE L AY" AW AY £c ALL NAME BRANDS 




mtANT DISCOUNTS 



INSTANT DISCOUNTS 




DON'T TRASH IT 

TRADE IT! 

Your Old mattress is worth 

UP TO uoo 

Get credit toward your 
new set of Bassett Bedding. 



No One Can Beat Our Prices! 



t i \ ■ 1 \ : I 




COMMUNITY UlaUNd NcwspApcRS Auqusr I, 1 994 



Furlan gets 80th birthday surprise firom family 



Surprise 

Mary Furian nf Antloch turned 
80 years young on Aug. 2. Mary 
and her husband, John, arc long- 
time Antioch area residents. In 
honor of this very special day, her 
family planned a wonderful sur- 
prise party for her. Her daughter, 
Judy Smith, and her son and 
daughter-in-law, Tom and Carol 
Furian, hosted tiie surprise party 
in Tom and Carol's Antioch 
home. 

Approximately 75 friends and 
relatives gathered on July 23 for 
tliis special milestone birthday 
celebration. Among the extensive 
guest list were many friends, 
neiglibors and former co-workers 
of Mary's. Also many relatives 
were on hand, including her two 
daughters from Colorado. Rose 
EUcn and Julius Monge came in 
from Denver and Marilyn Heucr 
from Breckcnridge, Colo. Mary's 
granddaughter, Terri Dowling, 
came in from Uttlcton, Colo., and 
her two grandsons, Michael and 
Julius Mongc^ came in from 
California. 

All in all, it .was a beautiful day 
with many warm and loving peo- 
ple gathered In love for Mary. 
Happy birthday, Maiy, and many 
more to come! 

GiMNl bye cob webs 

Did you ever notice how the 
simplest, non-thinking tasks will 
usually clear your head of cob 
webs, providing clearer, more 
prioritized thinking? 

For example, my family and 
friends will hear me say, "I have 
my best and most insightful 
thoughts In the bathtub." 
Something about lying there, lis- 
tening to the sound of the water, 
relaxing among those bubbly 
bubbles, not a care in the world, 
except the task at hand of cleans- 
ing myself, dcnnltcly clears my 
head and produces logical, sound 
thinking. 

The same types of thought 
patterns come my way while 
dusting, vacuuming, painting, 
washing clothes, pulling weeds, 
doing dishes, etc. Having my 
mind on these simple tasks 
seems to work like a nap for me in 
revamping and coming back at 
things in a different and some- 
times better direction. 

As I sat feeding "The Carp 
Whales" in our channel, a neigh- 
bor yelled over, "Hey, liz, what 
arc you doing, meditating?" I 
replied, "You know what? I think I 
am." So now I have discovered 
one more relaxing, thought-pro- 
ducing past time in feeding the 
carp whale. Just one more enjoy- 
able, non-ttiinking activity that 
slows me down long enough to 
"notice and smell the roses in my 
life." 

Thank you roses for being 
there. As for the weeds, I become 
a better weeder with each passing 
year! 

Another baby 

Another baby raccoon made 



LOSE situs. 
■3MYS 

AH Natural T-Litc" 
Chromium Picolinate 

Pobon'sHiluralfoodi 

960 KUi SI. - JMtodl 

39S-0461 



Its way to the Schmchl house- 
hold. All of the other babies I 
raised, and either rcacquaintcd to 
the wild or turned over to the 
wildlife refuge, had been only a 



HOMETOWN GOODIES 



UZ 
SCHMEHL 




595'5580 



few hours or few days old when 
tliey came my way. TTiis little guy 
was about two months old and 
meaner and madder than all get 
out. 

He was so angry the first day 
that I never thought he would 
quiet down. However, less than 
two days later he was flne and as 
gentle as could be. Somehow or 
other he attached liimscif to my 
son's car, and after Jim pulled in 
the driveway Mr. Coon dropped 
down. 

He arrived on a Saturday of the 
Fourth of July weekend and we 
\^^ited till Tuesday to call some- 
one, deciding it would be best to 
wait till after the holiday. 

About 11/2 days after his ar- 
rival, the car began to smell and 
my husband noticed flics around 
the engine. He lifted the hood 
and discovered the body of 
"Rambo's" sibling. We never 
thought to check for more. 

In the short time "Rambo" was 
with us, we enjoyed his iitdc rac- 
coon antics. It didn't tekc him 
long to recognize his food bottle 
and fit into our routine. 

When wc contacted the Con- 
servation Dept, the gentleman 
asked if he was in a cage, etc. I 
informed him I used the cage 
only for night time and during 
times I could not watch him. 
Otherwise, he basically followed 
me everywhere. 1 said he is very 
gentle. 

V\nien the gentleman came to 
get him, he put on big gloves to 



handle him. I passed gentle little 
"Rambo" to him and gentle 
"Rambo" became instantly angry. 
He growled and snaricd every 
Inch of the way to the cage that 
was waiting in the man's truck — 
poor little guy. However, I knew 
he was in good hands when I 
heard the gentleman gently say- 
ing, "It's okay, little guy. You'll be 
aU right." 

Theatre time 

The next fine production of 
the PM&L Theatre in Antioch Is, 
"The Foreigner" by Larry vShuc 
and directed by Tom Hausman. 
The scheduled show dates arc 
Aug. 5, G, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20 and 
21. The evening performances 
are at 8 p.m. and the Sunday 
matinee performances arc held at 
2:30 p.m. 

Due to the exciting renova- 
tions of the PM8tL Theatre, per- 
formances for "TTic Foreigner" 
v^nll be held at the vacated Globe 
Department Store in Antioch. 
Seating at the theatre is limited 
and reservations arc a must. 
Please call 395-3055 for reserva- 
tions. 

Auditions 

The PM&L Theatre of Antioch 
will be holding -auditions for 
"Annie" on Aug. 8 for adults at 7 
p.m. and on Aug. 7 for children at 
5 p.m. Call the theatre to inquire 
about the audition process. All 
auditions arc open and newcom- 
ers are always welcome. 

We'U be waiting 

There are nice people In the 
world and then there are nice 
people. [ wiir withhold the name 
of this person in order to "protect 
the guilty" (especially the nice 
guilty). 

] truly enjoyed the special note 
from one of our very special 
Camp Crayon moms, concerning 
the fiiturc entry of (her words, not 
mine) "Monster Baby" into the 
Camp Crayon program. 1 think I 
speak for all staff members when 



♦ Custom Home Design 

♦ Home Improvement Planning 

♦ Consulting 

♦ Interior Decorating = 

♦ Architectural Approval Available 

LAKE REGION Bob Lubkeman 

• 42826 N. Sheridan Oaks • Antioch 

(708)395-2247 



HOME DESIGN 



HdSIUS rilDlMX 



MM !'■! li ; //( r am iHiKiHr i 



D£ere ^s 0€o \Pface Si£e Jfome ! 



We have the freedom 
to pursue life, liberty 
and happiness. 

Home ownership is a 
cornerstone in our 
pursuits. 




Rick Broquet 

Ask for Rick to own 
your place called home 

356-6968 

RE/MAX Heritage 4641 Grand Ave. Gumee, IL 60031 



I say, "We'll take her and any 
more like her." 

I know you call her "Monster 
Baby" with love and In jest 
However, even If she has the tini- 
est bit of "Monster" in her, all she 
has to be is half as good as her 
older sister and in our eyes, she 
would still be perfect. 

Good parents "always" and I 
mean "always" produce good 
kids. You did a great job the first 
time around and 1 am confident 
that baby number two will be 
Just as sweet and special. 

So, bring her forth as soon as 
she is old enough. Wc will be 
waiting in special anticipation 
of her arrival and will be looking 
forward to further contact with a 
very special mom to boot So, 
you see, no need to commute to 
a "military preschool" after all — 
and now you owe mc a tidbit. 

Finally 

During ouj- recent vacation to 
Eagle River, we experienced our 
first bear sighting. Bear arc def- 
initely abundant in the wooded 
areas of Eagle River and its sur- 
rounding towns. While wc have 
heard numerous stories of -peo- 
ple sighting bears, we had never 
seen one since building our 
Eagle River home 10 years ago. 

We were traveling north on 
Hwy. 45, about one mile out of 
town, and a beautiful black bear 
stood along the roadside waiting 
for clearance to cross. He/she 
wasn't very big, maybe about 
150 to 200 pounds. However, 



large or small, it was very excit- 
ing to us. 

On the other hand, I hope I 
never run across the one that 
has been spotted about 1/2 
block from our home. Rumor 
has it that he/she weighs about 
350 to 400 pounds. I can Just 
imagine my reaction if he/she 
appeared before mc, as I was on 
my way to or from the lake. I 
wonder how fast a "Lizard" can 
climb a tree. Not fast enough, 
and besides, bears also know 
how to climb— oh mc, oh myl 

Happy birthday 

Is it me, or does summer pass 
faster with each passing year? 
Soon the little ones wlU be re- 
turning to school. I feel as if the 
summer recess Just began. In- 
stead it is winding down to a 
close. 

A new month naturally 
means a new monthly birthday 
list. Happy August birthday to 
Ray Brausam, Katie Alveda 
Brown, Tami Edclman, Judy 
Fcchtner, Barbara FUlps, Chris- 
tine Foci^tcr, Kristin Franzen, 
Steven Franzen, Shahnaz 
Hansen, Nina Hurmis, Bobby 
Klcan, John Lass, Raymond Uss, 
Paige Majewski (now a Florida 
resident), Chris Marquart, 
Danny Marsich, Marlene Olsen, 
Jr., Donna Schmehl, John 
Vaughati, Matt Vogel and Alicia 
Wojtowicz. • 

Also happy wedding an- 
niversary to Michael and Pamela 
Mulcahy. 



-New ArrIvaIs 



>.nii iwi}.-'. 



Scan Isaac Arte 

A son, Scan Isaac, was born June 13 at Condcll Medical Center to Arthur 
WUIiam and Myma Mitagros Aric of Anttnch. He has two brothers Philip 
Ortman, 16, and lon-Carios, 4, and a sister Amber Ortman, 11. Grandparents 
are lames Aric of Fori Madison, Iowa and lorge and Millie Carbajal of Round 
Lake. *" 

Mitchell foseph C^nley 

A son, Mitchell Joseph, was born lune 20 at Lake Forest Hospital to Lauia 
and William Conley of Antioch. He has a sister Klmberly, 6. Grandparents are 
Hclga and Bill Ncubaucr of Gurncc and Joann and Ted Contcy of Waukcgaru 



^^Countonme 
to provide the best 
Homeowners insurance 
value in town. 99 




DICK WITT 

894HiUside 
Antioch, IL 

395-1089 



Call Me. 



ITATI fAIM 



INtUBAHCI 



StateFami 

Rre and Casualty Compaiqr 

Home Office: Bloomingtos, Dlmoii 



Uke a good neighbor, Stale Fann ii thefe. 



\ 



HlKi. Ua H>C'k' >..! 



Jl?'?' 



J i IV .M*v V 



, »*■*: iC '■ 







■■#' t--. •— "^ ^ ^**#'*«*«p *• 




AuquiT 9, 1 f 94 UUlANd NEurspApcRS " C 



ir 

ip 
ts 

id 



ra, 
re 



' J 



!ic|e. 




Experience Antioch along Main Street 






When thinking of Antioch 
what normally comes to mind are 
the words "small town." Yet here 
we are on our third week of expe- 
riencing Antioch and we're Just 
about to begin our stroll down ' 
Main Street, the hub of down- 
town Antioch. As we wandered 
through Lake and Orchard 
Streets/ we enjoyed a glimpse of 
many fine businesses, yet we did- 
n't have time to mention them 
all. There are still more to enjoy 
and experience next time you're 
downtown. 

When you enter Main Street 
from the south, take a moment to 
enjoy the view of downtown ^th 
Hie chtirch steeple acting as a 
backdrop for Main Street Main 
. Street is made up of many- fine 
shops, some are new to Antioch, 
others have been with us for a 
long time. Let's begin our visit to 
Main Street with a tasty stop at 
Dairy Queen, which has been 
part of Antioch for a long, long 
time. Although you'll still find the 
same wonderfiil food and service, 
there Is something new at Dairy 
Queen — a "walk up" window, 
great for those of you In a hurry. 
We all know that spring is really 
here, when DQ opens its doors 
after a long winter. 

Poison's Health Foods has 
been part of Antioch for a long 
time. Offering the finest in health 
foods and vitamin supplements, 
you'll find ttie staff helphil and ■ 
knowledgeable. The large selec- 
tion of products makes shopping 
interesting and productive. 
SqnslUne Books offers you a full, 
line of Christian books and gift 
items appropriate for many occa- 
sions. Birthdays, conmiunlons, 
christenings and holidays are 
great reasons to stop in and 
browse. 

Across the street you'll find 
Flo's Beauty Shop, which offers a 
wide range of services, Massage 

Donations accepted 
for Gilbertson £miily 

Donations are being accepted 
by First Chicago Bank of Antioch 
in honor of Bret Gilbertson and 
his family. Gilbertson, 30, of Lake 
Villa, lost his life in an early 
morning accident. Gilbertson 
leaves behind his wife, Cheryl, a 
daughter, Bailey, and son, Justin. 

Gilbertson was killed on July 

' 11 when he lost control of his 

motorcycle and struck a utility 

pole. The accident occurred on 

Route 59 in Antioch. 

For more Information call 
First Chicago Bank-Antloch at 
395-4302. 



rWRilE Usn 

Lakeland 

Newspapers wants 
to hear news of local 
sportir^g events, 
dubs, organizotlons, 
etc. Black and white 
photos are also wel- 
come. Please send 
news Items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 
S. Whitney, 
Grayskike, 60030 or 
call 223^161. 



by Andrea, the Sun Spot Tanning 
Salon, beauty makeovers, mani- 
cures, body wraps, pedicures, the 
works. Located inside Flo's you'll 
also find Kathy's Cottage and the 
Clothes Connection. Kathy's 
Cottage has a wide array of some • 
of the nicest hand-crafted items 
from the best local crafteis. The 
Clothes Connection, features 
ladies sports and dress apparel. 
"Wrinkle free" is their motto at 
the Clothes Connection, always 
trying to provide you with easy 
care, high fashion apparel. 

A stroll through Park Avenue 
Mall brings you to a wide array of 
antiques which are tastefidly dis- 
played. Next door at Party 
Poppers you'll find a large selec- 
tion of party goods perfect for 
your next celebration. Brans Nuts 
offers candy and nuts In bulk for 
that sweet tooth. BJ's Fashions 
for Men stocks the latest In fash- 
ion and st^e for the guy «4io 
dresses on the cutting < edge, 
w4iether for business or casual. 
Next door at BJ's Sports, you'll 
find sporting equipment and 
apparel for the sports enthusiast 
New in Antioch Is Leaves of 
Earth, a metaphysic bookstore 
where you'll also find Jewelry and 
gift items. Stop by to welcome 
Carol and enjoy the pleasant and 
relaxing atmosphere. Total Affair 
is a lovely bridal salon, tastefully 
decorated and provides brides, 
attendants, and "mothers" of the 
bride with beautiful gowns. If 
hunger comes to mind, after vis- 
iting tliese many shops, plan a 
stop at the Vault or Las Vegas 
Restaurants. They provide a com- 
plete menu and are open all 
hours to serve you best 

. Radke's Barbershop has been 
a part of Antioch for 100 years, 
although they're a long time 
Antioch resident, they provide 
up-to-date hairstyles for men of 



any age. For telephone repair and 
service stop by Blanchcttc's for 
experienced and prompt service. 
Persin's and Persin's offers 
Antioch a tasteful collection of ■ 
fine porcelains and crystals along 
with their extensive jewelry selec- 
tion. Lakes Area music provides 
lessons (private' and group) . for 
cliildrcn and adults. Band Instm- 
ments, guitars and music are also 
available. 

Pinetree Pet Shop carries a 
complete inventory of pet needs 
for most domestic and exotic 
pets. For aquarium needs, you'll 
find a large selection of tanks and 
supplies. Don't forget the Friday 
Fish Fry at the Village Pub, great 
for those "all you can cat** 
appetites. Welcome to Elite 
Embroidery (formerly Antioch 
Family Sports) featuring custom 
embroidery to fit any need. 
Choosey Qlild is the perfect place 
to find a unique and special gift 
for a baby shower or new arrival 
and offers distinctive apparel 
from birth to size 14. 

Now if this hasn't been 
enough "clowning around" for 
you, it's time to stop at J.J. 
Blinkers, the fiin gift shop. Here 
you'll find a great gag gih for 
those "over the hill" and you'll 
also find delightful gifts, serious 
collector. Antioch Schwinn pro- 
vides the cyclist with several top 
lines of bikes and accessories. 
Their skilled staff can diagnose 
and repair your bike probleins 
too. Tucked away under the blue 
a%vning on Main Street, you'll 
find DiMarco's which provides 
you with fine Italian cuisine 
accompanied by a formal, yet 
comfortable atmoisphere. 

Editor's note: Shop Antioch is a 
weekly newsletter showcasing 
Antiodh's merdtants and retailers. 
Prepared and written by Barbara 
Porch of Choosey Child. 




Getting fitted 

Sue Wteczorek of Antk)ch gels fitted for a belt from Gene 
arxi Rosemary Arnold of Arnold Leather at ttio Lake County- 
Fair.— Photo by Bob Hondrickion 



-New ArrIvaIs 



Damiui Scott SlmonlDl 

A son, Damian ScoU, was bom June 21 at Lake Forest Hospital to Tracy and 
GrcgSlmonlnl of Antioch. He has a sister Angel, 7, and Zackary, 4. Grandparents 
are the late Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Sundertnan, Bct^ Simonlnl of Antioch and the 
late Robert Simonlnl. Great grandma is Daisy Guth of Dundee. 

Alenuidiia Jacqueline Mae Utter 

A dau^tcr, Alexandria lacqucHnc, was bom ]unc 23 at Condell Medical 
Center to Gcotge and Wanda Utter III of Antioch. She has a brother Joseph, 2. 
Grandparents arc Ken and Joyce Glasurc of Round Lake and James and Dbtic 
Utter of Round L.ake. Great grandparents are Frank and Dorothy Gtasure of 
Wildwood and George and Josephine Utter I of Chicago. 

BrookLynWItt 

A daughter. Brook Lyn, was born June 23 at Condell Medical Center to Ttna 
and John Witt ofAntloch. She has a brother John III, 8; and two sisters Natasha, 
7, and Ashley, 5. Grandparents are Barbara Conway of Mundeiein and Ruth Hill 
of Round Lake. Great grandma is Betty Johnson of Park Cl^. 

Brlana Ashley Peters 

A daughter, Briana Ashley, was bom June 25 at Condell Medical Center to 
Brian and D6sir£ Peters of Antioch. Grandparents are Bernard and Patricia 
Peters of Chicago, John Mlchaelis of Brooklyn, N.Y. and Shelley Rogers of Long 
Island, N.Y. Great grandmas are Vclma Peters of Chicago and Adel Hammond 
of Baldwin Park. CallL 

KrlstyAnn Wallace 

A daughter, Kris ty Ann, was bom June 29 at Condell Medical Center to James 
and Jennifer Wallace of Antioch. She has a brother Kyle, 2. Grandparents are 
James and Peggy Jocewicz orTwin Lakes, Wis., and Laura Wallace of Antioch. 

Savanna Sarah Tragasz 

A daughter, Savanna Sarah, was bom July 16 at Lake Forest Hospital to Lisa 
and Roger Tragasz of Antioch. Grandparents are Milldrcd Wright, Ms. Shirley 
Tragasz and Mr. Richard Tragasz. Great grandparents are Catherine Wright and 
Mr. and Mrs. James Wolden. 






August 
1W4 



My 



^;?^i>',ftMwf5sas^;■;^s.>v(■:^J«?«*w.- 




CaIencIar 



, ) *^ ^ f^ f r r J ,. ^i f 



Lakelaad; 

:0 



Friday 



8 p.m. PM&L performs 
'Ttie Foreigner.' 
HeldatGk)t)e 
DeJDartment 
Store. 395-3055 



lUesday 



3 p.m.- 
8 p.m. 



Walk-in 
Reglstratton at 
ACHS 



Saturday 

2:30 p.m. PM&L performs 
and "Ttie RDrelgner.* 

8 p.m. HeW at Glot)e 
Department 
Store. 395-3055 



1 p.n).- Mearxier ■ 

3 p.m. Gander 

Mountain (8 
and older) $2 
county resident. 
Reciter 948-7750 



Wednesday I lo 

8 p.m.- SOLO weekly 
mkjnlgtit dariceat 

Prtrvcess 

Restaurant. 

Llbertyvlle. 

816-1011 



Sunday 



1 1 am. 



5 p.m. 



8 p.m. 



Lk)ns Club 

Chicken 
Bart>ecue at 
Williams Park 

PMScL children 
qudittorts for 
"Annle- 

PMSiL performs 
"The Foreigner.' 
Hekj at Globe 
Department 



Monday 



8 



10 a.m.- 'Fore ttTe Future' 
9 p.m. Golf Ck3sslc and 
Tennis Tournament 
benefitting Mordne 
GW Scouts at Kroll- 
wood Club, Lake 
Forest. 945-7750 

7 p.m. PM&L adult audit- 
Ions for 'Annie' 



Ttiursday [jT 

7'^ p.m. Planning and 
Zoning 
Commlsston 
meeting at 
VIHage Hal 



7:30 p.m.- Country darx;- 
TOpm lngatVFW.$4 
per person. 395- 
4916 or 356- 
7786 



Coming Up: 

Aug. 15 Registratbn for 
Dtet. 34 



Aug. 1 7 Job Fdr for per- 
8:30 a.m.- sons with db- 
1 p.m. ablltles at Oak 
Lawn HIton 
312-782-3335 



Aug. 21 
11a.m. 



Shut-In Mass fbr 

tttatKHKl- 

cappedatSt. 
Peter's Sockrf 
Center 




j^P^<XMETHIi»G^5^Wei^»^agBi$ISflnMitil^^ 





COMMUNITY UklANcl NcwspApcits AuqusT 9, 1994 






I. 



If 






I 

■i-f 

»■ 

I: 



i.i 



I 

i 



-PEopU News 

President's list 

Antioch resident Christo- 
pher Tdlnton has been named 
to the President's List for the 
spring semester at North Central 
College in Napcrvillc. 

Dean's list 

Angela Rauch of Antioch was 
named to the dean's list for the 
spring term at Augustana College 
in Roclc Island, lii. . 

Completes course 

Marine Pfc. Edward A. 
Wilcox, son of Alien Wilcox of 
Antioch, has completed the Field 
Radio Operator's Course. The 
1993 graduate of Antioch 
Community High School joined 
the Marine Corps in November, 
1993. '■ " ■'' ' 

Makes dean's list 

Antioch resident fames 
Konvallnka, |r. has been 
named to the dean's list for the 
second semester at GImhurst 
College. 

Receives scholarship 

Glna Hoerle of Antioch is the 
recipient of a $1,000 scholarship 
award from The Baxter 
Foundation. The scholarships are 
awarded each year to out- 
standing students who intend to 
enroll at an accredited college, 
university or vocational-techni- 
cal school. 

College graduate 

Andrew Marra^ son of Peter 
and Linda Marra of Antioch, has 
graduated from Saint Mary's 
College of Minnesota, Winona, 
Minn. 

Resident accepted 

Antioch resident Derek tang 
has been accepted at Iowa 
Wesleyan College, Mount 
Pleasant, Iowa. Lang plans to 
enroll for fall 1994. 

Albion dean's list 

Elizabeth Goodman was 

named to the dean's list at Albion 
College, Albion, Mich. Goodman 
is the daughter of Eileen 
Goodman of Antioch. 

Deans list i 

Christina Delany of 

Antioch has been named to the 
Dean's List at Gustavus 
Adolphus College for the spring 
semester. She is the daughter of 
Phillip and Carole Delany. 

Study Abroad 

Katherlne flarrls, a 1993 
Graduate of Antioch 
Community High School, has 
been accepted by the University 
of Wisconsln-PIatteville for the 
Study Abroad Program. She will 
be attending college In Seville, 
Spain for the Spring 1995 term. 




From tIhe CapItaI 



us Cong. Philip M. Crane (R) 



Government should privatize mail service 



Nels Rasmussen 



Masters Club 

Antioch resident Nels Ras- 
mussen was named to the 
Masters Club at the annual Mill- 
Rom Sales Meeting. This award is 
in recognition of his superior 
sales achievements in 1993. Hill- 
Rom is the international health- 
care industry leader In the patient 
care area. 

UW dean's list 

Antioch residents Rachel 
fohns and Cheryl Loyd have 
been named to the dean's list for 
the University of Wisconsin- 
Parkside in Kenosha. 

Navyexercise 

Navy Seaman Shane M. 
Werner, son of Thomas and 
ElizabethWcrner of Antioch, par- 
ticipated in joint/combined exer- 
cise RIMPAC '94 aboard the air- 
craft carrier USS Constellation, 
homcported in San Diego. 
Werner joined the Navy in July, 
1993. 

EIU dean's list 

Lisa Morley of Antioch has 
been named to the dean's list 
for the spring semester at East- 
ern Illinois University, 
Charleston, III. 



* It used to be that Americans complained about 
the U.S. Postal Service constantly Increasing the 
cost of mailing a first-class letter. Now, they com- 
plain the mall Isn't being delivered. 

It's not as if we were back In the 19th century 
days of the Pony Express when riders dashed across 
the wild west to deliver mall no matter what the 
dangers might be. 

The danger facing delivery of U.S. mail in the late 
20th century is it. might get lost, misplaced or set 
aside. 

As Eighth Congressional District residents, 
you're almost all aware of the problem Chicago area 
citizens have receiving their mall. Too often, it's 
been lost, hidden, thrown away, or burned. 

Now we have learned why there have been many 
complaints lately about letters to govcmment offi- 
cials In Washington not being answered. They 
aren't getting the mail, so they can hardly be criti- 
cized for not answering. 

Postal Inspectors recently discovered millions — 
that's millions— of pieces of undelivered mall at two 
of the largest post offices serving Washington. 

A surprise audit by postal Inspcctoi^ disclosed 
managers of one of the region's mail facilities rou- 
tinely just stash unprocessed mail in parked trailers. 
By doing this, they avoid the need to count mall as 
delayed. 

Other inspectors found more than 900,000 pieces 
of unprocessed mall at another regional facility. 



i SI 


^s 




j^^^I^bj ^^^TS^H^I 




^^^« 


■ 


KflBuT' ' '^^Jn^i^^^l^l 


1 


rfi 



And at Washington's prin- 
ciple post office, the unan- 
nounced inspectors found 
first-class mall addressed to 
the government that dated 
back to February. Postal reg- 
ulations specify that first- 
class maU is to be. processed 
immediately. 

These are just the latent 
examples of the need to put 
private enterprise into the 
postal business. 

The price of the stamps go up and up, but 
increasingly, tlic mall doesn't go through. 

I have proposed legislation for 25 years to end 
the government-owned monopoly held by the 
Postal Service — to privatize the mail. 

My bill would give all assets of the post office to a 
corporation owned by the cmployc.es through the 
creation of an employee stock ownership plan 
(ESOP) which would transfer stock to the employ- 
ees. Regulations would assure that the rural service 
and general performance standards exceed current 
levels. 

Certainly, the great majority of postal workers 
arc hard working and faudt-frec of the problems 
which are constantly disrupting our mall service. 
But the postal system's monopoly must be put to an 
end. 



Coast Guard hopes to start new class 



TINA L SWIECH 

Staff Reporter 

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary 
has been holding boating safety 
courts in Inglesidc for a number 
of years. Now they hope to 
expand north. 

Representative and course 
instructor, Millard Rutkowski is 
ecstatic at the growing number of 
people who have Joined in taking 
the course that meets each 
Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the Grant 
Township Hall. He is thinking 
seriously about having one in 



Antioch as well. 

When a class was held there a 
few. years ago, said Rutkowski, 
between 20 and 30 people signed 
up. And with the increasing popu- 
larity, about the seriousness put 
into safe boating, another course 
oficred in the Antioch area may be 
just what is needed. •-.;'. 

Both the Lake County Sheriffs 
Marine Patrol and the Fox 
Waterway Agency arc cncoura^g 
boaters to take safety courses. 



Rutkowski said someday, 
sooner than one might think, it 
may be mandatory to go through a 
safety course in boating in order to 
operate a vessel. It Is also reported 
that boat insurance costs can 
reduce if the classes arc taken 

"The more people we can get 
educated, the better," Rutkowski 
said. 

For more information call 
MiUard Rutkowski at (312) 454- 
6705 or (708) 359-0797. 



DR. FRANK K. LEUNG M.D. 

Board Certified Internal Medicine Endocrinology 
Specializing in Di<i betes Treatment 
HAS RELOCATED HIS OFFICE TO 

4040 Old Grand Ave. • Curnee 

(708) 244-0220 




Cfi 



99 








Check the Classified 

Section Each Week 

When Looking for 

a New loo 



State Farm 
Sells Life Insurance. 



Michelle Wolf 

1724 E. Grand Ave. 

Lindenhurst 

(708) 356-3353 



iTATi tttm 



IHtU««HC( 



Stsia FamtUfB IrnumncflCompsny 
Homsonic* Bloonwniton, llinolt 



Lakeland Newspaper's newest service, **LIPSERV1CE**, 

allows you to get "It off your chest. 

Complaints, compliments, ideas, opinions on any subject. 
Whatever "It" Is, we'll take your call and print in all 13 edi- 
tions of Lakeland Newspaper's "LIPSERVICE** column. 

So if you have something to say. Just dial 223-8073 and 
give it some *'liIPSERVICE^. We're good listeners. 

LIPSERVICE 

It's the talk of the town. 

223-8073 



BARK V TOWN 
KENNELS 



I i^ j * Deciding \_^ 
'Gfocminq 'Pet Supplies 

27607V/ pKindenburgRd 
inglcbide 

(815)385-0632 



UininHmnnmiHiinummiiimiiiiiHiiiminii iimi*j 



BINGO 



E?cnr Wednesday 
6e30p*iii. 

Uc. # B-796 

HAU/FORRE^rr 

Let us cater your wedding. 

annlversaiy. birthday parties 

• & bowling banquets. 

OPEN Sunday Breaf^ast 

PUBLIC 7 am. to Noon 

_ lake VHIg VFW Post 4308 "^^r" 

■iunininmiiiiinimiiiiimiiiiiiniiniH"mmm"i»ii'>": 



LIVE MUSIC 

Featuring 

CHERI 

Fri,, Aug. 5 
Sat,, Aug. 6 



BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 




Hours: 
Monday thru Friday 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Sat. a.m."12 p.m. 



(7M)39M111 

(706)39S-1203 

Fax(70e)39S4232 



ANTDCM g I 



IS YOUR PRINTER 
H0LDINaY0UUP7 
Help Is on if 8 way. 
FAST, AFFORDABLE PRlNTINa 
Is RIGHT AROUND 
THE CORNER. 



iMita 



«t 



nt 



KUintuB 



C 



mn 



966 Victoria •Antioch 



..^..^,- .,..._„ J. i I'i ,i:.x-,,„4 iLM.a,i 1 'i'l-S'l 



■''"t1"";;^T^~'. 



■"TT-^-'.'" 



it 
a 
to 

id 
in 

;et 

t 

aU 
4- 



r. 

)Ct. 

jdi- 
ind 



AtJqusT 9f '1 994 UlcElANd NEWSpApEtts 




UNI1Y 





KidCare Photo E) event successful 



Weave ho 

Wm Edglngton begins work on a woven basket at ttie 
Norttiem Illinois Conservation Club craft fair. Edging was one 
of dozens of crafters witti har>d made Items on display. — 
Pttoto by Bin Darmody Jr. 



The Taste of Antioch offered 
many delicious and entertaining 
attractions tills year, but in addi- 
tion to tiieusuai variety of food, 
song and good times, tticrc was a 
more serious offering for tiic kids. 
Century-21, Epifanio and Assoc 
hosted tlicir first annual KidCarc 
Photo ID event 

Photos of nearly 1000 local 
chUdrcn were taken and their 
parents were presented with a 
free KidCarc ID kit which Includ- 
ed the child's photo, weight, 
height and other vita] statistics. 
"Of course, we hope that none of 
the families we met will ever have 
to use thbsc documents," said Joe 
Epifanio, owner of Century-21, 
Epifanio and Assoc, "but we are 
pleased we could play such a vital 
role In helping to keep the chil- 
dren in our own community 
safe." 

Century-21, Epifanio and 



Assoc, realtors were at the Taste 
of Antioch on Thursday, Friday 
and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 7 
p.m., wciglilng, measuring and 
photographing the kids. "But It 
could not have been done with- 
out the fmancial assistance of our 
fmc community supporters, wc 
would like to tiiank: A-1 Quality 
Plumbing, Heating and Cooling; 
Absolute Property Inspections; 
American Fanilly Insurance, Brad 
Ipscn; Gary Adclman, Attorney- 
at-Law; Dale and Linda Aldcn; 
Antioch Quik Print; Barrington 
Mortgage Corp., Pete Glcavc. 

Amy C, Bates, Attorncy-at- 
Law;'Building Inspection Experts; 
Di Marco's; Fantastic Sam's; 
Gcncratfon Builders; Georgetown 
Furniture and Bedding; J.T.'s 
Roadhouse, LTD; Tim McAiiliffe, 
LTD; Margarctten Mortgage, 
John Eifert; Mortgage Edge, Steve 
RcvcU; Nice Ice; Nu-Way Speaker 



Products; PageNet; PIP Printing; 
Poison's Natural Foods;. Sequoit 
Auxiliary No. 4551; Sqiiires; 
Richard L Sarmont, Attorney-at- 
Law; Strang Funeral Home; Taca 
Bcil; Turo Electrical 

Construction; /Vibcrt Wysockl, 
Attomcy-at-Law, 885 Civic Qub." 

"It is because of the commit- 
ment of people like our sponsors 
and our agents that the event was 
so successful," said Epifanio. 
"We're all looking forward to 
dobig it again next year." 

Remember that these pictures 
should be updated every six ■ / ' 
months, so parents who wish to 
have their children's pictures 
taken in January should watch for 
the announcement of our next 
session. For those who wish fur- 
ther information, or for any busi- 
nesses who would like to become 
sponsors, please call Donna at 
395-5900. ' 



Sequoit Pride sponsors spring break cruise 



Greg Buchanan in concert 
at Chain of Lakes Church 



Chain of Lakes Community 
Bible will host Greg Buchanan in 
conceit on Sunday night, August 
7 at 6 p.m. ;• 

Greg Buchanan is a world- 
class harpist whose aggressive 
style of playing usually Fcdcfines 
the listener's concept of perfor- 
mance on the harp. His superb 
musicianship combined with an 
enthusiastic attitude toward the 
Christian life make him one of the 
most sought-after Christian per- 
formers in America. Greg readily 
gives God credit for everything he 
has today. 

Greg began playing the harp at 
aige 9. After four years in the U.S. 
Naval Band, he entered the music 
scenc'in southern California. His 
life took a downward spiral due to 
alcoholism, drugs and thb occult 
He left the music scene and 
entered college. A night at a 
Christian concert with a friend 
was to be the new beginning he 
was desperately searching for. The 
rest of his story provides a shining 



example of the grace of God. 

Buchanan was the first harpist 
in the world to own and play an 
electronic grand harp developed 
and hand -crafted -by Lyon and 
Healy. During concert perfor- 
mances, Greg also performs on a 
Celtic (Irish-folk) harp and a 
Kiimor (David's-lyre). 

The uniqueness of Greg's styl- 
ized playing has made him a pop- 
ular choice for international 
workshops. Greg fmds great ful- 
riUmcnt in being able to share not 
only his musical knowledge, but 
tils personal walk of faith, thus 
offering great creative inspiration 
to those he works with. He and 
his wife Becky have two sons and 
a daughter. 

This will be the ninth meeting 
in the church's annual series of 
Outstanding Suitmier Sunday 
Nights. This meeting is open to 
aU. Nursery and child care are 
available through age 6. For more 
information, call the church's 
ofTice at 838-0103. 



Antioch High School's Sequoit 
Pride organization, the fiind rais- 
ing arm of ACHS, announces a 
seven night western Caribbean 
cridse aboard Celebrity Cruise 
Lines' MV Zenith 

Departing March 25, 1995, this 
beautiful ship will be taking pas- 
sengers to ports of call such as 
Montego Bay, Grand Cayman, 



Cozumcl and Key West, and 
includes two glorious days at sea 
to relax and enjoy a wonderful 
spring break. 

Celebrity Cruise Lines con- 
tinues to win awards for its fme 
cuisine and unparalleled service 
aboard the ships in their fleet, 
and this cruise will treat partici- 
pants to a week of a casually ele- 



gant cruising, "celebrity style." 

Part of afimd raising effort to 
bencflt academic and extra cur- 
ricular programs at the high 
school, reservations are being 
handled by Chase Hill Travel 
Services. 356-3820. Also on the 
schedule is an informative 
"Cruise Night" on Wednesday, 
Sept 21 at the high school. 




eUs 



Lakeland Nev^/spapers wants to hear news of local sporting events, 
clubs, organizations, etc. Black and white photos are also welcome. 
Please send news items to Claudia M. Lenart 30 S.. Whitney, Grayslaka 
60030 or call 223-8161. 



in ■ • ■ ■ i 



i 



P 

i 



i 



The most 
important tMng 



I 





Three Great Locations 

ANTIOCH 

GRAYSLAKE 

LIBERTYVILLE 

ALL OF OUR AMRTMENTS HAVE 

•Fully Equipped Kitchens 
•Laundry Facilities 
•Professional On-Site Managers 
•24 Hour Service Guarantee 
(No Maintenance Worries) 
•Much More You Must See 

For More Infonnation On Our 1 & 2 
Bedioom Apt. Complexes Call 395-0949 
Between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM Mon.-Fr!. 



we 



Imdi 



IS 



confidence. 



i 



I 



m 



m 






Your request for a loan is as individ- 
ual as you are. So you'll find there is no 
such thing as a "loan category" at 
Anchor Bank. We're not looking for 
customers with a ^ific set of needs; 
Instead, we tailor our loans to serve you. 

We begin with the realization that 
each loan request is unique, based upon 
Its own set of circumstances. Anchor , 
Bank loans are customized, and struc- 
tured to serve your needs. Financing Is 
creative and terms arc flexible. With all 
loan decisions made locally, your 
re^nse time Is fast and funding Is 
completed without delay. 

Whether you're searching for a car, 
boat, real estate, coiutruction, home, 
equity, or business loan, be assured you'll 
find personalized service at Anchor Bank. 
We're the community bank that still 
believes In people. 




John Burnett and John Wolf review all loan appUcaiions and make pielimlnaty 
decisions on dlstwrsemenl of funds. 




(708)548-3000 

Highway 4$ 11 Washington • P.O. Box 270 
Crc/jhke,ll " 



i^ 



1 



Hours: Lobby - Mon., Tues., Thurs., 8:30-4:30; Fri., 8:30-6:00; Sat., 8:30-1:00 
Drive-Up - Mon.. Tuea., Thurs., Frl., 7:30-7:00; Wed,, 7:30-3:00; Sat.. 7:30-1:00 



S 




:-^.r:^"*^:'i;i'f:?;*-^.4-'i'? 



M 




n COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers Auqusr i, 1994 



Vote 



From pagC'Al 

explaining too many rules would 
ruin pleasure for recreational 
boaters and others. 

Outspoken activist for her 
' neighborhood, Carole Jpnites said 
she plans to attend the meeting 
s and Is hoping many will follow. 

lonitcs who has lived on Latcc 
Catherine for nearly 20-years is 
the president of the United 
Homeowners Association of 
Unincorporated Antioch 

Township. 

At the last meeting she came 
prepared with a petition filled 
with 225 signatures asldng that 
the 150-foot no wake zone be 
reinstated. 



Auction 



The avid boater' said she Is 
also concerned about another 
issue on the Chain. "I think they 
need more law enforcement (on 
the waters)," said Jonitcs. But she 
added she understands there is a 
cost involved and the Agency 
may not have to funds at this 
time. 

Jonites did praise the current 
Lake County Sheriffs Marine 
Units vrfio do run occasionally in 
front of her home and said, "I 
think the guys do a heckava Job." 

The meeting to vote on the 
no-wake zone is scheduled for 
Aug. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
McHenry City HaU at 333 S. 
Green St In McHcnry. 



From page Al 

Associates, professional auction- 
eers. All of the items have been 
donated and the proceeds will go 
to the all-volunteer Antioch 
Rescue Squad. 

PUBUC NOTICE 

Notice is hereby given that The 
EXTRA CLOSET, 849 Anita 
Street, Antioch, IL 60002, will sell 
the peraorral goods fiofn the fol- 
loMring units to satisfy ttie lien of 
The EXTFtA CLOSET (Seller) for 
rental and other charges due. 

UNIT #3065X05; OCCUPANT 

- Cynthia Dubas; CONTENTS - 
Floor Fan, Box Spring & 
Mattress, Snow Ski, Dishes, 
Folding Chaire, Small Desk & 
Misc. Boxes, 

UNIT #3361020; OCCUPANT 

- Soott Migawa; CONTENTS - 
Gill's Bilte, Golf Clubs, Rocking 
Horse, Stereo Cabinet, Lawn 
Mower, Baity Crib. File Cabinet, 
Two Circular Saws. Sander, Lots 
of Children's Toys. 

These items and all items 
stored in the above units will be 
sold to the highest bidder for 
cash. Removal of all items from 
the premises must be within three 
days from date of sale and a 
security bond posted to cover 
same. 

Sale will tm held on August 13, 
1994, on the premises of The . 
EXTRA CLOSET, 849 Anita 
Street, Antioch, IL (Depot & Anita 
Sts.), at approximately 9:00 am. 
to 12;00 p.m. The EXTRA CLOS- 
ET reserves tt\e right to withdraw 
any or all of the at>ove mentioned 
items prior to sale. ' 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 
ACCIDENTS. 

0794E-008-AR 

July 29, 1994 

Augusts, 1994 



The barbecue Is sponsored by 
the Antioch Uons Qub and the 
proceeds will be used for commu- 
nity service. The menu includes 
hot dogs, brats, com-on-the<cob, 
desserts, refreshments, and of 
course, chicken. Children's 
games begin at noon and a rafiQc 
will follow the auction. 

So, make sure you and your 
family head out to the chicken 
barbecue and auction. Williams 
Park is located off Main Street in 
Antioch behind the library. 



PUBUC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given that 
Antioch Self Storage, located at 
Route 83 at Illinois-Wisconsin 
State Line will sell the personal 
goods from the following .units to 
satisfy the lien for rental and 
other charges due. 

UNIT #9; OCCUPANT - Jeffeiy 
Kuechte; CONTENTS 
Household items. 

UNIT #l; OCCUPANT - 
Kenneth G. Mazzuce; CON- 
TENTS - Household items. 

These items and alt items 
stored in the above units will be 
sold to the highest bidder for 
cash. Removal of all items from 
ttw premises must be within three 
days from date of sale and a 
security bond posted to cover 
same. 

Sale wll be held on August 8, 
1994, on the premises of Antioch 
Self Storage at approximately 
10:00 &m, Antioch Self Storage 
resen/es the right to withdraw any 
or all of the above mentioned 
items prior to sale. 

NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR 

ACCIDENTS. 0794E-004-AR 

July 29, 1994 

August 5, 1994 



iif 



Grass Lake School Registration 



Registration for Grass Lake School District #36 
will be held August 10, 11, 12. Times will be 9 to 11 
am and 1 to 4 pm. All students, including previously 
enrolled students, must be registered by a parent. 
On Wednesday, August 10th, registration will be 
extended from 5:30 to 7 pm. 

On registration day, parents will receive a ten- 
tative class assignment for each child in kindergarten 
through fifth grade. For sixth through eighth grades, 
home room assignments for each student wiU be given 
out. 

Fees for 1994-95 will be as follows: 
Kindergarten: $15.00; Kindergarten milk: $34.00; 
Grades 1-8: $30.00; Swimming (Grades 1, 2, 3): 
$11.00; and Swimming (Grades 4 & 5): $5.50. 




Pig in a poke 

Volunteers at Saint Peter's Chiurch In Antioch rrionitor a pig slowly rotatlrtg on a spit at ttie annu- 
al pig roast. Six pigs and two vats of steamed com on ]he cob was prepared for picnicicers. — 
Photo by Bill E>(»rmody Jr. 



Assessment 

From page Al 

Houston pointed out, due to 
the tax cap, tax rates in the town- 
ship are actually dropping. As an 
example, Antioch has experi- 
enced a 71 cent decrease in the 
tax rate from 1990 to 1993. 

Houghton also hopes resi- 
dents understand the Assessor's 



Oificc is not responsible for the 
size of property owner's tax hilts. 
Tax rates arc determined by 
the numerous taxing bodies 
including school districts, town- 
ship, village and county.' The 
amount of taxes a resident pa)^ is 
determined when the tax rate is 
applied to the property's assessed 



value. By state law, the assessed 
value is 33 and 1/3 of the market 
value. 

Property owners who have 
questions concerning the value 
assigned to their property, should 
call the Assessor's Office at 395- 
1545 between the hours of 8:30 
a.mL and 4:30 p.m. 



Up-frontPricing 



nnwicwo 01'" Diuikftruo 0|' 



'^?! ^ ' ' ^ i;x ' . ' . ' * - !! »■? ^IJ 




*W4 



• -'.U 




i 



\ 



i 



"f^l^^t^Z^h 



At a GP1 Goodwrench Service Plus ckakn 
the prices are right , . there. 



How long do you (tiinlc a restaurant would stay in business 
without menus and prices? Tliai was our answer, too! Not 
long. Yet, people still lalce their vehicles in for service, then 
hope for the i)est when ihc bill comes. Now you don'l have 
to do that anymore. Because there's new GM Goodwrench 
Service Plus, It's a revolutionary new approach to dealer- 
ship service, and up-front pricing is just one of the features 
that malces it new. 




Other features include lifetime guarantees on covered 
parts and labor*. ..extended hours... courtesy transpor- 
tation... highly trained technicians who Icnow yourOM 
vehicle better than anyone... and, of coui^, the quality 
of genuine GM parts. Remember,^ 
only select GM dealers offer 
GM Goodwrench Service Plus. 
See the following one today. 



We want your business. 



CHEVROLET • PONTIAC • OLDSMOBILE • BUICK • CADILLAC • CMC TRUCK 



Raymond Clievn)kt>Olds 

120 Rl. 173 
Antioch. IL 60002 
(708) 395-3600 . 



For infonnation, call the schtiol at 

395-1550 






*Sctdnkrr«)f<ki«lt. OI994GMCflip. Alt rifbu Ricrycd. 



U'. \ 



I 




,;7n!r-,r'Ti.T^4.- 



AvqusT 9, 19?4 l^kElANd NEwspApcRs COMMUNITY 




Antioch swim announces 
conference qualifiers 
PACE Al 2 

Family feud 

^ Antioch father, son go 
head to head at Wihnot 
PAGE AH 

LV vs. LV iimm^ 

; TWo Lake Villa teams 
' face each other in state 

tourney PAGE Al 2 

'*' . 

For More 
SpoRTs/LeisuRE 
> See PAqE C25 



Practice begins for 
ACHS girl golfers 

\' .The Antioch Community 
' C High School Varsity and JV 
" j^Msl^lf teani5%ylll b<^ 
} Vpractice August is'at Spring 
' Valley golf course In Salem, 
:.Wis. 

Practices will start at 6 
-' aoL and end at approximate- 
ly 1 1 am. Varsity onlyivUl 
liavc second session practices 
that be^ at 6 p.m. Spring ^ 
% Valley golf course is located 
. in Salem on Rte. 83 about 
' ^Jtfirco miles north of Antioch. 
C ' ' Any gill Interested in - 
< learning to play golf should 
plan to attend ttic practice 
sessions. Ihere axe also a llm*- 
" itcd number of starter golf *^ ' 
dub'sets available for golfers 
- to use during the season. 

Wapon also indicated that 
any parents or golfers with 
'^^questlons should call Antioch 
; High'School at 395-1421, or 
attend practice August 15, at 
8 am. 

Antioch lady golfers 
M linlB on ^FrnvDay*;. 

The Antioch Women's 
Tuesday Golf League, spon- 
sored by the State Bank of the 
^.iLakes'of Antiodi, held its 
^ annual *Fun Day*' July 28 at 
' aiapclHlU Country aub in 

McHeiuy. 
I Winners in the various 
\ categories indiided' Joan 
'^ Casey and Carat Povdski. 
: ; longest drim; Lfe IChounek, ^^^ 
: and Lorraine Dladkman, doi^^ 
r est to the pin; Angle Maras^^l^i 
;^ , and^yVllnia HuH, for low grosst^ 
,',<i'iiildliet»^*A. s?--v ck'fe'^ tfen 

>J' v>/Iliw yta& a six-way tie for?. 
^. lowest putts;Sharing1hetit^^'; 
' were Dee Finlcy.BaibBehne, ^ 

^iv Jean StanleyjuidGeiTy '^ '^'' ' ^"^ 

V Chipping awards went tpi$^ 
\ElMedeHan9en;Pave!ski. 
^^Bladanan^MuyliHi - 

f]||dU|^toD,%nw»^^ICiiwirek-^ 






AhrenMoiigiRQ and Loulse«. 

[ Moiganwonlhedistloc1k)i^WS 
C ofbetng the most honest 
^ golfers which also happened,, 
^ to indude the most putts ' 
^ «wardasweU. 

The golf season will end 
\ Aug. 30 with a luncheon. 



IV Mustangs can celebrate banner year 



KEVINHANRAHAN 

SfafrRepx>rter 

All the Lake Villa Township 
Traveling baseball teams qualified to 
compete in state compctitioa Only 
one, however, advanced to play in 
tlic Midwest regional — tlic level 
before competing for a Uttlc League 
Worid Scries bid. 

Lake Villa's Traveiing Mustang 
squad was tiiat team, and it came up 
one game short of taking the 
Midwest regional. 

After beating a Michigan team 7- 
1, Lake VUla went on to defeat 
Rockford 4-2. Two games up in the 
double elimination tournament, 
Lake Villa was only one victory shy 
from being crowned Midwest 
champs. 



Only Roddbrd, ti:ie same team 
Lake Villa downed eariler, stood In 
the Mustangs' way. Roddbrd needed 
to beat Ijakc Villa twia^ and to shat- 
ter Lake Villa's hopes, Roddbnl did 
7-2 and 8-7 in an extra-inning bout 

Lake Villa coach Ryan 
Pcndctgast would bo the first to say 
his team did not choke under pres- 
sure. 

"The kids put everything they 
had into It They never let down," 
Pendctgastsaid 

Losing 5tO after thi?cc innings, 
the Mustangs quietly tied the game 
and captured the lead liy scoring one 
in the fourtli inning, two in tlic fifth 
and three in the sixth. 

Standing out offensively for Lake 
Villa were Chris Kocinski, who went 



2-3 with a triple and two runs scored, 
and Trent Dornel, wlio went 2-2. 

Roddbrd came bade to tic the 
game in the bottom of the sixth to 
send the game into overtime. 

Lake Villa quickly answered 
with a go-ahead run in the top half 
of the seventh. Starting pitcher 
Shawn Schuler (six innings and 6 
strikeouts) had to leave the game 
after six innings because of league 
rules. 

During its do-or-die final at bat, 
Roddbrd loaded the bases widi two 
hits and a walk Two more wallcs 
forced in the tying and ^^ning runs. 

"It was an unfortunate tiling, but 
our kids never gave up," Peiidergast 
said. 

The coach said the balls hit by 



Rockford had eyes for the holes, 
whereas, Lake VUIa's balls coukln^t 
findtheholes. 

"Sometimes the balls find a way 
of going throu^ Ours didn't," 
Pendeigastsaid. 

Lake Villa's distance in post-sea- 
son play is the further any Lake Villa 
team has ever attained, vvhk::h is 
plenty of reason to celebrate despite 
the final loss to Rockford, Pendcigast 
said. 

And, of course, they are still die 
Mustang state champs. 

The banner team. Induded 
Kodnski, Schuler, Domd, Kevin 
Pcndergast, Tom Chapman, Josh 
Rapier, Chris Chebncy, Nick 
Severson, Kyle Davis, Scott Straub 
and Ryan Meyers. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Rally higjUlights successful year for LV Colts squad 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

A dramatic comeback put 
Lake Villa I's baseball team in just 
the position it wanted Friday at 
Carmcl High School. 

After beating Rockford 8-7, 
only one team, Winthrop Haifoor, 
stood between Lake VUla and a 
spot in the state Mickey Mantle 
Colt league Hnal four at 
Waukegan. But the second-game 
effort, played minutes after the 
first, came up shy in a 5-3 loss. 

"Every boy on the team can 



play high school ball for any 
school he wants," Lake Villa 
Manager Jerry Davis declared. 
"We only lost a few games due to 
errors, and that happens to every 
tearh." 

After downing Lake Villa II, 
the squad scored three times In 
the seventh liming for the win 
over the Rockord Yankees. 

Andy Davis, who scored two 
runs, walked to start the liming. 
One out later, Stu Johnson was 
hit by a pitch. Jim Grath then 
delivered the RBI single which 



brought Lake Villa to within one 
run, 7-6. 

Andy Baumgart, who had a 2- 
run double in a 4-nm sixth in- 
ning, did it again in the. seventh 
and this time it tied the game at 
7-7. The wiiming run then scored 
on a wild pitch. 

"There was big doubt, but it 
was all team play," Davis said of 
the win. 

Mike Peterson, playing in his 
first game since joining the team 
from Antioch for the tourney, 
surrendered two hits in the Rock- 




Lako VHki 1 flrtt bOMinan Stu Johnson connects during tti» tlcrta Colt toumoy.— Photo by Nil Dormody 
Jf. 



ford seventh but then lx>rc down 
and got two strikeouts and a pop- 
up. 

Lake Villa scored first againist 
Winthrop Harbor. Davis walked 
and scored on an RBI single by 
Craig Curtis for a 1-0 lead in the 
first 

Winthrop Harbor took charge 
as the fm»t four batters scored in 
the second inning. The winners 
were held to just one nm after 
that 

Lake VUla mounted a rally in 
the fourth iimlng. Curtis walked, 
stole second and scored on an 
RBI single by Stu Johnson. John- 
son then scored on a sacrifio; fly. 

Afterward, Davis reflected on 
the 23-6 season. 

"Our entire goal firom the be- 
giiming was to make the state 
tournament and we did," Davis 
said. 

Most players will play for An- 
tioch, but a few, such as pitching 
and hitting standout Matt 
Vassey, will go to Grayslake or 
Carmel Highs. Vassey had a 2- 
run double in the sixth against 
Rockford which brought a 5-5 tie. 

Based on the team's play last 
week, the fans of those schools 
have plenty to look forward to. 

Baseball notebook: Umpire 
Jerry Niemo df'Wauconda 
showed the game isn't all serious. 
He Joined with the fans in doing 
the "YMCA" dance to the ViUage 
People song. Ray Scripture pro- 
vided the music on the public 
■ address system...The Rockford- 
Lake Villa game survived a 
debate in the use of the designat- 
ed hitter mle. 



lindenhurst Bullets compete with best in ASA qualifier 



The Lindenhurst Bullets trav- 
eled to Blue Island to compete in 
the Amateur Softball Association 
Class A Fast Fitch Tournament 

This is a qualifier featured com- 
petition amongit tite best gills soft- 
ball teams in the Oiicagoland area 
with the winners advancing to 
regional play-ofBi and ultimately 
tiie nation^ championship in 
Marietta, Ga. 

TTie Bullets opened the double 
elimination tournament with a 
hard fought 4-1 loss to the toi^ 
pitching of Lisle. 

The next day tfie Bullets diarged 
back witii a 13-2 slaughter-rule vic- 
tory over Country Qub HUIs. 



The third game of the tourna- 
ment found the BuUets idling 13-9 
to Tinely I^ulcTliis second loss sent 
the Bullets home and eliminated all 
diances of advancement to le^on- 
alplay. 

Hie pitehing duties for the 
Bullets were handled by starter 
Nkx)le langley (14 iiuiings, 14 nins, 
19 walks, 15 strike outs) with relief 
from Kelly Kotiaiz (1 inning, 1 iun« 1 
walk, 1 strike out) and Kristen 
Scopel (2 iimings. 4 runs, 3 walks, 2 
strikeouts). 

Leading the team in hitting with 
batting averages over .300 for the 
entire tournament were: Nicole 
Langley .667, Kristen Scopel .500, 



An^e Kendziora .444, Sho Kent 
.400, Amie Cariberg .333, Kelly 
Kbtiaiz .333, Jermy Piefer .300 and 
Megs Kotiarz .300. 

Ihe first team home run was hit 
by Amie Caiibeig. 

Outstanding defense was i^yed 
by catcher Megs Kotiaiz who threw 
out two attempted base stealers 
and tagged another nmner out at 
tiie plate after chasing down a wild 
pitch. 

A near flawless infidd perfor- 
mance was displayed at first by 
Kelly Kotiaiz, at second by Katie 
Anderson, at third by Amie 
Cariberg and at short by Jenny 
Piefer. 



Ihe outfield rotation of Erin, ^ 
Gina Seedoff, Terri Fasano, Sho 
Kent Kristin Scopel and An^e 
Kendziora played with always 
increasing confidence and aggres- 
siveness. 

The Bullets and die Raiders have 
been invited to partidpate in an - 
out-of-state tournament Both 
teams wiU next compete In 
Hammond, Ind, in a 16 and under 
gids Softball tournament 

If both teams advance out of 
pool play, it is possible for the 
BuUets and the Raiders to play each 
other— lindenhurst against 

Lindenhurst— hold your breatii 
softisallfans! 




COMMUNITY UkclANd Newspapers Auqusr 5, 1994 



■ v.- 



Two Lake Villa teams duke it out in state tournament 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Staff Reporter 

It was like two brothers fight- 
ing as Lake Villa I was pitted 
against Lake Villa II in the battle 
for Lake Villa survival in the state 
Colt League tourney bid. 

Both lost their opening games 
in the double elimination Mickey 
Mantle state regional and 
whichever Lake Villa team had 
the most runs after this game 
would remain alive in the tourna- 
ment. 

For the other, it would mean 
the end of the season. 

Lake Villa I ousted its fellow 
Lake Villa team liy winning 1 1 -4. 

"We hated to push out our sis- 
ter Lake Villa team, aftcrall 
they're a good team," said Uike 
Villa 1 coach Jerry Davis. 

The two teams faced each 



other in the season's opener, and 
Lake Villa II downed Lake Villa I 
8-5. 

Now, Laicc Villa I has the brag- 
ging rights. 

Davis said the game was high- ■ 
lighted by timely hitting and 
strong pitching. 

With five runs in the second, 
Lake Villa I scored all the runs 
they would need. 

After two outs, Andy 
Baumgart hit a single, Doug 
Qlscn knocked in Baumgart with 
an RBI triple. 

Following a Nick Rathbun 
walk, John Groth connected for a 
2-RBI hit. Pitcher Chris Ramig 
and Andy Davis then each had 
RBI hits to round out the scoring. 

Olscn slugged in two more 
RBIs in the third inning after 



Stewart Johnson and Jim Groth 
reached base. 

"Our big guns came through 
for us," Davis said. 

Lake Villa I finished Its scoring 
with four in the sbcth. Craig Curtis 
knocked in two with a hit, and 
Baumgart doubled to score two 
more. 

The defensive play in the fifth 
inning when Lake Villa II second 
baseman Andy Davis made a div- 
ing stab in the whole behind sec- 
ond and threw the runner out 
while sitting on the ground. 

Pitching was also key as 
Ramig went the distance. Davis 
said Ramig's curvcball kept the 
opposing Lake Villa batters off 
balance and he was hitting the 
inside corner of the plate. 

"He's been the ace all year," 



Davis said of Ramig. 

Gene Martin, Lake VUla II 
coach, also said Ramig's pitching 
was a key factor. 

"They ran the bases on us, 
and the pitching was excellent," 
Martin said. 

For Martin's Ukc Villa II 
team, Joe Budill carried the big 



bat with two RBIs. Dave Martin 
and Erik Dohrmann also had 
RBIs to give Lake Villa II its four 
runs. 

Ukc Villa li finished its sea- 
son 16-6 in league play and 18-9 
overall. 

As for Lake Villa I, it advanced 
further in the state tournament. 



Grant picks soccer coach, sets fall sports times 



Grant High will become one of 
the high schools which offer the 
world's mo.st popular sport. 

The Bulldogs will welcome 
soccer players for the first practice 
Aug. 15 at Grant. 

James Muttra will be the 
coach. He played soccer for four 
years at Wheaton North High 
before moving on to the 
University of Illinois. "We tried to 
hire from the staff within, but 



none of the new teachers had soc- 
cer background," Frank 
Cittadino, athletic director, said. 

Soccer will be a co-ed sport 
and will play its first five matches 
away. It will be only a junior varsi- 
ty sport this fall. 

"Wc expect a good turnout,'* 
Cittadino said of the first practice. 

An initial survey showed 65 
students interested in soccer. 

Grant is the latest area school 



to begin soccer. Warren Town- 
ship High begins a women's pro- 
gram and as will the College of 
Lake County. 

The football squad wll dis- 
tribute equipment Aug. 8. The 
varsity is at 8 a.m., sophomores at 
9 a.m. and freshmen at 10 a.m. 
The first day of practice for the 
defending Northwest Suburban 
Conference champs is 8 a.m. Aug. 
10. 




m 









Lake Villa I hurler Craig Curtis flres a pitch during state toumamQnt 
action.— Photo by Bill Dermody Jr. 



Antioch Waves place 3rd in division champianship 



Antioch placed third with a 
score of 883.50 in the North 
Central Division Championsliip 
behind Rockford and Trails July 
25. 

Antioch swimmers placed in 
the following events: 

•Girls 200-yard freestyle open. 
Dawn DcScrvi (fourth), 2:26.28; 
•Girls R and under 25-yard 
freestyle, Ellora Jares (fifth), 20.23; 
•Girls 11 and 12 50-yard freestyle, 
Courtney Wilson (fourth), 31.59, 
Christine Fusz (fifth), 32.15; -Giris 

13 and 14 50-yard freestyle, Lisa 
^ Ipsen (fifth), 29.66; •Boys 13 and 

14 50-yard freestyle, Joe Skurski 
(fifth), 28.44, Roland Bchm 
(sixth), 20.61. 

•Girts 15 through 18 100-yard 
freestyle, Mary Aschbacher (fifth), 
1:11.06; •Boys 200-yard freestyle 
open, Roger Bchm (fourth), 
2:13,57; •Boys 8 and under 25- 
yard freestyle, Ross LcFave (fifth), 
21.69; -Boys 9 and 10 50-yard 
freestyle, Ryan LeFavc (fifth), 



35.62; -Boys 11 and 12 50-yard 
freestyle, Ryan Rothcrmel (first), 
27.54, Rodrick Bchm (fiftli), 31.2; 
•Boys 15 through 18 100-yard 
freestyle, Brian Murphy (second), 
52.90, Rodney Bchm (third), 
55.87. 

"Boys 6 and under 25-yard 
freestyle, David Roy (second), 
23.77; •Boys 8 and under 50-yard 
freestyle, Taylor Pechaucr (sixth), 
45.96; -Girls 6 and under 25-yard 
freestyle, Elizabeth Wlilding (sec- 
ond), 23.38, Catherine Eschbach 
(third), 25.49; -Girls 8 and under 
50-yard freestyle, Eliora Jares 
(sixth), 48.63. 

•Boys 8 and under 25-yard 
brcaststrokc, Taylor Pechauer 
(second), 23.41, Andrew Farrell 
(sbcth), 29.38; -Boys 1 1 and 12 50- 
yard brcaststrokc, Ryan 
Rothcrmel (first), 36.65; •Girls 15 
through 18 100-yard breast- 
stroke. Dawn DeScrvi (second), 
1:20.95, Kelly Sullivan (fourth), 
1:24.39; -Boys 15 through 18 100- 



yard brcaststrokc, Rodney Bchm 
(fourth), 1:21.22, Jason Mondcllo 
(fifth), 1:25.93. 

•Girls 9 and 10 50-yard breast- 
stroke, Stephanie Wlilding 
(sbctli), 48.12; •Girls 11 and 12 50- 
yard brcaststrokc, Courtney 
Wilson (fourth), 40.94, Courtney 
Winding (fifth), 40.96; •Girls 13 
and 14 50-yard brcaststrokc, Teri 
Mozal (second), 35,88; •Boys 13 
and 14 50-yard brcaststrokc, Joe 
Fusz (fifth), 37.99. 

•Girts 9 and 10 100-yard indi- 
vidual medley, Katie Gulp (third), 
1:32.45, Casey Clark (fourth), 
1:32.54; -Girts 11 and 12 100-yard 
individual medley, Courtney 
WQson (fifth), 1:21.09; -Boys 11 
and 12 100-yard individual med- 
ley, Rodrick Bchm (third), 
1:20.40; •Boys 13 and 14 100-yard 
individual medley, Matt Wilson 
(fourth), 1:07.60, Roland Bchm 
(fifth), 1:13.62; •Boys 15 through 
18 200-yard individual medley, 
Brian Murphy (first), 2:15.68, Josh 



Guros (second), 2:16.66; 'Girls 13 
and 14 100-yard individual med- 
ley, Teri Mozal (fifth), 1:17.03; 
•Girls 15 through 10 200-yard 
individual medley. Dawn DcServl 
(fourth), 2:46.48. 

•Boys 8 and under 25-yard 
backistroke, Taylor Pechauer 
(fourth), 23.99, James Larson 
(sbcth), 26.69; 'Girts 8 and under 
25-yard backstroke, Kaitlyn 
Ament (sbcth), 24.09; •Girls U and 
12 50-yard backstroke, Kimberiy 
Meyer (fourth), 36.78, Katianne 
Pechauer (sbcth), 30.12; -Girts 9 
and 10 50-yard backstroke, Katie 
Gulp (sixth), 43.45. 

•Boys 11 and 12 50-yard back- 
stroke, Kris Vanderkooy (second), 
34.95, Ryan Rothcrmel (third), 
35.17; •Girts 13 and 14 50-yard 
backstroke, Lisa Ipsen (fifth), 
39.19; •Boys 13 and 14 50-yard 
backstroke. Matt Wilson (sec- 
ond), 29.93, Joe Skurski (sbcth), 
35.00; -Girts 15 through 18 100- 
yard backstroke, Mary 



Aschbacher (third), 1:14.99; -Boys 
15 through 18 100-yard back- 
stroke, Brian Murphy i (first), ' 
1:01.53, Josh Guros (second), 
1:01.78. 

•Boys 8 and under . 25-yard 
butterfly, Ross LcFave (sixth), 
30.19; -Girts 9 and 10 50-yard but- 
terfly, Casey Clark (fourth), 38.77; 
•Girts 11 and 1250-yard butterfly, 
Kimberiy Meyer (fifth), 35.78, 
Katianne Pechauer (sbcth), 35.82; 
•Girls 13 and 14 50-yard butterfly, 
Teri Mozal (fifth) 33.54; -Boys 11 
and 12 50-yard butterfly, Rodrick 
Bchm (fourth), 37.51; -Girts 15 
through 18 100-yard butterfly, 
KeUy Sullivan (sbcth), 1:31.70; 
•Boys 13 and 14 50-yard butterfly, 
Roland Bchm (fourth), 30.65; 
•Boys 15 through 18 100-yard 
butterfly, Josh Guros (fourth), 
1:01.80. 

These participants also com- 
peted in the conjfcrcnce champi- 
onsliip July 30 in DeKalb. 




w 




AuqtfST !ff 1994 Uk(; 



y^'^g?r?y*^g^??p s ^.';: ^ 'j ;j --, 'i" ^ 



COMMUNITY 







s 






I 



»nt 



k- 

t)r 
I), 

rd 

1), 
it- 
7; 

ly. 

'8. 
12; 

ly. 
11 

ck 

15 

ly. 

70; 

ly. 

55; 
ird 



SofrbAll Giiy ResuIts 



Standlnrai as of Aug. 2 

MondayLeague 

CompctlttvcD 

Slcrilnc Finish/Wilson; 

John's Garage 

Midnight Blue Lounge 

Convicts 

Y-Not Sandbar/Mlrowski 

Jctsons 

Outlaws 

Falboys Construction, 

Inlaws 



Mcndrixons and Sons 

Midwest Brick Paving 

Mcllo Folks 

The Hitmen 

Rockies 

Barbs Florist/Growers Equip. 

American Family Insurance 

A's 

Hcadln'IIomc 

Yvonncs 

D 

IDC 

GM Concrete 

Tempcl Steel 

Nielsens Enterprises 

MImi's Lingerie 

StcrlingFlnlsh/Larson 

Cherry Electric 

C/C Pub 

A Custom Touch 

PNC Mortgagc/Rockics 

Women's 

Yvonncs 

Greg Larson Excavating . 

Nielsens Enterprises 

Austins/Libcrtyville 

Rings Radiator 

Romantic Times/ 

Summer Thunder 

Main Event 

MCA 

Kross-Inn 

ITS Marauders 

Church 

Lakeland Evangelical 
Shepard of the Lakes 
Falin Lutheran 
Holy Cross Lutheran 
Living Waters I 
Bethel Lutheran 
Trinity Lutheran 
SL Gilberts KOC 
Living Waters II 

■ Tuesday League 
Industrial 

Y-NotKanaby 
Kl^M Plastics 
Those Guys 



w 


L 


10 


2 


9 


2 


7 


4 


7 


4 


6 


5 


6 


5 


4 


B 


2 


10 


2 


11 


12 


2 


9 


3 


9 


4 


8 


7. 


7 


8 


7 


8 


7 


B 


5.. 


9 


4 ■ 


11 


3 


11 



12 

U 

10 

B 

5 

5 

S 

4 

3 

2 



14 
12 
11 
10 

7 



.6 
6 
3 
2 



2 

2 

3 

5 

7 

8 

8 

9 

10 

11 



1 
3 

4 . 
5 
6 

7 

9 

11 

12 

14 



11 


1 


B 


4 


8 


4 


8 


.5 


7 


5 


7 


5 


5 


7 


2 


10 


1 


11 


13 


2 


10 


4 


10 


5 



Coca-Cola 10 6 

Your Town Video 9 6 

Pharm Boys/Baxter 8 7 

Piper Platics ' 8 7 

lardis Industries 5 10 

Dueblin Company 1 14 

Prototype Equipment 1 14 

Competitive D 

Quiet Storm 12 1 

B&H Mold/Bad Boys 11 . 3 

Cloudy Horse 9 3 

Profusion 8 5 

Slugs 6 7 

Bigjohnsons 5 7 

Big Dawgs 3 ' 9 

Bills Pizza 3 11 

Dowel Movement 1 12 

D 

CIC Roofers 12 1 

Midwest Motor Coach 9 3 

Tigers .8 5 

Pro-Tool 6 7 

Austlns/Llbcrtyviltc 5 6 

IBEW 5 7 

Young Guns/ World Gym 5 8 

Margots 5 8 

GapSlappcrs 2 11 



Chill Whippcrs ' 10 3 

D&G's Limited 10 4 

Sasparilias 9 4 

CPi 9 5 

TjMFramers 8 6 

The Tavern on the Lake Street 6 8 

Spartans 5 7 

Roadklll/Yvonncs 5 8 

Hello Folks/LiU 3 10 

Du-Hawks 2 12 



Bamums/Llbcrtyvlllc Lanes 11 1 

USFP 7 4 

Douglass I'V/Knurklchcads 8 5 

.lardis Industries 6 5 

Bcavis, Butthead & Boys 6 5 

Hastings SB Club 7 6 

Stooges 4 6 

Downlngs Bar 4 7 

Longshots 2 9 

UndcrSU 2 9 

Wednesday League 
Women's Competitive 

Old Gold 15 1 

Mundelein Animal/ 

Arrow Glass 10 5 

RIB/SBG 10 5 

Century 21 Market 

Place/HMI 9 6 

Zooland Pct/Iwcma SL Farm 8 7 

Flex Four G 9 

Shanty . SB 

DreamChascrs 5 10 



Priceless Design 4 9 

Krlstofs Entertainment Center 2 12 



D 

Steltz' Resort 11 1 

lack Frost Iron Works 10 2 
K-Mart/Nllcs .93 

M&M Excavating 8 G 

Cass Photo/Misfits- 7 7 

Y-Not/Grubich 6 7 

Surglpath 5 8 

Schmcrlcr Ford 2 

Pitbulls 



Father-son feud highlights 
family finale at Wilmot 







'^" 




pyg 




i 




1 




s 




'^^^ 




^^ 




^^^v 




^»T*ij 




^^ 




m 




i 




w, 




mh 




w, 




-i-mm 








'V.f- 




•;'i'; 


' 






.*:» 








1. • 




1 '^* 




■^':- 







MICHAEL H. BABICZ 

Correspondant 

Tommy. McGuIre Sr. of 
Antioch defeated his son, Harry, 
Jr., in a "family fucd finale" best- 
ing the lO-car "Beat Your 
Neighbor" field. 

In the mini-mod main, Hank 
Hovorka started out in front 
briefly. Dr. Ken Johnson overtook 
the lead at the completion of the 
first lap. 

A caution flew at the midway 
point ' for a tangle between 
pointleadcr Roy Morrison and his 
brother, Jim, with innocent 
bystander Hovorka making it a 
threesome. Both Morrison's 
ended up out of action. 

On the restart, Sexton put his 
Sexton Painting/Antioch Auto 
Center/Enemy Race Cars Chassis 
into the Jead. Johnson broke 
something on the front end 
bringing out another caution, but 
sending him to the pits. 

Sexton held off a battling 
Hovorka who spim in turn four 
coming for the checkered. 

"ril definitely be here to try 
and make it four in a row," said 
Sexton, noting the next mini- 
modified program on Friday, 
Aug. 12. "It was a little rough out 
there. I saw Hank along side me, 
then all of a sudden he wasn't 
there." Tom Donat took the ini- 
tial lead in the 15-Iap street stock 
main. A caution on lap three for a 
car in turn two saw pointleader 
EJonaine Miles pit while ruiming 
second. 

John Jannssen took the lead 



KHM Plastics 

Ultimale Body 

Four star Auto Body/ 

Untouch. 

Gam-Mcd 

Scgcrdahl Printing 

Silver Clout 

Tavern on the Lake Street 



Waukcgan Sarc and Lock 12 2 

BISDutldcrs 10 3 

Abilities Unlimited 10 3 

ABC Roofers . 9 3 

Last Chance/ 16 Inchcrs 8 6 

Bud Brothers :• 7 6 

Lyons and Ryan 5 8 

]/W Builders/Naked Guns 4 9 

Robinsons ' 1 13 

Legion of Doom ' 14 



Marriott Maulers 12 2 

Mlcro-Cal 10 3 

Hillbillies 9 5 

A-1 Installations 7 6 

McKay Mazda 7 7 
Dichards/ 

Certified Auto Body 6 7 

Dancin' Machine 6 7 

Sportln'Wood 4 9 

Ducce EX 4 10 

Jones Intcrcablc 4 10 

C-Major 

Y-Not Sandbar • . 9 4 

Edwardos/Downlng Bar 6 5 

On a Roll Painting 7 5 
Worms/Hlllcr Constmction/ 

Stans Lumber 7 5 

Bud Lite/Off 7 5 

Ken Cook Trucklng/TPS 7 6 

Don Garden Enterprises 6 6 

Ball Brothers 4 9 

DaBoyz 3 9 

Thursday League 
Induttrlal 

The MudvJIlc Ten B 3 

CF Industries ., 9 4 

Wolohan Lumber 7 4 . 

Segcrdahl Printing 7 4 

Downlngs Bar 7 5 

Dueblin Company 5 6 

y-Not/Kccfer 4 7 

Men With Wood 3 10 

Quill Corp. 2 9 

Competitive D 

Intrupa 7 3 

Slammcrs B 3 



D 

Fodracks 
11 Assault/Gary Stuart 
13 GpncFlshln* 

Oogla Boogia 

Ultimate 

Avanll's/Casc of Hit and Run 

Modern Homes 

Big Johnson's Shotguns 

Mtdv^cst Hose 

Bakes 



D 

Slammcrs 

Preferred Slowboys 

Men With Wood 

Roadrunncrs 

Kaiscrs/Horchak Chiro 

Dynasorcs 

Dan Stubing 

Walgrcens 

Midnight Blue Lounge 

Hello Folks No. 1 . 

D 

Flukes 

Dragons 

Hello Folks No. 2 

GPW Builders 

Nb(s 

Highland Green Nursery 

Capacclo Bros. Furniture 

Fall Guys 

TCI Cable 

Phantom Reign 



7 
7 

6 
5 
4 
3 
2 



11 

10 

7 

6 

7 

5 

4 

3 

2 

2 



11 

9 

B 

7 

4 

5 

5 

4 

4 

3 



10 

9 

7 

6 

7 

5 

6 

6 

3 





3 

,4 

5 
5 
7 
9 
B 




2 

3 
5 
6 
7 
9 
8 
7 
10 




3 
4 
5 
6 
8 
8 
7 
9 
8 



1 
2 

5 
5 
6 
5 
7 
7 
B 
12 



12 


1 


10 


3 


9 


4 


9 


5 


7 


7 



Friday League 






Coed 






Keiths Topsoll 
Sole Survivors 


12 


1. 


10 


4 


Greenwood 76/Ultimatc 


9 


5 


VR&N 


9 


5 


Beyers Bunchs 
JJ Twigs 


8 


6 


6 


.8 


Longshots/Villa Rosa Pizza 


6 


8 


Just Oak 


6 


8 


Bass Brawlers 


3 


10 


Waste Tech 





14 


Coed 






B&H Mold 


12 


2 


A-Tire 


11 


3 


The Unknown 


9 


5 


Quill Corp. 


B 


5 


Odd Balls 


7 


7 



Llndcnhurst Slugg/ 
Sports Authority 



Rapid Overhead 6 8 

OMC Dream Team 5 9 

Gurncc Mills 2 11 

Inglcstdc Citgo 2 12 



Grand Tracks 

Main Evcnt/Rock-N-Roll 

Boss Construction 

Batmen 

Dakotas ' 

Northern Illinois ' 

Mechanical 6 8 

On a Roll Painting 6 8 

Barbarians 1 11 

King of Diamonds 13 



REMAX/Huclclt 10 4 

Landscape Concepts 9 4 

Color Concepts 9 4 

Superior Pavlng/Scalcoat 9 4 

TNT . 8 6 

Black Jax 7 6 

Palatine Ace Hardware 3 10 
Zaromba Man. Slammcrs/ 

Mucllman 3 11 

Big Sticks 2 11 



D 

OTralnas 11 3. 

Knucklehcads/Bumpers 11 3 

Lake County Medical Gas 10 4 

Norfoertll 9 5 

Tappers 7 S 

White Lightning 7 7 

Blasters 5 B 

Abels DIablos 3 10 

Hcitigo/Slammcrs 3 11 

DK Contractors 2 12 

Sunday Lei^e 
American 

Rodger Rabbltt/Champs 12 4 

Lake County Sheriffs/ind 11 5 

Quill Corporatlon/3rd U 5 

Rockies 10 6 

Unity 9 7 

Walldngton Brothers 9 7 

Stack-On Products 5 11 

Crew 7 4 12 

Dynasores 1 . 15 

National 

Head First/Champs 14- 2 

Hewlett Packard/2nd 12 4 

Aauarium/3rd 9 7 

Idio Chiropractic 9 7 

APS Car Quest .88 

Outlaws - 7 9 

Mldniglit Blue 6 8 

Cork Smokers 5 11 

Huskies 1 13 



on lap 10, but one lap later pitted 
with mechanical problems. That 
gave way to Ostergaard and his 
Speed City/Antioch Veteran's 
Taxi/Ring's Radiator Camaro. 

Ostcrgaard's four feature win 
came ahead of Jay Crichton who 
edged out Mike Waterman for 
second as tha race was 
ycUow/checkcr flagcd due to a 
white flag lap spin. 

"I decided I'd run my groove 
instead of trying to nm somebody 
elses," explained Ostergaard. "I 
have to thank my number one 
fan, my wife, Audrey, and my two 
sons who put the car back togeth- 
er each week." 

"Tiiis was my third time run- 
ning and it's a lot of fun, especial- 
ly beating my son and finally win- 
ning," said Harry McGuire Sr. of 
his "Beat Your Neighbor" win. 

The next appearance of the 
street stocks will he on Saturday, 
Aug. 6 as part of the Wilmot 
Speedway Race Against Drugs 
Night The Herb's Auto Part's 
street Stock Challenge Bonus is 
up to $225 as neither Miles nor 
Ostergaard accepted the chal- 
lenge on July 29. 

All yoimg people age 16 and 
under will be admitted free on 
August 6, as guests of Toft Auto 
Racing. Paul Bach's Lake County 
East-West Chrysler-Plymouth/ 
Jeep-Ea^c is sponsoring the 
night Vaj's Garage of Bristol is 
sponsoring the Race Against 
Drugs Custom Car /Truck/ Race 
Car Show to be held from 4 until 7 
p.m. on the fairgrounds. 




Grant cheerleaders 

Grant Community High School named its varsity cheerleadlng squdd for next year. Seniors mak- 
ing ttiG team Include Jenny Greaves, Amber RInkenberger, Rachel Goldstein, JennI Marcomb 
and Kelly Lindgren. Juntors cheering for the varsity squad Include Sarah Shafer. Amanda NIeves, 
Dori Rogers, Sara Bending, Holll Mantas and Misty Colin.— Photo by TIiki Swl«ch 



J 




Lakeland Newspapers wants to hear news of local sporting 
events, clubs, organizations, etc, Black and white photos are 
also welcome. Please send news Items to Claudia M. Lenart 30 
S. Whitney, Grayslake, 60030 or call 223-81 61 . 




ARTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, AT THE NEW GURNEE STO 

THE CELEBRATION BEGINS WITH THESE GREAT BONUS BUYS, GOOD THROUGH MONDAY 





Misses' dresses. Choose 
from a terrific collection of 
fall styles and colors. 59.99- 
89.99. sale 40.19-60.29 



Misses' Lee* one-pocket 
T-shirts. A great variety of 
colors. Save on this fashion 
basic. Reg. 7.99 ea. 



savje 



Jrs.' selected bodysuits 
and tunics. Short sleeved 
styles In many colors. 9.99- 
28.00, sale 4.99-14.00 




Juniors' Palmetto's* sports- 
wear. $18-$32, sale 9.38-18.76 
Save $5 on juniors' bottoms. 
Reg. 24.99 sale 19.99 





Gumee 

Giand Hunt Center 
652S Grand Avenue 

8SS-0707 



iw^ssrrcf^ 




Panties. Choose frorh an Designer fragrances. 

assortment of fashion & basic Drakkar, Ciara. Guess, 
styles. 3/8.97 to 7.00 ea., Liz Claiborne and more. 
sale 3/6.00 to 4.69 ea. $20~$54, sale 16.00^5.90 



Save 66% on a 14k gold Selected famous-maker Citizen and Pulsar* 

18* rope chain. Reg. $1 50 jewelry. Earrings, bracelets, watches. An outstanding 

Save 60% on diamonds & pendants and more. 12.50- collection of styles. 59.50- 

1 4k gold chains...$20-$400 42.00, sale 8.37-28.14 350.00, sale 35.70-210.00 



PHOICBI 

Unda dress pumps. Reg. 36.99 Women's Pu-cuff boot or 
30% off all other women's lace-up boot. Reg. 24.99 pr. 
dress pumps. Reg. 29.99- $8 off kids' selected boots. 
44.99 sale 20.99-31.49 Reg. 24.99 sale 16.99 




i 



Women's & kids' Keds* Men's D-Factor basketball $41 off men's Reebok* 

shoes. Classic Champion, or Satellite cross-training Pump Vert II basketball 

Looney Tunes'", more. 19.99- shoes. Discontinued styles, shoes. Discontinued 

49.99, sale 14.99-37.49 Reg. 64.99 & 69.99 style. Reg. 99.99 



Save S30-$33 on women's Girls' 4-14 Buster Brown* 
Reebok* Umbo and THR apparel. Styles may vary 
Walker shoes. Discontinued by store. Reg. 8.99-26.99, 
styles. Reg. 64.99-67.99 sale 6.02-18.08 



Girls' 7-14 windsuits. 
Reg. 32.99, sale 21.44 
33% off other toddlers'-girls' 
14 windsuits...19.42-29.39 



Boys' 8-20 windsuits, 25.99 
Save 35% on boys' 4-7 
windsuits. Reg. 34.99- 
36.99 sale 22.74-24.04 




X'"fiKltf:«^ 




FIsher-Price* 8e Playskool* $10 off men's Levi's* 

toys. Stimulate your child's Prewashed Indigo 

creativity with quality toys, jeans. Choose f roni three 

1 :99-99.99, sale 1.49-74.99 popular fits. Reg. 29.99 



Young men's Vintage tees. Save $9 on men's Save 40% on men's 

106% cotton in new washed- jersey crew tops. Reg. $28 Hanes* 4-pk. boxed 

down colors. Available in $11 off nnen's Croft & Barrow* dress socks. A variety 

sizes M-XL.Reg. 9.99 ea. rugbys. Reg. $36...sale 24.99 of colors. Reg. $12 



Adults' selected Starter* poly-filled jackets. Thread, 
Earth Tone, Contender, Opponent and mixed-fabric polo 
styles in assorted colors. Teams and styles may vary by 
store. Reg. 99.99-149.99, sale 49.99-74.99 



O 



m 



> 
m 

> 

e 



<« 
^ 




Comforters and All sheets. Choose from our Blankets. Cotton and acrylic Traditional quilts. 39.99- Twin pack pillows. Two 

accessories. Save on ruffles, incredible collection of prints styles in colors to coordinate 54.99, sale 19.99-27.49 poly-fill, machine washable 
shams & more. Reg. 14.99- and solidis. 5.99-99.99, sale with your decor. Reg. 14.99- 30-50% off matching shams pillows for one great price. 
189.99. sale 10.49-132.99 4.49-74.99 49.99. sale 9.74-32.49 & accessories ..sale 8.99-32.99 Reg. 14.99. sale 7.49 



Bath & hand towels and Assorted kitchen terries, 
washcloths. Solids, stripes, scented potholders, flour 

prints, jacquards and more, sack towels. Many colors 
2.99-21.99, sale 1.49-13.39 and styles. Reg. 1.49-1.99 




Lexus lace sets. Swags, 
panels, valances, balloon 
shades & more. Reg. 1 1 .99- 
19.99, sale 5.99-9.99 



Dinnerware sets. Reg. 59.99 
Save 30% on matching 
accessories. Reg. 6.99- 
69.99 sale 4.89-48.99 



KitchenAid* Ultra Power Automatic breadmaker. 
10-speed stand mixer. 4'A- Makes up to 1 J4-pound loaf; 



Plaque remover. Reg. 89.99 Bissell* Power Lifter Plus". Hoover* Lega^"^ vacuum. 
3-pk. brush heads...sale 18.99 Deep cleans carpets and Built in tools. Reg. 21 9.99 



qt. stainless-steel bowl, tilt delay timer, viewing window All other personal care more. Reg. 299.99 *^r?nn^i?wrifp^nX°^"*^ 



head and more. Reg. 249.99 and more: Reg. 299.99 



I _^ • I .« MM ««M #««« <-^ I *• t ann cartoH or wfite to the Hoovef* 

electncs...sale 2.99-149.99 64-oz. solution. .sale 8.99 company for details. 








Portfolio CD tower or 
Soiiax CD/tape storage. 

Reg. 39.99 & 79.99, 
sale 19.99 & 39.99 

PLUS, PICK UP OUR 
76-PAGE BACKTO-SGHOOL 
SALE GATALOG FOR EVEN 
MORE GREAT SAVINGS 
THROUGH SATURDAY, 
AUGUST 13! 



Save 40% on a 50% off a photo box, 

Samsonite* Tahoe bridge magazine holder or coupon 

set. Set includes table & 4 caddie. It's the perfect time to 

cloth-seat chairs. Reg. 99.99 get organized. Reg. 9.99 ea. 



Talking picture frame. 

Holds a 10-sec. recorded 
message. A great gift 
idea. Reg. 18.99 



Save $21 on a Sony* 
3-pc. stereo or Unideh* 
10-channel cordless 
phone. Reg. 79.99 ea. 



^^^»1CSii^^SS)IS*'^''^B^'^»'K!i!» 



g^: 





SBMM 

$16 off a Game Boy'' system. $61 off an RCA portable 

With Mario Land 2 video CD stereo or personal CD 

game. Take the excitement player. Stereo with AM/FM 

with you. Reg. 59.99 and more. Reg. 1 59.99 ea. 



$500 SHOPPING SPREE! 

REGISTER TO WINBOTH FRIDAY AND 

SATURDAY. A DRAWING WILL BE HELD 

EACH DAY ATOUR NEW STORE. 




$31-$41 off a Sony* Save $1 10 on a Leisure' 

cordless phone or AT&T 5-pc. luggage set. Includes 
phone with answering tote; carry on; 24" , 26 " & 
machine. Reg, 119.99-129.99 28" pullmans. Reg. 199.99 

EXTENDED HOURS: SHOP 

fflDAY AND SATURDAY 

8:00AM TO 9:30PM 



> 

e 
e 

VI 



r 



o 

o 




• fl^pi 






III 

J 




I COMMUNITY UeIancI Newspapers AuquiT 5, 1994 



(■■■.■■. 

mi 




H^'iri 



f$^ 



''ki'^Vi 











:?>f(. 







'i/^^^^-^r 







SKS 



i 



i: 



Alpha Hydroxy Products Are Free 
With A Free Skin Analysis. 



f jH ....J.'^;\t'.- : 



IS!^!: 



KKSi? 






M 



'^. 



-^i 



isei 



Ail 



W^ 



m 



vmi 



^^ 






©iife 









>f'^)i 






■i^;v>^ 



;1P^ 



^^^ 



Vt-;?'l' 



,i^Afl 






iM 









M^ 



■»>Pix: 






.:•:.:•:■:•:«•:' 



i^y^i 



■Toioro 






LSSik''*! 






WSI 



■:«>!«»:c 



5SS:; 



^ 



^SS 



>••:•:•:•:♦:•»:•: 



•r»»»i«;i 



.■.'•:.'.%:•!•:•:•:•:•:' 



SW-V 



>:•:•:■:•»:• 



»:»!•:•:•:•:•> 



.:.:.:.!.:•:.:•:•:•»:• 






»>:•>:•>:•:' 



•:•:•:•:•:•:•:• 



>!•:•:•:•:•»:•;•:' 



>:•!•:■:•:•:• 



.T.:«:»>!«:i 



C!"SJ 



jv>*y-';) 



1^; 



:i.<^ 



[itfe 



m 



nm\ 



Wiiim^^ 



J:-gs::ss 



^ 






*KrM 



;>::•: :S::-:S 



.•,',•.•.■.'.•.'.".".:.>:. 







.»: 



K'K 



•:•:»:•>:•••:' 



■»»;5s;»: 



•:•:•:•:•:•;•;•:■ 



•>:•:•>:•> 






t^f^'e? 



>:•:•:•:•>»:■ 



.x«:'X':-» 



C»X'»>» 



■:«:»:«»io 



>:•:•>»:• 



>:>:•:•»:•:•: 



•!WwW 



•it^ 



a<J 



i-^^ 



.»'»:»:o:i 



>:•:•:•;•:•:•:•;' 



i".!.'«!.!.>"i 



i;»;>>>:«>:< 



pr:^:sS? 



>:•!•>:•:•:• 



"::i:::S5$ 



'•I-W-WST. 



■#1 






.!«%«:•:' 



\t'yyyyyyy.<yjK'j 



•yyyyyyit 



i 



>>:•:•:•:•> 



<>:•:•:•:•> 



iwiS 



f^ 



Ipi^^'M 



IS I 



•:.!•!•:■:•:• 



.:.:.:.>:•:.>:•:•:«:• 



•:»:•>:•:•:•:< 



v«%%% • • • • 



SftWSS 



:•:.:•:•:•:•:' 



»:•:•:•:•» 



i 



^ll 



■'sr': 



V»5:^: 



^ 










^'--K 



■■m 



'•i*>,'ii' 






W-iW^*? 



ms 



t'<V 



•/i*:: 



^:;m 



■>iS 



*fefe 






(I 





^•i 



^^ 



/y.-lwfj 



ft^^v^ 



Kj«ii 






rr?'.' 



.«VjJ 






isgffl^ji 







»M 




W.V.* 

.-.-.v.v.v.* 

,..•:?:•:•:♦:•:•:•:• 
*¥:•:•:*:•:•:*:•:•::: 



hm 





C<i-i^ 



am- 






AtijqiJST iF, I'y94 lAkElANcI 'NEWS|iApkRs'6djUWtV. 



Women recruits arrive at Great Lakes 



JUDY LAZARUS 



"Welcomo qbdqrd".... Rocrults find out what comes noxt 
lino up for InstrucHons at ttio Inpfocossing cantor. 



staff Reporter 

The first women recruits to be 
trained at Recruit* Training 
Command Great Lakes have 
arrived. A total of 40 women and 
330 men arrived In a single day 
last week to form the historic first 
co-ed company at Great Lakes. , 

The training of female 
recruits Is part of the base closure 
■ and realignment process in 
which Naval Tralnhig Centers in 
Orlando and San Diego will be 
.consolidated at Great Lakes. 

Recruits were aliowcd one 
telephone call home to tell of 
their safe arrival. Subsequent 
procedures Included urinalysis, 
thoy opening paperwork/ and ditty 
bag Ijssue. After a short sleep, 



came breakfast, haircuts, mailing 
civilian clothes home, psycholog- 
ical testing, and the "moment of 
truth," In which recruits arc 
asked to disclose any disqualify- 
ing information that they may 
have failed to released during the 
recruiting process. 

Twelve of the women 
received haircuts, since regula- 
tions require that their hair be no 
longer than the top of the collar. 

Company 201, the fkst one to 
include women recruits, consists 
of 40 men and 40 women. It's two 
company commanders are Chief 
Boatswain Mates ' Francesca 
Bradshaw from Great Lakes and 
Operations Specialist Second 
Class Vivian Cousins from 
Oriando - one providing experi- 



ence of pushing recruits at Great 
Lakes and the other provtdbig 
input on women recruits. 

''Our company Is all set up," 
Bradshaw said, -'^e'rc looking 
forward to it It*s a challenge. We 
enjoy pushing recruits," ' . 

Bradshaw and Cousins met 
two weeks ago. "She's real 
squared away," Bi'adshaw said of 
her fellow company commander, 
. "This first company is our 
pilot," noted Machinist Mate 
Ciiief Ron Bennett, in processing 
assistant leading chief petty offi- 
cer. "There's been lots of talk 
back and forth with Orlando." 

Men and women will be in 
recruit companies together when- 
ever there arc enough women to 
allow that to take place. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 





|Right Mbm^^^^ I 

:^Decision on unit district 
heads off nightmare 



PAGEB4 




Ofifenders may be going to Lakehurst court 



Women's 
Health, 

Sleriy Miller, M.D., pre 
miers column on health 
issues 
PAGE B25 

Headlining 

Eddie Rabbittplays at 
McHenry County Fair 
PAGE B7 




KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter . 

After seven years of talks and 
recommendations, the branch 
courts of the Circuit Court could 
be consolidated Into one loca- 
tion. 

Upon County Board approval, 
the Zion, Waukegan, North 
Chicago and Prairie View branch 
courts could be adjudicating out 
of one building near Lakehurst 
Mall in Waukegan. . " 

The Lake County Law and 
Judicial, and Finance commit- 
tees passed recommendations 
to centralize the four branch 
courts. * 

Instead of having four branch 
courts operating in city or town- 
ship facilities on select days of the 
week, two courtrooms in the new 
location will be handling village 
and traffic violations eight hours 
a day, five days a week. 

That would leave two sites, 
one In Grayslake and the new one 



in Waukegan, to maximize space, 
Court Administrator Robert 
Zastany said. 

The move, he added, would 
prevent the circuit court from 
disrupting the activities at the 
four branch locations. . 

"it will let city and township 
facilities better serve their grow- 
ing populations," Zastany said. 

Three years ago, village offi- 
cials in Fox Lake and Wauconda 
asked the circuit court to move 
for the- same reasons. The 
Grayslake branch was created as 
a result, which Zastany said is uti- 
lizing Its space and time more 
effectively now. 

When court officials first 
began talking about consoUdat- 
ing seven years ago, they recom- 
mended a location at Belvldere 
Mall in Waukegan. Certain land 
covenants prohibited that deal 
from going through, however. 

Zastany said when the space 
became avaUable at L.akchurst 



Mall, officials jumped at the 
opportunity. 

Its proximity to 1-94 and 
routes 41, 120 and 43 made It an 
Ideal location, he said. 

"You have the road network 
there that can handle the traffic," 
Zastany said. . 

He also said It might boost 
consumer traffic there, wliich has 
declined since Gurncc Mills 
opened. 

Officials, he said, also consid- 
ered the population and geo- 
graphical centers of the county 
before finding the available space 
at Lakehurst. 

The Grayslake branch was an 
ideal location because the geo- 
graphical center of the county Is 
Rte. 45 and Rte. 120. 

The population center of the 
county is In the Libertyville- 
Vernon Hills vicinity, which will 
increase travel time for police 
and citizen offenders who were 
assigned to the Prairie View 



branch for court appearances. 

To accommodate southern 
Lake County residents, Zastany 
said, commitments have been 
made to begin searching for 
another branch in the southern 
end of the county once the 
Lakehurst facility reaches a satu- 
ration point. .. 

Village officials from Vernon 
HUls and Buffalo Grove oppose 
the hew site and have prepared 
written resolutions against the 
move. 

"Wc Jcnow pcople'arc going to 
be happy, and wc know some 
people arc going to be really 
unhappy with the new site," 
2^tany said, but he added the 
county is also in the process of 
designing a scheme to limit court 
appearances in Waukegan for 
police officers from the southern 
end of the county. 

The County Board Is expected 
to make a final vote on the new 
site Aug. 9. 



Attorney General's report highlights achievements 




MARY FOLEY __^ 

Staff Reporter 

The 1993 Annual Report from 
Attorney General Roland Burris 
highlights the offices crime, 



advocacy, consumer, seniors and 
fraud crackdown initiatives. 

During the past several years, 
the Attorney Gencrafs office won 
legislative approval for the first- 



County Mania 

Best selling "Bridges of ^ 
Madison County" brings ■ 
tourism to Iowa 
PAGEB7 




Fair beauty 

Miss Ubertyvllle Jllllan Lotysz (center) was crowned Miss Lake County 1994 at ttie annual Lake 
County Fair. Congratukating her are left. 1994 Illinois County Rair Queen Amy Maguire and 1993 
Miss Lake County JodI Knox of Mundelein.— Photo by Bill Dwmody Jr. 



ever statewide grand jury to Conspiracy Prosecution Task 
investigate and prosecute drug Force within the office to support 
traffickers, in addition, the office the grand jury's activities, 
created the Cash Reporting The office also created a num- 

Transactlon Unit and Drug her of advocacy divisions. The 

Women's Advisory Commission 
was created in 1993 to provide a 
means for guiding and advising 
the Attorney General's Office on 
the identification and prioritiza- 
tion of women's issues and initia- 
tives. This commission includes 
50 professionals with expertise in 
advocacy, social work and law 
enforcement The group also is 
charged with the task of identify- 
ing important legislation on 
behalf of women. 

Based on the same model, the 
Children's Advocacy . Advisory 
Council was formed. This group 
is geared toward the develop- 
ment of Ideas for the prevention 
of child abuse^and the protection 
of Children's rights. 

Other advocacy groups 
Include the civil rights division 
and a conmilssion on Africa- 
American males. The office also 
led a successful effort to add the 
Crime Victims' Bill of Rights to 
the state Constitution. 

In the area of consumer 
affairs, the Attorney General's 
office promulgated auto 
See A1TY. GENERAL page B2 



ii 




iCOUNliYrjlf^kEM^EwsFfApEits August 9,1 9f 4 



i ■ ■ ■ » > I ■ 



Netsch still knocks in trick shot in Ryg fund raiser 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 
Staff Reporter 

The setting was perfect, albeit 
a bit unusual for a major cam- 
paign fond-raiser. 

Democrat Governor candi- 
date Dawn Clark Netsch was 
expected July 30 to demonstrate 
her wcU-known billiards skills at 
Slate Street BUilards in Vernon 
HUls as part of a major campaign 
fund-raiser for County Clerk can- 
didate Kathy Ryg. 

Netsch, the guest of honor, 
however, was sidetracked by an 
illness to her running mate Penny 
Scvems and could not attend the 
event. 

Netsch did manage to pick up 
the cue as she called Ryg at the 
classy pool hall to extend her 
regrets for not making the event 
and her best wishes to Ryg in her 
drive for the coveted County 
Cleric scat 

"If 1 were there, I would show 
you a couple of things on how to 
play pool," Netsch told Ryg and 
her guests over loud speakers via 
telephone. 

Netsch quickly gained the 

Atty. General- 

From page Bl 

advertisng regulations, proposed 
legislation to require increased 
disclosure in sweepstakes and 
prize promotions. The proposed 
sweepstakes legislation was 
vetoed by the Governor. 

Legislation regarding 900 tele- 



attention of voters with her com- 
mercials that presented a down- 
home Netsch making trick shots 
at a pool hall vdth the slogan "A 
straight sliootcr with real solu- 
tions for Illinois." 

One of those solutions Netsch 
is banking on includes a a)ntro- 
vcrsial income tax increase that 
would be earmarked to schools 
and property tax relief— a plan 
that reduces property taxes by 10 
percent, she said. 

But Netsch lent her support to 
Ryg by pointing out Ryg's experi- 
ence as a (Vernon HiUs) munici- 
pal clerk and her ability to carry 
on the voter- friendly tradition left 
by former county clerks Grace 
Mary Stem and Linda Hess. 

"Grace Mary Stern and linda 
Hess have shown how to run a 
very user-frlcndly ofTicc. You (Ryg) 
will carry on that tradition as Lake 
County Cleric," Netsch said. 

Following Nctsch's telephone 
address, Ryg noted that in her 
preparations for the billiards 
event she learned that pool hus- 
tlers were called "chumps" or 
"squares." 



"I don't want to be a chump or 
a square. I'm virorking too hard to 
be Lake County Qerk," Ryg said. 

She went on to point out that 
60 percent of the voters in Lake' 
County voted Republican In the 
last election and she stiU faces a 
brisk challenge as ' a Democrat 
candidate for one the few Lake 
County elected offices to be held 
by the Democrats. 

She also said her Republican 
challenger Willard Hclander will 
be trying to stress during the cam- 
paign that she is a woman, that 
she is qualified for the position 
through her work as executive 
director of the Central Lake 
County Transportation 

Management Association and 
that the two-party system is a 
moot point. 

"People in their conscience 
know that the two-party system is 
an important part of democracy," 
Ryg said. 

Rygi on the other hand, is bet- 
ting on her experience as a 
Vernon Hills Village Qerk as welJ 
as her other areas of municipal 
experience including district 



director of the Municipal Qerks 
of Illinois, treasurer of the 
Municipal Clerics of Lake County 
and a member of the 



International Institute of 
Municipal Clerks. 

Said Ryg, "Experience — I am a 
known quantity as a clerk." 



phone numbers was strength- 
ened this year, and the office help 
in the passage of reforms in the 
Charitable Trusts Act 

Senior citizens were not 
ignored by the Attorney General 
cither. The office won passage of 
the law creating criminal penal- 




ties for fraudulent sale of "living 
trust" arrangements. They have 
also initiated the Eldcriy Services 
Officer Training. This training Lako County Clork candtdcrta Kathy Ryg speaks with Domocrat 
provides law enforcement offi- gubomotorlal candldato Dawn Clark Notsch. Notsch could not 
cers with knowledge on combat- attond Ryg's fund ralsor at Sloto Stroot Billiards In Vomon Hills but 
ing cider abuse and other crimes managod to address Ryg's supporters over tlio phono.— Photo by 
against the elderly. Kovin Hanrahan 



pThE LaIce CouNiy FaIr — — — - •" ■ '/ . ' . — - 

Libertyville dominates Lake County F!air contests 



The 66th annual Lake County 
Fair featured its first compact car 
demolition derby, an agriculture dis- 
play by 4-H members and the Farm 
Bureau as well as a midway filled 
with carnival games and ride. 

Libertyville residents dominated 
the stage at this years fair. Residents 
took home both beauty queen titles 
and the junior and senior divisions 
in the talent show. 

Miss Libertyville Jillian Lotysz 
was named Miss Lake County and 
Little Miss Libertyville Carley 
Marcelle Rciff was named Little Miss 
Lake County. 

In the talent division, Angela , 
Beltchenko of Libertyville gained 
first place in the junior division for 
her performance of a lyric ballet 
Kristina Vanni, 14, also of 
Libertyville, took top honoi^ in the 
senior division for her ventriloquist 
performance;. 

Jody Meyer, 30, of Vernon Hills 
took first place in the adult division 
of the contest. She is also known by 
her stage name of Shoshana. 




! 



\ 










:?zi; 




■J «:■ .::. 1 . ' . t .• ,' 



i 

I 



:; 



I 



'■*''■- 




^ < WiMtvcr 9Jf f4; UlcElANd Nb^|>c'Rs) COUN 



At a G Iance 




LaIce 
CouNiy 



School districts mull unit fate 

lAKE VIIXA— Reaction to Lake County Regional 
Superintendent of Schools Ed Gonwa's decision to 
reject a unit district was mixed among tlie district's 
impacted by the proposal. MUlbum and Antioch 
Elethcntary District superintendents said if the unit 
plan isn't accepted by Dr. Joseph Spagholo,- state 
superintendent, they will have to plan for facility 
growth. Other superintendents arc taking a wait and 
see approach until the final decision is made by the 
state. ' 

Road boss wants 

LAKE VIIXA TOWNSHIP— Highway Commissioner 
Jim Scmmerling wants the township board to sign an 
intergovernmental agreement with him allowing the 
highway department personnel to plow driveways for 
senior and handicapped citizens. He cited the public 
needs and public safety as reasons for the program. 
Township Supervisor Sue lianson said the township is 
willing to cooperate within the limits of the law. She 
said state law rules out the use of public vehicles on 
private property. 

Gumee awards bid 

GURNEE— A nine-month construction schedule is 
expected to commence shortly after die Gurncc Village 
Board agreed to award a bid to Camosy Inc. for the 



satellite fire station. Trustees voted 4-2 to award the • 
bid to the Waukcgan-based firm. Trustees Verna 
Rochclcau and Mark Ratfcldcrs voted no. Approving 
the contract were trustees James Yost, Dave O'Brien, 
Bob Amadcn and Jerry Smith. - 

Jones wins chieJPs post 

GURBiEE— Robert D. Jones will be the new police 
chief In Gumee. Jones was selected from a nationwide 
search that Included 152 candidates. Village trustees 
namcdjonos by an unaniinous decision Monday. 
Former Police Chief John Ward resigned March 9. 

Opposes court closure 

VERNON miXS— Village ofllcials have prepared a 
resolution opposing the possibility of closing down the 
Prairie View Branch Court. Next week County Board 
members are expected to vote on whether to centralize 
the Prairie View, Zion, Waukegan and North Chicago 
branch courts into one location near Lakehurst maU. 
The move would force all south Lake County police 
officers and citizens charged with minor offenses to 
make their court appearances in the Grayslake branch. 
County officials say the cost-effective move would bet- 
ter utilize space, while others argue the move would be 
more costly for those living south of Girayslakc. 

Open house attracts many 

MUNDEI£lN--About 400 people made it a point- 
to accept the Munde]ein Police Department's invita- 
tion last weekend. They not only saw how the depart- 
ment worked but also had an opportunity to examine 
helicopter, a squad car and the crime van. Children 
had their pictures taken with McGrtiff the Crime Dog 
and were flngerprinted for I-Search while parents 
learned more about Drug Abuse Resistance Education 
(DARE) and how the department interprets evidence t 
solve cases. < 

Woodland may go year round 

GAGES LAKE— The reconmiendation by the 
growth committee in Woodland School District 50 is 
for the board to look into the possibility of instituting 
year around school. The committee suggested a five 
track program would be the appropriate choice of 



structure. Basically the student population would be 
divided Into five groups, with only four groups attend- 
ing school at any given time. A group would attend 
school for 60 school days, then have 15 school days off. 
Students would also have two weeks at Christmas and 
the entire nionth of July off. The need for alternatives 
was explored by the board because student population 
growth is outpacing the districts ability to build more ' 
faculties. * - ■:'■'■■■ 

School to cost more 

ISLAND LAKE— Hie cost of building the Island .. 
Lake school is more than district officials expected, 
but is not more than they can handle. At a price tag 
of around $7.4 million, the new school will cost 
$800,000 more than voters approved in building 
bonds last November. William Harkln, Dist. 118 
director of finance and operations, said one reasoii , 
for the increase is the hi^er than anticipated bids 
for phase 11 of the project, which includes construc- 
tion of the school building on Newport Court. The 
accepted base bid of $5,965,000 was approximately 
$500,000 more than anyone anticipated, he said. The 
four additional classrooms were added at a cost of 
$285,000. 



Train kills 22-yeBr-old 

LONG LAKB— A womu on tht north tide of the 
Ung Uki ntt roid tnda crawini^to git to Rte. 134 
wu hit by a commuter trtln around 7 Lm. 
Widniidijf. Stephinlt Biille, 32, who reportedly 
reilded on Auguatini Ave. with hir huiband, either 
didn't He the train and etopped on the tracki, or 
attempted to croti over them oefoie the fait-moving . 
npreii train fmaihed Into her lata model compact 
Ford. The Metre train drasfied the ear at leaet a 

3uarter-mUe eut almoit to Fabneld Rd. BaiUewM 
ead on erilval accordlni to Fox Lake jperamedica 
who reepondcd. Commuten were delayed more 
than an hour due to the accident. There are no 
eroiiln||ateeattbeMah»8ttraG]u. Onnt Townihip 
Supervisor Gordy Kleifen'haa uked the vUUfe 
board to write a letter to Metia. 



i 




Hofeld attends Antioch fund raiser 

Democratic Laic© County Sheriff candidate RIctiard 
Jablonskl enjoyed guest speaker Al Hofeld who traveled 
north to the Antioch Country Club for a fund raiser In 
Jabloriskl's honor. "He's going to bo our next sheriff," said 
•the Democratic candidate for Illinois attorney general.— 
Photo by Tina Swioch 



-Pet of ihE WEEk 



This hound needs home 




Popcye is a handsome, 2 year 
old Beagle mix. 'Hiis short, medi- 
um size male has a white body 
with attractive black patches, 
lirown patciics on his face, and a 
white tipped tail. If you love 
Beagles, you'll love our Popcye. 

He has an active, playful, typi- 
cally Beagle personality that is sure 



to win your heart. Livcly.and affec- 
tionate, Popcye gives kisses and 
still acts like a puppy. Very people 
oriented, he adores attention and 
thrives on loving interaction. 
Popcye will make an outstanding 
pet for a family looking for an 
active, smaller dog. Popcye has 
been waiting eagerly for a home 
since November of 1993. 

A cash donation of $55 includes 
free spay/neuter, collar, leash, first 
shots, ifoUow-up care and more. 

Orphans of the Storm is located 
at 2200 Rivcrwoods Rd., in 
Dcerficld. Hours arc 1 1 a.m. to 5 
p.m., seven days a week. Call 945- 
0235 for furtlicr information. 



Lake County's Largest 

Chrysler-Plymouth 

Dodge-Dodge Truck 



c:-> 



^ 



FOX LAKE, IL 

TAIRCONDiriONINGSERVtcTI 

I Fac<oryTraln»d Technicians- we'll I 
' Add upHo 1 to. ol Freon, Inspect Air j 
I Condrtionlng System and Pmssu re | 
■ Test (o r Leaks. — i 

*4d.69 

I Valid l hniB-tS-0 ^ ^^ J 

[looiifsYiEisER^c^^ 

I •tapKlhoMilitdWi Kar^Utairt I 



.tapKlhOMilltdWl 

Ills*"*) 
^■MlMlrtlQI 






^a 



„-^ 



1^49.95 

I ^alidlhrue-l&-9^ ^_ J 

|TNlElAlnENAiEluiiE¥l 



I mCy ahdtt 

• Cynndtr 
tCftkiehf 

.tt^KTin'intinpnrti 



'91.03 
'94.00 



I 



I.» bnvi]. >^ id • ||m4 (I •n'oili) AnNdM K^TPid tA 
atu tun l-sa eat tnl lid iMtm 1(74 H^) 

DOOQE TRUCK PRICES MATT VARY 

LOn« pond Oliu n 1 e-D4. Piaaanl ciMpun Hlini | I 
«U|iom«rp«iclala. TuoBnallndkidfld. I 






''-v^ 



'^iw^r 



19e4FIVB-STAII 

SERVICE OUAUTY AWARD 



^ 



c:::5:iX3— I 



SANDY McKIE and SONS 



CHRYSIIR PIVMOUTH OOOGt AND OOOGE IRUCKS 



•«• nn llMi^ • w tt i p^ rmt* • ■■ la • p 



81 South Rtt. 12 



^jgANDY 



SERVICE PARTS ,^- 

OPEN MONDAY THOU FRIDAY 7.00 «.m. to S;00 p.m. 
CALLt07-e4Tl 



>X LAKt. IL 



7<»-5a7-M73 




jED^IpiyfAL, lA|<E^ct NwspApES AUQDST 9,'^9%4 





In niinois, with its multiplicity of local governmental 
units, movement of political boundaries is rare. Change is 
undertaken only for the most compelling reasons. ' - , 
. Thafs why Lake County Circuit Court^-afiprbvalin ^^ ; 
1992 of the transfer of ai five square-mile areiaflrom the>rcr- 
Vernon Area Fire Protection Dist. to the Coimttyside Fire - ^ 
Protection Dist; came as a surprise. Vernon appealed the 
boundary change, considereid a 'tonsolidatiorf' by v 
Countryside, The appeal has been upheld by a ruling in 
the 2nd Dist. Appellate Court. 

In reality, the boundary change, couched in special leg- 
islation and orchestrated by Vernon Hills trustees, was a 
bald-faced land grab. Appellate judges saw the relocation v 
for what it was and ruled the action unconstitutional. 

Involved in the boundary change were two shopping 
centers and homeowners in two subdivisions. The appel- 
late court decision did not unravel questions about taxes 
paid since 1992 and costs to individual businesses and 
homeowners of changing fire alarm systems. That will be 
another chapter in a thoughtless adventure. = ^ ^ 

Vernon Hills trustees and tlieir legal advisers who hap- ■ 
pen to be State Sen. Adeline GeorKaris and her associ- ; 
ates, have taken a rather cavalier attitude, chalking up the^ 
attempted boundary change apparently ^jsliEishot;Wor^ 
taking. Their immediate reaction was to announce plans y 
to appeal the appeal. Mayor Roger Byrne shriiggedoftthe^- 
appellate order, saying that the boundary change was; : 
intended to save homeowners and businesses money. 
PiUng up legal fees and lobbying costs seems to be an odd 
way to save money. 

While the politicians and lawyers sort out things, busi- 
ness owners in Marketplace ana River Tree Court, and the 
householders in Sugar Creek and Stone Fence Farms can 
^consider themselves fortunate that whatever fire district j 
they're in, they'll obtain excellent fire protection from 
either Vernon or Countryside. 



Decision on unit 




There may be room forargument that Lake County 
Schools Supt. Ed Gonwa was reaching when he turned 
thumbs down on a petition for a referendum to create a 
new unit school district encompassing Lake Villa 
Township. 

At the same time, depending on indtyidual viewpoint, 
the argument stands that Gonwa may have headed off . 
nightmarish problems that would have followeda suc- 
cessfijlvote on unification ofschool districts in the town- 
ship, including construction of a new high school, 

Foi-ldie record; Gonwa found fault with the petition on 
grounds thatthe rural Millbum School serving one of the 
last countrysidie areas of the county would be reduced to 
turn-of-the-centuiy size because of loss of both enroll- 
ment and assessed valuation. 

vOfficiaUy, GoriwaV finding doesn't drive a stake into the 
heart of a Lake Villa unit proposal, sought for nearly two 
years by the Committee of 10; which saw autonomy, self- 
cletermination and escape from Antibch Hi^'s chronic 
(financial problems as benefits of unification. There still 
oare appeals technicalities and a late August deadline for a 
teyiewby the state superihtelident. ButGonwa's soul- 
seaiching decision is looked upon by the Committee of 
! 10 as'crippling. . , 

: Taxpayers can take solace that a $34 million debt for a 
hew high school has been avoided, years of compensa- 
tion adjiistthehts to neighboring districts willbe unnec- 
essary and |he trauma of pupiluphea^ liotbe expe- 
rienced. Unification isn't ap^ are there any easy, 
answers to the p^roblems of public education today. 



— Vi EWpoi INT , 

Gesture of friendship- 
here's a ticket, sir! 



DILL SCHROEDER 



Publisher 

Ready for a laugh? 

Readers in a magazine poll on 
their favorite vacation state cred- 
ited Wisconsin with the friend- 
liest highway patrol (tic). 

Maybe, 

From personal experience and 
talcs related by friends, the uni- 
formed upholders of the law in 
Wisconsin seem to go out of their 
way to personally greet as many 
Illinois visitors as possible — ^with 
traffic citations. 

Welcome to Daiiyland. By the 
way, credit cards arc accepted. 

It's hard to argue with the 
magazine poll's other fmdings 
that gave our neighbor to the 
north 13 first place awards 
including: best state parks, best 
maintained highways and best 
rest stops. 

LEGEND RETURNS— Tony 

Bennett knocked 'cm dead again 
during his annual return to 
Ravinia. Critics say he's singing 
better than ever. My favorite. 



Tony never forgets Highland 
Park. It was at the old Villa 
Modcrne strawhat theater that 
the famed crooner discovered in 
1955 that his future was as a 
singer, not an actor. A "Guys and 
Dolls" role was not memorable 
for tlie legend. 

MAN-SIZED JOB— If thhigs 
arc bogging down for Gcoi^e 
Ranncy Jr. with the remodeling 
Job on his Casey Rd. farm home, 
there's a reason. Ranncy, the dri- 
ving force behind innovative 
Prairie Crossing development on 
Rtc. 45, is the head of the coordi- 
nation council appointed by Gov. 
Edgar to reform Jolict Arsenal for 
civilian use, basically as a huge 
nature preserve. The governor 
couldn't have picked a better per> 
.son for the Job then envlronmen- 
tatist Ranncy. 

MEMORIES— Another Lake 
County Fair has come and gone, 
but the memories linger, like the 
delicious barbecue pork sand- 
wich served on the midway by 




John Doctsch, who'll be rcmcm- 
bered as the host of Johnny D's, 
one of the best seafood restau- 
rants ever in Lake County. The 
zesty barbecue was worth the 
price of admission. John, we miss 

yourcookingl 

******* 

DOUBLE FIRST— Not only 
have the first women recruits 
arrived at Great Lakes Naval 
Training Center, the first compa- 
ny containing both men and 
women has begun training as 
Company 281. One of the two 
company commanders is a new- 
comer from Orlando, where 
women were trained, exclusively 
before the Navy decided to con- 
solidate all recruit training at' 
- Great Lakes. Welcome, ladies. 
***ik*** \ 

Bill Schroeder offers editorial 
commentary ever Tuesday on 
Lake County Live presented by 
STAR Channel 3/E/.& Cable at 
5:30 and 7:30 p.nu 



LL/I I V-/I %I#\L Newspapers 



u-m::' 



Letters TO T^E EdiTOR 



■ -t ^i^ (j.^ 



Need aerial truck 

Editor. 

On Sunday, July 25, 1 witnessed as others did a 
devastating fire in Lake Zurich. The Vdlage Print 
Shoppc (owned by local residents) is gone. VoUe's 
Bridal Alterations is badly damaged along with 
Burkes Photography studio. 

Our firefighters, along with reportedly 13 other 
stations, worked very hard and non-stop to control 
and extinguish the fire. Two other villages sent In 
their aerial ladder trucks to battle the blaze. I can't 
help but wonder what would have happened if 
those aerial trucks were needed in their own vil- 
lages. I believe the rest of the business in that area 
would also be gone. 

Wc need an aerial truck in Lake Zurich. We also 
need to pass the Lake Zurich Rural Fire Protection 
Districts referendum on the November ballot. 

The men and women of the Lake Zurich Fire 
Dept are highly qualified and do everything they 
can to help sustain life and property when there is a 
fire. Let's help them out. Let's give them the equip- 
ment they need to do the best job they can do. 

Pam Hoffman 
Lake Zurich 

How to waste tax money 

Editon 

1 fmd it amazing that Mr. Hook, Vernon Hill 
trustee, is "obviously disappointed" their bought 
and paid for law has been found unconstitutional. 

It should have been obvious that when you write 
your own law, pay a lobbyist to get it passed, then 
sue based on that law, that the law is special legisla- 
tion, therefore unconstitutional, not to mention 
sneaky, as all done in private as far as I can deter- 
mine. 

What's disappointing is the Lake County Circuit 
Court didn't see it this way from the start! What's 
disappointing is that this fiasco has cost the village, 
Countryside Fire and Vernon Fire well in excess of 
$500,000 so far! That doesn't include the $300,000 or 
so lost by Vernon Fire from this year's tax receipts! 

That doesn't include the additional tax burden 
to all property owners in the improperly trans- 
ferred area of 42.7 percent or some $150 to $5,000 
■ each! That doesn't include the cost to owners to 
switch alarms from Vernon to Countryside and 
now back to Vernon at some $500 to $700 per 



business tinies two! 

What's disappointing is the lack of concern for all 
these owners by their elected officials and the secre- 
cy that surrounded tills whole deal from the onset, 
including at least three private meetings at The 
Forge Club costing $797. 

Mr. Cashman's idea is to make it all a "moot 
point and form a municipal fire department six 
years earlier than anticipated." I doubt Countryside 
Fire would consider this as moot! I certainly don't 
consider some $1,000,000 of wasted taxpayers' 
money as moot! . 

Who do wc contact for reimbursement of these 
unconstitutional costs incurred? 

Steven T.Klein 
Vernon Hills 

Inviting road problems 

Editon 

The rerouting of Rte. 45 is nothing more than the 
greed of a hand FuU of inhabitants of the Village of 
Millbum. Most of these people see that this com- 
munity has some historical significance. They see 
this hamlet as another Long Grove. 

Not so. The movement of Rtc. 45 will cause many 
future problems with flooding. McDonald Woods 
Forest Preserve will lose some land to the new road; 
not much area that can be used for water retention 
except bellow the site of the old crcameiy. 

1 own 38 acres west of Millbum. The plan of these 
cretins is to have new Rtc. 45 run through the best 
part of my land, This was decided at closed, invita- 
tion only meetings, to keep out malcontents like 
myself. With all the building, flood water from 
Undcnhurst and the new Rtc. 45, there is not 
enough area on my land to hold all water provided 
by rains much like those back in 1986 and 1987, 

Let us not overlook the number of homes that 
must be removed. It was reported that one would 
go, mine is eight. From the parsonage of the 
Millbum Church to the house on Grass Lake Rd. 
that is blue in color. But then Old Mill Creek wants 
the new Rte. 45 to go through Undcnhurst. 

The mayor of Old Mill Creek sounds like the 
sheep in George Orwell's book "Animal Farm" when 
he states that of Rte. 45 is the natural boundaiy 
between Lindenhurst and Old Mill Creek. The nat- 
ural boundary is the township line. This land 
See LETTERS page B5 



i 

1 



I 












i 



; 



. AiiqusT 5 ,1ff4 U^kEUNd'NE^vipApo»^ci?lJl^fY ■ 




-P/VRiy LiNEs — ^ — — 

Fair days provide clue 
to party differences 

'* Party Lines, the Lakeland Newspapers column of political commen- 
tary, Is prepared from staff reports. 

On opening day of the annual Lake County Fair, the major political 
party booths were a picture of oppositcs. 

The Republican center was bustling with • activity. V<Jteran 
Waukcgan precinct committeeman BUI Snodgrara was directing 
four-way traffic, handing out souvenirs and visiting— ail at the same 
time. 

Over at the Democrat booth, a solltaiy attendant was eating lunch. 
Maybe both the workers and fairgoers were waiting for Dawn Clark 
Netscli to show. 

The difference in the two parties becomes 
evident at fair time. 



mmm 


M 


''*'.' '.^^^K?'' ' -''^c^^H 


Ih 


''J^^^^K ' -^ ^'^^H 


^1 


W^m 


1 




BH 


^^^^p 


^mi 




*Wtff^l 




':'^i 



Landfillplan raises new toxin dangers 



• • • 



Silghdy blarred— Friends and foes alike 
agree that Connty Board Rep. Pam Newton . 

(R-Vernon Hills) tarnished her Image as an inde- 
pendent Republican and friend of the environ- 
ment ' by her support of W.W. Grainger land 
rezoning bi Mettawa. 

One resident of Newton's district called 
Party lines to offer an explanation. "AU you have 
to do is check where most of her campaign con- 
tributions came from to explain her vote. Developers, " the call stated. 
Looks like the Grainger vote is going to haunt more .than a few 
County Board mcmtiers. 



Pam Nowton 



♦ •• 



Sharing— CoantyBoard Rep. DIckRatdi 

(R-WUdwood) . and UbertyvlUe Twp. 
Supervisor Ralph Swank arc going to share 
the work — and the profits — of putting on a fund 
raising pig roast Saturday, Aug. 27. The cullnaty 
event is set for Daybreak Farm. Call Dick at 223- 
6506 or Ralph at 816-6800 for tickets. 

• •« 

Distraction— Ela Township Snpe^sdr 
Robert "Bob" Gicver has cleared his agenda 
for a long-standing favorite project, a new town- 
ship office center. More than a few Lake Zurich "^"P" Swank 
observers have noted that Grever is so intent on tiie township project 

that it's become a distraction from his other pub- 
lic office, serving on the Lake County Board. A 
monument to Bob? 




CHRIS GEISEIHART 

Reduction and, recycling of garbage are the ' 
preferred means of "disposal" for things wc can 
no longer use. 

LandfilUng the non-rcusablc items is cer- 
tainly preferable to incineration. There is no 
douljt that in the years to come Lake County 
will need more landfill space, even as wc citi- 
zens become better at managing our solid 
waste with guidanj:c from SWALCO (County's 
Solid Waste Agency), 

USA Waste's petition is being heard ri^t now 
by the county. The proposal Is to expand its 
Countryside Landfill near Grayslakc, fonmcriy ARF 
Landfill, both vertically up to 80 feet and liorizon- 
tally to tljc north and south for an additional 76 
acres. Its life span would extend to 20 years. 

ITicse arc my concerns: 

Up to 80 feet of garbage could be placed 
onto top of layers of the buried trash which 
have l>een accumulating for more than ten 
years. It Is possible that leaking Icachatc could 
easily travel through sand scams in the soil if 
the pressure and settlement of garbage causes 
tears in the newliners'placed there. 

filinois EPA record throughout the 1980s list 
thousands of entries of materials accepted as 
"special" waste at ARF. This potpourri of hun- 
dreds of chemicals includes a variety of petro- 



leum products, contaminated earth, oil and 
latex paint, sludge, ink waste, lead and chrome 
sludge, mineral spirits waste, fly ash, hospital 
waste, asbestos and trichlorocthylenc cleaner 
sludge. This toxic stew, combined with the 
Icachatc that forms from regular garbage, has 
collected at the bottom of the landfill and Is still 
there. 

The possibility still exists for contamination 
of wells in the surrounding area. 

A valid concern Is that if the methane gas 
flaring system isn't hot enough, 4t might not 
destroy the toxic fumes coming out of the 
Icachatc. 

Here arc some solutions: 

The County Board must not permit the ver- 
tical expansion for the reasons stated. If expan 
sion is approved to the north and south, USA 
Waste must amend its application and delete . 
its acceptance of special wastes and the con- 
cept of placing up to 80 feet of garbage on top 
ofthe old landfill. 

Provisions must be made for immediate 
removal ofthe Icachatc from the present site 
and treatment that will guarantee to eliminate 
these toxic materials ft-om our environment 

Editor's note: Chris Geiselhart is an environ- 
mentalist and a school teacher. She resides in 
Ubertyville. 



Letters 




• • • 



Robort GrovoT 



Comparlns^Now that he's seen both 
sides of grassroots government, count 
Wauconda Township Supervisor llm Keagle 

as an authority that township duty can be "hands 
on" service. Like the emergency plumbing job he 
and a friend did for a needy family recently. As 
the former mayor of Wauconda, Keagle sees vil- 
lage government as more hectic. "But for actual- 



ly helping people, you can't beat township goveriunent," says Keagle. 



• • • 



Park obstacle — Even some of her most 
ardent supporters are getting impatient with 
Lake Zurich Mayor Debbie Vasels to resolve 
the long-standing dispute over village acquisi- 
tion of Breezcwald Park. 

The problem is that Vasels' stand on of the 
park's value is undercutting .other projects that 
need to get accomplished. 

• • • 
ChanglniE shlrts>-Any day now Mayor 

' Ken Hamsher may be donning a striped shirt .- — 

to referee the on-going battle between two Fox DoWjIo Vasols 
Lake businessmen over rights to the title of Fireworks Impresario. 

Pete lakstas, force behind the popular Independence Day over- 
thc-watcr display, is chagrined that DIno Maravallas is orchestrating 
a second show, one that is scheduled this year for Saturday, Aug. 6 In 

conjunction with the Venetian Night Boat 
Parade. The rub is that the same people arc being 
asked to contribute to both shows. 





' • • • 



Early arrival— Mike DItka has a reputation 
for being "always on the go." But Party Line's impa- 
tience last week had the famed coach arriving at 
Deer Park Lanes on Rte. 12 a week eariy for the Joe 
Marconi Memorial Bowling Tournament Mike will 
be on hand Saturday, Aug. 6. Our apologies. 



• • • 



Polo Jakstas Playing the links— Lake Zurich Village 

Administrator lohn P. Dixon took a cut on the Old Course at St 
Andrews in Scotland while on vacation in the old country . Dixon said 
he shot an 85, including a couple ofbirdies on the front nine, lie said 
the course was comparal)le to many municipal courses in the United 
States. •'I didn't find it that difficult," he said. While the many pot 
bunkers were a hindrance,"Dixon said his caddie helped him make his 
way through without much trouble. Next year's British Open will be 
played on the same links, except the grounds crew won't be so kind 
and let the rough near the fairways grow out of control. While Dixon 
was taking in the fresh air, his compatriots in Lake Zurich were sweat- 
ing away in a marathon meeting lasting well past midnight 



From page B4 

grabbing is going to make voting difficult. The poll 
station in B.J. Hooper School in Undenhurst must 
now handle the mayor race in Old Mill Creek for 14 
voters. The poll station In MUlbum School must 
handle the mayor race in Lindcnhurst for four vot- 
ers. ■ 

Rte. 45 should go cast of Millbum. There is plen- 
ty of room for water retention by the major stream 
both in my field and In Tempel's field. But maybe, 
that is the problem. Tcmpel would lose some land 
to the road. And this can't happen to Tempcl. 

George Druce-Hoffman 
Wadsworth 

loumalists seU out 

Editor 

You might ask why I would write you about a 
Tribune article; it Is because the Tribune has lost its 
journalistic direction and other editors should 
respond to the serious nature of this condition 
because of the weight the Tribune has on public 
opinion. 

Tribune opinion should be in the editorial sec- 
tion and not in a scries of articles recently done on 
Lake County and the Grainger matter. One specific 
article was the one entitled, "Grainger Foes Lacked 
Know-How." The Tribune writers went on and on as 
to how active citizens and the citizen groups did 
such a poor job in the way they went about their 
opposition to Grainger and how Grainger made all 
ofthe ri^t decisions and handled things so well. It's 
amazing how hundreds of thousands of dollars 
spent on professional public relations can out-duel 
citizens digging into their own pockets. 

The real kicker ofthe story was how sad and soriy 
wc should all feel for poor politicians who might 
have been called some names and associate with 
possible unethical practices during the Grainger 
zoning matter before the County Board. 

This is the same newspaper that used the termi- 
nology, "Slick Willie" when referring to comments 
made by a candidate running for president when 
putting the best PR foot forward. Now "slick" is 
good when used by Grainger and grassroots citizen 
attempts are dumb, when they speak plain lan- 
guage, lack know-how and embarrass politicians. In 
the first place, an embarrassed politician is an oxy- 
moron. 

Is this a sign that all ofthe Fourth Estate sold out 
to big money and slick? One, now, can only dream 
of how the Fourth Estates fought for the little guy; I 
loved "Front Page." 

D.M. Doughty 
North Barrington 

Needs to clear name 

Editor 

For weeks, Pat Qulnn, State Treasurer and candi- 
date for Secretary of State, has made headlines by 
slinging mud in what is shaping up as a rather des- 
perate attempt to deflect attention from his own 



questionable conduct Now, thanks to a recently 
filed Senate resolution (No. 1728), Treasurer Quinn 
may have an opportunity to come clean. 

This bi-partisan resolution (filed liy sponsor 
Denny Jacobs, Dcmocrat,''and co-sponsor ludy Barr 
Topinka, Repulilican, and supported by Nancy 
Drew Shcchan, the Democratic candidate for State 
Treasurer) calls for a Senate Investigation Into 
Quitui*s misuse of his offices' Linked Deposit Loan 
program. At issue in these widely reported abuses 
arc allegations that Qulrm has repeatedly traded 
taxpayer-backed loans to individuals and corpora- 
tions for kickbacks to fatten his own campaign cof- 
fer. 

Treasurer Qulnn denies that his dealings have 
exhibited any appearance of impropriety and has 
tried to explain away the charges as merely "coinci- 
dental." 

Incredibly, it was revealed that Quirm received a 
$10,000 campaign "contribution" from Chicago 
developer Sam Zcll on the very same day Quinn 
awarded a $20 million dollar loan to Tootsic Roll for 
the purchase of land they had been leasing from 
none other than...Sam Zell. 

Wc believe Treasurer Quinn should have the 
chance to set the record straight about this unbe- 
lievable "coincidence," as well as several other cited 
examples of abuse. " ' 

That is why the Senate has proposed tliat Quinn 
provide full disclosure as to who is receiving linked- 
deposit loans and how many campaign contribu- 
tions Quirm has received as a result of these loans. I 
will serve as the chairperson for the Senate execu- 
tive sub-committee which is slated to investigate 
this matter. 

Quinn, who never misses a chance to portray 
himself as the great extoller of the Democratic sys- 
tem, should welcome this opportunity to clear his 
name while providing a thorough explanation of his 
alleged indiscretions. 

Senator Walter Dudycz 
(R-Chicago) 



-Letters J^^lcQM e— 

Letters to the editor are v 
welcome. They should be oh 
■topics of ger^eral iriterest/^^^^^^^y ;■ 
opproxjmatelY 250 words or : 
less; Allletters must be sighed; 
and contain a home address . 
and telephone number. The 
editor reserves the right to 
condense all letters. 



\ 






V 
hi 

I 



III 

III. 

I"' 

ti; 
lii ' 

lit 




jCOUNMf UkelANd ;NpvspApERS AuqtsT 5,1 9?4 '■ ^• 




Hog friendly 

Betsy, Rob and Nicole Hadley.^ 16 months, pet a hog while touring the 4-H bams dt the Lake 
County Fair.— Photo by Bob Hondrlckson 




Fire doesn't stop 
from m^ng dreams 



Woman named Willard at county fair 



Hundreds of people and at 
least one Hog know that there 
really is "A Woman Named 
Willard" following last weekends' 
Lake County Ualr. More than 75 
supporters of Willard Hclandcfi 
Republican candidate, for Lake 
County Clerk, sported T-shirts 
scripted with "A Woman Named 
Willard" as they passed out stick- 
ers and fans and sparked a lot of 
fun and interest in the woman 
with a man's name. 

At one point Friday afternoon, 
WKRS disk |ockey Dave Michaels 
was so intrigued with the swarm 
of "A Woman Named Willard"- 
clad fair goers that he orchestrat- 
ed a contest to determine who 
the "Woman Named Willard" 
really is. He invited 1 1 wonien in 
the T-shirts to join him on the 
stage, along with Hclandcr's son 



Bill, and posed the question, 
"Which one of these women is 
Bill's mom?" The third audience 
participant won the mini-contest 
by selecting the real mom/county 
clerk candidate. 

And what about the hog? After 
engaging in a fiercely-fun bidding 
war at the livestock auction 
Saturday afternoon, Hclandcr- 
came out the top bidder on the 
Open Class Reserve Grand 
Champion hog, raised by 12- 
year-old Ryan Wyse of 
Woodstock. Hclander donated 
the weighty specimen judged 
tops, according to Wyse, for its 
lean muscle mass and hams, to 
St. Mary's of Fremont Church. 
The hog will, be served at St, 
Mary's annual Pork and Com 
Roast on Sunday, Aug. 7 froni 
noon to 7 p.m. 



Tons of other "Woman Named 
Willard" recognition was in evi- 
dence at tfic fair as no less than 
eight cars "wore" her name in 
various demolition derby rounds, 
including Thursday night's big 
winner. 

"The demolition derby and 
all the fair events reminded me 
a little of the clerk's race. It 
takes a lot of power and mettle 
(metal for the cars) to keep 
going and you get exhausted, 
but it's a lot of fun and very 
worthwhile. The most impor- 
tant thing I hope people came 
away with by meeting me at the 
fair is that everyone should take 
the time to register to vote, 
become informed about all the 
candidates and then exercise 
their right to vote this 
November," Helander said. 



Carmel High School names scholars 



SPENCER SCHEIN 

Staff Reporter 

Voile's Bridal & Boutique in 
Lake Zurich is continuing its tra- 
dition of making dream's come 
true for brides all over the coun- 
try, even though a fire destroyed 
its alterations annex. 

The family run business has 
worked with women from all 50 
"-states and Europe since opening 
its doors at 53 S. Old Rand Rd. 
nearly 22 years ago, and already 
has plans to rebuild for the bet- 
ter. 

Most of the gowns stocked in 
the storefront next to the shop 
were rescued by fire fighters, 
family members and volunteers 
the early morning of July 24, 
when the building next door 
caught fire and soon spread. 

Dcana Dean, vice president 
and daughtcr-in-Iaw of Voile 
Halthen, store namesake and 
founder, said 750 dresses were 
damaged in the blaze by smoke 
and water. Each of them have or 
will go through a restoration 
cleaning and then be inspected 
by store employees. 

If any minute imperfection 
still exists, she said they not 
given back to the owner, and an 
identical dress is reordered from 
the manufacturer. 

- As of this week, Dean said 
they had gone thorough one- 
third of the gowns and taken 
care of brides through the third 
weekend in August. 

Most of the customers are 
appreciative of the efforts being 
undertaken at Voile's. Several 
brides have even sent candy, 
flowers and thank you notes, she 
said. 



No one has been let down so 
far, said Dean, who added no , 
one will be in the future. The 
store's 16 seamstresses arc 
working around-the-clock in 
three shifts, and other employ- 
ees arc working 20 hours-pcr- 
day in order to make every bride 
100 percent happy. 

While the fire crushed every- 
one emotionally, Dean said they 
would only grow better iind have 
a nicer and fire safe facility 
where the current one stands, 
' boarded-up. 

Amy Schmid is one happy 
bride who is glad she bought her 
wedding gown at Voile's. 

Despite the tragic affair, 
Schmid said she' has been treat- 
ed vdth the highest degree of. 
care and concern. 

After seeing the fire on the 
evening news that night and 
hearing later reports, Schmid; 
21, of Round Lake, went to the 
store with her mother, Carol, 
and learned her dress had been 
one that was too damaged to be 
repaired. 

"I was upset about it until 
(Halthen) explained to me how 
she had all the manufacturers 
working overtime," Schmid 
said. 

"I think it was something 
that could have been a tragic sit- 
uation," she said, but the fEimily 
was very conscientious in mak- 
ing sure everyone was satisfied. 

"They treated me very nice- 
ly," she said. 

An identical dress was sched- 
uled to arrive early next week, in 
plenty of time for Schmld's Oct. 
14 wedding to Qiff Mctaxa, of 
Lake County. 



The following students have 
been named to Carmel High 
Scliooi's second semester honor 
roll. 
Antloch 

Superior honors: Erin Ryan. 

High honors: Susan Zuikcr. 

Honors: Tim McKinney and Lisa 
Dusak. 
Fox Lake 

Honors: Bridgcuc Jolinson and 
Marike Anderson-Dam. 
Grayslake 

High honors: Carrie McGowan, 
Colleen Krombach, Nina EHsseou and 
Kimbcrly Froelich. 

Honors: DIcrdrc DcMcycr, Joseph 
Majcwstd, Raymond Morris, Michael 
Cullcn, Caroline Pale, Kevin Froelich, 
Christina Greer, Kathleen Karrigan, 
Matthew Walter, Kelly Haubcr and 
James Stamatakos. 
Gumee 

Superior honors: Maribcl Htlo. 

High honors: Rachacl Bctz, 
Danielle LaFaycttc, Leslie Freeman 
and Erin Jennings. 

■ Honors: Margaret Ballard, Con- 
stahtlnc Hidalgo. Christine iiolik, 
Daniel Scanlon, David Trino, Otis 
Carter, Joe George, Steven 
Golebiowski, Kelly Owslany, Dan- 
drldgc Trino and Francis Ang. 
Hawthorn Woods 

High honors: Jennifer Clciy and 
Beth Casiriconc. 

Honors: Robert Glazik.Lisa Gl- 
annlni, Rcgina Brutlomcsso, Stephen 
Carlstrand, Nicholas Kucera and Ian 
Wasscluk, 
Ingleclde 

Superior honors: Susan Brophy. 

High honors: Jason Gola, Eliza- 
beth Smith, Cberylyn Meudt, Lisa 
Szukala and Emilic Woods. 

Honors: Dennis O'Sullivan, Maik 
Connolly, Christine Schopper, Ryan 
Duffy, Kevin Mclntyre and Nicole 
Swiss. 
Island Like 

Superior honors: Peter Braido. 
Klldeer 

Super honors: Andrea Muzzu- 



pappa. 
Lake Villa 

Superior honors: Richard Shef- 
fcrson and Carrie Cohen. 

High honors: Chris Czerwinski. 
Jessica Gundrum, Brian Lcldcr and 
Patrick Harris, 

Honors: Robert Ringa, Lisa Cur- 
ran, Bruce Davis, Michelle Fcrrlgan, 
Joseph Brysicwicz, Jllllan Dcnoma 
and Rebecca Gundrum. 
Lake Zurich 

■■ Superior honors: Catherine 
Arvidson, Lanndon Rose, Lisa Gad- 
wood and Erin Samolls. 

High, honors: Ginny GllloUl, 
Douglas Ogurck, Tara Stanton, Ryan 
Schaul, Amy Strutzcl, MatlhcwBurke, 
Nicole Lynch, Sara Ticman and 
Kathleen Williams. 

Honors: Andrew' Straka, Thomas 
Wiltiams, Ana Aywa?:, Zebulon Geary, 
Lauren Ploog, Rebecca Straka, 
Caroline Dewey, Leah Lazarus, Jaclyn 
Pokiyfkc, John Olakowski and Kevin 
Swiat. 
Libertyvllle 

Superior honors: Samcr Attar, 
Kathleen Cupcc, Erik Jansscns, Mar- 
tin Cappcllc, Andrew Eiston, Michael 
Nash, Dana Brueck, Heidi 
Hcrchcnbach, Marguerite Kasper- 
czyk. John Pavlus, Steven Nash and 
Chlgyun Ryoo. 

High honors: Cassandra Roach, 
Brian Savage, Louis Skriba, Linda 
Wang, Elizabeth Buckingham, Kath- 
leen Kalista, Timothy Selz, Colleen 
Thompson, Robert Tschanz, Brian 
Wcsterman, John Fowler, Julie Kwa- 
siborski, Sarah Pavlus, VickiTekampe 
and Gregory Zomchck. 

Honors: Erin McMurrough, 
Kathleen Tschanz, Brian Wagner, 
Daniel Zomchck, Katie Cunnln^am, 
Daniel Graham, Susan Victoria, 
NocUe Nista, Austin CappcUe, Joseph 
Drennan, Shannon Duffy, Elizabeth 
Glover, Daniel Potcmpa, Sarah 
Sbbeck, Frank Sup, Mark Tschanz 
and Charles Vltu. 
Llndenhursl 

High honors: Lisa Ellerbrock, Al- 



lison Kaspcr and Annmaric Scully. 

Honors:- Tracy Belter, Nell Wolff, 
Bridget ChiUcki, Robert Farina, Na- 
talie Barrett, Jason Chiticki, Aimce 
- Duddles and Colleen Tschanz. 
Mundeleln 

Superior honors: Trad 
Sebastian, Ryan Gibbons, Adam 
Laud, Charmainc Smith, Kiemen 
Strle and Carmclla D'Incognito. 

High honors: Michael DcvcUe, 
Clare Manning, Stephanie Webb, 
Michael Gaiden, Ryan Raffcrty, 
Rashmi Subbarao, Jennifer Greco, 
Zachary Malloy, Maria Alcvras and 
Kelly Sullivan. 

Honors: Brett Anderson, 
Giuseppe Bellini, Michael 
DiDomcnlco, Kelly Morton, Ansarlc 
Harris, Jeffrey Schlcsscr, Thomas 
Sonza-Novcra, Elizabeth Stocckcl, 
Suzanne Brooks, Angcllne DeMuth, 
Heather Franklin, Ryan Gocdkcn, 
Barbara Hcgcrlc, Brian Passolt, 
Laurence Qulnn and Sarah 
Wcrnlng. 
Round Lake 

High honors: Gcbesus Rivera, 
William Koch, Shanyssa Rivera, 
Scott Crawford, Anthony Tworek, 
Kristcn Valtonis and Rebecca 
Strang. 

Honors: Caspar Gonzalez, Kate 
Kristan, Kathryn Sandbcrg and Amira 
Lama. 
Vernon HiUs 

Superior honors: lames KwiatL 

Hl^ honors: Allison Lawton. 

Honors: Erin Byrne and Dax Ro- 
driguez. 
Wadsworth 

High honors: Amie Pultorak, 
Joshua Willelt, AJay Easo and Agnes 
Narlkkattu, 
Wauconda 

High honors: Cary laniszewsici, 
Mark Klssclburg, Peter Lynch and 
Karl Schachelmayer. 

Honors: Kim Mucliner, Michelle 
Gircus and Michael Gricus. 
WlldwDod 

Honors: Keri Kohler and Michelle 
Magee. 



'^ 



;%ift^ 



lablonski issues debate challenge 

Ridiard Jablonski, Dctnocratic candidate for Sheriff of Lake 
County, has issued a debate challerige to his Republican oppo- 
nent, aint Griimell, In the November race. 

Jablonski has asked GrinncU to respond to ills challenge by 
Aug. 12. 






Geta 
jump on summer 




with the 

Concept home cooling system. 

■ ^Efficiencies to 12.0 SEER. 

■ 10-year limited warranty on scroll compressors. 

■ 5-year limited warranty on reciprocating compressors. 

■ Efficient coil with more heal transfer for greater, more 
affordable cooling. 

See your Armstrong Air dealer for details. 




Commercial Refrigeration 

587-1698 



1 



R 

n 
s 
a 
s 
I 



1 



! 



' 



i 




RHONDA VINZANT 



Editor In Chief, 

Music fans who. "love a rainy 
night" will be hoping for clear 
skies as popular country and pop , 
artist Eddie Rabbitt takes to the 
stage at the McHcniy County Fair 
Friday night 

Rabbltt's best-known hit, "I 
Love A Rainy Night" has been 
awarded the three mlUlon-alr 
award while "Driving My life 
Away" has been recognized for 
two million airings. .:,. , 

. During his 20 year plus career 
Rabbitt has belted out 26 number 
one country hits and eight Top 40 
hits. . :...:;,:-^, ■;•.•':, :- 

*yifc will be pcnormiiig our 
most popular works as well as a 



lot of new material," Rabbitt said. , 
"My ncvy niatcirlal is similar lii 
beat; 'to the big name tilts that; 
people associate with me. I call It 
Country with a rapid beat My 
basic arrangement Is three-part 
harmony, with technology it gets 
upgraded." 

"We do a very family oriented 
^how," said Rabbitt, the father of 
two, who spends a great deal of 
his timc.worklng on fund ralshig 
events for charities. He has been 
an active participant In many 
causes such as Special Olympics, 
Safe Kids, Easter Seals, The 
Muscular Dystrophy Association, 
and United Cerebral Palsy. 

In 1968, with $1,000 in his 
pocket and no music business 



contracts/ Rabbitt took a; 
Greyhound to Nashville. Follow- 
; Ing a proven Country, music, 
/career path, Rabbitt began writ- 
ing songs in the hopes that estab- 
lished stars might record them. 
In 1970,' he struck gold with Elvis 
Presley's recording of "Kentucky 
Rain." 

After Establishing a strong 
base as. a songwriter, Rabbitt 
began to sing his own songs and 
landed hjs first recording con- 
tract In 1974. He scored hits with 
his second album, "Rocky 
Mountain Music" and crossed 
oyer to the pop charts in 1979 . 
with the theme from the Qint 
Eastwood movie, "Every Which 
Way But Loose." The haunting 



single, "Suspicions," followed 
and won the prestigious Robert J. 
Burton Award In 1980 from BMI 
as the most performed song of 
the'year. * 

Rabbitt has used his star sta- 
tus to help but with various caus- 
es throughout his careen 

"It's important to help where 
you can. I try to give back some 
of the good fortune that I've 
received," said Rabbitt. "Jeannle 
and I lost a son, Tlmmy, in 1985 
to a liver transplant operation, if 
we can do some good, we want to 
do so." Rabbitt says all of. his 
charities are special to him. 

Rabbitt is working on several 
Juturc projects that emphasize 
ilie family. 



/'Right now I am working on a. 
children's' album with rapid 
songs for kids, I'm in the studio 
with that project riow," he said. 
"I'm also conccrnliig working on 
a television show about "Rabbitt 
Land" in wiilch Andrew the squir- 
rel meets different characters in 
each room he visits." Rabbitt 
says the stories and songs come 
from ones he has created for his 
own children. 

Rabbitt will perform with his 
Hare Trigger Band in Woodstock 
at the McHenry County Fair 
Grounds Aug. 5. Show time is set 
for 8- p.m. and tickets arc avail- 
able at the fair office or by callbig 
(815)338-5332. 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



v,i..:.;«.';;-j 






South Dakota 



Wisconsin 




Illinois 



Re-visiting the bridges of Madison County 



NEAITUCKER 

Staff Reporter 

There are two schools of 
thought that generally arise after 
reading the- best-selling book 
'The Bridges of Madison County.' 
One, readers think Madison 
County, Iowa, with its covered 
liridges 15 a fictitious place, or 
two, they think the two main 
characters in the book, Francesca 
Johnson and Robert Kincaid, 
were people who really existed. 

Neither of those beliefs is cor- 
rect As a native of Madison 
County, I can assure love struck 
readers of the novel that my 
beloved homeland truly does 
exist And despite the people 
who come to the door of a farm- 
house around the corner from 
Roscman Bridge looking for 
Francesca, and hordes of people 
calling 'National Geographic' to 
research the history of Robert 
Kincaid, tlie two characters are a 
figment of fiction; 

Fortunately, the reality of 
Madison County and its sbt cov- 



ered bridges has been more than 
enough to satiate the curiosity of 
many people. Just as the 1988 
movie 'Field of Dreams' escalated 
tourism to Dyersvillc in north- 
eastern Iowa, this novel has done 
the same for Madison County. 

The boom in tourism began 
after New York Times writer 
Frances X. Qines flew in to write 
a piece that was published in 
April of 1993. He received the 
grand tour, hosted by Sherry Ellis, 
the executive vice president of 
the Madison County Chamber of 
Commerce. 

What Cllncs saw in this bucol- 
ic setting were sharply rolling 
hills, limestone bluffs, dense oak 
forests, large Victorian homes, 
winding country roads, and what 
seemed to be endless farmland. 
If he had visited during the sum- 
mer, which he indicated he just 
might do, he would have seen 
lush cornfields of green and some 
Wintersct city streets so tree- 
lined that they don't sec sunlight 
from May to Septenibcr. 



Madison County made quite 
an impression on the man from 
the concrete jungle, He had an 
assessment for Ellis of his tour as 
he returned to the Des Moines 
International Airport. 

"Sherry," he said, " I flew in 
tliis morning and I'm leaving 
tonight, and I feel like I just had a 
week's vacation." He also added, 
"As I visit Iowa, I fall in love more 
and more with Iowa and lowans." 

After the New York Times arti- 
cle came Japanese television, PBS 
television, BBC Television, The 
Oprah Winfrey Show, and 
Charics Kuralt from CBS. The 
local network affiliates out of Des 
Moines have done extensive cov- 
erage on the county and 
Wintersct, population 4,200, 
which lies just 30 miles south and 
13 miles west of the state capitoL 

The Chamber of Commerce 
has directly felt the press of 
increased tourism to the area. In 
the 104 weeks to date the book 
has been on the New York times 
Bestseller List the staff has grown 



from two people to six people, 
with the threat of adding more 
soon. This does not include the 
volunteers woricing each morn- 
ing and on Sundays. 

In 1991 and '92 combined, the 
office booked sbc incoming tours. 
Thus far in 1994, 140 tour buses 
have been scheduled, the insur- 
gencc of charter has had a collat- 
eral benefit on the entire commu- 
nity of Wintersct, but perhaps no 
one is smiling more broadly than 
Ken Billctcr. 

Billcter is the owner of the 
Nortlisidc Cafe. The cafe, located 
on the north side of the liistoric 
city square In Wintersct, is men- 
tioned in the book as a place that 
Francesca Johnson has a meal. 
Time and time again, visitors 
have scrambled off charter buses, 
eager for the chance to eat where 
'Franscsca' did. Regardless of 
mispronunciations, the guests 
arc still welcome. 

"1 love it, I love it I love it," 
Billetcr says in thai charming 
southern Iowa twang I have near- 



ly foigottcn since 1 left four years 
ago. 

. He is referring to how his 
place overflows when the buses 
unload. He estimates his busi- 
ness has increased over 15 per- 
cent since the book hit the 
stands. People riding the charter 
buses who do not fit into the 
restaurant during .their .short 
lunch break arc usually seriously 
disappointed. 

But increased business Is not 
the only thing that Billetcr enjoys 
these days. > , 

"I enjoy rhoctirig "the people.^ 
llicy are very friendly," he said. 

Tourists are coming from all 
over the world, and usually want 
to take complete advantage of 
their time. According to Dave 
Braga, editor of the weekly 
Wintersct Madisonian newspa- 
per, tourists want to see every- 
thing. This includes the ashen 
rubble that was once the McBride 
Bridge. 

In an ironic twist considering 
See BRIDGES page B21 



V^iV 



ti; 

1 !. 

I.' 



hi 

k 



II'' 

ij- 

in* 






\ 

r 
iiij 

w 




I^IC^i^l^l j^mAp^tJEWSRApEBS AHQUST ^,}y^f, 



—Kids Fare 



Into t^e Ni 




Children's activities set for Fine Arts 



A vast variety of children's 
activities turn the Elgin Fine Arts 
Festival into the perfect family 
outing for a latc-summcr weelc- 
cnd. The festival, scheduled for 
Saturday, Aug. 27 and Sunday, 
Aug. 28 in tiie downtown Elgin 
Civic Center Plaza, literally offers 
somctiiing for everyone, includ- 
ing pint-sized visitors. 

There is a special area, just for 
kids, on the East Bank; of tfic Fox 
River, with the children's enter- 
tainment stage across the bridge 
on Walton Island. 

From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Saturday children will be invited 
to participate in Art and Crafts, a 
moon wallc, mural painting and 
sand castle building. During this 
time the Elgin Public Museum 
will offer button making, nature 
painting and a nature scavenger 
hunt. The Children's Discover 
Museum of Elgin will provide 
face painting and bubble making. 

Qilldrcn, parents, and grand- 
parents will enjoy a wide variety 
of entertainment during the festi- 
val. On Saturday, Shanta will pre- 
sent "Stories and Songs of African 
People" at 11 a.m., followed by 
the IJlustrated Theatre's Summer 
Celebration at 12:30 p.m. 
Captain Black will host a Treasure 
hunt at 2 p.m., with a puppet 
show by the Oamen Avenue 
Puppeteers at 3:30 p.m. 

Entertainment begins at noon 
on ■ Sunday with Storyteller 
Donna Dettman's "Frogs' and 
Other Princes." The Highland 
Dancers perform at 1 p.m., fol- 
lowed by "Scales and Talcs" with 
Beth Bishop and her exotic ani- 
mals. The entertainment wraps 
up with a program by the Rope 
Warrior called "Rope jumping in 
a New Dimension" at 3 p.m. 

The Elgin Fine Arts Festival 
offers the A.A.U.W. Art Showcase, 
the EOS Young Virtuosi 
Competition, Entertainment 
Tent, Artist Demonstrations, and 
a concert by the Elgin Symphony 
Orchestra over the course of the 
three-day event. All activities 
take place in the Civic Center 
plaza, with the exception of the 



ESO Concert, which will be pre- 
sented free of charge at Elgin's 
Wing Park on Friday night. Food 
and beverage vendors will be 
located adjacent ■ to the 
Entertainment Tent. 

All activities arc free and open 
to the public. For further infor- 
mation, call the Elgin Fine Arts 
Festival Hotline at (700) 931- 
5613. 

CLC to present summer chil- 
dren's theater 

The College of Lake County 
summer cliildrcn's theater scries 
continues with "The Shoemaker ^ 
and the Elves" on Aug. 11. All 
performances will be held at 
11:30 a.m. in the CLC auditorium, 
19351 W. Washington St., 
Grayslakc. 

The program is sponsored by 
the CLC activities office in coop- 
eration with Waukcgan Park 
District's Bowcn Park Theatre Co. 
Tickets are $2 each performance. 
Payments may be made by Visa, 
MasterCard, Discover or 
American Express. 

The plays will also be pre- 
sented at Bowen Park just off 
North Sheridan Road in 
Waukcgan. "The Shoemaker and 
the Elves" will be performed Aug. 
5, and 6 at 10 a.m., 1 1 :30 a.m. and 
1:30 p.m. 

For tickets, call the CLC box 
office at 223-6601; ext. 2300 or 
stop in room C-101 or call Bowcn 
Park at 360-4741. 

llVizardofOz' 

The Wizard of Oz will be Papal 
Players' one hour musical for the 
summer fantasy festival through 
Aug. 9. The Wizard of Oz will be 
performed at Palatine High 
School, 111 Rohling Road in 
Palatine. 

Scheduled performances are: 
Aug. 7 at 2 p.m. and Aug. 9 at 10 
a.m. 

Ticket prices arc $5. Advance 
group purchases of 2Q or more 
arc $4 each. Thti theatre will be 
open, one-half hour prior to 
showtime for seating. Advance 
ticket reservations requested. 
For further information please 



WXLC FM 

ILLINOIS BEACH STATE PARK I to 4 p.m. 

1 994 NISS JET SKI 
BIKIHIFIHALS 

GP/^lfD PmZE DRAWING FOR A 

KAWASAKI 740 SUPERSPORT 
PERSOHAL WATERCRAFT 

COME OUT AMD REGISTER! 
LAST CHANCE! 

SPONSORED IN PART BT:- . 

MIElSEfi BhTEfiPmSES - NISSAH 4X4 THUCHS 

BUO JET SPOftTS rOUR WEST COAST 
FERFORMAMCE HATIONALS 



SEEYOUTHEREI 




call 359-9556. 

Loosey Goosey 

Looscy Goosey explores the 
mythical worid t>f Motlier Goose 
when she Is brouglit to trial for 
writing siUy rhymes that "Don't 
m^e sense." With the help of the 
jury, we explore "the stoiy behind 
the story." A fiin-fiUcd hour of 
songt dance and outrageous 
characters followed by a brief 
question and answer session with 
the actors. 

Looscy Goosey is directed and 
choreographed by Rob Rahn. 

The production will be play- 
ing through Aug. 13. Wednesday 
through Friday at 10 a.m., 
Saturdays at 1 1 am. 

Individual tickets are $6 and 
are available by. calling tlic box 
office at 634-0200. Groups of 15 
or more are $4 and arc available 
be calling 634-5909. 

Workshop set for Mds 

Summer Theater Arts 
Workshop is a special North- 
brook Park District program 
offered this summer at the 
Northbrook Theater. For chil- 
dren in grades 5 througli 9, this 
workshop immerses students in 
the performing arts, with classes 
in acting, singing, dancing and 
stagecraft All classes arc taught 
by theater professionals. 

The four-week long session 
runs through Aug. 12, and culmi- 
nates in a fully staged musical 
production entitled "Lucky 
Dollar - Private Eye." Children 
will also attend a field trip to a 
professional tlicatcr production. 
Liniitcd spaces still available. 
Call 291-2367 for enrollment. 



Fkiday 

Kralg KennlnK & Company perform at Slice of Chicago, 36 S. 
Northwest Hwy., Palatine, 991-2150 . . . Chisel Brothers ,'thun- 
dcrin' R&B at Cabana Beach Club, 1550 N. Rand Rd., Palatine, 
776-9050 . . . Pat Banana , Grateful Dead tribute, at Shades, 
21860 N. Milwaukee, Deerficid, 634-BLUE. ..'Stralisht from the 
Heart is featured at Sundance Saloon, Routes 176 and 83 In 
Mundelein, 949-0858 . . . Rock Candy is at Sluggers, 285 Center 
Dr., Vernon Hills, 362-7411. 

Saturday 

Leon Russell plays at Shades. Opening band is Door|ani. . . 
Chldeco Zydeco at Cabana Reach Club . . . Eddie Shaw & the 
Wolf Gang at Slice of Chicago . . . Straight from the Heart at 

Sundance Saloon ... Jumpln* Bones at Sluggers. 

Coming soon 

Lambs Farm will be the site of the 7th Anniversary Smooth Jazz 
Family Festival, Sunday, Aug. 14, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. sponsored by 
WNUA 95.5 FM. Admission and parking are free. Entertainers 
scheduled to perform include Boney fames, Norman BrowDi 
and Dave Koz. Colby and Caruso will be the opening act.— by 
CLAUDIA M. LENART 



What's Happening? 

Lakeland Newspapers is looking for Items to be listed each week In 
our Community Calendar feature. Items sucti as club and organization 
announcements, meetings, ctiurch socials, special events, etc. Send 
Items to Tina Reulbacti. Lakeland Newspapers, 30 S. Wtiltney St., 
Gravslake,IL 60030. , 




THE LARGEST SHOW OF Hj 
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR 



PEOPLE WITH 
DISABHITIES 



Come and choose from over 200 exhibits 



AUGUST 12-14, 1994 • CHICAGO, IL 
Rosemont Cbnvention Center . 

5 minutes East of O'Hare Airport . 



5 PM 
5 PM 
SPM 



Check the Classifiedl 

Section Each Week 

When Looking for 

a New lob 



•Vans •Qothing • Lifts 
•Wheelchairs •Toys 
•3-Wheel Scootere 
•Computers • Support 
piganizQtions • Computer 
Seminais • Exercise 
Equipment •Free 
k. Workshops 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

Cliicago Mayor's I 
Office for People ' 
with Disabilities I 

Easter Seal Society of ^ 
Metropoliton Chicago | 

BRING AD FOR $1 OFF A | 
SINGLE ADMISSION I 

'Regular Admission: $4. Under 12 FREE | 



FRIDAY 10 AM 

SATURDAY ..... 10 AM 

SUNDAY 11AM 

Phone: (708) 577-4773 



EXHIBITS 
DEMOS 



..SPONSORS 



OPEN 
TO THE 
PUBUC 



H' 




A 5a\all Wonder 



MILL POND SHOPS (LOWER LEVEU 

Children's fashions for 
newborn through size 6X 

SUMMER SALE NOW IN PROCRESS! 

-NEW FALL ARRIVALS- 

634-1410 




Cowboy & Indian Collectibles 
•Jewelry •Antiques 

•Pottery •Furniture & More 

•Artifacts (just off the Forest 

' • Courtyard Buildings] 

913-6802 






•Stained Glass Windows & Lamps 
•Kaleidoscopes 

: "Glass Jewelry & Gifts" 
Mill Poiid Shops (Lower Level) 

634-6555 




Jewelry & Gifts 

/f\_ From World's 
'^___V Minerals 

^^ ROCKS w 7^ 

Located In the Mill Pond Shops (Upper 
(708) 634-3870 '^"^«'> 






t>; J -<_.'. I 



\ 



F.Y.I. 



/^ 



»^"> 










Country 'Phantom' 

Marriott Llncolnshtrc 
Thdatrc presents the "Phan-. 
torn of the Country Palace." 
This hysterical musical takes 
you down-home to ihccapltal 
of country music, where 
you'll witness the hilarious 
adventures of the Country 
Palace regulars as they pro- 
pare for their Country Music 
Hxtravaganza. Performances 
arc Wednesdays at 2 and B 
p.m.; Thursdays and Fridays at 8 p.m.; 
Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.; and 
Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Ticlcots to 
all performances arc $3Z50. Senior 
citizens and students receive $10 off 
the regular ticket price on Wedne- 
sday's 2 and B p.m. and Sunday's 2:30 
p.m. performances. Call 634-0200 for 
reservations. 

'The Palama Game* 

Friends of the Homeless, the 
fund-raising auxiliary of the Coalition 
for the Homeless of Northwest Cook 
County aka PADS presents dinner 
and theatre "The Pajama Game" on 
Aug. 5 performed by the Buffalo 
Grove 'Performing Arts Theatre Co. 
This dinner/ theatre package Includes 
a social hour at 5:30 p.m. followed by 
a catered Chinese dinner at 6 p.m. at 
the Crossing Clubhouse, 1100 
Fremont Way, Buffalo Grove. The 
theatrical performance begins at 8 
p.m. at Buffalo Grove High School. 
Reservations are $25 per person. Call 
818-1916 for ticket information. 

Actors needed 

In partnership with DIst 214 
Community Education. Don 
Leonard's Family Theater is accept- 
ing hcadshots and resumes from local 
performers interested in auditioning 



for a musical based on ."Miracle on 
34th Street" Seeking performers who 
sing and act and fit ilic following age 
type and categories; Men stage iage 25 
to 65 (two ingenue, four character) 
and women stage age 25 to 50 (one 
ingenue, four character) plus one girl 
stage age 6 or 7 and two boys stage 
age 5 to 7. Kris Krlnglc candidates 
should have a beard or be willing to 
grow one. Interested candidates 
should send a current resume, head- 
shot, and a letter of interest to: Don 
Leonard's Family Theater, P.O. Box 
1638, Pa(aline,lL 60078. For more 
Information call 359-3372. 




DoIor«i Flnt«y, Fran Jantta, Mark 
Badtk» and Pwryn Pomato perform 
in "Ih* ¥onlgnmt.' 

'The Foreigner* 

• "The Foreigner" mirrors our prej- 
udices with rib-tickling humor and 
slap-stick fun at an old Georgia Inn. 
The PM&L production will be per- 
formed at the Globe of Antioch on 
Orchard Street. Performance dates 
arc scheduled for Aug. 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 
14, 19, 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. Matinees 
will be offered at 2:30 p.m. on Aug. 7, 
14, and 21. Tickets purchased at the 
door arc S8 for adults, $6 for seniors 
and students. Call 395-3055 for fur- 
ther ticket information. 

Auditions set 

Auditions will be held Aug. 9 and 




KARAOKE 

Singin' Fun For Everyone! 




325 N. SEYMOUR 

MUNDELEIN 

60060 



ERRY 

MEXICAN 
RESTAURANT 




HRS. 

M-Frl. 11-10p.m. 
Sat. 12-10 p.m. 



HowTo Sniff 

OutAHome 

Wierftoblem. 

If your water smells bad, what can you do? ECO WATER' 
Besides wearing a clothes pin on your nose s y s t e m s 
when you tate a sip of water. Call Eco>X^ter. 
We'll mate your water the best it can be. 




PUT AN ECO IN yOUR HOME 



OlQ90Eco\ltocr SfUnns, 



EcoWater Store 

(708) 297-1480 • (800) 397-1480 



10 from 7 to 10 p.m. for the 
Northbrook Theatre production of 
"Applause". The musical version of 
"All About Eve," this show will use a 
large cast including approximately 
seven to 10 women and 13 to 15 men. 
Those interested In auditioning 
should prepare a song (an accompa- 
nist will be provided) and should 
come dressed to dance. Rehearsals 
arc Tuesday, Thursday, and Sunday 
evening from 7 to - 10 p.m. 
Performances of "Applause" will be 
woclccnds, Oct 14 through Nov. 5 at 
the Leisure Center Theater, 3323 
Waiters Ave,, Norlhbroolc Call 291- 
2367 Tor further information. 

'The Progressives' 

Stage Two's summer repertory 
season continues with "The Progres- 
sives," a satirical comedy that polces 
fun at the lives of a "progressive" cou- 
ple. "The Progressives" enters into 
rotating repertory with "Artlflcial 
Intelligence" and "An Occasional 
Impala" throughout the month of 
August Performance dates are Aug. 4, 
6, 12, 14, 20 and 26, Thursdays at 7:30, 
Friday and Saturdays at 8 p.m., 
■Saturday and Sunday matinees at 3 
p.m Stage Two Theatre is located at 
12 N. Sheridan Rd., Waukegan. 
Admission is $10, $8 for students, 
seniors, ndlttary pcrsorincl. Call 662- 
70BB for ticket information. 




jQff Johnson and Marilynn Ecclet In 
a »c«no from "An Occasional 

Impala," 

'An Occasional Impala' 

Stage Two presents "An 
Occasional Impala," a comedy by 
George Savage Jr., which plays in 
repertory with "Arlillcial Intelligence" 
and"The Progressives." Suggested for 
mature audiences, performance 
dates are Aug. 5, 7, 13, 18, 20 and 27. 
Times are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 8 p.m. 
Fridays and Saturdays, and 
Saturday/Sunday matinees at 3 p.m. 
Admission is $10 for adults and $8 



students, seniors and military. Ticket 
packages for the entire summer 
repertory arc available at a discount, 
with three shows for $25 adults and 
$21 for seniors, students and military. 
Call 662-7088 for reservations. 

'Bom Yesterday* 

The Elgin Community Theatre 
will hold auditions for "Bom Yester- 
day" Aug. 6 and 7 at 7 p.m: Auditions 
will be comprised of readings from 
the script The cast calls for four 
women and 12 men. No previous 
experience Is required, and anyone 
interested can call for directions and 
for more Information. Auditions will 
be held on East Division Street' in 
Elgin, next to the O'Connor-Homier 
Funeral Home. Call 741-053Z 

'Best of Second Ctty* 

"The Best of Second City," a com- 
pilation of scenes and songs from the 
best of Second City's 34 years of 
material, will run through the end of 
the summer at The Second City 
Northwest, 1701 W. Golf Rd., Rolling 
Meadows. Show times are 8:30 p.m. 
Thursdays, 8 and 10:30 p.m. Fridays 
and Saturdays, and 7.p.tn. Sundays. 
Ticket prices are $10 on Thursdays, 
Fridays and Sundays, and $12 on 
Saturdays. For reservations or further 
information call 806-1555. 
See FYI page BIO 



CLG part of the prescription 

for her success 




Debra (Nelson) Blue, M.D, always had a dream of being a doctor. 
Attending the College of Lake County helped her to make that dream a reality. 



A 1978 graduate ofCLC with a degree in nursing. 
Dr. Blue was the fii^.t member of her family to go 
to college. Beginning her studies was something of 
an uncertain time for her. 

"The faculty members at CLC were just 
wonderful. They helped me and gave me the 
confidence and support I needed," said Dr. Blue, 
who is now a family practitioner in a medical 
practice in Lake Geneva. Wis. 

She said the childcare services at the college, 
which provided day care for her young daughter 
while she attended classes; the proximity of CLC 
to home; and the mix of students were among the 
other pluses she found at CLC. 

Celebrating its 25th anniversary, 

the College of Lake County has helped 

more than 300,000 people like Dr. Debra 

Blue write their personal success stories. 

Let us help you write yours! 



Having worked successfully for several years 
as a nurse, Dr. Blue decided it was time to pursue 
her dream of becoming a physician and entered 
medical school. Her CLC experience helped there 
too. 

"While many of my colleagues with bachelor's 
degrees were working at clerical jobs to help put 
them through medical school, I was able to work 
as a nurse right up to the week before 
graduation," she said proudly. 

Now CLC is literally part of the family. 
Dr. Blue's sister graduated from CLC's nursing 
program and is a nurse, and Dr. Blue's daughter is 
currently a student here. 



SUCCESS STORIES WRITTEN 
College of Lake County 
Twenty Kiflh Anniversary 
1969-1994 



H^ 



HERE 



Registration for fall classes is still open. Classes start Aug. 22. 

For a free class schedule or more information 

call (708) C-O-L-L-E-G-E today! 





lAKELIFE UketANd Newspapers AtiqusT 9,1994 



m 



From page B9 




iiiii 



^SasH 



illlJItl^thii 



Pops concerts 

The Lake Forest Symphony 
wlil present Summer Pops 
concerts to be performed 
lakeside on the grounds of the 
Cunco Museum and Gardens. 
On Sunday, Aug. 7 "The Best 
of Broadway" will be fea- 
tured. Tickets are $30 for 
reserved scats, $7 for the 
lawn. For further details or 
tickets, call or visit the Lake 
Forest Symphony office at Dccrpath 
Plaza, 225 £. Dccrpath, Suite 138, 
Lake Forest, IL 60045, 295-2135. 

'SteppW Out '94' 

Robb Edwards, Alcldcr Fromcta, 
Pattc Armato Lund and Mike 
Williamson continue their run at 
Shady Lane Thcatcr-Marcngo, 111. in 
"Stcppin" Out '94" throu^ Aug. 6. 
The new musical revue includes not 
only the great music of the '30s and 
'40s but also a tuneful cross country 
trip saluting America. For reserva- 
tions and show schedule call 
(815)568-7218 or (815)568-7219. 

Folk music festival 

Don't miss the Folk Music 
Festival at Lambs Farm on Sunday, 
Aug. 7 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Admission and parking arc free. 
Workshops will offer 45 minute ses- 
sions on topics such as vocal harmo- 
ny, playing the harp, songwriting, 
banjo playing, swing music, and the 
songs of Stephen Foster. For further 



Information call 362-4636. 

Auditions set 

The Renaissance Singer's 
Workshop, a subsidiary of Poly- 
hedron, is holding membership audi- 
tions for the fall session oii Tuesday, 
Aug. 16 and Thursday, Aug. IB from 7 
to 10 p.m. Auditions wilt be held in 
Evanston by appointment. Singers 
should prepare one song or aria of 
any style and language; accompani- 
ment provided. For further Informa- 
tion call Director Gwendolyn Mantcr 
Scminara at 973-1601. 






::Q2':: 



Mil 



Alt club exhibit 

The College of Lake County 
will host the 66th Annual 
Exhibition of the American 
Jewish Art Club through Aug. 
19 in the Community Gallery 
|^;| of Art, 19351 W. Washington 
^^^^*^^ -^ St,, Grayslakc, The exhibition 
will feature paintings, works 
on paper and sculptures by 
renowned Chicago artists. 
Gallery hours arc 8 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 
a.m.to 4:30 p.m. Friday. For informa- 
tion call at 223-6601, exL 2240. 

Adler art exhibit 

The Adler Cultural Center has 
invited its members, students (all 
ages) and faculty to exhibit their art- 
work at the Adler Center. This show 
will allow the Adler Center to focus 
attention on the creativity of all the 
people associated with the Cultural 
Center. Artists who have been associ- 



ated with the Adler Center will be 
exhibiting alongside children from 
the mixed media and painting classes 
and students from the adult watercol- 
or, figure painting, drawing and 
ceramic classes. The show will run 
tlirough Aug. 13. For details contact 
Julia M. Morrisroe at 367-0707. 

Artists, crafters sought 

The merchants of Plaza Verde 
located on Dundee and Arlington 
Heights Roads In Buffalo Grove, will 
host an art and craft show on Aug. 13 
and 14 featuring original handcrafted 
Items. Space is stIU available for 
artists and crafters to display their 
work. For information call Midwest 
Art 8i Craft Fairs at 852-0812. 



Buoys and Belles 

Buoys and Belles Square 
Dance Club is hosting a 
"Waikiki Wiggle" dance on 
Friday, Aug. 5 at First United 
Methodist Church, 128 N. 
Utlca St., Waulccgan. Dancing 
will be from 8:30 to U p.m. 
with a Round Dance Work- 
shop at 8 p.m. and a Pius Tip 
at 11 p.m. Call 662-6545 for 
details. 



Dancenter North 

Registration at Dancenter North 
begins on Aug. 8 for the fall semester, 
which runs from ScpL 8 through the 
end of January. Along with ballet, 
pointc, jazz and tap, Suzuki violin and 
Irish dancing for children and adults 
will be offered. Call 367-7970. 



L 



-SpECJAl Events— 

Appearing at Zaines 

Zanies Comedy Nitc Club, 230 Hawthorn Village Commons, presents 
Shirley Hemphill on Aug. 5 and 6, along with Ted Holum and Brian 
Walters. On Aug. 7, Ted Holum, Brian Walters and ly Phlpps will perform. 
Call 549-6030 for reservations and information. 

Venetian Night entries needed 

Fox Lake boat dealers arc taking applications for the 1994 Venetian 
Night Boat Parade Sunday, Aug. 6, tliat will be one of the highlights of the 
third annual Boat and Auto Show, Aug. 5, 6 and 7. There will be three prizes 
In three categories for Illuminated boats. Participating boats will gather at 7 
p.m. on the lake outside the entrance to McDonald's. 

Lindenfest'94set 

Lindcnfest '94 will begin on Thursday, Aug. 11 and continue through 
Sunday, Aug. 14. Lindonfcsl '94 will feature food, business and civic organi- 
zation booths; a carnival, parade, free activities and cntcrtalnmenL Lonnlc 
Brooks and "Rhythm City" motown and soul review will be performing on 
the mainstagc on Saturday, Aug. 13 at 7 p.m. For details call 356-8252. 

Workforce training preview seminar 

The Center for Economic Development will host a workforce training 
preview seminar for business owners, human resource directors and super- 
visors to introduce Effective Learning Techniques (ELERT), a low-cost 
learning/teaching program for developing or improving work place skills. 
The preview will be held from 8:30 to 11:30 a.ra on Aug. 10 in RoomC003 
at CLC. Cost is $25 per person. To register call 223-3615. 

Gumee Days roll in 

Gumee Days will take place Aug. 11 to 14. Festivities include tcstlmonU 
al dinner, teen dance, community dance, parade, cxhlblte, lOK race, volley- 
ball tournament. Little Miss and Miss Gurncc pageants and much more. 
For more information call 623-7788. 

Pet show and festival 

The Fifth Annual Pet Show & Festival will be held on Saturday, Aug. 13 
at 10 a.m. at the North Shore Hilton, 9599 Skokic Blvd., Skokle. Categories 
include largest pet, smallest pet, most unusual pet, best trained pel, and 
coolest pet trick. All participants will receive ribbons. Participants can reg- 
ister up to and including the day of the event Call 729-7333 for details. 



t: 



l>t 



lit > 



It ; 



r'* 

r 

I*' 



If: ' 



I' ' 



II'. 

I'' 
111) 

hit. 



Folk musicians 
have their day 

Music fans wUl find every- 
thing from harmony yodclLng to 
Stephen Foster tunes at three 
stages during the folk Music 
Festival at Lambs Farm this 
Sunday. 

Mainstagc entertainment will 
include performances by 
Beggar's Alley, Patti Ecker, Mark 
Dvorak, Dan Zahn & Friends, 
Small Potatoes, Cynthia 
Shclhart, Peg Lehman, the 
Freeway Rangers, Kairo String 
Quartet, the Sons of the Never 
Wrong, Larry Swcnson, and 
Sammy from Miami. A majority 
of the performers arc members 
of the Lake County Folk Club. 

One workshop stage will be 
devoted to "Kids' Stuff" with 
Amy Beth, Chuck VanderVennet 
and Patti Eckor. 

Adult workshops run for 4S 
minutes and include such offer- 
ings as "Let's Start Swinging" 
(that's where you'll find the 
yodcllng), "Songwriters," and 
"Puttln' on the Style," Other 
• workshops feature banjo strum- 
ming, vocals, and something 
called "purple harmony." 

VandcrVermet and Amy Beth 
will be there to cncoiuagc the 
timid to "Sing a Stephen Foster 
Song." Those who have said, 
"I've Always Wanted to Play the 
Harp" won't want to miss 
Cynthia Shclhart's workshop. 

Festival hours arc 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Aug. 7. Admission and park- 
ing arc free; participants may 
also visit all the Lambs Farm 
faculties and shops.— by SliZIE 
REED 



• **••*•••••** 



* * * * 



IS YOUR NEST 

CETTIINC TOO 

CROWDED? 

Shop For A New One 

In Lakeland 
Real Estate Classifieds 



SAY "YES" TO HOSTING A RUSSIAN 
EXCHANGE STUDENT 

Be one of the families to host an excliange student from Russia or 
one of the former Soviet Union, Form your own union witii a special 
friend from Russia, Ukraine, Moldova, Uzbeleistan, Kyrgthyzslan or 
one of the other former Soviet Unions. As A Host Family you 
provide a home and love. Don't wait, phone now Say "DA" to 
hosting a Russian student between 15-18 years of age to arrive in 
August for 1994-95 school year. Call your state co-ordinator Barbara 
(217) 243-8453 or call toll free 1-800-SIBLING. 

American Intercultnral Student Exchange (AISE) 



Do You Read Your Horoscope? 

Custom AsfrotoglcAl Prorile» t>&sed on ttve llnve, date 
and location of birtti. Find out how special you 
really arel Career ProHes, Child, Relallon^p. 
Matal/Blrih and Morel 

CRE^TOFTDE^ 

For EREE brochure. Wrilc Nowl 

Starior Enterprises - 
P.O. Box 455 Dept. LN 
Antioch. IL 60002 



■t,-h**-k^,***^i-k**-tt** 



Have Fun With Fiiends 

Lake County Council 
Navy League OF U.S. 

Golf Outing 

WEDNESDAi; AUG. 24 

Big Oaks Golf Course 

Green Bw Road 3/10 mile norih of sioEiiNEORussEiL road) 

/AwimWT TW A ¥ Y • •ACmVE DUTY NAVY 

UPEN 10 all; .rexireonavy 




•NAVY I-EAGUE FRIENDS 



TEE TIMES: 10:30-U:30-1:30 

***PmZBS - GOli - CART - 
LUNCH - DINNER - PRIZES *** 

LUNCH: HAMBURGERS, HOT DOCS, 

CHIPS, BEER & POP 

DINNER: GRILLED STEAK & 

ALL THE TRIMMINGS 

Attitude Adjustment 5:30-6:30 • Dinner 6:30 PM 

" PRIZES DISTRIBUTED FOLLOWING DINNER "• 



CLIP OUT - MAIL INI 

GOLF OUTING REGISTRATION FORM 



NAME: 



ADDRESS:. 
CITY: 



STATE: 



ZIP: 




( ) Enclosed find $. 
( ) Enclosed find $_ 
( ) Enclosed find $. 



for golf, lunch & dinner @ $60.00 each 

for golf & lunch only @ $40.00 each 

for _1 dinners only @ $30.00 each 



PREFERRED HOUR FOR TEE TIME: 10:30. 



11:30 



12:30 



Please make checks payable to Lake County Council, NLUS, and mail to: 
Kathryn Paul, Secretary • Lake County Council, NLUS, 2829 Bethel Blvd. • Zion, IL 60099 



/(iu^usT9, 1994 UI(ElANd'fiiE^i%jJ)lJiiK.tXk|^ 




Fox Lake irdi^ 

irrinols (Route 12) > 7 '^ ^ 





Commuter Parking Lot 14 Boat & Auto Dealers 



The Venetian Night boat parade vtrill be folbwed by (Ireworfct at Dockere. 




The Sale-A-bratlon will be held Aug. 5 - 7 In downtovm Fox Lake. 

Food vendors add to Summer Sale 



You won't go hungry at the annual 
Fox Lake Sale-a-Bratlon this year. 

Plenty of food vendors will be on 
hand offering scrumptious edibles for 
those busily Involved at the sidewalk 
sales, and the Boat/ Auto Show up and 
down Grand Ave. 

Among the pa'Hclpants are U Hot 
bog Choo Choo, with their famous 
Chicago-style red hots, Polish sausage 
and potato chips as well as Pepsi prod- 
ucts. 

Capo's- Cove will offer their mouttv 
waterlng Sicilian and American cuisine; 
and the Channel Inn will be cooking up 



some temptations ttxat will wet your 
palette and make* you go back for 
more. 

Yacht-Seds will offer a popular corn 
roast. The new owners of the Grand 
■ Cafe will also be serving up roast corn 
as well as mozzarella sticks, mild or hot 
chicken wings, calamarl, . fresh- 
squeezed lemorxjde and fresh brewed 
Ice tea. 

During the Fireworks display, a cot- 
ton candy vendbr as well as U Hot Dog 
Choo Choo will be offering appetizing 
Items next to Dockers.— by TINA 
SWIECH 



EDC sponsors event, 







out 




. .The Fox Lake Economic 
Dteveloprnent Commlssloh has worked 
tiard to put on the Sale-^-Bratlon each 
year. . • - 

This will be the third annual event, 
arnd each year It keeps getting better 
ar>d better. 

Ken Blrchard, president of the Fox 
Lake State Bank, agrees ttvat the kinks 
have been less eachjme. "We expect 
many more people In attendance this 
year because of 'our. broad rriarketlng 
efforts," said Blrchard. 

And with weather permitting tt^re 
should be no problem with the three 
day event. 

.Beginning Aug. 6 at noon the 
Boat/ Auto Sales Show will begin In the 
commuter parking lot arxJ will continue 
through Aug. 7. 

On Aug. 6 the Doers Club Arts & 
Crafts Fair starts at 9 a.m. In the Fox 
Lake Community Center. Then In the 



evening there will be a fireworks dis- 
play and tt>e Venetlari Night Boat 
Parade. August 7 is the rain date for 
the fire wori<s display. . 

A Collector Car Show takes place 
Aug. 7 In the commuter. parking lot, 
>/here vintage cars will be on 
display.— by TINA SWIECH 

ComEd wUl light Up 
village for weekend 

The village board approved 
Commonwealth Edison request to 
drop a special line for Sale-A-Bration 
vendors and the fireworks display r>ext 
to Dockers.. 

Trustee Jim Segln brought the 
request to the board, and explained 
there would be rx>.cost to tt>e town 
what so ever for tiie additional electri- 
cal line. " . 



CELEBRATE SALE-A-BRATION AT 

Dockers Streetfest 

AND FIREWORKS! 



,jjiKltieiser 



idciesA'^^: 






.(jirattoi*' 



PdfWng 



DOCKERS 
IlilOTEDMEIVUI 

•New York Strip sieak 
•Bro^ted Chicken 
•Spaghetti 

•Feltuccine Alfredo 
•HaniDurger 
•Salad Bar 

Sorry no reservations 

-Please, no coolere 
™S>]ouroftndialrs 



f^i^^ Polish 



Veneiiai 



*BmtPi 



^^a4e: 



/^-Si 




COME EARLY - STAY LATEI 

DOCKERS 

Restaurant & Lounge 



SPEND SAT. AUG. 6TH 
WITH US! 

{rain date Aug. 7{h) 



COME BY BOAT (DOCK FOB 25} OR CAR 



Hours: 

Monday-Saturday 11 a.m. -Close 

Sunday 9 a.m. - Midnight 



SUNDAY 

BRUNCH 

OPEN 9 AM 



32 West Grand • Pistckee Lake 

Fox Lake. IL G0020 

708-973-0033 






JIH 'JAKEM^^ ^cUyl NEwsp^pERS AiignsT ^,19%A 



m 
Pi 



in] 
lilt t 

111,'. 

p 



Fox Lake 



Illinois (Route 12) 



Commuter Parking Lot 
14 Boat & Auto Dealers 



.«,.».*. (sa««.a,) August 5, 6 4 7 

• Venetian Night Boat Parade! (Saturday] 
. Arts & Crafts fair! (Saturday) 

M Community Cwttr 9 1.ITI.-4 p.m. 

• Collector Car Show! (Sunday) 



CominutMPirliirt? lot 12-4 p.m. 

Fof Infofwation CJit |70a| SaTailJ 



,VlMUi« Hal D*9 Colarr 



See You At Sale-A-Bration ^^'"^^SS^'^h^ 

and Dockers for 

Fireworks/ 
(708) 587-3273 

10 S. Rt. 12, Fox Lake 




Vienna Beef 





4.91% Interest Rate 

A.P.Y. Effective July 17, 1994 

Limit $50,000 per household 






I After You've Seen Saleabratlon... 

Mark Down August 11th for a ^^« l/ffC^^ 
^.^..^N^^Memorial Tribiitc ta CLWtO 

See RICK SAUCEDO 
and the FABULOUS AMBASSADORS 

August nth, 9:00 pm 

Ackanceci Ticket: $5.00; at the ctoor $7.00 
• Come Early For The Best Seats • 
II liyi"r\/^\/ 37318 North Stanton Point 
J U ixt DVJ A Ing'eside. Illinois 60041 

SPORTS CENTER 




5 Year CD 



(708) 587-8088 




ACORN 

AUTO & M ARJNE 





587-2700 

7 E. Grand Ave. 
Fox Lake 



Interceptor Hood Shields 



TmucK Jtccm; 

S66.95 

jk Maremont Exhaust 

(Including catalytic coverters) 

50% Off 

▲ m RENT TOOLS FOR THAT 
"SnaALJOB" 




6.5% Interest Rate 
A.P.Y. Effective July 1 7, 1 994 
Limit $50,000 per household 

•Minimum balance to open account and earn AP.Y. is $500 
, Penalty for earty withdrawal- Above stated A.P.Y. is accumta as of 7-17-94 • FDIC Insured • UmiledTemi 

Second Federal 

Savings and Loan 

•Home Loans •Checking Accounts •Savings •CD's 
Corner of Rt. 1 2 & Grand Ave. ^ 




(70a)587-(5311 



Equal Housing 
Lender 



Au4ii»V>,^l f »4 lAkeM Nwspjvj^iJgJEBi?! E 








Ifl< 






III; 

Iki' 



lli:'- 








Fox Lake 



FORD 



MERCURY 



FORD 

TRUCKS 






Ford 
Credit 



> >. 



Savings so Me. tHey wouldn't fU inm^hbm^oom! 






.9% 



«iPI| 



Autdmat|c^aircoi;if 



MODELS 



vrj^-'r'JW 



,V_- .•f--(' ^J' 



l-.O'-V - 



I'lT.qnfS.'Wir: 






c.:s;f'a*5*-J. 






1994 FORD TCMPO 4 DR. GL or 
1994 MERCURV TOPAZ 4 DR. GS 

^0 Down *2f 9 

Automatic, air conditioning, power windows, 
power door locks. #P302. Program car. 

$9984 






s&svJdS 






m 



NEW FORD IMPERIAL CONVERSION VM 

A.O.D. trans.. AC. pw, pi. quad captains cliairs. tilt wheel, 

speed control, rear sofa bed, TV. V.C.P. ready. 

Just in time for summer vacation! 

$24,984 

FORD REBATE -.,. -SlOOO . 

FOX LAKE FORD S 

MERCURY REBATE,-. -$5003 ^ 



YOU PAY 



18,981 !!! 



■■■ 



sm 



,tijit'oJ>^ 



^3*r!i 



.'Prfgr'^irv 



A^#J 



m 



l^ijBwS^^SffiS 



AWD 1993 
AEROSTAR PROGRAM 

Extended, all wheel drive, dual air. 4 Jter, 
power windows & locks, tilt, cruise. #P315 

#16,988 



^i- 



VA 



Sii-i'v^v; 



FOX LAKE FORD MERCURY 

"Legendary in Customer Servi ce ' 



90 South Route 12 • Fox Lake, IL 60020 ^ 
( ^-/ ) Sales & Service - 708-587-3400 ^^^^^^^ 

"^ !M0'n.'Thurs. 9-9: Fri. 9-6: Sat. 9-5 ^ 

PARTS & SERVICE OPEN SATURDAY 7 AfVl - 12 NOON , 



E-INS 
WELCOME: 



^ . V. 



.^i-^ANDY SHOP LAKE COUNTY'S 

^^^CKIE LARGEST CHRYSLERPLY MOUTH 

M. '^'^- DODGE & DODGE TRUCK DEALER 
' ^ ^' 708-587-6471 

' YOUR FIVE STAR AWARD DINNING DEALER 

\ IN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION YEAR AFTER YEAR! 



WITH EVERY CM 
PURCHASE 

FREE 

IPJUNT SUUMTI 

ON ALL NEW CMS I 



"•*?11,'' 



Fox Lake 






MMID NEW 1994 

DODGE SHADOW.OR 

PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE 

111 



1M0 ncKiir 








_ Automallc transmission. 5.2L ve enflinQ. rear 
Fully l«to.y equipped. SiK. ii52W. ■ . step bumper, plus Dodge's Uneat eguipmeni. 

■ssr'94S8 UigrigS 

Just add lax, He, lllla & doc. fees | ■ ^^ # ; _ 



SANDY'S SPECIAL PURCHASE 



r>^ 1 - .— ^i 



'94 CHRYSIIR IHS 

#6-4031. Fully loaded with dual air 
bags and leather Interior. ^^ 

$22,995 




Mil» a FULL SIZE CARS 



SPORTY 



TRUCKS 



VANS 



SANDY McKIE 



■ ' IWDlf IMMII 

On-: IMil^n tilt 1k*it*f I •■ » •l--,»«SlI « 



^teANDY 

•I Soulh m*. 12 IMrFSxcAKr .t 701M7.M73^ 



OH— KiS? 







I ^j-. i-i »'** 



H.'«MM'aA «i ••»■ • 



igpatf^ffe^ifelANd NEwWE.s'Aii.;iiw ?,l"»T4'''yfi 



sssssssssssssssssssss 



37 Years Of 
Customer Satisfaction 



Sailing WoRiiilNC 



inc. 



500 South Route If Fox l^akalL ^^^^ 
am-s 587-2916 Fax. Number; (708) ^/J"^"^ 
^^° fcata^^^^ Capri, Hoble Cat, Sur^fish, 
Sovereign, Custom Hens 
Johnson Outboards^ 
o ^ f pc _ / FQ.qnA/S - SERVICE 




708-587-5814 

410 KINGS ROAD, FOX LAKE, IL 60020 



/P' 



SHOflE«STATlDN 



Boat Hoists 
And Piers 



Motor Yachts 25-44' 

COBALT 

Symbol of Boating Excellence 



POWCREDBY 



M AXTJM 

The Only Logical Choice :-■- : ' '■ J^ ^^l 

Affordable Luxury 17-32' 

1 995 MAXUMS ON DISPLAY!!! 



600 South Route IZ Fox Lake/IL 60020 

(708)973-0000 

Ski-Centurlon, Elec+^a CrajJ. CMC 

Inflatables Johnson Outboards 

SKI SCHOOL 



King Island Marina 

514 South Park Avenue, Fox Lake JL 60020 

(708) 587-291 7 

The Finest Slips In Pistakeelake 

Sail And Power To 25 

SPRING THRU FALL 



SSSSSSS&SSSS 



ssssss 



Fox Lake 



DROP ANCHOR 






Bi=iyLlNER 



■^ FOURWINNS 





IMautiques' 

RINKER 







VMH-UCIuiSMtr 






fCEmRATE & SAVE ^^SS^S"™^ 






B'' 




CHRIS CRAFT CLEARANCE 

Take advantage of year end factory Incentives! 

Sale Absolutely Ends 8/7/94 



93' 194 Quiet Rider Concept 

115 KP. OMC OultMwrd, Custom Trailer 



See 95 4 Winns Product 

170 Freedom Bow Rider, 170 Freedom Fish and Ski, 

190 Horizon Bow Rider 

Starting a\ 11,495 plus freight prep & options for . 
a comptere boot, motor 8 trailer package, 

TRACKER- 

Aluminiun Fishing Boats 

Pontoon Boat 



Suggested Sell: 
Discount 
Sale Price: 
Factory Incentive: 

Purchase Price: 



18743 

• 4,053 

14,690 

1,000 

13,690 



94 2} 7 Ct)rls Craft Concept 

5.0 ER OMG V-8, Custom Trailer 




93' 197 Ct)ris Craft Concept 

5.0 L V-8 CMC, Custom Trailer 

Suggested Sell: 20,618 

Discount: 4,627 

Sale Price: 15,991 

Factory Incentive: 1,000 

Purchase Price: 14,991 

94 237 Ctiris Craft Concept 

7A L King Cobra Big V-8 OMC; Custom Tandem Trailer 



Suggested Sell: 
Discount 
Sale Price: 
Factory Incentive: 

Purchase Price: 



28,368 

6,614 

21,754 

1,500 

20,254 



Suggested Sell: 
Discount: 
Sale Price: 
Factory Incentive: 

Purchase Price: 



34,872 
8,438 

26,434 
1,500 

24>934 





(708) 587-5800 



avic 



^v^w3,\99A UkeUNd NewspAptBS. '^'^f Wg> E 





SHIPS STORE • PARTS DEPARTMENT 
SLIP AVAILABLE • DRY STAGMN & OUT 

IMautSques f^^f"""9 

I BY CORRECT CRAFt W SIN CE 1925 



POWERED BY 






The OnV LoQcai Choce 
For Dependable f%1ormance 



Close Out 

Prices On 

All '94's 



Since 



Customer service ^- ^ 

Fox Lake Chamber President Jeamette Campbell Ceft) prepares ttie Fox 
Lake State Bank boat for Sale-A-Bratlon wtille Ractiel Brand and Adam 
Brand set ttie table, Ttiey're ttie wife and son of Todd Brand, a bank vice 
president, Merctxants and business owners are pkanning special events and 
sales to mark ttie weekend fesllvlttes. 



KRAMER BOAT CO 



J t25® 



Fox Lake 



DROP ANCHOR. 



ON RT. 12 AT THB BRmCE-IVX 

1926 708-^-2623 

Daily 9-S; Wed. til 8 p.m., Closod Tu*sdaya 

Augusts, 

6 » 



BRyLINeR 



c»* 



5*^ 



xU^^ 



nn . 











00 ^o 



FOURWINNS 






RINKER 







yffofUOoitBoatr 



Wo^Xjm^W harbor 

■^5^UTCS59&1M W (708)587-0200 

JO^?.^^;r.l^ K» th. Moulls Family Since 952 



BIG 



TIME BOAT DEALS! 



BRyUNER 



World Leader In Ple»ur» Boats 



ALUMINUM BOATS 



Many 1995's 
Now Availabe! 



Quality Everywhere 
You Look 



nutbaarasl 



New 
for 
95. 



POWERED BY inntUff^MajtYai. ^^^^f^^^ 

tbr 



N 



-m^ 



StVA*^ 



Bavliner 2050 1 SOIh Brunswick Annivefsaiy Edilton. pwwed by . - . 
depth finder A much much morell ijEffiaMat^Bi™j 



40TH ANNIVERSARY SALE 



PQWEREP BV 



OKV °! 




FAMILY BOATS 

YOUR PONTOON BOAT HEADQUARTERS FEATURING 

SUNOVJISER MmmUcgmnSee the 1995 Rinkers 

265 Fiesta Vee 
Aft Cabin Cruiser 






u FREE ., 

^ JmtPurch«M 



Clearance Prices On Remaining 1994's 

RIHKER 

«^TV •10,600 

1 - V-180 Open Bow 3.0LX...".".."- " .jg gOO 

2 - 209 Captiva Open Bow 4.3LX.... »iq ann 

I - 209 Captiva Closed Bow 350 Mag. ». . 1|;300 

1 - 240 Fiesta Vee Cuddy Fish 5.7 ""T-i;' 

SUNCRUISER PONTOONS 

1 - 18- BM Fishing Boat W/30 HP .»^. •_. ,... ;• /^gg 

1 - 20- BM Fishing Boat (Loaded) W/70 HP. ..«.. ta^ 

2 - 20- Trinidad W/50 HP. . « •— • "" """""mo SS 

2 - 24- Trinidad W/50 HP.. ......»...»»..."". * 1°'**^ 

Pius Freight & Prop 

SPECIAL PRICES ON 93 GIBSON HOUSEBOATS 

g BEN WAITS MARINA 

S'k SALES - SERVICE - STORAGE 

^ UWMCItHaTSS.ScHIC*I.EA.WMHROOMtttHQWB»-^ 

116S.RT.12 FOX LAKE 708-587,0211 



A_ ..^ 



^tm 



WJ'-jmpi^„,j 




[tUll 



lAliiiii%*.lAJ(ElANd NewspApERS AuqusT y,19»4^ 



Fox Lake tni 

Illinois (Route 1 21 V ^ '^ 



Illinois (Route 12) 




Commuter Parking Lot 14 Boat & Auto Dealers 



Visitors can browse vintage cars at Collector Car 




The Collector Cor Show event This will be the third annual show 

which takes place during the Sale-A- In Fox Lake and cars ranging from 

Bration Is always a very popular event. the vintage to the muscle-type will 




Ten marinas are participating In ttie Sale-A-Bratlon combination auto-boat sale. 

Combo Auto-Boat Sale 
offers fantastic savings 



If you want fabulous savings on a 
new car or water craft, don't' hesitate 
to come out to ttie 3rd annual Boat 
and Auto Show. 

Hundreds of new cars and boats will 
be on display at the Fox Lake com- 
muter parking lot on Grand Ave, and 
Nlpperslnk Aug. 5 through Aug, 7 at 
very special prices. 

Bill fVlcKie of Sandy McKle Chrysler 
Plymouth Dodge said this year he Is 
expecting a large turno.ut. "There will 
be gigantic savings to customers," said 
McKle. 

Also participating with shiny new 
vehicles vAW be Fox Lake Ford Mercury 
and Ray Chevrolet Geo. 

Ten marinas will be taking part In 
the sales show Including Fox Lake 
Harbor, Hidden Cove Marina, 



Kramer Boat Company, Lake Shore 
Marine, Munson Marine, Ostrow 
Marine, PIstakee Marina, Sailing 
World. Skipper Bud's, and Watts 
Marina. 

Sales manager of Watt's Marina, 
Larry Dechow said sale-a-bratton Is a 
fun time In town which t>rlngs people 
from all over. 'All the festivities In town 
should draw a lot of peopHe/ rxst to 
mention the terrific savings offered, said 
Dechow. 

"You'll be able to buy a '95 Rinker 
at '94 prices,' Dechow said. 'The best 
time to buy Is right rx>w. at ttie erd of 
the season.' 

Everybody should come out arxi 
see the savings each of the marinas 
and car dealerships have to offer.— by 
TINA SWIECH 




be on display. D'Arco. Those who have registered in 

Most of the care are for show, but a advance however will receive a dash 

few of the owners may even take an plaque. 

offer up on one of their prized posses- There Is no ctKirge and everyone is 

slons. ' more than welcome to come out and 

Candy D'Arco assisted Roy Miller see the great old. machines, 

with the event last year, and said the The coilector'car show Is on display 

crowd expected should be a big one. Sunday, Aug. 7 from noon to 4 p.m. in 

"We always have people drive up the commuter pari<lng lot— by TINA 

Cn their own collector cars),' said SWIECH 




The collector car show will be held Sunday. Aug. 7 from nbon to 4 p.m. In the com- 
muter pcvking lot. Jaguar Is the featured marque. Muscle, vlhtago sport and clos- 
slc cars will also be on display. 

Crafty Seniors show their wares 



Doers Club members of tt>e Fox Lake 
State Bank have been tK>ldlng a craft 
fair for ttie past four years. 

Aug. 6 will mari< the second annual 
fair held in coordirvatlon with the Fox 
Lake Saie-A-Bratlon. A number of 
unique and tiandmade items will be 
available to purchase. 

Some of the special features, 
according to Bemie Rembiake, Doers 
Club coordinator, are homemade 
bread and Jellies, beautiful txandmade 
items Including quilts, knitted and cro- 
cheted goods, bird houses, jewelry, 
ceramics, button tins, paintings" and 



much more. - - 

An unusual room will be available 
which will tiold all recycled treasures, 
said Bernle. The proceeds from tt>ese 
items will go to the American Cancer 
Society. 

Both men and women Doers rr>em- 
bers are displaying their crafts, and ttie 
Silver Foxes are furnishing refreshments 
for ttie public 

The Craft Fair will be held at the. 
Fox Lake Community Center on 79 
Keystone Ave. off of Grand Ave. from 
9 a. m. to 4 p.m. and everyone is Invit- 
ed. 



Fireworks display spectaGillar 
end to Sale-A-Bration events 



Sandy McKle and sons Chrysler Plymouth Dodge, Fox Lake Ford Mercury and Ray 
Chevrolet Geo will be participating In the combination auto-boat sale which 
promlsos fantastic savings. 



After you browse the street sales, 
and take a taste or two from the food 
vendors, sit back and relax and enjoy a 
spectacular sight Aug. 6. 

Ttie "West Grand Avenue Flreworics' 
display will feature dl^ Jockey Sound 
Creations starting at 4 p.m., and every- 
one is ertcou raged to bring their lawn 
ctxilrs and blankets. 

T-shirts and caps will t>e sold near 
Dockers and proceeds will go to th>e 
flrewort<s fund. 

Grand Ave. will be blocked off from 
PIstakee Lake Rd. to the west end and 
parklrig will be available throughout 
the town including Lakeland Plaza, 
Second Federal, U Hot Dog Choo 
Choo, and the commuter parking lot. 

For those who arrive eariy, ttiere will 
be parking on West Grand Ave. wher- 
ever It Is legal. Police Chief Jim Busch 
reminds everyone not to park In front of 
driveways, lanes or In front of fire 



hydrants. 

The chief said there will be over c 
dozen officers out directing traffic dur- 
ing the event. 

Prunella's will offer handicappec 
parking. 

Sea Walls by Willie (Frazee) con^ 
structed four barges for the flreworki 
display wNch will start around dusk. • 

The Venetian Night Boat Parade Is tc 
follow, although according to flr6Wori<i 
coordinators. Carol Strauser and Clr>dv 
Bart, the event schedule coulc 
change, with the parade first and ther 
the fireworks after, 

The coordinators praised the help 
they've received from everyone. "This 
couldn't have taken place without the 
entire community," Bart explained. 

'Come out and enjoyl' said Strausei 
and Bart. 

The rain date for the firewori<s dis- 
play Is Aug. 7.— by TINA SWIECH 



LIFE'S A BEAR 



DONNA ABEAR 




Tales from a teenager's bedroom-r-Part 1 



It was a sweltering summer 
night (outside anyway— believe 
me, my air conditioning was 
going full blast); The moon was 
full. The younger children were 
sleeping (at last) in their beds. 
My husband was upstairs getting 
his exercise as he worked out his 
finger on the remote control but- 
ton. I was aAonc in the laundry 
room downstairs, directly across 
from my teenage son's bedroom. 

I don't know what made me 
do it I guess I was feeling spunky, 
devil-may-care. There seemed to 
be this urge that flowed suddenly 
through my v^ole being, carry- 
ing through to my feet and mak- 
ing them sneak toward that bed- 
room. The teenager's bedroom. 

Slowly I tiptoed, step by step, 
inch by inch. I was burning with 
curiosity, wondering if he had, 
indeed, been cleaning his room 
now that we'd mutually decided 
he was old enough to handle it 
He'd made me promise not to 
check up on him, or nit-pick 
about the quality of his worL 
But there I was, downstairs alone, 
my son out at the movies, the 
closed door (with the sign that 



said, "Keep Out— This Means 
You, You Little Geek") calling to 
me in a wooden whisper, "Open 
me. Open me now." So I did. 

Or at least I tried. I was able to 
turn the handle, and move the 
door about an inch. There 
seemed to be something behind 
it I saw the sleeve of a shirt. And 
a pair of underwear. A shiver 
went through mc. Was there a 
body behind the door? 

I took a deep breath, closed 
my eyes, and pushed harder. It 
budged another inch. A pair of 
Jeans were now visible. Hmmm, 
they didn!t look occupied. No 
body. I relaxed a little. 

Pushing as hard as I could, I 
finally moved the door open wide 
enough to step inside the room. I 
flipped on the light As I got my 
first good look, I felt as though I'd 
been hit with a cattle prod. 
Actually, that might have been a 
possibility, because I could see 
that this was no longer a bed- 
room — it was now some kind of 
nightmare laundry farm. 

Apparently that carpeting 
we'd installed in my son's room 
was very fertile,, because it 



seemed to be growing every kind 
of strange crop imaginable. T- 
shirt plants, sock sprouts, blue 
jean trees, you name It— he was 
growing it Dirty, clean, and in- 
bctwccn. The last thing I remem- 
ber seeing before I fainted was 
the underwear, hanging vinelike 
from his lamp. 

When I came to, I almost 
choked on the smell of dirty 
socks, and had to stifle the urge to 
scream. I ran from that horrible 
scene as fast as I could, out of 
breath by the time I got upstairs 
to the safety of my own bedroom. 

"Oh, there you arc, honey," 
said my husband. "You're miss- 
ing a good movie. Invasion of the 
Body Snatchers. You know— the 
one where everyone turns into 
pods from outer space. " 

"What about laundry? They 
don't turn into laundry, do they?" 

He assured me that tficy did- 
n't But then I saw it— the pile of 
clothes on the floor next to. his 
side of the bed. I should have 

known. 

He's one of them t 




AuflufT 9,^1994 LaIcciancI H^pApEin 1j||U^EI,I|^E 




Join Arbor Day Foundation, receive free spruce trees 



Ten free Colorado blue spruce 
trees will be given to each person 
who Joins The National Arbor 
Day Foundation during August 

The trees will be shipped post- 
paid at the right time for planting 



between Oct. 1 and Dec 10 with 
enclosed planting instructions. 
The six- to 12-inch trees are guar- 
anteed to grow, or they will be 
replaced free of charge. 

To become a rriember of the 



foundation, send a $10 member- 
ship contribution to Ten Bliie 
Spruces, National Arbor Day 
Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., 
Nebraska City, NE 68410, by 
August 31. ' 



Good Food 

Liven up summer with 
a simple potato salad 

If the perfect simple summer potato salad recipe has eluded 
you and you're tired of spending hours peeling, cooking and wait- 
ing for it to cool, the Kraft Creative Kitchens professionals have a 
solution, They have developed a delicious potato recipe using 
Vclvccta Process Cheese Spread as a key Ingredient 

Ranch st^e potato salad 

6 caps (2 1/2 poands) nmtdt red potatoes, quartered 

1/3 cup of water 

1/2 pound Velveeta Process Cheese Spread^ cubed 

1 /2 cup ranch dressing 

1 small red or green pepper, finely chopped 

1 /3 cup sliced green onions 

fi slices bacon, crisply cooked, crumbled 

Microwave potatoes and water in covered 2-quart microwave- 
safe casserole dish on liigh 14 to 16 minutes or untU tender, stirring 
after 8 minutes. Drain. 

Microwave Velveeta and dressing in 1-quart microwave safe 
bowl on high 1 1/2 to 2 minutes or until thoroughly heated, stirring 
after 1 minute. Stir into potatoes. 

Add remaining ingredients, mix lightly. Serve.warm or refriger-., 
ated. Makes 6 cups. 



Raffle to benefit Family Service Agency 



Some lucky person will, win 
two round-trip airiine tickets to 
anywhere in the continental 
United States or weekend accom- 
modations at the Grand Hotel in 
Milwaukee. 

These are two of the prizes in 
the Family Service Agency 
Sunmicr of 1994 Raffle. Tickets 
are $1 each or six for $5. Call 
Family Service Agency at 662- 
4464 to order tickets. Winners will 
be notiTicd following the drawing 
on Sept. 2. 



Family Service Agency of 
North Lake County is a non-prof- 
it agency providing counseling, 
community education and bilin- 
gual /bicultural programs In 
Waukegan, Lake VUla and Zion. 

All services arc provided on a 
sliding fee scale, and no potential 
client is turned away because of 
inability to pay. 

All proceeds from the raffle 
will go directly to support Family 
Service Agency programs. 



"MESSAGES FRQM YOUR BUSINESS COMMUNITY" 

Reader Ads Prepared By J,L. Enterprises, Inc. 



c. 
r-" 

c 

'kt 

tc 

k! 

:l^ 
Ic 

ar 

'Ip 
hi! 

ne 

>et 
lis- 



vf 



CHILDREN'S 
DISCOVERY CENTER 





llSe]^€2tKK^€;t^i^ 



Tina Fisher - Director 

If a planned, active day in a positive learning atmosphere sounds good to you, it cerlainiy wili be 
enioyabte tor your child^ CHILDREN'S DISCOVERY CENTER, located In Round Lake 
Heights at 700 West Rollins Road, phone 546-3363, provides full and part time child 
care for children ages two to twelvtwelve years, from 6:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Transportation 
to Round Lai^e area sciKX)ls is also provided as are nuttitious meals and snaclcs. Sending your child 
to CHILDREN'S DISCOVERY CENTER will only prepare him or her better for later school 
years and life experiences by the use of hands-on discovery and learning. Your child will learn to 
build positive, healthy relationships with both his peers and with adults, in an atmosphere where 
problem solving, creative thini^ing and positive attitudes are encouraged. They offer a half-day 
preschool program and summer day camp. In the tall, they start a full day piaget discovery 
■kindergarten program. We are pleased to recommend the state-licensed facility of CHILDREN'S 
DISCOVERY CENTER to all our readres. You are invited to call 546-3383 for further 
details. Both^uand your child will be gtad you did! 

Over the past few years, the living habits of Americans 
have changed dramatically. One of the major factors in 
this change is the emergence of the modern apartment 
community. Many people, turned off by the continual 

^_ maintenance problems and the expenses of home 

ownership, have opted tor the carefree style of apartments lii^e those available at WEDGEWOOD 
CREEK. Located at 1700 Wedgewood Dr. In Gurnee, phone <708) 336-5100, 
WEDGEWOOD CREEK is a prime example of sophisticated, gracious living geared to the 
lifestyles of the '90's. At WEDGEWOOD CREEK, they are dedicated to pleasing their residents. 
Well planned, soundly constructed and professionally managed one and two tsedroom apartrnents 
are availaWe. Each features wall-to-wall carpeting, appliances and cable TV hook up. Now is the 
opportune time to visit WEDGEWOOD CREEK and begin living in a pleasant environment that is 
conveniently located to everything in Gurnee. Stop in soon for a tour of the facilities today or 
call <708) 336-5100 for further details. 

A-TIRE COUNTY SERVICE 

Today, you can purchase tires just about anywhere; mail order catalogs. 

department stores or the service station on the corner - so why do so 
many area motorists elect to rely exclusively on A-TIRE COUNTY SERVICE? The reasons are 
several, but perhaps three of the most important are quality, price and service. A-TIRE 
COUNTY SERVICE, located at 363 N. Cedar Uke In Round Lake, phone 546-7491, 
will assist you in selecting just the right tire for your needs. Make your selection from a large 
Inventory ol quality Goodyear tires. There is a tire to meet every need: passenger car tires for 
foreign and domestic models, and deep-tread tires for trucks, four wheel vehicles, and RVs. 
Once you've made your selection, their experienced personnel will expertly mount and balance 
your tires and re-align your wheels if you so desire. Complete auto service is available, from 
tune-ups and oil changes, to brake, shock, and exhaust work. In addition, 24-hour towing 
and road service Is available. We give A-TIRE COUNTY SERVICE our complete 
recommendation for 34 years of quality service. Call 546-7491, and keep the 
•fter-hours phone 546-2289 In your glovebox at all times for quick reference. 




aOOO:^V£AR 



A-MAJOR MUSIC INC. 

Locally Owned & Operated By Jo Dooley & Marion Osenga 

Musicians and teachers throughout the area have come to know and rely on the friendly people at 
A-IMAJOR MUSIC to provide top-quality, brand-name instruments and superior sfervice. 
A-MAJOR MUSIC Is located at 3701 B. Grand Ave. in Gurnee, phone 623-8565. 
They feature a fine selection of band and orchestra instmments; everything from snare dmms to 
trumpets, from flutes to slide trombones, as well as violins and guitars for sale or rental. 
A-MAJOR MUSIC'S sheet music selection is the finest In the area. There are selections from 
Bioadway Musicals and rock tunes, to your favorite top 40's. Their service department is fully 
trained to repair and tune most any instrument. For instrnmental students, they'll provide 
patient, competent instmctions to those who tmly want to learn. The writers of this "MBSsages 
From Your Business Community" Section urge you to jump on A-MAJOR MUSIC'S bandwagon!! 
We know you1l be glad you did! 

MAJOR HILL INSURANCE AGENCY 

Serving The Area With Over 43 Years Of Experience 

if you're like most people, who don't fully understand the unending 
complexities of the insurance business, at least be certain you know and can 
rely on your agent. The total coverage professionals at MAJOR HILL 
INSURANCE AGENCY doni look upon themselves as insurance salespeople as 
much as those dedicated to providing each and every client with a perfectly-tailored package for 
the individual's needs. Drop over to MAJOR HILL INSURANCE AGENCY, located at 5 W. 
Meade Ct. (|ust off Rte. 12) In Fox Lake, phone 587-7712, 687-7714 or FAX# 
587-1204, and see why this professional agency has won the respect of people throughout the 
entire area. Let these insurance experts review your present policy. If the policy is satisfactory, 
they'll tell you so. However, they may be atrfe to provide you with better coverage at a better 
rate. We, the writers of this "Messages From Your Business Community" Section, give MAJOR 
HILL INSURANCE AGENCY our total recommendation. - ' 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
CHIROPRACTIC 

Dr. Scott Reiser 

Chiropractic has become the largest drugless healing profession in the World, and next year will 
celebrate its 100th anniversary. This science explains that some of the causes of pain or disease 
in the body are the vertebral subluxations which create pressure upon nerves and interfere with 
the normal transmission of vital nerve energy, DR. SCOTT REISER'S objective is to locate the 
place in the spine where the nen/e pressure exists and by gentle adjustments, restore vertebrae 
to their normal positions. These corrective adjustments release pressure on nen/es. and thereby 
allows the body to heal itself. In addition to the traditional "back pain," there are other problems 
which have been proven to respond to Chiropractic treatment, including headaches, whiplash,, 
work accidents, sports in|uries, pinchednerves and numbness, to name a few. We, the writers of 
this "Messages From Your Business Community" Section, give DR. SCOTT REISER and his staff 
from ROUND LAKE BEACH CHIROPRACTIC our total recommendation. Most third party 
insurances are gladly accepted, and evening appointments are available. For a free Initial 
spinal examination and consultation (X-rays are not included), contact them at 
314 W. Rollins Rd. In Eagle Creek Plaza at 740-2600. 



10. 




ilii«.ift!MC^!miANa NCWSPAPCRS KvV^ij'^^^A.:^^ 



Be ThERE 



MoviE Pick- 




Retired business execs offer free counseling 

Free counseling for small business owners and operators will be offered at 
the College of Lake County by representatives of the Service Corps of Retired 
Executives. Counseling on business start-up, marketing, planning and flnanc* 
Ing will be offered from 9 a.m. t^ 1 p.m. Mondays at CLC. To make an appoint- 
mcni call 223-3B33. 

Calling all bridge players 

Llbcrtyvlllc Woman's Club is soliciting bridge players for three different 
bridge marathons to begin In September. Marathons arc held in the players' 
homes, two tables at a time and will run for eight months. Call Vivian Chapln at 
362-7034 for further details. 



Grisham's back with a thriller 



TuEsdAy 



'■t' 



J »■ 



'^ Retired teachers luncheon 

The Retired Teachers Assn. of Lake County wilt hold a buffet luncheon 
meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 9 at noon at The Meadows 21 Restaurant, 1760 N. 
Milwaukee Ave., Libertyvillc. Featured speaker will be Charles Iscly III, presi- 
dent and CEO of the Lake County, Illinois Chamber of Commerce. Lake County 
retired teachers and their guests arc Invited to attend. Reservations arc not 
required. Call 623-0191 for more information. 



WediyesdAy 



.i ".J ' 



'^iMlL 



AA1IW plans summer social 

The Mid-Lake Couiity branch of the American Assn. of University Women 
will he hosting an Ice Cream Membership social on Wednesday, Aug. 10 at 7 
p.m. at the home of Jill Dayton, 630 W. Golf Rd,, Llbcrtyvllle. Present, new 
prospective and former members are welcome. For details call at 362-866B. 



In every other new movie this 
last year we have been intro- 
duced to new and virgin Juvenile 
talent that knocks our socks off 
with their performances. Author 
John Grisham's newest thriller, 
"The Client" proves to be no 
exception in this category. 

Since an 11-ycar-old boy — 
who sees a lawyer for the Mafla 
stick a gun In his mouth and 
commit suicide — is the center of 
Grisham's story, the film calls for 
an outstanding child actor to play 
this part. That they have in Brad 
Rcnfro who makes his film debut 
In "Client." 

In comparing the transfer- 
ence of other Grisham novels 
from paper to celluloid, " The 
Client" docs rather well next 
to'Thc Firm," and "The Pelican 
Brief." This one followed the 
book more closely. 

The two biggest changes are 
the expansion of the federal 
attorney's role (Tommy Lee 



Jones), and the addition of a 
rattier unnecessary chase scene 
through a morgue. 

I guess director Joel Schu- 
maker decided not to argue with 
success, so he has Jones almost 
repeating his Academy Award- 
winning role in "Tlie Fugitive." 
We arc blaming the director 
becau.se previous roles Jones has 
played proved that he Ls much 
more versatile than this. 

Despite the strength of her 
two male co-stars, Susan 
Sarandon steals the whole show 
playing Mark Sway's (Renfro's) 
attorney, whose job it is to pro- 
tect the child not only from 
Jones, but also from the mob. 

The movie starts off with a 
bang and despite a few lapses, 
keeps the suspense going 
throughout This one is probably 
worth the ticket price at a 3.5 of 
five rating.— by GLORU DAVIS 




Tommy Loo Jonos. Susan 
Sarandon and Brad Ronfro 



T^TrT^lr Ir Ir }, Ir 1' If- ^^ 



If Ir Ir \r ,r \r 



' ^ ^ s ^ s ^' 



Moms Club 

The Moms Club of Wauconda, a 
support group for at-home mothers, 
meets the second Thursday of each 
month at the Federated Church of 
Wauconda, 200 S. Bairington Rd. at 
9:30 a.m. For more information call 
526-4073. The Moms Ciub of Gurnee 
meets the third Tuesday of every 
month. For more information call 
548-401S or 263-7535. 

Tough Love 

Tough Love meets every Monday at 
7 p.m. at the Round Lake Area Park 
Disi. Call 1(800)926-K1DS for further 
details, 

Parent Group 

Tiic Parent Group sponsors weekly 
Parents Anonymous support groups. 
Fridays from 9 to 11 a.m., Thursday In 
Vernon HUls from 7 lo 9 p.m. and In 
Zion on Tuesdays from 8 to 9 p.m. 
and Wednesday from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 
For more Information call 263-7272. . 

Home Bible studies 

The Apostolic Church of Liberty is 
offering free home Bible studies. Part 
of the United Pentecostal Church 
International, Bible studies cover 
from one simple lesson to lessons 
covering Genesis lo Revelation chap- 
ters in the Bible. Church services arc 
held Sunday mornings and 
Wednesday evenings In Grayslake. 
Call 223-6813 or 526-7609 for further 
information. 

Rational Recovery 

Rational Recovery Seif Help Network 
meets every Monday at 10:30 a.m. at 
Lake County Health Dept., 131 £. 
Grand, Lake Villa, and at 7 p.m. at 
Antloch Manor Apartments, 445 
Donin Dr., Antioch. RRSN is a non 
higher power, non-12-step program 
for Individuals with alcohol and/or 
substance abuse problems. For more 
information call 83B-2530. 

Medieval history 

The Society for Creative Anach- 
ronism is a non-profit educational 
organization devoted lo the study and 
recreation of the Middle Ages. The 
Lake and McHeniy County SCA group 
meets the first Saturday of each 
month at the Fremont Library in 
Mundeleln. Call Mark Glpson at 587- 
, 7959 or Gcrl Celba at 566-6504. 

Divorce support 

Learn how to cope with divorce by 
meeting other women vy4io are also 
experiencing the challenges of 
divorce. A women's support group 
meets twice a month on Wednesday 
evenings. Call Lisa at 680-4106 for 
more information. 

Mothers of twins 

Lake County Mothers of Twins Club 
meets the third Thursday of the 
month at Warren TWp. Library. Call 
Robin at 244-7762 for further details. 

Al-Anon 

Al-Anon meets at 7 p.m. eery 
Monday at Peace Lutheran Church, 
1050 S. Rand Rd., Lake Zurich. For 
further information call Sandy at 540- 
0601. 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 O 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



B 
B 
B 

3 

B 

9 



11 .50 all seats all ahows 
UHLE BIG LEAGUE (PO) 

FrI. & Mon.-Thura. a;0&5:lS>7:3D; 
Sat. « Sun. 1 :00-3:0&S:1 5-7:30 

YOU SO CRAZY (N/R) 

No On« Unctor 16 Admltlwl 
Daily 0:4S 

CROOKLYNCPGia) 

Frl. & Mon.-Thure, 5:15-7:30-0:40: 
Sat. & Sun. 2:45-5:15-7:30-9:40 



Air Conditioned 
THE CROW (R) 

Fri. & Mon.-Thurs. 5:15-9:35 
Sat. & Sun. 1 :0O-5:1 S9:35 

THE IHKWELL |R) 

Dally 3:00-7:15 

BLOWN AWAY (19 

FH. « Mon,-Thur«. 4:45-7:15-0:35; 
Sat. & Sun. 2:00-4:45-7:1 5-0:35 



B 
B 

B 

a 
a 

a 
a 



■aaBBaaaaaBaBaaaaBaaaBaBBBaaaaBHBBBBaBBBaaBBBBBB 



CiNEpUx OdEON ThEATRES 




CMtnutOuui 



Forrest Gump (FG-ia) <on 2 screens) 

(Digital) 12:45-3:45-6:43-9:45; (Dolby) 2:30-5:30-8:30 



Black Beauty (G) (Dolby) 

12.45 



The Lion King (G) (Dolby) 

1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00 



Airheads (PG-13> (Dolby) 

1:25-3:20-5:15-7:10-9:05 



The Client (PG.13) (Dolby) 

2:20-4:50-7:25-9:55 



It Could Happen To You (PC) (Dolby) 

1 :O0-3:lO-5;2O-7;3O-9:40 



H GURNEE CINEMA ""i 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL - 708-855-9940 




5R. CIT. SPECIAL MSA WEOS A FRI AFTERHOON. BARGAIN MATINEES • ADULTS $4 BEFORE 5:30 
FRIDAY. AUGUST S THROUGH THURSDAY. AUGUST 11 




CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (DT9) 
(NO PASSES on HOV. FUN TICKETS) 


PO-13 


DAILY 1:1(M:0»7:OS-10:0O 




FORREST aUMP (OTS) 
(KO PASSES) 


P0.13 


DAILY 12j6Mi4M:4M:33 




THE MASK 


PO-13 


DAILY 12a54:«)-5;20-7:3©-«>«0 




LtTTLE RASCALS 


PQ 


DAILY 12j«-a:«M;4M:80-8K)0 




AIRHEADS 

(NO PASSES OH MOV. FUN TICKETS) 


PO-13 


DAfLY t:3M:2S-5:25-7:2S«:a9 




THE CLIENT 


pa-13 


DAILY 2:3(M;U-7:30.0>«9 




THE LION KINO 

(NO PASSES OH HOV, FUN TICKETS) 


a 


DAILY 1:1M;1M:1».7i1M:19 




TRUE LIES (OTS) 

(NO PASSES OR MOV. FUN TICKETS) 


R 


DAILY t:«M;0O-7:00«SS 




IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU 


PQ 


DAILY ia:0M:lS-».4M;S5-B:10 




ANQELSINTHEOUrnELO 


PQ 


DAILY 12d0.a:3M:50*7:1 04:29 




BLACK BEAUTY 


Q 


DAILY 12:29 ■ 



LAKE ZURICH THE ATRES -'T'pa^SSO-OOOO 
ROUTE 12 EAST OF ELA RD..'lAKE ZURICH 

•6 00 AtJULra • J iiiJ CMILOflEN lUniloi 1 11 
•3 OO MON FRI tJNTIU 5 PM GAT A SUN UNTIL 2 30 PM 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW 

I TME LITTLE RASCALS (PO) 
AIR HEADS (R) 
THE MASK (PQ-13) 
IT COULD HAPPEN TO VOU (PQ) 
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (PG-13) 

TME CLIENT (PQ-13) 
LASSIE (PQ) 
TRUE LIES (R) 

ANQELS IN TVIE OUTFIELD (PO) 
FORREST QUMP (PQ13) 
THE LION KINQ (Q) 



START FRIDAY 8/S/94 

1 1 :00-1 :30-3:1S-6:00-7:00-a:4C 

1 : 1 0-3: 0O-4 : BO-7:1 0-9:00 

1 0:4S-1 :0O-3:2O-e:1 s-«: 

1 1 :1 0-1 :40-4 :00.«:4ft-»:1 ( 

Frl. A Sat. 12:50-3:4S-7:00-»:4C 

Sun.-Ttiurs. i2:BO-3:4B.«:35-9:ll 

1:3O-4:0O-«:20-«:I 

11: 

Frt. A Sal. 12;4B.<l:3O-«:40-9:3C 

Sun.-Thura. 12:48-3:30.«:16-9:0< 

1 1 :0O-l :49-4:i»«:3B-»:4fl 

12:3O-3:2O-e:0ft-»:( 

' 1O:3O-1:0O-3:00-S:0O-«:4S-«:4I 



Clear and Present Danger (PG-13) (on 2 screens) 
(Digital) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00; (Dolby) 2:00-5:00-8:00 



HAVSTTHORN CENTER 



True Lies (R) (Dolby) 

1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 



The Little Rascals (PG) 

1:15-3:15-5:15-7:15-9:15 



Mask (PG-13) (on 2 screens) 

1:4&4:00-6:15-8;30 (NO BARGAIN MATINEE SAT., SUN.) 
(Dolby) 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45 




SHOWPLACE 1-7 815-455-1005 
ROUTE 14 & ROUTE 31. CRYSTAL LAKE 

1 nil APUL T'". • 3 Ou CHII DRErj iKri'lor 11, 

igor.Kjr-t i-n\ until ^ pm sat a sun utjtil ? !■■ cr.i 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY VSt94 
I THE LITTLE RASCALS (PQ) l:3O-3:1S-5:0O-7:0O-«:0O 



AIRHEADS (R) 
THE MASK (PO-13) 
THE CLIENT <PQ-13) 
ItRUEUES(R) 
FORREST QUMP (PO-IS) 
THE LtON KING (O) 



2rfM-4:1S-e:304:30 

2:1S-4:3O4:4S-«:05 ! 

1:25*3:S5-«:254l:SO | 

12:45-3:30-«:10-«:50 

12:30-3:2O-«:0S-f»:0O 

:00-3:QO-5:00-7:00-9:fW 



^^ Presents ^jj 

r/ie Foreigner 

by Larry Shuc 

Mirron ourpfejudkawil}) lib-lkilmg humor &. ilapitick funal ao Old Geoi{iaIitn. 
Direcled by Tom Haiuman 

Aug. 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21 

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 p.m. 

Adults *9. Students & Seniors *7. 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre*877 Main St.«Antioch 

Box Office Hours: 

Mon, thru Thurs. 5:30-7:30 p.m. and 1 1/2 hra. before showtimos. 

Reserved Sealirvg, VISA/MC 



OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE OPEN DAILY MATINEE 



Till IIIIIIXIXXXXX 



MOVIES AND TIMES BELOW START FRIDAY 7/29/94 

SHOWPLACE 8 -26 N. WILLIAMS STREET. CRYSTAL LAKE 
■5- Adults - O- Child (11 & Under) 8 15-455-1005 



CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (PG-13) 



ia:1S-3:1B-«:0(^.>00 



ANTIOCH THEATRE 378 LAKE ST.. ANTIOCH 395-02)6 



•4" ADULTS "2" CHILD (1 1 & UNDER) "Z" UNTIL 5 P.M. 
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER (PG-t3) i2:is-3:i8-6:oo-e:oo 



LIBERTYVILLE 1 & 2 
708 N. MILWAUKEE. LIBERTYVILLE 362-3011 



M.OO Adults • "2.00 ChiM (1 1 & Under) *2.Q0 Until 5 p.m. 

ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD (PG) 2:oo^:is-e:3o.a:oo 

*3.00 Adults • M .50 Child (1 1 & Under) •2.00 Until 5 p.m. 

WOLF ttt\ i>iB-a<4B-a!iB-n>4B 



McHENRY 1 & 2-214 GREEN ST, McHENRY (815)385-014-1 



taoo Adults -M. SO Chlki (11 & Untier) M.50 Until 5 p.m. 
IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU (PG> 2 oo-4 is^i 304i 45 

»4.00 Adults - »2.00 Child M 1 & Under) *1 .50 Until 5 p.rri. 
ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD (PG) 2:is^:3o^;4s-9:oq| 



GRAYSLAKE OUTDOOR COR RT 120 & 83 GRAYSLAKE 223-8155 



•OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • BOX OFFICE OPENS 7;» ■•*• ADULTS • CHILD (1 1 1, UNDER) FREE 

THE MASK (PG-1 3) starts a:30 1 
ANQELS IN THE OUTFIELD 



;j-Y OUTDOOR COR LINCOLN/CHAPEL HILL • (815) 385-0144 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - '6- ADULTS - CHILD (t 1 & UNDER) FREE 

TRUE LIES (R) starts a:3o 
SPEED (R) 

TTJHfMllIIlTIT 



5^ 



From page B7 
the book, that covered bridge was the vic- 
tim of a broken marriage. The man tried to 
burn off initials carved into tlio, wooden 
trusses. TYaglcallyi tlie lOO-ycar-bid tim- 
bers caught fire and the landmark was 
completely destroyed in 1983. 

Other, top attractions on the trip 
include the house in Wintersct that was 
John Wayne's birthplace, the site of world's 
first delicious apple tree, the majestic 
Wintersct courthouse, several houses that 
were part of the underground railroad, 
and the Wintersct City Park. The park fea- 
tures the Cutler Donohoc Bridge, moved 
there in 1970, and miles of hiking trails 
ending up at Clark Tower, wlilch \\rais built 
on a limestone bluff as a monument to 
Madison County pioneers. 

Pamel State I'ark, which is located near 
the Roseman Bridge, has not been forgot- 
ten cither. Thousands of old oak trees dot 
its rugged laridscapc. , 

I still remember entering the west side 
of the park as a kid. 1t was breathtaking to 
slip through the tunnel that had been 
blasted out of solid rock at the bottom of 
Hogback lUdgc, a, monolithic limestone 
formation rising above. Access across the 
Middle River there is limited to the con- 
crete fjord. I would always take off my 
shoes and walk through the water anytime 
1 was given the chance. 
The most alarming thing about the dra- 
matic changes that have come to^ the; 
county since the book began its sales trend 



toward the current five million copies is 
what the future holds. 

Hollywood is knocking on Madison 
County's door for the first time since the 
filming of 'CoIdTUrkey', starring Dick Van 
Dyke, in Winterset in 1969. 
' Oyer a year ago, Steven Spielberg's 
Amblin EntcrtairmtcnC bought the movie 
rights to the book, and this September, 
those rights will come to fruition. Clint 
Eastwood has signed to play the part of 
Robert Kincaid, with the leading candi- 
dates for the Italian-born Franccsca being 
Isabella Iloselllni and Sonia Braga. The 
screenplay, yet to be completed, is being 
written by Oscar winner Alfred Uhry, who 
wrote 'Driving Miss Daisy' and 'Mystic 
Pizza.' 

The film crew has selected a house, 
which sits on the north edge of the county. 
For security reasons, its location b a close- 
ly guarded secret. 

. The sbc-bcdroom, two-and-a-half 
story structure features four Fireplaces and 
tbrec porches. One report says that a 
~ Chicago man owns the estate. Sadly, the 
decaying building has been abandoned 
for many years, with animal droppings 
several Inches thick on the furniture that 
still remains inside the windowlcss home, 

That docs not stop Hollywood, with its 
penchant for creating fantasy oiit of rcali- 
ty. It is estimated the rcroofing alone will 
cost around $30,000. A barn will be disas- 
sembled at andthersltc and reassembled 
at the movie site Rest assured, the house 



will mdst likely be pristine when the cam- 
eras begin rolling this fall. 

The actuial Roseman Bridge, made 
famous by the book, will not be featured In 
the movie. It was also left off the cover of 
the book, which instead pictured the 
Cedar Bridge. The camera people don't 
like the way the Roseman films. Instead; 
they have settled on a high truss metal 
bridge in Webster Tofwnshlp, which is Just a 
few miles north of my family farm. 

Work crews will place ncariy 20 tons of 
lumber on the bridge to recreate the 
Roseman. The site offers, a picturesque 
location on the winding bends of the 
Middle River, the same one that flows 
under the real Roseman Bridge. 

Billeter expects crews to do some film- 
ing in his cafe. It's not written in stone yet 
The production company is checking to 
sec if the cost is not too prohibitive. If so, 
they will biiild their own facsimile. If they 
do use the real cafe,' it will be closed for 
two weeks. Billeter says film crews get 
about two minutes of fUni per one day of 
shooting. * •.' - 

When all is finished, the Iowa fllm 
office estimates that Hollywood money 
flowing through the local economy wiU 
range up to $500,000. 

It is exciting to sec the positive changes 
that have come to my boyhood home 
these past couple years. It makes me very 
proud to realize that I ^ew up in sur- 
roundings that so many people find 
breathtaking. I have to admit, tliat the 



county has becoihe more beautiful to mc 
every visit I make back to It 

I last visited my ^parents during the 
Independence Day weekend. . I can't 
remember the last time I bothered to go by 
the Roseman Bridge before that weekend. 
My stster-ln-law was quick to point out 
that I did so in eighth grade on a hayridc. 
That was 16 years ago, if her memory can 
be trusted. It perplexes mc to tliink what I 
must liavc been doing during the ride not 
to notice such beautlAil architecture. She 
could only provide mc with conjecture for 
that answer. 

I concluded I had not seen, the 
Roseman or any of the other bridges in 
that many years simply because they were 
there at my disposal, like anybody else 
who lives near a tourist destination. As I . 
was taking pictures of the Roseman Bridge 
for this aiticic, I honestly couldn't help but 
realize just haw Robert James WaUcr must 
have felt several years ago when he creat- 
ed the idea for the book while doing the 
very same thing. He was so swept away by 
emotion, he went home and finished the 
short novel in a mere seven days. 

I can agree with Waller, more so than I 
would have four years ago. The landscape 
of Madison County,' Iowa truly is beautiful 
.... and romantic 

A special thank you goes to the 'Wtnterset 
Madisonian,' which provided information 
for this article. Tourist brochures are avail- 
able from the Madison County Chamber oj 
Commerce by calling (515)462-1185. 












pMiiiMatdiit^eFeioiat^iit^--^-<^> 





^ COUPON 1 

I 
I 




trNoodles J Sntree 





yluJimAmtridmDiaiitg ■' 



With the purchlise 
of another entree of 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Previously Red Noodle 



On Route 83, Jusl North of. Rollins 
Round Lake Beach 

223-7010 



j equal or greater value. | 



Limit one coupon per visit 

One coupon par lable. 

Coupon not valid with any 

ottisr special or promotion. 

Up to $8.00 

• Dining Room Only 

Expires 8/15/94 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



J.. -COUPON 1 



®L (MoAco A 



* * * 1 2 



^?!!r 



Hnf It nil An Cut-.rnt 



FRIDAYS 

All II 



' 1 II V 

Want To Eat! 



All U want to Eat Crab Legs with Cod 
DiMarco's Famous Fish Bake iaii r..n.ng) 
Early Bird Fish Fry ht p.m -coh-» ineiudrdi . . 



OPEM: Tues.-Thufs. 5 p.m. • FrL-Sun. 4 p.m. • Closed Monday 

' . : Banqusis Available * Accepting Reservations 
L (706) 395-fl6fl3 » 883 Main St.. Antioch, IL 



. ..M6.95 

. ..M1.95 

^8.95 



Bring in this : 

tor a free 
- Canolti 



LAKE COUNTY'S FAVORITE SPOT! 









WE ARE FEATUmNG 
A 2 1/2 POUHD BUCKET 

FULL OF MEATY 

SMOKED RIBS for only ^9"^ 
NTN & QBl ARE HERE! 

(interactive television} 

1760 N. MILWAUKEE • LIBERTYVILLE 

708-362-8202 



Ffox Lake or Round Lake Beacbl 

iSammie'si 

j 1/2 Off Any Sandwich ! 

I Witii Purchase of Fries ft Reg. Driok ! 



I 
I 



ri I a.m.-3 p.m. only. Expiits l/IS/M) 



! 303 W.RolliOSRd. 3S W. Grand Ave. MyKM Ml 



I Ronnd Lake Bcxb 



Fox Lake 

587-4674 



Grilled StiftTip-MO.SS 
Tuesday - CLOSED 
Wednesday - Fried Walleye Pike: 



Friday- Perch Platten 
AB-You-CanTEaCe.SO 
Saturday - BBQ Ribs: 
Alt-You^an-Eal'a.95 




AB-You-Can-Ettf •9.9^ 

^ers ^taurant, 1Rputtl76, Waucorufa, IL 

(708) S2&690S 

^ou OCnozu li s ... 'We're. jMers 





OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 

mai Only Are We 

The Ul Pizza in 

Lake County f We 

Also Have A Full 

Menu Which 

Features 

EXCELLENT BABY BACK RIBS!" 

Half Slab Only ^9.95 FuU Slab Only ^12.95 

Dinner Indudn soup or salad, choioa ol potato and broad ' 

THE SILO 

Rt. 176, Lake Bluff 

(7081 234-6660 



BRINC THE GANG THIS 
SUNDAY FOR POSSE 



"Children Under 10 Eat Free" 

Call Aboul Daily Specials 

Sun.-Thurs. \J* 

1 1 a.m.-1 p.m. 481 Peterson Rd. 

Fri.-Sat. Libertyville. IL60048 

11 a.m.-12a.m. 549-1972 




4 
< 

4 
< 





'U^y 



FRIDAY EVENING 
FOR DINNER! 



„M-„"«J, 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. 

Fish Fry Every 4^ 

cwjjS!'' 

SaaXpm) COUNTRY "QnenTues 

o^a''&\m)RESTAURANT ThrS&jnf 
Meiy * Country Store * Orchard * Greenhouse 



Friday Evening* 

QUIG'S 



300 S. Rl. M (1/4 Mi. N. of MiJoiliiaJi Kd>Miirxlelcin. IL 1(708) 5664520 





Ttt|UE]LII:E.ir|jvkd^Nd Newspapers AvqusT 5,1?94,v-.;'. 




fiiie food & spirits Where 




When you go to the Grand Palace on Grand Ave. in 
Gtimcc, you'll recognize that" owner John Papaloannou's 
knowledge of 20 years of experience In the food business 
went into this restaurant, along with liis other restaurant, 
Dluc Bay Restaurant in Round Lake. With that kind of 
experience, you know what people want in a' restaurant - 
and the Grand Palace has It! 

You can feel free to dine In casual attire in an upscale 
atmosphere at the Grand Palace, which celebrated its 
grand opening earlier this month and features a wide 
variety of continental cuisine. 

The lunch menu offers delicious entrees that include 
a variety of appetizers, salads, and sandwiches to choose 
from. Sandwiches include Corned Beef on Rye and Grand 
Palace Burger for $4.95; Reuben, French Dip Au Jus, and 
..^Chicken, Tuna, or Shrimp Salad on Croissant, or the 
triple-decker Club House, all for $5,95. The tasty chicken 
sandwich, which includes a marinated grilled boneless 
chicken breast on a croissant or kaiser roll, is offered for 
$6.75. Soup is included with all sandwich orders. Pasta, 
seafood, and beef specialties arc also available for lunch. 
And Idds can cat for as low. as $3.95. 

If you're dining at the dinner hour, you can start your 
meal with a cold or hot appetizer such as shrimp or 
crabmeat cocktails, Escargots en Croute, Oysters 
Rockefeller, and fried calamarl, to name just a few. 
Specialties offered Include Chicken Florentine, Veal 
Cordon Bleu, and Coquillc St. Jacques, which is sea 
scallopsservedinamornaysaucc. If pasta is your 
passion, Italian dishes like Pcsto Pasta, linguini with pine 
nuts and imported romano cheese tossed in a basil pesto 
sauce, is sure to please. Other Italian fare includes 
fcttucinc alfredo and seafood linguini. Seafood entries, 
offered fresh every day, include shrimp scampi, salmon; 

and orange rqugliy. For beef 

lovers, there's quite a 

variety to choose from, 

including the 24 oz. Grand 

Palace Porterhouse Steak, 

Filet Mignon , and Baby 

Back Ribs. 




If you still have room for dessert, the Chocolate 
Mousse, cheesecake, ice cream, or sherbcrt will 
deliclously complete your meal. A full line of cocktails, 
beer, wine, and soda is available to quench your thirst. 

The Grand Palace has banquet facilities for private 
parties of 20 to 250. The restaurant itself scats up to 150. 
To arrange the banquet room for a meeting, bridal 
shower, anniversary, holiday party, or any special 
occasion, call 662-2929. The Grand Palace even offers 
wedding packages that Include four hour bar service, 
bridal room, and champagne toast for as low as $27.95, 

' T!ie Grand Palace takes pride in offering the very best . 
In food at everyday low prices,. so give the whole family a 
treat - come to The Grand Palace, located at 5572 Grand 
Ave. in Gurnec. Hours arc 11 a.m. to II p.m. Monday 
through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday and 
Sunday. 



Eat Out 



FEATURE 

or THE 

WEEK 




T 



ftfftfiiiifffitfiiiiiiTiiiiiiminm 



IT'S NEISV^ IT'S EXCITTOG^ 
IT'S DELICIOUS 

FROM THE OWNERS OF BLUE BAY RESTAURANT .. 




PASTAS • POULTRY • SALADS • SANDWICHES • STEAKS •SEAFOOD • 
APPETIZERS •COCKTAILS •CHILDREN'S MENU • AND SO MUCH MORE 

"We Specialize in a Large Variety of Continental Cuisine 
for Lunch and Dinner" 



i,-hAiAi.'UAiS\iAi/iwU.%'\\/kai,'\^^^^^ 



^ 






At Grand Palace we take pride in offering the 
veiy best in food at evetyday low prices, not to mention our daily specials. 

Our Lunch Prices Start at $4.95 
Dinner Prices Start at $5.95 

Children's Menu Starts at $3.95 

Our Banquet Facilities Hold from 20 to 250 people 

Wedding Packages start at $2795 and Include: Four Hour BarSen/lce, : 
; ' '' Bridal Room and Channpagne Toast 

We are the Perfect place for your Meeting, Bridal Shower, Anniversary Holiday Parties 
or any Special Occasion. Please call or Fax us for Hirther Information. 

5572 West Grand Avenue, Gurnee, IL 50031 
(708) 662-29i29 Fax (708) 652-6099 



Vfe welcome all major credit cards. 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Dciily 
Dinner Specicils 



SEnVEDTUESDAY - SUNDAY IHxccpt Saturdays) 
Good through Aug. 2-7 * 

Baked Boston Scrod Dcjongc ^ir."3 

Breast of Chicken Vessuvio 1U»"5 

Lamb Kabob *ll-95 

Veal Micanaise X^»Vd 

BBQ Back Ribs I ^13.95 

bKludet Our Ijucy Susui RcUih Tny , Silid. Polalo. VcgelaUe, Ikvcn£c & Dnxit 
Ctuual attire, moderalefy piictd. fy raervation. charge cards accepte£ 



Rts. 120 & 45 - Grayslakc • (708) 223-0121 
Your Hosts, Bill and Kris Govas 



"^srm 



Dine In 

Or 
Carryout! 



Try It. 



You'll 
love 



Contemporary Thai Dining with a 
mouthwatering Thai Touch, 

— FOR LUNCH OR DINNER — 

3e7-19SO 

or Il99ll 

LMMInHnlhemVItigi Cmmn 




nH I MTonilMRlBitMnW^MmlO«nWckt 
\J=-^ VBNONHUS 



Hfj, M. -IhUR. 
Il;30-ia00 
Fd&Sat. 
ll;3O-10:3O 

•Sui. 12-9:30 



^3^3^::^=::^!:^=::: 




Sun. Thru. Thurs. 

Daily Fish Specials (waiicyc & catfish) 

Our Chef Prepares All Food 

Fresh When Ordered. 



!» 




11 ijn.-IOpjn, 
SaLtMOpjTt. 
Sir.1Mp/B. 



K [^ 




WILD(iOOSE(M 

iilocald at 21190 GibrKo4 

100yanis»ulli(asEofMiMbn 

0[Dilunt(thwto(I!lS3) 

949-5550 




V.T^Wr, 






^K^I^IC; 




THE DEAN TAGGART FAMILY 



c^*^ 



#^^ 



tt'liiUT i^loaiJ 



iljuutu* 



« 



(S»-" 






FRIDAY 
FISHERY 



'Lxaltdtn btfiuilful downtown Gilmer' 

438-0300 

"A FAMILY 

RESTAURANT" 

OPEN 7 DAYS 

Lunch 3c Dinner 

Breakfast on Sundays 

Children's Portions & Prices 



BESTWBS 
IN TOWN 




Gilmer & Midlothian Roads • Mundelein, DUroLs 60060 



NexicanRestauEant 



iNNOVAmE 

Gourmet Tex^Mex 
CvisiNE 



••vl 



^"^"nT 



?^' 



m 



DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS 

Dining Al Fresco! 

PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE! 



ERRV C 

MEXICAN^ 
RESTAURANT 

72$ N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL 

(IN THE HAWLEY COMMONS) CARRY.OUT 

HOURS: MON^Fm 11 AM'IOPM cri. ACTA 

$ATUIIOAYt2N00N'l(»i>M CLOSEOSUNDAY #00''7''V 



Aiiqi)^>9, 1994 UketANd Newspapers' lAKa^il*^' 






^m 



Eat Out 



FEATURE 
OF THE 
- WEEK 




CLIP ANO SAVE 



Dairii 
pueen 



Afaato: 



«» 



DAIRY QUEEN OF 
ANTIOCH 

DQ SOFT SERVE ITEMS • 

YOGURT - HOT FOOD 

HARD ICE CREAM - NOVELTIES • 

SOFT DRINKS- CAKES. 

PIES AND LOGS 



AUGUST 

ALL SALES START ONMON. & END FRL 




1 2] 31 . 41 SI 

Peanut Buster PufUt, Buum Split, Royal 

Ifuigp N Cake - Tour Choice *1.39 

Hot Dog ii le OK. Drink •1.22 



tI a 9l id il i3 

Peanut Buster Parfalt, Banana Split, Rojral 
■ Pudge N Ci^e - Tour choice *1.30 

Ftoot Long w/Chlll '1.37 

14l is] ii] 17| 18| 19 

le oz. Bllxuurd *1.4Z 
Foot Long & 21 os. Drink *r.71 



21 



26 



22I iai mI iit 

"Yogurt Conea 2 for 1 
BDS 2 for 1 



26 



■2^ 3<< 3'l I 

BanuiM Split 'LSO 

Tiuthom w/CblU • 1 .20 



13 



20 



27 



SEE YOU AT 

LINDENFEST 

AUC. 11-141 



Voiir Choice OfNon-Fat Frozen Yogurt Or 
DQ Soft Serve For All Products 

966 Main St., Antioch 
395-8383 



YAN'S HUNAN INN 



Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 




SERVING LUNCH e DINNER 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Wednesdays & Fridays 



lOON'.MilwaukfeAvt 
liln'rlyvillf. II 



OPEN 7 

iDAYSil 

WEEK 



')Ii I jikcliiirst Ktiatl. 



\\'iiiiki'j;an, II 

( ;iri\ (hilSp.u;iIists 7l)H/-|7:t- l!i(i( 




* ^^f Take A 

Sweet, Lite 
Bite of Life! 

' ' SnioyaurPanUatic 

SOUP & SALAD BAR 

Tuea.-Fri Lunch .'3^ 

Dinner* & Weekendi ••5.50 

Our Full Buffet Features Jk Be An Early Bird 

Over80FoodItems j^m, SiSaue! 

Tues.-Fri. LuKh •5.50 ^M^ Full Lunch Buffet . . .Only '4.751 

Tues.-Fri, Dinner •7.50 ^^P^ Dm.-TrL ihii:K..m. \ 

Sat. & Sua. Brunch ^W F^H Dinner Buffet . . .Only '6.50, 

^Inn^^^^^^^^^^^^^^2j5^^^^i|^J|^^J^ 

' " CloMd 

rOUmummmmiFKT Monday 



217. NO. ROUTE 31. McHENRY (1 MILE SO. OF RTE. 120) 
(815) 344-0330 





Antioch Dairy Queen 
satisfies vour sweet tooth 



There's nothing like stopping at Dairy Queen for a 
delicious treat to satisfy your taste buds when they're 
craving something swectl 

If you're yearning for a hot dog, tasty BBQ' 
sandwich, or any of the dciectable DQ ice cream 
treats, Antioch Dairy Queen, located at 966 Main St., is 
sure to please. 

Owner John Halvorsen takes pride in the new 
menu board provided by Coca-Cola and Dairy Queen. 
The new menu board is easier to read, making item 
selection a better experience. John also noted that the 
Dairy Queen is very active in the community,; 
participating in the Taste of Antioch and also 
appearing at Lindcnhurst's summer festival coming 
up Aug. 11-14. DQ novelties such as diily bars, buster 
bars, blizzards, hot dogs, and Coke will be offered to 
festival-goers. 

A new, item to Dairy Queen's menu is the "Misty 
Cooler", a combination of a misty slush and fresh 
fruit. Choose from strawberry, clierry, raspberry, and 
blueberry fruit toppings. Along with such goodies as 
banana splits, sundaes, shakes', and ice cream 
sandwiches, Dairy Queen offers Queen's Choice hard 
ice cream in 8 delicious flavors. There's also soft-serve 
yogurt, and even sugar-free and fat-free ice cream for 
those watching their waistline. Their most popular 
item is the Blizzard, in 16 delicious flavors. 

For a special occasion, try Dairy Queen's 
scrumptious ice cream cakes and logs in the 
refrigerated section. Ten-inch and sheet size cakes can 
be custom decorated in popular characters liJce 
Barney, Bugs Bunny, and Power Rangers. 

When ordering at Dairy Queen, you have the 
convenience of going in or ordering at the Express 
walk-up window outside. There's no need to be afraid 
if there's a long line at DQ - their 15 employees take 
pride in the speedy service they provide. 

Go ahead and indulge in an ice cream treat today 
at Antioch Dairy Queen, 966 Main St.. Hours arc 11 
a.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week. 



=^ 



San J^uis 

Mexican 'Restaurant &> ^af- 




50S.GreefiBayRd. 

Green Boy Rd. & Washington St. 

Woukegan 

244.-36^6 

Fojitas, Comhinafion Dinners, 
Chlmlchangas, Tacos & Morel 



Buy One lfi#rc«» Oc# Second 
1/a Off! »f Wwtrih One fW CEl 

Dining Alone? 
I Hove a flrifik on Mie houa* wMi cii#r«e. 

Ptecsa ptosent coupon, Ona pof table. Not valb on buffet, some of leuer value 



Open 1 1 am-1 1 pm, Sun.-lhurs.; 1 1 ani*1 pm, Fri ft Sot. 







Waterfalls 

QcatauranL • DonquctA • Lounge • Dance Club 

24436 W. Rt. 173 • Antioch* IL 60002 
708-395-2212 

ballir 

Starting At ^7.95 




SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH 

BnJ(^4/kr Dinner Drinb In oniy IM 

Our Lounge WtibMttsk From •S.I6 CMId 

tbeSO's S 60% 70's & 80's M.M Mihchilr 

CLOSED MONDAYS 




■^^ ).\^ i-JK^t -if- iv'**--J^-~. i-j 1"., 





.•^% 











LOUNGE. 
NomSmdngBre^^ 7:00 ojru 



;|Plion«?689-9062^ 



Huge Lunch Buffet Mpn.-Fri. 11 ani-3 pm 

Sunday Brunch - Large Selection 

LUWCII & DINNER SPECIALS, CTIILDREW'S MENU AVAILABLE 



rcs^s^f^f-- 



GREAT:^FOQD - REASONABLE PRICES - 

o , « . NICE ATMOSPHERE 

Steaks, Pnmc Rib, Hickory Smoked BBQ Specials, 
Lobster, Crab Legs, Seafood, Sandwiches 



JEiX^ANkASG A N^SS 



Tfie wueather*s perfect 

So why not enjoy your meal on our 

OUTDOOR DECK 

ovcrloofcinc beautif ul 

SAND LAKE 

R]'s Eatery 

& The Oatback Bar 

1913 E. Grand Ave. ♦ Llndenhurst 
Phone 356*2300 

Op«n Mon.-Frl. 11 •.m.; Bat-Sun. a B.m. 

DiNi-m ♦ CAfinr out ♦ fmi Dcuvnir 

DOUILI DCCKBII ♦ THIN CMIST ♦ PAN PIZZA 





Serving Dinner 

Starting AT 

5 p.ni. fees., Welf Ihin. 

4 p.nt Frt., Sat, ft Sin. 



ERIDAr & SAimiD AT 

PRIME RIB SPECUL 

Regular Cut- $9.95 

Special Qjt- 511.95 

IVESDAT-niEJitSDiir 

DINING ROOM SPECIAL 

Full Slab Ribs- $9.95'. 



T^es., Wed., Thurs. 

15% Senior 
Discount 

Evenings, Not Valid 

With Any Other 

Coupon Or Promo 



Early Bird Specials 
4-e FrL, Sun. 



live Enteftainmem FH. & 
Sat Nite In Our Lounge 



BanqHst fiMflUks Vw Meeting • Showers 
10-dOO People Wedding • Golf Ontings 

CaU (708) 395-4800 

40150 N. Rte. 59, Antioch, Open to the Public 



GREAT ALL-AMERICAN 
FOOD & FUN 




The Village Tavern 

All You Can Eat Specials 

Served From 5 to 10 PM 
Tuesdays 

Meatloaf, Mashed Potatoes & Vegetables 
$6.50 

Wednesdays 

Chicken, French Fries & Coleslaw 
$6^25 

Thursdays 

BBQ Beef Ribs & French Fries 

$6.95 

Fridays 

Our Famous Fish Fry All Day 
With French Fries & Coleslaw 

All Served With Homemade Bread 

Whether you're on your own, with a date, family or 
friends, The Village Tavern is always a great timet 

- There's Always Fun & Entertainment 

Old McHenry Road In Long Grove 

(708) 634-3117 

All major credit cards accepted. ' 




LAkELlFE' UkelANd NewspApcRs AuqusT 5,1 994 



>:-» 



«> 



»l 




ACROSS 

1 Bible bk. 
4 Air Force 

tnissilc 
9 — Dawbcr 
12 Honest man ' 
13KiriTc 

Kanawa, 

for one 

14 — dc France 

15 Bacli*s 
instnitncnt 

17 Swcc" — 

18 Drag something 
heavy 

19 Discover 
21.Wordv^fithDay 

or State . 

24 Ovcrwhchucd 

25 Randy's 
ice partner 

26 Pig's place 
28 Ganncnis for 

Indira 
31 Saws along 

the grain 
33 Ciil-dc— 

35 Decorator's 
advice 

36 Choose 

38 — dc deux 

40 "Aren't Wc — ? 
(old song) 

41 Zhivago's love 
43 Appeared 

45 Englishman 

47 Make lace 

48 Hebrew letter 

49 Terrorists' 
devices 

54 Nonnatuly 







^777 


.v.-.'.'.'.'.l 




UJ 

t/) 

z 






^ 






sunnncr 

55 French river 

56 Strong brew 

57 Legal matter 

58 Perfume, 
in a way 

59 Batik artists* 
need 
DOWN 

1 Gown's partner 

2 Kimono pari 

3 Capitol VIP 

4 Love affairs 

5 Objectives 

6 Birling need 

7 Plowed land 



8 Tcn<lotis 

9 Fantastic 
idea 

10 Guinness 

1 1 Supermarket 
section 

lOYalic 

20 Wear's partner 

21 French verb 

22 Post 

23 Infonnation 
channels 

27 Bark shrilly 

29 Vain 

30 Realtor's sign 
32 Go away! 



34 Table vessels 
37 — of Cancer 
39 Military 

construction ' 

man 
42 Fragrant seed 

44 DDE's command 

45 Boxer Max 

46 Ceremonial 

50 Sword 
dcfcatcr? 

51 Demented 

52 Early 
ncwswoinan 

53 - red 
(get angry) 



^mi'A ^v-M^n king 
aujciBKapjDPj i:jiji^ 

aaera hhs sriip] 

U3BPJ EHBBraPlHnPl 

gen n^3]KL^[:] \=m^^ 



CIaSS REUNiONS 



Amundsen High School 
Qass of 1974 wiU hold their 20th 
class reunion Saturday, Sept 3. 
Call Teresa MitchcU Redmond at 
546-6876 or Jackie Amari 
Kclcghan at 286-471 1 for details. 

Maine East High School 
Class of 1969 is planning a 
reunion on Aug. 13 at 6 p.m. at 
the Indian Lakes Resort in 
Bloomingdalc. Contact Greg 
Engwall at 681-5708. 

Grant Community' High 
School Class of 1984 is planning 
their 10 year reunion. Contact 
Michelle Runnir.n at 587-5911 for 
details. 

Grant Community High 
School Class of 1974 is planning 
their 20th class reunion for Aug. 
13. Classmates should contact 
Patti Knack Shogren at 587-5434 
for further details. 

Grant Community High 
School Gass of 1959 is searching 
for classmates for a reunion to be 
held Sept. 17 at Maravela's in Fox 
Lake. Contact Shirlcyann Russell 
at 223-4290 or 360-2194. 

Grant Community High 
School Class of 1954 is planning a 
reunion for Saturday, Sept 17 at 
Andre's Steak House in 
Richmond. Classmates should 
contact Harry Hcnningscn at 
587-7444. 

Mundelcin High School, 
Class of 1964, 30 year reunion will 
be held Saturday, Aug. 20 at the 
Princess, 1290 S. Milwaukee, 
Libertryville. Call 949-2200 for 
further details. 

The Ultimate Reunion 
Co., Inc. is currently seeking 
alumni for the following classes: 
Mundelcin High School Gass of 
1974, Aug. 13. 

Adiai Stevenson High School 
Class of 1984, Saturday, Aug. 20. 

Grayslakc High School Class 
of 1984, Saturday, Oct. 1. 

Contact The Ultimate 
Reunion Co., Inc. at 1(800)477- 
7945 or (708)202-1267. • 

Alamnl Systems, Inc. is 
currently seeking alumni for the 
following classes: 

Antioch Class of 1984, Oct. 15 
at Andre's Steak House, 
Richmond; 



Barrington Class of 1984, 
Aug. 20 at Holiday Inn, 
Mundclein; 

McHcnry (East and West 
Campus) Class of 1984, Oct. 8 at 
Tamara Royalc Inn, McHcnry; 

Round Lake Class of 1984, 
Sept. 9 at The Princess 
Restaurant, LibertyviUe; 

Rolling Meadows Class of 
1984, Aug. 27 at Poplar Creek 
-<^ountry Club, Hoffman Estates; 

Warren Class of 1984, Sept. 
10 at Holiday Inn, Mundclein. 

For more information call 
Alunmi Systems, Inc. at (815)477- 
0858. 

Taylor Reunion Services 

is seeking alumni for the follow- 
ing classes: 

Highland Park High School 
Class of 1984, Nov. 26 at Bub City, 
Chicago; 



Lake Forest High School 
Class of 1984 is looking for alum- 
ni for their 10 year reunion to be 
held in 1994. Alunmi arc asked to 
call Taylor Reunion Services at 1- 
800-677-7800 for details; 
Call Taylor Reunion Services at 
1-800-677-7800 for details. 

Lake Zurich High Class of 
1974, Oct. 1 at Holiday Inn, 
Rolling Meadows. 

Libcrtyvillc High Class of 
1984 is looking for alumni for 
their 10 year reunion to be held in 
1994. Call Taylor Reunion 
Services at 1-800-677-7800 for 
details. 

McHcnry High School Class 
of 1974 is looking for alumni for 
their 20 year reunion to be held 
Aug. 20. 

For further information call 
Taylor Reunion Services at 1-800- 
677-7800. 



NEWS 1220 




THE TALK OF LAKE COUNTY 
PRESENTS 

tst BRICKYARD 




Saturday August 6th, (1 1 :36 a.m.) 




Horoscope 

ARIES (Mnrcli 21 to April 19) 

You'll gain a fresh pcrspcclivc about 

a business or investment mnttcr this 

week. A disnppoinimcnt in a 

friendship may dampen y^'ir mood 

somewhat. Advice you rcceiv>^ gives 

you a whole ncW outlook alx)Ut a 

project you're considering. It's a 

good weekend for cultural pursuits. 
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) 

There's a need for give-and-take in 

close relationships this week. Meet 

partners halfway. You'll have to be 

patient regarding a business matter 

that remains on hold early in the 

week. Talks with others are produc- 
tive. 
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A 

setback or delay with respect to a job 

concern may. cause you to revamp 

your strategy. An alternate plan has 

every chance of succeeding. Believe 

in yourself. You'll enjoy meaningful 

dialogues with close ties. Romance 

is favored. 
CANCER (June 21 lo July 22) Be 

sure to accept someone's offer of 

assistance. Don't let false pride get 

in the way of your progress. Other 

priorities may take precedence over of financial obligations. Things will 

socializing. Your thinking is very lookup. 

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to 
December 21) You'll be addressing 
your attention to an unfinished 
project this week. A little soul-sear^ 
ching will enable you to see that a 
past problem was not your fault. You 




take priority over personal desires. 
It's an excellent week for taking care 



clear about work concerns. Mixing 
business and pleasure proves ad- 
vantageous. 

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A 
partner seems to have the world on 
his or her shoulders this week. Do 

your best lo lighten things up. Be have a special facility with the writ- 
there when needed. A hobby has ten and spoken word. 



profit-making potential. Later in the 
week, you reach a new level of un- 
derstanding with a loved one. 

VIRGO (August 23 to September 
22) You may feel you could have 
done a better job on a project. Try not 
to be so hard on yourself. Surprise 
visitors who drop by give a heeded 
lift to your spirits. Family discus- 
sions arc favored. The weekend is 
favored for enterlaining guests and 
domestic interests. 

LIBRA (September 23 to October 
22) Worries in connection with 
parenting or difficulty in getting 
along with a close tie dampens your 
mood somewhat this week. You 
have much to say now and you say it 
ettectively. You may be excited 
about a new intellectual interest. So- 
cial life beckons this weekend. 

SCORPIO (October 23 to 
November 21) Though you are self- 



CAPRICORN (December 22 to 
January 19) Don't feci that you have 
to be something other than yourself 
to make a good impression. Also, 
avoid letting a financial concern to 
keep you from having good times. 
These amusements needn't cost 
much but go a long way toward im- 
proving your mood. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 to 
February 18) Don't be so serious- 
minded this week that you stifle the 
free flow of your intuition. A busi- 
ness matter seems complicated but 
you needn't get depressed about it. 
Your leadership qualities arc 
brought to the fore. Social life blos- 
soms this weekend. 

PISCES (February 19 to March 
20) For a while, you may be down 
about a problem this week. Later, a 
breakthrough in your thinking comes 
and you'll gain a fresh outlook and a 



assured this week, you still may have better perspective. Business-related 
difficulty getting others to see your talks are favored since your perspec- 
viewpoint. Extra responsibilities tive is clear. - 



Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo 

A Sports Fisherman's Dream 

by JIM WARNKEN, PRESIDENT 
NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

About 150 miles north of Acapuico, Mexico Is the relatively new resort area 
of Ixtapa with Its miles of pristine white sand beaches and fabulous hotels. 

However, back when Ixtapa was nothing moriB than a (orest.of Mangrove 
trees, its sister town of Sahuateinejo was a thrivlrig fishing village. 

Fishing village, you say? Must mean the fishing Is pretty good if these peo- 
ple made their living at Itl 

How about a 120 lb. sallflsh? Looking for some real game fish? 600 lb. mar- 
lin are not uncommoni Yellowfin tuna mn as large as 220 lbs. Mahl-mahJ 
(called Dorado In these parts) as large as 50 lbs. come out of. the waters 
around Ixtapa. 

. Zihuatanejo still retains Its traditional fishennan's way of life. Local skippers 
come from generations of family flshemnen and are experts at locating any kind 
of game fish. 

Boats range from 24 foot outboard launches to 38 foot sportflshers. A day of 
fishing ranges from $120 to $150 which Includes bait, tackle and soft drinks. 
Ask your hotel to prepare a box lunch. 

Catch and release Is becoming popular as well as a program called "Tag 
and Release". A marlln recently tagged in Ixtapa showed up In Australia! If you 
do land that too-good-to-be-tme trophy fish, you can have It mounted and 
shipped back to the U.S. for about $500. 

Another way to appreciate your catch Is to eat itl! • ■ ; , . ; \ 

Your crew will flltet your catch and several restaurants, such as Casa Elvira 
or La Mesa del Capttan, will prepare your meal for a slight charge. 

Arrangements for fisliing can be made through your hotel desk or directly 
with the Recreational & Sportsflshing Boat Cooperative. Their office Is on the 
pier at Avenlda Ruiz Cortlnez 40 in Zihuatanejo (phone 42056.) 



2234 E. Grand Lindenhurst, III. 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(708)356-3010 



^ 




J 



aa 

/e 

w^- 

ir- 
ih) 
irs 

trs 
fid 

of 
cs. 

ag 
ou 
nd 

tra 

itly 
he 



AuqosT y^^^j94 .UktANd NEWspAp€R5j,HE^|jn$yiftiq|fj 




()\c!i II M(( 



Caregivers Btippbri 

CondellMediral ' 
Center's Caregivers Sup|i6rt 
Group will nicot at 7 jp>:ni:i 
tlie fburtli Tuesday of every 
/ month at the Allen Conciell 

IntcrEcncrational Care in 
*- LibertyvUle. Anyone who is 
^- responsible for giving care '.' 
to elderly; infirm, or dis- 
abled family members are 
invited to attend. Call ai6- 
4584 for information. 

We Need Each Other 

"We Need Each Other", a 
support group for people 
with chronic pain and theh- 
fatnllies at 7;30 p.m.' at the 
Allen Conference Center at . 
Condcll Medical Center in 
UbertyviUe; The group 
i ' meets the third Tuesiday of 
each month; For Informa- 
tion call 680^1092. 

i Diabetes Eierclae 

flic Diabetes Exercise 
Program has been designed 
by Centre Qub and Condell 
Medical Center's Cardiology 

; Services to meet the needs 

■ of the diabetic individual f. 

; who wishes to incorporate 
exercise into His lifcit^c, ' ; 
Tlie classes are held in eight- 
week sessions at 9 a.ni: 
Tuesdays and Thursdays or 
6 p.nL Mondays and 
Wednesdays. A physician's 
referral Is required for par- 
ticipation. Call 362-2905, 

t cxt 5773 for information. 

I 

I Home H«ftltta, Care .,.,., . , 

Accredited Homo Health 
i: Care Services arc available 
\ through Condell Medical 
k' Center. Skilled nursing care, 
' physical, speech and occu- 
::pati^naltherapi^.ahd 
home health aide services 
Arc provided through the 
h Home Health Care 
Department. For Informa- 
tion, call Condell Medical 
Center at 817-7717. 

Physldan Referral 

A Physician Referral 
Service is offered through 
*the Doctor's Office 
Connection (DOC) at 
Condell Medical Center. Call 
DOC-2905;ext.5610. 



*^Woivien's HeaItIh- 

Disentangling marital 






U 



L\kl I OKI SI 

Hospii A 



la: 



^ Bereavetnentsiipport ; 

^>;i ;; J^ and :v -J 

i^foUithl^ 

!i^™jiii at7:3b^p^ the 

' ilbiraiiy at Westmoreland. 

Call 234-5600, ext. 6446. 

II.T.S. bereavement 

' For parents who have 
- lost babies to ectopic preg- 
nancy, miscarriage, stlUbirth 
or newborn death, meets' the 
third Tuesday of each 
. month at 7 p.m. in the 
library at Westmoreland. 
CaH234-6161. 

Cancer support group 

Meets the fourth 
, Wednesday of each month 
' at 7 p.m.' in'tiic Outpatient 
Oncology Waiting Room. 
Call 234-5600, ext; 6445. 




MERRY MILLER, MP. 

'llic recent demise of Nicole 
Simpson has turned tlic national 
spotlight onto some of the suffer- 
ing that occurs bcliind the scenes 
in even the most Successful of 
families. The nightmare of 
domestic violence can turn a 
marriage into a living hell. Less . 
overt battling can also lead to 
much despair, and a vicious cycle 
of conflict that begets anger and 
depression and more conflict. 

Domestic violence is an 
extreme example of betrayal and 
violation within a marriage. 
Unfortunately, it is surprisingly 



common: one out of four women 
have been physically abused by 
an intimate mate. Often the vio- 
lence within a marriage is Its 
darkest secret, hidden from even 
close friends and family. It brings 
much shame and sorrow. - 

Less extreme examples of 
marital battles also can lead to 
depression. Screaming, frequent 
criticizing, belittling, and also 
passive withdrawal' and avoid- 
ance of one's spouse can lead to 
much resentment. The high rate 
of divorce in this country is testi- 
mony to how poorly we resolve 
' confUcts within marriage. 



Depression often weaves its 
way into unhappy marriages. 
Certainly It Is depressing to be 
embroiled in marital conflict. 
What many do not realize is that 
depression can also be the cause 
as wcU as the effect of marriage 
problems. 

Depression is an overused 
word, that can mean many 
things. It can be used to describe 
a momentary mood, or the blues 
that all of us go through at one 
time or another. But it is also 
used within Psychiatry to refer to 
a very disabling and painful ill- 
ness. When a person suffers from 




a depression,! 
he or she typi- 
cally sees the world difTcrently 
than normal, much more nega- 
tively. 

Depression is characterized by 
a distinctly sad mood that per- 
sists, and is often accompanied 
by physical symptoms such as 
changes in appetite and sleep. 
Concentration may be difficult, 
energy is usually depleted, inter- 
ests are lost, motivation wanes. 
Sometimes suicidal thotights 
develop. 

When someone is depressed, 
See WOMEN'S HEALTH, page B26 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Double duty doctor comes to Ingleside 



TINALSWIECH 
Staff Reporter 

There arc many doctors of the 
digestive system, but not many of 
them specialize in ia certain area. 

An exception is Dr. Dale Coy, 
who Is not only a gastroenterolo- 
gist, but also a physician whose 
major interest is helping patients 
suffering from liver disease. 

The doctor said he decided to 
become involved with this type of 
work because of the variety of . 
organs which are involved. "It's a 
field' that's very challehging," he 
said. 

Coy teamed up with Dr. 
Pliilip Nagei who has eight loca- 
tions plus an office at the 
Northern Illinois Medical Center 
in McHcnry. Most recently Dr. 
Coy Joined the practice at the 
Westlake Clinic in Ingleside, to 
serve patients in the Fox Lalce 
. area. 

The Cleveland native attend- 
ed school in Chicago and lived 
there awhile and now he resides 
in Lake County. 

The physician has an Impres- 
sive background. For two years. 
Dr. Coy was assistant professor of 
gastroenterology specializing in 
liver disease .. at Rush- 
Presbyterian St. Lukes Medical 
College, 

While Coy hitemed at Rush- 
Presbyterian St. Lukes Medical 



Center, 85 liver transplants were 
done each year. 

Now, instead of performing 
transplants, Dr. Coy said his job is 
to try and prevent' them from 
happening. 

The combination hepatolo- 
gist/gastroentcrologist explained 
when a person has a liver ail- 
ment, their circadian clock is off, 
making them susceptible to sleep 
disorders; ; . 

Some of Coy's knowledge in 
the field of liver troublc.inciudcs 
chronic liver disease and its 
complications; interferon treat- 
ment of chronic viral hepatitis; 
hepatic encephalopathy and dis- 
ruption of circadian rhythms; 
and quality of life after liver 
transplantation. 

Dr. Coy has given many pre- 
sentations around the world on 
the subject of the digestive sys- 
tem, has been a member of vari- 
ous organizations, and has writ- 
ten several book chapters as well 
as articles on the subject he offers 
patients. 

Dr. Nagcl and Dr. Coy have 
locations In Ingleside, 
Barrington, McHenry, Buffalo 
Grove, Cary, Crystal Lake, Lake 
Zurich, Woodstock and the 
Northern Illinois Medical Center. 
For an appointment, you can call 
the 24-hour answering service at 
(708) 382-4410. 






^,1 _ I . ^ ' ' ■■'■ ^i, m.ii -I n,,' ^^—^''^' 'li 




Dr. Dalo Coy shakes tho hand of Dr. Philip Nagel at tho Wosttaka 
Clinic in Inglosldo. Dr. Coy Is a combination 

gastioontorologlst/hopatologlst and bogan taking patlonts at 
Wosllako last month. Dr. Nagel and Dr. Coy havo nine offlcos 
throughout Lake and McHenry Counties.— Photo by Tina Swtech 



liaste makes waste... and much worse in health care reform 



After nearly two years at the 
top of the nation's agenda, it 
appears that meaningful reform 
of our health care system is with- 
in reach, if members of Congress 
can avoid sinking into partisan 
bickering and if they can make 
the correct choices under pres- 
sure. Those arc big "Ifs." 

The temptation to divide the 
issue of health care reform along 
party lines is tremendous and the 
results would be disastrous. 
Closed door sessions or playing 
fast and loose with Congressional 
rules could result In one party 
slamming through its own ver- 
sion of reform that would have 
little support among the 
American people. Oh the other 
hand, a filibuster could sink all 
hope of health care reform for a 
very long time. It's hard to tell 
which scenario would be worse. 



More frightening is the possi- 
bility that politicians of both par- 
tics, anxious to point to an 
accomplishment on the issue 
before the fall elections, might 
craft legislation that'causcs more 
harm than good. Congress must 
take the time to correctly analyze 
the ramifications of its actions 
and be certain that Americans- 
understand the problems and the 
proposed solutions. The last time 
Congress forgot to do that was 
1988, and the result was a disaster 
prophetically labeled catastroph- 
ic health care. 

This time around the issue is 
far more complex and questions 
harder to answer. All the more 
reason to move cautiously. 
Much of the debate has focused 
on universal coverage achieved 
through a government mandate 
for all employers to provide 



health Insurance for their work- 
ers. Small companies have legiti- 
mate concerns about this, yet 
health insurance for all 
Americans is a desirable goal. 

There are many technical, but 
crucial, issues yet to be thorough- 
ly debated. For example, how can 
managed care plans like HMOs, 
which have become so popular, 
continue to survive if they are 
told by the government which 
doctors they must hire and are 
prevented from. offering incen- 
tives to doctors who deliver high 
quality care in an efficient man- 
ner? 

Lawmakers need to ask why 
some people say price controls 
will work for health care, when 
they have never worked for any- 
thing else. Why, when Americans 
have repeatedly said, in surveys, 
that they don't want the govern- 



ment running health care, do 
some people insist on a new 
Medicare Part C program that 
would have the government con- 
trolibig the health care of nearly 
half the U.S. population by ihe 
year 2000? These are tough ques- 
tions that. must be thoroughly 
answered, not cast aside in flurry 
of political deal-making. 

Health care reform Is the most 
significant social and economic 
issue ever considered by 
Congress. Every American should 
tell their elected representatives' 
to take the time to get It right. 
Otherwise, we may remember 
the hot summer of '94 not for 
being burned by the sun, but by 
our lawmakers. 

Editor's note: Article submitted 
by J, ED. and Associates, repre-. 
senting Blue Cross and Blue 
Shield. 



'/>. 



'.*l-*^> 4Vi-.r.':^% 



— •**^'.*"% -. 



'.r- 




Hi^f^L^iiWATCH UkelANd Newspapers Atiqun> 9,1994 



«.ff 



4«> 



r\ 



Condell participates 
in food program 

CondcU Medical Center is announcing its participation in the 
UDSA's Ctiild and Adult Care Food Program. The same meals will be 
served at no separate charge, In addition to the adult day care service 
fee, to enrolled participants without regard to race, color, national ori- 
gin, religion, sex, ancestry, marital status, physical or mental handicap, 
unfavorable military discharge or age at the CondcU Medical Center for 
Intcrgeneratlonal Care, 700 Garfield Ave., Libcrtyville. 

This program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
and the Illinois Department on Aging, give financial assistance to adult 
day care centers so that nutritious meals can be integrated with non- 
residential care services. The goal of the program is to improve the 
diets of participants. The meals and snacks served meet standards 
established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 

Listed below are the USDA Income Eligibility Guidelines which are 
effective through June 30, 1995. The amount of reimbursement 
received by Cotidell Medical Center is based on the number of enrolled 
participants whose family income Is at or below: 








vm\i 




^^^ii;iuii«n uyiiMtflBH 


FamilvStZG 


Yearly 


Monthly 


Weekly 


Yearly 


Monthly 


Weekly 


1 


S9.5SB 


$798 


5184 


513,616 


S1.135 


£262 


2 


12,792 


1.066 


246 


18,616 


1.517 


351 


3 


16.016 


1,335 


30& 


22,792 


1.900 


439 


4 


19,240 


1,604 


370 


27,380 


2,282 


527 


Each additional 


lamiiv member 


3,224 


259 


62 


4,588 


383 


89 



For more information, contact Condell Day Center for 
Intergencrational Care at 816-4585. 

Making Strides fights cancer 



The Lake Coimty Unit of the 
American Cancer Society will hold 
the flfdi aiinual Making Strides 
movc-along-athon on Saturday, 
Aug. 6, at three sites: Cook Field in 
Libertyville, Bowen Park in 
Waukcgan, and Hackney's 
Restaurant, Lake Zurich. 

The purpose of this event is to 
promote awareness that people 
do survive cancer. Former 
patients, current patients, their 
families, friends, and co-workers 
obtain pledges for their five mile 
walk and bring them that morn- 
ing. 

Registration begins at 8 am. 
and the event will start at 9 a.m. 
with a talk by a cancer survivor. 
The speakers w'dl be Danyl Didicr 
of Lincolnshire at Bowen Park, 
Dan Martins of Round Lake Beach 
at Libcrtyville, and Pat lloran at 
Lake Zurich. 

Entertainment will also be pro- 



vided. The Swing 'h* Easy trio, 
which consists of Peggy Coniff and 
Kathy Morgan of Libcrtyville, and 
Jcanninc Saltman of Barrington, 
will entertain the Ubertyvllle par- 
ticipants, while Susan Becker of 
Mundelein, a singer, dancer and 
choreographer, will share her 
music with the Waukcgan regis- 
trants. Also sharing the stage will 
be several finalists from the 1993 
Lake County Fair Talent Contest. 
At Lake Zurich City Lights, a group 
of singci^s who perform profes- 
sionally under the direction of 
Barbara Judt, will be on stage to 
entertain those who show up at 
the Hackney's parking lot. 

All participants will also receive 
goodie bags and will be eligible for 
prizes, depending on the amount 
of the pledges that they bring in. 

For more information please 
call the American Cancer Society 
at 336-9293. 




The problem of Chemical 
Dependency doesn't go away. 

When you pretend your alcohol or drug problem doesn't exist, 

you're only fooling yourself. At Victory Memorial Hospital's 

Chemical Dependency Programs, we know that even though 

alcohol and drug addiction arc destructive diseases, there is a high 

■ potential for recovery with treatment. 

Just hoping the problem will go away isn't enough. 

Take the first step towards recovery, call us today for a 

confidential assessment at 

(708) 688-HELP, 24 hours a day. 



XYy- 



VICTORY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

•^ 1324 N. Sheridan Road . Waukcgan, IL 

Victory's Ouipatient Chemical Dependency Progrmns are also 

available ai 2031 E. Grand Ave., Suite 200, Lindenhurst, Illinois 

Call (708) 356-9685: 

A Ttnul Quality .Stanax^enwni Orjianizuiinn 



Votorans Xavler Esteban and Gllboft Ponrose (left): AI Pato, Modlcal Contei Director: and voferar 
Joseph Kozlowski «n|oy a gamo of card* as part of the Adopt-a-Vot- Program at the North Chlcagc 
VA Medical Center. 

New Adopt-a-Vet program a success 



Earlier this year, North 
Chicago Veterans Affairs Medical 
Center (VAMQ Implemented an 
Adopt-a-Vet program. Since the 
kickoff celebration in February, 
the program has sparked a lot of 
enthusiasm and Interest and cur- 
rently about 100 patients and 
employees arc participating in the 
program. 

The volunteers arc all em- 
ployees at North Chicago VAMC 
who have agreed to "Adopt a Vet" 
in the nursing home care unit and 
spend a minimum of two hours 
per month involved in activities 
which arc mutually enjoyable to 
the veteran and the employee. 
Some of the activities have 
included a visit to Lake Voiture on 
the medical center grounds to 
enjoy the outdoors, a game of 
checkers or chess, or lunch in the 
Canteen. Other employees feed 
their patients regularly and escort 
their adopt-a-vet to religious 
activities. The patients and the 
employees agree it is one of the 
most exciting programs at the 
medical center and gives the 
opportunity for one-to-one inter- 
action just for fun between 
patients and employees. 

The concept "Adopt-a-Vct" 
has been used in other VA's and in 



otlicr nursing homes, but is often 
limited to feeding patients who 
arc unable to feed themselves. 
When the program was initiated 
at North Chicago VAMC, the coor- 
dinators felt it was important to 
allow the employees more auton- 
omy and encourage the patients 
and employees to choose their 

Women's Health 

From page B25 

they think and act difTcrcntly than 
normal. They arc often more irrita- 
ble, getting angry easily over 
annoyances that would not nor- 
mally matter. They lose confi- 
dence and self-esteem. They 
become more focused on the neg- 
ative, interpreting events as being 
more hopeless. They may become 
hypersensitive to signs of criticism 
and rejection by odicrs. 

Depression can be caused' by 
multiple factors. A tendency 
toward depression may be geneti- 
cally transmitted. Medical condi- 
tions may lead to or aggravate 
depression. Losses, changes, stress 
in general may lead to depression. 

llic vicious cycle is as follows: 
marital conflict can i)c the stress 
that leads to depression, but 
depression can also cause more 



own activities. The program is 
coordinated by Susan Murphy 
and Joyce Wadlington, both re^s- 
tercd nurses, "The Adopt-a-Vct 
Program works ' because the 
employees want it to work and 
because they care," says Murphy. 
She adds, "The patients 'sell* tlic 
program." 



Irritability and hypersensitivity 
which leads to marital conflict. 
Eventually it becomes hard to tell 
which came First. Couples can • 
become enmircd in botfi depres- 
sion and marital battling, widi no 
clear way but 

The good news is that there-is 
help. Excellent treatments for 
depression arc available today. 
And couples can learn to commu- 
nicate more directly and positive- 
ly, without escalating into insults 
or violence. 

Merry Miller, M.D., is a board 
certified psychiatri&t and is the 
director of the women's Circle of 
Health in conjunction with 
Neuropsych in Libertyville. She is 
also on staff at St, Therese 
Medical Center in Waukegan and 
Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville. 



Victory Lakes,., The Natural Choice. 

Victory Lakes provides family-centered, quality hag-term care iri a natural home-like environment. 

We realize that when a loved one must separate from the family, it can be a difficult experience for everyone 
involved. Al Victory Lakes, we try to make this transition a litlle easier by having open visiting hours and 
encouraging family and friends to stop by and join in our many resident activities and holiday gatherings. 



Victory Lakes offers comfort, convenience, and concern. From the raised, outdoor flower beds for our 
wheelchair-bound gardeners to the cozy dining room to pur in-house beauty parlor and colorful aviary 

to the sparkling clean living areas, loving care is evident everywhere. 



Come visit anytime. Meet our professional staff. Get to know 
firsthand what you can expect from a quality nursing home 
environment. 



We offer: 




• Long-Term Nursing Care 

• Rehabilitation/Medicare Unit - short term 

• Alzheimer's and Reialcd Disorders Unit 

• Respite Care Program • overnight to 30 days 



Please call (708) 356-5900 for a tour. 



s~\/vicr€ 



Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care Center 



1055 East Grand Avenue • Lindenhurst, IL 

7 mUet wtsi ofRt. 94 • AffUhtttl with Vkuny Mtmoiiai lUtsniml 



»fo 




It's tIhe TA^lik oF xhe town 

Get it off youR c^est (708) 22 5 ^807 5 





• UpservlcG 1$ a phone-in column presQnted as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapets makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland jt4ewspapem does 
nof.clalm the content or ttie subject matter as fact but as theper- 
sonaJ opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the 
right to edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call In at 
223-8073 and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the 
call Is anonyrinous, please leave your village name. 



Higher pay, more say 

The clerk In Round Lake Heights Is 
like that advertisement for the. 
phone service, where the lady can 
talk longer, soy less and pay less. 
Nov/ the clerk can do less In more 
hours for more money. 

Mass disapproval 

This Is to the members In Catholic 
parishes regarding attire at Mass. 
You know who "you qro. You look 
like you just took a break from 
working In your garden to go to 
church, r m sure your response 
would be that at least you go to 
church. You could take the time to 
be properly dressed. I'm sure you 
would never see shorts In a 
Protestant service. Then why at 
Mass? Please have respect for 
God and other church members. 

Raise from where 

The residents of Round Lake 
Heights woufcl like to know why the 
villoge clerk got a $7 per hour raise 
when the village cannot even 
afford to pay their bills. 

Billy Marfin antics? 

This Is to the head of ttie Antloch 
Youth Baseball Tearri, and to the 
coacties of ^\ye Junior Girls All Star 
Softball Team. Rease get with the 
program. The events leoding up to 
"ttie ali star game were totally 
uncalled for. For me to tell dl that 
you did, Upservlce wdOld have to 
dedicate the entire column to It. 
You should not be Involved at all 
next year. Perhaps you shoukl tell 
Upsen/ice readers what hap- 
pened. , . 

Secret meetings 

Why are there so many violations of 
the open meetings' act In the 



Village of RouQd Lake Helgtits? Is It 
because no one attends the meet- 
ings, even frorf> ttie press? The act 
was made to protect the voting 
population. When you can't 
attend a meeting because you 
don't know when or where It Is, that 
Is not right. Thl5lsademqcracy,not 
a dictatorship. 

Nasty Chicken 

Hey chicken man. You are ttie nas- 
tiest and most arrogant man I have 
ever seen. I can't t^eileve ttie way 
you tdk to people. 

Free fish, free problems 

Thank you Wauconda Village 
Trustees, Thank you for getting free 
fish for Bangs Lake, via the conser- 
vation department. Thank you for 
giving the conservation depart- 
ment ttie power to create and 
enforce their rules, especially 
regarding public access. Thank 
you for giving control for public 
access to the park district Thank 
you for having the village enforce 
the laws, as for boot registration 
and swimming, because the park 
district doesn't tnove ttie power or 
the funds to enforce the rules. It Is 
no surprise to me. They don't even 
have the rrioney for what. they 
have control of now. 
Thank you for thte agreement for 
the village and tf>e park district to 
cooperate with the conservation 
department to maintain a tiealthy 
environment for the fish and the 
vegetation. The consen/atloh 
department is greatly needed. If 
we were lacking In our responsibili- 
ties J woukj gladly welcome them. 
I thought we were stocking fish and 
keeping our water clean, and con- 
trolling weeds. Is that paddle boot 
out there the new casino. They are 



^m 



_:i*¥X^'i:M^'f»i '^4''' v^^ ' V^l»iJ');ii-'^^ •<" 




Oldsmobile 

Huf;e Inventory ofAutom abiles 
ONE PMCC DEALER 



H 



Oldsmobile 



DEMO SAU -YEAR END OEARANa 
Take A New Look! 




On Rte. 41 at Washington • Gurnee, IL • 249-1300 




Libertyville Rent-Alls 



185 W. Peterson 

1/4 mile w«8t of Rt«s. 137 & 21 

Libertyville 



362-7610 



cutting Into private business and 
our livelihood. Thank you for 
putting more traffic on ttie lake, 
Thank you for not allowing the vot- 
ers 1o have a say In this rhatter. 
And last, thank you for not giving 
our lake away. 

Walconda 

This Is- regarding the people who 
have been protesting the 
Wauconda Rodeo. I'm from 
Wauconda, but I didn't get a' 
chance to go to the rodeo. I'm not 
for It or against It. These people ae 
protesting the rodeo yet they can- 
not even spell Wauconda properly 
on their signs. 

New library location 

I like Upservlce. ifls a good thing to 
hove In ttie paper, t read It every 



i»e r,f H9V^^Jg>m4 UlcEtANcl NEwsp*p|n%|jffSggl,>y^^ 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



They sold they were from Fox Lake 
and only wanted to hear about 
their town In the newpaper 
because the Fox Lake Press was 
their newspaper and nobody 
else's. 'Has It.ocaJrred to the Igno- 
rant caller that Upservlce appears 
In a section titled 'County.' What 
exactly does that mean to sakJ 
caller? Tt>e people who read the 
Graysiake Times, which Is dso a 
Lakeland Newspapers product Just 
like the Fox Lake paper, are also 
tired of tieorlng Qll the nonsense 
that goes on every week In Fox 
Lake, in case that caller was mis- 
takenly thinking that Fox Lake Is 
Nirvana, believe me It Isn't. Get 
out of you shell and experience the 
rest of the county atleast. . 

See UPSERViCE page 628 



week. I like ttie stuff you print, lorn 
sick of ttie Graysiake Ubrary con- 
troversy. No one noticed the 
empty Surglpath building sitting 
right outside of town. It already has 
a huge parWnig lot. It is far away 
from the railroad tracks and kids 
ride their bikes by It every day on 
their way to and from town. It Is not 
in a bad location. The only thing . 
around ttiere Is Motorola and they 
are very courteous drivers. I live 
right near It. Ttiey shouW consider it 
Instead of dl tt^se stupid places 
arour»d town. Including ttie gelatin 
factory land which Is close to the 
tracks again. 

Everyone's newspaper 

This Is to tt>e stupid cdier who said 
they were tired of hearirig about 
the Graysiake Utxary controversy. 






ENJOY BACKYARD BIRDS ALL SUMMER LONG! 

'*Ut us help you choose the right products for Birdwaichin^' 

Wild Bird Center 

For your enjoyment of backyard birds"^^ 



^Moh;-Fri;10-6 
Saturday 10-5 
i ; Sunday 12-'4: 



GIFT IDEAS INCLUDE: 

•Bird Feeders • Wild Bird Seed 

•Birding Binoculars 'Sound of Nature 
•Bird Baths Tapes & CDs 



Red Top Plaza 

1322 S. Milwaukee Avenue 

Libertyville. Illinois 60048 

(Behind Burger King) 

549-9990 




•Bird Books 



I . *5»** OF? THE PURCHASE OF ANY j 
\- T^HIRT OR SWEATSHIRT IN STOCK! j 



•Plus So Much More!! Ll^fl.*! ^!ii!f!L^j 




^^^^^^^^^^^#^#^^^^4^^ 



AMEMGAN SECURITY MOIKME 

ILLINOIS RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LICENSEE 

SHOPPING FOR RATES... 

LOOK NO FURTHER!!! 

AMERICAN SECURITY MORTGAGE 



OpportwMM 



HAS ALL YOUR SHOPPING NEEDS... 

%W. . FIRST TIME HOME BUYER PROGRAM 



\\\ 



HOME EQUITY LOANS 
CONSTRUCTION LOANS 

FHA/VA LOANS 
CONVENTIONAL LOANS 

LOW, LOW RATES 
PERSONALIZED SERVICE 

YOUR SHOPPING CART WILL BE FULL WHEN YOU COME TO 
AMERICAN SECURITY MORTGAGE FOR YOUR FINANCING. 

CAU. TOUT!!! I4l0ft-79l^7628 

"Your Best Interest Is 

Our Main Concern.^' 
TkiM ComBBlnt Localioin: 



I IN Plan 
S40B 

l«lalnlch,IL 
IWB) MMi« 



Ona TlKuT Poiiita 

MIO 

Blooniii|dala,IL 60108 



I0T38 S. Cicera kn. 

MOI 

0diLtin,IL604B3 

(708) 49M4«4 



^J'■J>»_'^;!^■r *■- 



'fl 




LIPSERVICE UkdANd NcwspApCRs Auqusr $,1994 



1 J 



-; 



v.'i 



LI 




It'^s The T/\lk oF xhe 

Get It oFF youR chEST (708) 22 



TOW/fNI 

5-8075 




lyakeland 

iS?^ Newspapers . 



Ffom page B27 

Tax relief 

A bill providing tax relief on proper- 
ty to low and middle Income 
seniors Is about to be presented to 
Governor Edgar. All seniors In ttie 
state of Illinois stiould call ttie office 
and support this bill. His office Is 
being bombarded by strong 
school lobbies, We need the tax 
relief. Tel! the Governor. 

Board all wet 

What Is going on with the School 
District 41 school board. First, they 
are compldning we don't have 
enough money to educate the 
children we presently have, Then, I 
read they are providing the devel- 
opers In the area v/lth the needed 
water to create more growth In the 
district. What are we going to do 
next.? Ask us for more money to 
educate these new children. We 
are still paying for the last building 
additions. I thought these people 
were supposed to be responsible. 

A few dollars more 

To the people who stole the out- 
board motor and gas can on 
Channel Lake In Antloch from the 
67-year-old senior citizen, I hope 
you will get the few dollars you can 
get for It. 

Jury officer 

I v/lsh Reno Jensen would be able 
to get work as a police officer In 
the town where the jury that 
lurned her loose lives. It Is kind of a 
sad day. No one has any rights to 
complain about crime In Lake 
County, because you are the peo- 
ple who are turning them loose. 

More tact 

This Is to the person who com- 
plained about the police not 
doing anything about the Injured 
rabbit. Yes they were qut of line by 
saying that they could throw the 
rabbit In the garbage at the sta- 
tion. They could have used more 
tact, but I would be more con- 
cerned about people drinking and 
driving and killing people than I 
would be about a squished rabbit. 
Get smart. 

Help ourselves 

it is time that the United States quit 
sending relief money to third world 
countries as long as we have peo- 
ple unemployed In the United 
States. Why don't we spend our 
tax money on helping fellow 
Americans, Instead of helping 
other countries? Willie Nillle Clinton 
keeps sending our money over- 
seas. I am tired of paying for this 
foreign aid. 

Killer touchdown 

Jtils Is about the way our country Is 
going. We have people on free- 
ways cheering people who are 
killers like they are scoring a touch- 
down. We have other Idiots who 
sacrifice animals In the name of 
religion. What Is next?' Sacrificing 
people In church? I say people 
ought to wake up. and get rid of 
these Idiots. If you can't get rid of 
them. I would be happy to help. 

Senior paper 

This Is In response to the Upssrvice - 
call that Fox Lake should have Its 
own paper, if they did have one it 
would be a big laugh. It would 
turn Into a paper for all of the 
seniors. No one cares about the 
teenagers in this town and all we 
do Is get harassed by the Fox Lake 
Police. Why don't we do some- 
thing for the teenagers for once? 

Handgun hogwash 

This Is regarding gun control. 
Senator Metzenbaum says the best 
way to keep handguns away from 
the crimind Is through gun licens- 
\rtg. Licensing Is a valant to gun 
cfkne. tie says, I happen to t>e a 
vetefon. drxi onty one percent of 
all crimes In the state of Ullnols are 



committed by assault weapons. 
Most of the crimes committed are 
done so with cheap handguns. 
We've got a draft dodger for a 
president. Janet l?eno told the 
NRA to drop dead and go to hell. 
We have Sarah Brady who soys 
that a five-day waiting period Is the 
answer to everything. I am a hand-* 
gun owner and a veteran. I will 
keep the weapons I feel ore nec- 
essary to protect my family. The 
draft dodgers, slackers, and know- 
it-alls who don't know which end of 
the rifle the bullet comes out of can 
be the ones who drop dead and 
go to hell. I'm an owner" of a 
handgun and proud of It. 

Clean the library 

Have the employees of the 
Grayslake Public Ubrary ever heard 
of customer service? Don't they 
realize we are their patrons and 
their livelihood? In my opinion, this 
Is the rudest library staff I have ever 
seen. They should take a cra^ 
course In public relations or we 
should clean house along with the 
board and get rid of the whole 
bunch. 

On the decline 

You people printed my contribu- 
tion, but by exercising your editorial 
privileges, you stripped It of all sub- 
stance. I forgive you. However, 
the grammatical error Is Inexcus- 
able, You people are the product 
of a declining educational system. 

Backyard gambling 

Tills Is regarding the Llpservice call . 
last week that talked about river- 
boat gambling In Fox Lake. I agree 
'that the mayor and the trustees 
should park it In their own back- 
yard, If they want tt so badly. 

Help the kids 

I get so mad when elected people 
abuse their privileges. Two new 
Gavin School board members are 
wasting time and money on their 
personal vendetta with the school 
district superintendent. This Is 
senseless because the district Is in 
the black, the test scores are fair 
even with a reduction In state fund- 
ing, and our superintendent has 
one of the lowest superintendent 
salaries In Lake County. Right now 
there is a shortage of qualified 
superintendents. It seems we are 
getting our money's worth. Does tt 
make sense to give this guy a hard 
time? You were elected to serve 
the kids, not your own interests. • 

Bambi violence 

This Is In response to the Upservlce 
call entitled 'Circle of life,' Go see 
•Bambl." All right? 

Account for increase 

TMs Is regarding Round Lake Beach 
raising village slickers from S6 to 
S25 dollars for cars In one fell 
swoop. I did a little Informal survey. 
I discovered that Gurnee charges 
$4, Vernon Hills charges $6 and Is In 
the process of doing away with the 
charge. Round Lake and the 
Heights charge $8, Lake Villa 
charges SIO, Grayslake and 
Mundelein and Antfoch charge 
$12, Round Lake Park and Fox Lake 
charge $20. The city of Waukegan 
and Round Lake Beach charge 
$25. On top Is Ubertyvllle, which Is 
known to tax Its residents beyond 
belief, charges $30. I can see the 
possibility for an Increase, but this is 
ridiculous. Waukegan has a 
greater range of services. If this 
cannot be changed, at least let us 
be sure the funds are accounted 
for In some way so we know how 
this money Is being spent. 

Foley facts 

I think Mary Foley did a very good 
job with her article on the 
Wisconsin Central rail line's com- 
muter service. It was very well writ- 
ten, clear, and factual It Is the 
type of writing I litce to see In any 
newspcper. 



§•• 



Fir§t Time Home Buyers 

The Homestartf Program Can 
Make Ifour Dreams Come True! 



J . j,.,;^v»v^;-^V;w — ^ V ,-%v... ^■:^"i'j'-<.> "¥' ; 



•-S .'S 'KV 



THIS IS M AFFORDABLE 
MORTGAGE flATURING: 

•3/3 DOIVN BORROWER MUST 

HAVE 3% OF OWN MONEY (DOWN PAYMENT) 

•fXEXIBLE IINDERWRITIMG 

RATIOS 33/28 

•NO CASH RESERVE REQUIRED 

AT CLOSING, RESULTING IN LOWER CLOSING COSTS 

•CO]WENTIO]\Al LOAl^ 

CALL m ]>fOW 

TO GET MORE DETAILS 




John Hansen 




Kim Presley 




Ray Georges 




Richard O'Connell 



lAliE COllTFS 

MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS 

Now Celebrating Our 75th Year! 

FIRST FEDERAL BANK 



) 



fsb 



Wholly Owned Subsidiary, Northern States Financial Corporation 



Apply At Our Lending Office 

5384 Grand Avenue 
Gurnee 

or call . 

(708)249-6312 




MAIN OFFICE LEWIS AVE. OFFICE GURNEE OFFICE 

Madison at County St. 1428 Nor tli Lewis 5384 Grand Avenue 

Waukegan, IL 60085 Waukegan, IL 60085 Gurnee, IL 60051 

(708)623-0084 (708)249-6307 (708)249-6312 



»rjf»*^ **•—-*.-* 



«<^-*»**V * -" 



!S 



79 



AuqusT^, 1994 UkclANcI Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



BusiNESS BRIEfs 




Kohl's opens new store 

GURNEE^FCohrs Department Store announces the 
Grand Op.cningof its ncwGurnccstorcAug. 5 Inthc ^ 
Grand Hunt Center located at 6525 Grand Avenue. It is 
the 23rd Kolil's store to open its doors in tlic 
Chlcagoland area. 

Kohl's is a family-focused, value-oriented specialty 
department store providing wctlrknown national 
name-brand merchandise at value prices. Wider aisles, 
scanning at checkouts, friendly service and a liberal 
return policy appeal to the busy lifestyles of today's 
customers, 

Kohl's merchandise presentation consists of RO per- 
cent faniily clothing and 20 percent merchandise for 
the home— linens, domestics, housewares and decora- 
tive items. About 150 to 200 new Jobs arc being created 
by the opening of the new Kohl's store, which encom- 
passes over 75,000 square feet of space; 

The Grand Opening in Gurnec brings the total num- 
ber of Kohl's stores to 96, with locations in Wisconsin, 



Illinois, Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Indiana and 
North and South Dakota. Plans Include opening an 
additional 16 to 18 licw stores each year. 

The Milwaukee-based retail chain reached an annu- 
al sales volume of $1.3 billion. 

New screen telephone 

WAIfKEGAN-^mcritech and Citibank have 
unveiled a new screen telephone that wiU change the 
way people look at the phone. The new service gives 
customers a better way to pay bills, bank from home 
and use Amcrltech phone services. More than 200,000 
residents in 15 suburban communities will be the Rrst 
to be able to get a screen phone to do in-home bank- 
ing, including bill-paying and securities trading, and 
easily use advanced telephone services including Caller 
ID, electronic directory searches and more. 

New Air-Drive headquarters 

GURNEE— MTI Construction Services Inc. has . 
begun construction of a 22,000 square foot building for 



Air-Drive, Inc. in the Dclaney Business Center, Gurnec. 
The building will serve as company headquarters and 
manufacturing facility for Air-Drive, manufacturer of a 
proprietary line of metal fan blades for the appliance 
industry. Occupancy date is scheduled for November. 

Air-Drive is now located in temporary facilities in 
Mundclcln, after its facility in Ubcrtyville was . ' 
destroyed by fire earlier this year. Provisions have been 
niadc throughout the building to withstand the use of . 
heavy steel and equipment. • 

Volo Antique mall expands 

VOLO— The Volo Antique Mall, located on Rtc 
120 just west of Rte 12, is marking its second anniver- 
sary with' another expansion project. Beginning in 
September, the Volo Antique Auto Miiscum known as . 
the 'Warehouse' will be converted Into a two-story 
building, allowing new antique dealers to display their 
wares aside the valuable collector cars. The next phase 
of construction wiHbc to retire the furrilshlng and bed- 
ding operation, then expand Into that building. 





Lakeland 

Newsjpapers 





It's a blast 

Dairy Queen's win 
awards PAGE G4 



.-}/i-\ 
''^. 



Murjwiy on 
Re^ Estate 

Additions that recapture 
dollars PAGE C4 

Investment 
Trends 

Start a college savings 
plan now PACE C2 



Gallery features spiritual side of Indian art 






Hall of fame 

Lake Zurich insurance 
. agent receives award 

.page:c4 

STOCK WATCH 



Company Price Change DIv. 

Abbott 28 3M +1 $0.76 

Allstate 247/8 -I $0.72 

Amcrltech 41 3/8 +11/2 $1.92. 

AT&T 541/2 +1/8 $1.32' 

Baxter 26 3/4 +1/4 $1.00 

Brunswick 23 3/4 -5/8 $0.44 

Com. Ed. 24 3/4 '"+13/8 $1.60 

D. Witter 393/4 -11/2 $0,50 

.Kemper 607/8 +5/8 $0.92 

McDonalds 26 7/8 -1/4 $0.24 

Motorola 523/8 +21/2 $0.28 

Peoples En. 26 +3/4 $1.80 

Qkr. Oaks 753/8 +11/8 $2.12, 

Sara Lee 203/4 $0.64 

Sears 477/8 -3/8 $1.60 

UAL 101 +1 $0.00 

' Wa]greens36 1/4 +1/4 $0.68 

,WMXTech.29 -1/8 $0.60 

Cherry Elec. 121/2+1/4 $0.00 
Local stocks led by Motorola 
followed the general markets 
rise up this week. 

Stock Watch provided by^ 
Noah Seidenberg of Edward D. 
/ones&CcGmystake. 



NEAl TUCKER ■ 

; Staff Reporter 

. Ron Salway's art gallery In 
Prairie View has original prints of 
the most influential names in the 
artworid. Hanging from his walls 
you can expect to find the likes of 
Strongbow, Yellowhawk, Long 
Soldier and Red Owl. 

Salway's gallery is called 
Crazy Horse Print & Frame Shop, 
and it features original artwork 
from what he calls authentic 
' American Indian artists. It Is the 
artist that makes the works he 
displays unique. ^ 

The 20-year-old gallery and 
frame shop docs about 95 per- 
cent of its business outside of 
Illinois because businesses like it 
arc few and far in between. They 
not only sell art, but publish it 
too. Even his lithographs are 
signed by the original artist, mak- 
ing them a better long-term 
investment 

The movie 'Dances With 
Wolves' has created a great 
demand for Oglala Sioux artwork, 
and Salway's galleiy. is poised to 
meet those demands. 

The root of the authentic 
Indian art is very spiritual. This is 
in contrast to the. Madison Ave 
style of the more well-known cre- 
ators of Indian art such as the 
Italian-born Ozzi, or the 
American-born James Bama. 
Salway said those portraits usual- 
ly feature a brave with massive 
pectorals, striking a majestic 
pose, with their feathered head-, 
dress blowing in the gentle wind. 

"Indians don't associate with 



stylized art. They just don't visu- 
alize that kind of life for them- 
selves," Salway said. 

Salway showed some exam- 
ples of Indian art, which usually 
includes animal apparitions in 
the background, or in the clouds. 
The most common choice for an 
apparition is the buffalo. When 
God came down to speak to the 
Indians, he came in the form of a 
white buffalo. 

When the Indians lost the buf- 
falo they lost more than just a 
source of foo'd. Salway likened 
the loss ofthc buffalo' to modem 
man losing all the gold our econ- 
omy is based on, all the grocery 
stores, all tools, all clothing, all 
electricity, and caskets. Indians 
buried their dead above ground 
wrapped in buffalo skins so the 
God would rcco^iizc the body 
and accept it. 

Anyone familiar with Indian 
art would know- the name Paha 
Ska He was an influential inno- 
vator in the Indian art world, and 
he was also Salway's father. 
Incidentally, his mother was 
French and Indian. 

Paha Ska was the first to paint 
on velvet He then went to oils. 
After that, he turned to painting 
on natural deer and rabbit skins, 

Salway proudly displays a 
composite portrait his father 
painted of one of the niost 
famous Indians of all time, Crazy 
Horse. ChicfCrazy Horse refused 
to have his photograph taken 
before his death in 1876 because 
he did not want the white man to 
Sec GALLERY page C2 




Ron Salway, owner of Crazy Horso Print ft Framo Shop In Prairie 
View, holcto an India Ink painting on deerskin by Paha Ska, his 
father and one of the most Influential American Indian artists. The 
Buffalo Hunt' Is a two sided creation. On the reverse, the buffalo 
Is the victor over the brave.— Photo by Neal Tucker 



First Colonial merges with Wisconsin's largest bank 



First Colonial. Banksharcs 
Corporation and Milwaukee- 
based Firstar Corporation have 
signed a definitive agreement for 
First Colonial to merge with 
Firstar. 

Firstar is the largest bank 
holding company headquartered 
in Wisconsin, with $14 billion in 
assets and offices in six states. 
First Colonial is a $1.8 billion 
bank holding company with 17 
banks and 30 offices in the 
Chicago area Following comple- 
tion of the merger, Firstar will 
have the seventh largest com- 
mercial banking institution in 
Illinois. In Lake County. First 
Colonial operates Fox Lake State 



Bank; First Colonial Bank of 
Vernon Hills and newly acquired 
banks in Highwood and Vernon 
HiUs. 

Firstar's presence In Illinois 
includes offices In Napervillc, 
Park Forest, Northbrook, Geneva 
and Bolingbrook. Tlic company 
has a trustee company in Oak 
Brook. 

"This transaction allows 
Firstar to almost triple the size of 
its Chicago area franchise," said 
Firstar Chairman Roger L 
FitKsimonds. 

First Colonial Chairman C. 
Paul Johnson said the affiliation 
with Firstar would benefit First 
Colonial's customers and 



employees, as well as sharehold- 
ers. "Firstar is one of the coun- 
try's best-performing regional 
bank holding companies. Its 
strategy has long been to build 
strong, long-term relationships 
with customers, which has also 
been First Colonial's goal." 

Johnson will be nominated to 
join Firstar Corporation board of 
directors following completion of 
the transaction. 

"We felt It was extremely 
important to select an appropri- 
ate acquirer," lohnson contin- 
ued. "Firstar is ideal, with vt stock 
that is highly recomrr d by 
many analysts. The ta.. .:rrcd 
nature of an all-stock tnin^ ''on 



will be most attractive to First 
Colonial shareholders, and I 
believe that the price recognizes 
the value of the First Colonial 
franchise." 

Firstar has four banks in 
Illinois with $1 billion in assets 
and 15 offices in DuPage, Cook, 
Lake, Kane and Will counties. 
Plans call for all of the Firstar and 
First Cototiial banks to be consol- 
idated during 1995. The com- 
bined organization will have 45 
offices and $2.8 billion In assets, 

"A major benefit of the trans- 
action is the very significant cost 
reduction that can be achieved by 
consolidating 21 Firstar and First 
See MERGE page C4 





BUS|NE$S/REAL ESTATE UkElANct Newspapers August 3, T994 , 



v#ft 



v^.-., 




' 


"... 
v , 




^ 




■ 


^^^L.' "L .J 




1 






r ^kj 


1 




1 


k 


•^ 


^^ 1 


M^^^S 


^ 


^S 


^^ 


MJ- 


my 




Crazy Horso Ptint A Framo Shop In Pralrlo Vlow also roproducos its 
authonffc Indian art on gro«tlng cards. Ttio two works on top drs 
from ttio very Influontlal Richard Rod Owl. At left Is 'Spldor Dancor'. 
At right Is 'Dakota Dancor.' Tho two works on the bottom, by the 
well known Paha Ska, from (ett are 'Spirit,' which Is actually a com- 
posite drawing of Crazy Horse,' and 'Appeal to the Great Spirit.' 

Gallery — 

From page CI 

take his image. In ordcrto recreate 
his image, Paha Ska intcndcwcd 
actual Indian council members 
who new Crazy Horse. 

When Salway added framing to 
tils business three years ago, he 
used the same philosophy that had 
made tiis art business successful— 
give the customer somettiing few 
other people have. He accom- 
plishes this by not being con- 
cerned about price, only quality. 

When someone brings their 
precious artwork for framing, 
Salway goes to great lengths to 
make sure the framing enhances 
the piece. Custom framing is at no 
extra chaigc. He displayed one 



Indian piece that featured a carved 
bone necklace in the frame, simi- 
lar to the one the Indian was wear- 
ing In tlic painting. 

JBach piece of art sold or 
framed comes with a certificate 
of authenticity when applicable, 
and always with a biographical 
sketch on the author. The paper 
arc then put in a plastic scaled 
bag and attached to the back of 
the piece. 

As for his advice on what peo- 
ple should buy and how they 
should have it fhimcd? 

"A person should always buy 
what the absolutely love for their 
home. With that, they can't go 
wrong," he said. 



• MARQUARDT HYUNDAI • 

Brand New 1994 Hyundai EnccI! 

America's LOWEST priced car. 
'6945 • NO PMrMENTS TIL SEniMBER! 

*$50tf rebate and Valvecare rebate applied. Based on $1000 down. Plus taxes, 
title, doc fees, license and options. For 60 mo. @ 3.25% for qualified buyers. 

Marquardt «»llyundai 

On Rt. 41 at Washington St. • East Exit • Gumee 

* (708) 249-1300 • 




Loddng for Money? 

DONT CALL USUI 

That's right. If yoii think it's not possibie to get 

money for your privately held mortgage, don't . 

waste your time calling SECURE FUNDING. At 
SECURE FUNDING we will show you how you can 

get quick cash for your mortgage; Whatever the 
. reason you need the cash for, we can provide the 
resources to make your need successful. 

SECIJRE FXJNDING Wmo 

Memh^r Ngt'nnal HbbI FstatR Mortgage Investora Assoc. 



-Investivient TrencIs— — —~ 

Noah A. Seidenberg. 

Investment Representative of Edward D. Jones & Co. 

Start college savings plan now 



A little now or a lot later. When 
It comes to saving for your child's 
or grandchild's college educa- 
tion, there is one important rule 
to rcmcmbcn the sooner you 
begin, the better. 

College costs on average have 
been increasing approximately 
eight percent a year for public 
universities and sometimes more 
than that for private colleges and 
universities. For example, at the 
University of Wisconsin In Green 
Bay, tuition, room and board and 
other fees currently total about 
$5,000 a year. If your child or 
grandchild has 10 years before 
college, tuition when he or she 
enrolls in 2004 is estimate to be 
approximately $10,900 If costs 
continue to rise at ci^t percent a 
year. 

Of course, there arc many 
grants and scholarships available 
for the college bound, but it does- 
n't hurt to have some money set 
aside. When it comes to some- 
thing as important as college sav- 
ings, no one wants to talcc unnec- 
essary risks. However, college 
costs are rishig rapidly, so if you 
have the time to let them work for 
you, growth investments should 
probably play a role in your 
investment plan. A plan that 
combines zero coupon bonds. 



and growtli-and-incomc mutual 
funds offers the growth potential 
you need. 

Growth-and-lncome mutual 
funds allow you to Invest in the 
common stocks of hlgh-quallty, 
growing companies with long 
liistories of increasing dividends. 
Common stocks offer the growth 
potential you need to keep ahead 
of inflation and ahead of the ris- 
ing costs of college, Because 
mutual ftmds spread your Invest- 
ment over a variety of companies 
in a number of different indus- 
tries, you get the added safety of 
diversification. In addition, 
mutual funds offer professional 
management. Experienced 

Investment professionals con- 
stantly monitor the performance 
and quality of the companies in 
the fund. 

U.S. Treasury zero coupon 
bonds arc backed by the full faith 
and credit of the. U.S. govern- 
ment, which earns an added 
measure of safety for your college . 
plan, they're designed for 
investors who want to accumu- 
late a specific amount of money 
for a future date. When you buy 
zero coupon bonds, the amount 
you invest is discounted below 
the face value of your investment. 
When your bonds mature, you'll 



Is Your Nest Getting Too Crowded? 

Shop for a New One in Lakeland Real Estate Classifieds 




receive their 

full face' 

value, U.S. 

government 

guaranteed. 

Although 

you will pay 

federal 

income tax 

on the 

amount you 

earn, U.S. 

Treasury zero coupon bonds are 

state and local tax free. 

Like any long-term invest- 
ment, your college saving pro- 
gram should be tailored to your 
individual needs. The sooner you 
start, the easier it will be. 

Editor's note: This is a column 
highlighting stocks of local inter- 
est. The author, Noah Seidenberg, 
is the local representative "^for 
Edward D. Jones and Co., [the 
nation's largest investment firm. 
For further inforniation or addi- 
tional questions, cali223'}90a^ 



WeIgome 
WAqoN 

Helpful Civtc Information to ac- 
quaint you with your community: 
Call the Welcome Wagon represen- 
tative so that she may visit you. Z 

Antloch ^ 

Karen ? 

35e-e377 




Fox Lake/ 
Spring Grove 

^"•'^'Sheny 
17oa) sa7- teag 

Grayslake 
Wildwood 



Vida 
338-5971 



Gum 

Patti 
223-8498 



Linda 
735-0650 



Ingleslde 

Gina 
073-0920 



Lake Villa 
Llndenhurst 



Kris 
358-3881 



Lake Zurich 

Ann Jeanette 

040-5790 438-9049 



Libertyvilli 

.Sally 
880-1599 



Lincolnshire 

Letty' 
945-3181 

' Long Grove 
Kildeer 
Hawthorn Woods 

Bonnie 
840-7981 

Mundelein 

Laurie Marta 

588-1853 405-9130 

Round Lake Area 

PhebeKarpel Priscllla 
223-8504 740-3183 

Vernon Hills 

Letty Maureen 

945-3181 949-8928 

Wauconda 
Island Lake 

Lee 
528>7809 

You are entitled to a Gomplimen- 
tary subscription from your home- 
town newspaper. To receive your 
paper, contact your Welcome 
Wagon representative or call 
Lakeland Newspapers at (708) 
223-8161. For Infomnation about 
positions with the Welcome 
Wagon call Maria at 
(708)577-3637. 



}] 



Ti 



I 



: 






i 



i 






.1- mjs^-^ — ^^— - 



::55isrrSv!rni:cr~rrrr 






AiiquOT %l ^94 LAkEUNd NEWspApcits BIISI NESS/REAL ESTATE 




1 
P 



1-* 



Tired Of 




r 











-7^^T'r:'rr^j^.^^i^i 








SAME NAME - SAME LOCATIO 

IN FOX LAKE SINCE 

Depositor Owned 










Savings and 



Zs.-,* 





■^ «i 




XtAjA/t>«&A4 



^ 1 i-i" 










^1 



...••::::•••.- 



V .-^ 



••«.••' 



•Home Loans •Checking Account^iiS^ayii^^ 

Corner of Rt. 12 & Grand Ave. '^W'h 

Fox Lake |^%. -^^^..y.,,. 




587-631 1 








^gi?.„#i:^> ^^-f^^;:^^. 




^^ 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UIceIancj Newspapers AuqusT 5, 1994 



MuRplHy ON ReaI Estate — Merge 



Jerri Murphy 



Additions that recapture dollars 







^^^B"'^'^^^B^ 


^^^^^M j^^K^y^- i 


Bi^fflWWi 



When a seller is considering selling their 
present home, the question most often aslccd is, 
"What Improvements should I make that I can 
actually recapture on the sale price?" 

TTie best rule of thumb Is that a buyer buys 
what they actually sec. For example, carpeting is 
the quickest fresher and update improvement a 
seller can make. Generally offering a carpeting 
allowance is hcIpM but docs nothing to Ignite 
the excitement when tlic buyer walks in and gets 
that all important Hrst impression. Many people just don't have the 
imagination to replace old worn, tired, dated carpeting with a vision of 
die same home with new carpet. Keep your selection neutral to insure 
the fullest spectrum of buyer appeal. 

Fresh paint gives another immediate face lift to a home. Be carc^l 
to choose an off white that isn't too yellow or too gray. Pay a little extra 
to have the Job done well. Buyers arc sophisticated enough to spot 
shoddy, sloppy work. The more neutral the walls, tiic easier It is for the 
new buyer to visually move themselves in. 

Bathrooms are another critical point for new buyers. Cracking and 
molding grout lends the idea that the whole bathroom needs work. 
Amateur attempts at grout repair make matters worse and make the 
new buyer think dierc was really a worse problem than they thought. 
Sparkling clean Hxturcs, fresh colorful finger towels and a strict mini- 
mum of personal effects make this room look fresh, appear larger and 
pleasant. 

Kitchens arc another strong focal point Greasy black splashes and 
cluttered counters do not convey the most inviting message. This is 
one room in which dated, busy wallpaper should be removed. Plain 
walls and a simple border arc a big improvement, as this area carries so 
much important. Rust stains on sinks and hardware lend the impres- 
sion that the whole kitchen Is outdated. Dark appliances can be paint- 
ed to look newer. Kitchen floors take a lot more abuse than any other 
room and can make this room look cither dark or fresh and new. Worn, 
cracked linoleum should be replaces for a sharp clean look. 

Many sellers feel that investing in an improvement they do not bcn- 
cfit from is a waste. Statistics indicate that houses that show with fewer 
objections sell quicker and for more money. If you substantially 
improve these areas, you can count on a good return for your invest- 
ment dollar. 

Questions or comments may be directed to Terri Murphy, Box 6234, 
UbertyvilleJL 60048. 

Dairy Queen stores earn awards 



From page CI 
Colonial banks Into one bank," 
Fitzsimonds said. "These savings, 
coupled with revenue enhance- 
ments, arc expected to produce a 
positive Impact on earnings by 
the second year of the merger." 

Fitzsimonds said the value of 
cost reductions would approxi- 
mate $24 million or 22 percent of 
First Colonial's operating expens- 
es. The value of revenue 
enhancements and cost reduc- 
tions together is expected to 
exceed 30 percent of operating 
expenses. A one-time restructur- 
ing charge of approximately $23 
million is expected following 
closing. 

Firstar sees great potential for 
growth in fee revenue at First 
Colonial offices, Fitzsimonds 
added. Firstar is known for its 
hi^ level of fee revenue relative 
to total assets. First colonial is 
already generating significant fee 
revenue relative to assets, with 
one of the largest tmst businesses 
in suburban Ciiicago. 

"Firstar has made 28 acquisi- 
tions in the past 10 years," 
Fitzsimonds noted. "Our strategy 
is to select our merger partners 
carefully, trim costs skillfully and 
grow fee revenue energetically. 
Following this strategy, we have 
more than doubled in size since 
1986, while almost tripling earn- 
ings per share. The First Colonial 
transaction is very consistent 
with this pattcm of success. We 
are all the more confident in liglit 
of the very fine group of ofiicers 
and employees that First Colonial 
brings to the relationship." 

The merger and resulting 



Illinois organization will be over- 
seen by Jolin B. Williams, execu- 
tive vice president responsible for 
the community banking group at 
the $5.5 billion Firstar Bank 
Milwaukee. In 1991, Williams was 
responsible for the merger of 
eight Firstar banks in metropoli- 
tan Milwaukee into one organiza- 
tion. A year later, he oversaw the 
merger of 13 acquired offices Into 
the Milwaukee bank. 



"Jay Williams is an excellent 
banker," Fitzsimonds said. "He 
has the operational experience to 
effect a smoot^i consolidation 
and the strategic insights to grow 
our Chicago area franchise 
aggressively. Jay Is also well 
attuned to the needs and expec- 
tations of both customers and 
crnployccs. He epitomizes 
Firstar's philosophy of relation- 
ship banking." 




Chuck Whito (loft) was Inductod Into the American Family 
Insurance Hall of Fame durlr^ the company's All American 
convention held In Montreal. The Lake Zurich agent earned 
the award by being ranked one of the top agents In the 
country In service and sales for 20 straight conventions. 
American Family CEO Dale Mathwich (right) Is shown pre- 
senting the award to Chuck and Unda White. 



I 






Edward Watson, executive 
vice president of operations for 
International Dairy Queen, Inc 
(IDQ), announced the Dairy 
Queen store on 4673 Grand Ave. 
\n Gurncc, and the store at 966 
Main St. m Antioch have earned 
Dairy Queen Golden Cone and 
Silver Brazier Limited awards for 
the fiscal year 1993. 

"We arc proud of the hard 



work and dedication. of the own- 
ers, managers and staff at the 
Gurncc and Antioch Dairy Queen 
stores," says Watson. "Their 
desire to make die stores top per- 
formers is a credit to them. 
Recognizing them with these 
awards is a way of saying 'thank 
you' for making the Dairy Queen 
system a leader in the fast-food 
industry." 



RE AL EST ATE 

ucnoN 



>'^''«s^^m3 



6,100 SQUARE FOOT COUNTRY ESTATE 

VIRGINIA HOUSE 

25333 West Highway 60, Grayslake, Illinois 



Perched otop a hill, this macninccni 
Greco-Roman style home proviJei 
p,inornmic views of (it 1 1 + acre mate 
nnJ the tollinB cixintryiide beyonJ. 
AmonK the luxurious nmenities nf this 
lO-ruom, brick, I M-story home arc 
4 bedrooms. 4Vt baths, extemivety 
equipped kitchen, cherry-nanetcd 
library, two Hreplaces, .inJ an attached 
4>car snatnp: with Ruest ep.vtmeni. 



Originally Priced at: $799,500 
Sugg. Opening Bidr $200,000 



Excellent Flnanclnfi Available 



AUCTION DATH: 
Tuesday, August 23, 1994 
7:00 p.in. 



VIEWING DATESi 

1:00.4:00 p.m. 

Sundays, Aujoist 7, 14 £i 21 

Saturday, August 13 



AMENITIES* 

• Lar{;eKCepiion hall with crystal char^Jelicr 

• I'/t room apartment aKivc (jaraj;*^ 

• Stereo, intercom &i alarm system 
ihroufjihoui 

• Central Vacuum • Walk-in vault 
*P(ease see Bidder's Informaiion Packet 

for complete list. 

Fur brochure iSt. terms of sale, call: ■ 

(312)630-0915 

^ SiGLDONGOOD&GOM'ANY 




I 



I 



— Rciil EiiRtc Auctloni, Inc, AffilUic 



THE CHICAGO AREA TRANSPORTATION 

STUDY ANNOUNCES THE RELEASE OF A 

PROPOSED PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT PLAN 

FOR NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS FOR A 6Q-DAY 

PUBLIC REVIEW AND COMMENT PERIOD 

The proposed Rublic Involvement Plan is designed to address the concerns and the 
needs for those groups and individuals who want to be more involved in the trans- 
portation and decision-making process. 

The document can be obtained by calling the Public Information office of the 
Chicago Area Transportation Study (CATS) at 312/793-3460 beginning Monday 8 
a.m., August 8. The public review and comment period will continue for. 60 days. 

A public open house will be held at CATS offices, address below, on TViesday, 
September 20, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. to discuss the plan and to receive verbal or writ- 
ten comments. 

Persons planning to attend the open house who will need a sigh language interpreter 
or other similar accommodations should notif>fc the Chicago Area Transportation 
^Study at 312/793-3460. 

Written comments on the proposed Public Involvement Plan can also be mailed or 
faxed to the address below: - 

CHICAGO AREA TRANSPORTATION STUDY 

PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE 

300 W.ADAMS 

2ND FLOOR 

CHICAGO, IL 60606 

(FAX) 312/793-3481 



i 






I 



iiB" ip ' ii i i T a nrt ^m r ■ 



"fflM^ii 



u-sfcfc^ag^w ■■^■^■■wniir*- 



Aijquw y, 1994 UI<eM NEVirtpApcRsOBITUARiES; J 



i 




J- 




:eland 

■ ■ I 
Newsjpapers 






I 



Margaret Irene Erickson, nee Vassau^ 

- Age 89 of Grayslake, IL passed away Tuesday, July 
26, 1994 at Winchester House, Ltbertyvlllc, IL. She was 
born In Westminster, VT October 8, 1904 and had made 
her home at Grayslake, IL most of her life. She was a 
member of the United Protestant Church and Womens 
Christian Fellowship, Sorbsls Chapter #329, Order of 
Eastern Star, Grayslake, Village Afternoon Unit, 
Homemakers Association. She was a bookkeeper by 
trade most of her adult life and she and her husband 
"Whltey" owned and operated Wagrier's Cleaners of 
Grayslake for several years. 

She leaves her daughter Barbara (Donald) 
Richardson-Cannon of Gurnee, IL; her grandchildren Jill 
(Roger) Reckis of Springfield, VT, Jo Dette (Erich) 
Schuetz of Atlanta, GA and James K. (Terri) Richardson 
of Grayslake, ILj seven great-grandchildren Lindsey and 
Chelsey.Reckia, Evan & Joel Schuetz, Sarena, Tessa and 
John Richardson; sister Margery (William) Sandbcrg of 
Florida; a brother Clarence Vassau of Vernon Hills, IL; 
numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded In 
death by her husband of 58 years, Emest "Wliitey" 
Erickson In April, 19B3; her son John Erickson in October 
1983; her parents Joseph and Margaret Vassau; three sis- 
ters Grace, Thelma and Hazal Vassau; and two brothers 
Kenneth and Harold Vassau. 

Funeral services were offered at 4 PM Sunday, July 
31, 1994 at the Strang Funeral Chapel, 410 E. Belvidere 
Road, Grayslake, IL with the Rev. Gehl DeVore, Pastor 
emeritus. First Methodist Church, Waukegan, IL offici- 
ating. Interment will be private at Avon Centre 
Cemetery. The family received friends at the chapel 
from 3 p.m. Sunday until time'ofservlccs. Inlieu of flow- 
ers, friends may contribute to Grayslake Fire 
Department/Rescue Squad or United Protestant 
Church, Grayslake, IL In her memory. 

.:._..r'"." ■ 

CpUette G. Riegler, 

• Age BebfAritloch, it passed away Monday, August 
1, '.1994 at Winchester House, LlbertyvlUe, IL, She was 
born August 5, 1907 In Chicago, IL the daughter of the 
late Charles and Frieda (Doege) Netzel. In 1941 she 
moved to Lake Villa, IL She was a member of the 
Mi^burn Congregational Church In MUlbufh, IL and 
waS also a member of the Ladles Aid of the church. Mrs. 
Riq^er was employed at Abbott Laboratories In North 
Chicago, IL for 20 years, retiring In 1970. On August 17, 
1935 she married Arthur N. Relgler in Chicago, ILand he 
preceded her In death on March 19, 1978 in Monroe, WI. ' 

-Survivors include two daughters, Lois Thain of . 
Clinton, WI and Judith (Emest) West of Antioch, IL She 
waslthe grandmother of seven and the great-grand- 
mottier of twelve. She was also preceded in death by 
one sister Margaret Peters, one brother Raymond 
Netzel, one son-in-law John "ITiain and a great-grandson 
Nicholas West. 

Funeral services were held at 1:30 pm Wednesday,. 
August 3, 1994 at the Mlllburn Congregational Church, 
Millburn, IL with Pastor Paul Meltzer officiating. 
Interment was in Warren Cemetary, Gurnee, IL. 
Arrangements were handled by Strang Funeral Home, 
Antioch. In lieu of flowers, those desiring may make 
contributions to the Millburn Congregational Church, 
Andoch Rescue Squad or a Charity of your choice in her 
memory. 

Marguerite "Peg'* McCarthy, 

> Age 69 of Mesa, AZ formedy of Antioch, IL Resided 
in Libertyville 1969 through 1975; Andoch 1975 through 
1990. Bom September 10, 1925 in Chicago, IL; passed 
away July 24, 1994. Survived by husband William "Mac" 
McCarthy, Mesa, AZ. Children William (Ann) McCarthy, 
VUla Park, IL; Patrick (Gerianne) McCarthy, Bethesda, . 
MD; Daniel McCarthy, Brooklyn, NY; Marguerite 
(Randy) Shanahan, McHenry, IL; Peter (Marybeth) 
McCarthy, Chicago, IL; Thomas (Cynthia) McCardiy, 
Grayslake, IL; John McCarthy, Chicago, IL 

Grandchildren Eric McCarthy, Patrick and 
Raymond McCarthy, Kaileen, Meaghan, Erin Shanahan, 
James and Jessica McCarthy. 

Preceeded in death by son Martin, 1954, parents 
Wallace, 1990 and Marguerite, 1986 O'Brien of Chicago, 
IL 

■ She has a sister Mary Coleman (John) , brothers Jack 
O'Brien (Lorraine), Thomas O'Brien; all reside In 
Chicago. 

A funeral mass was held at St. Bridget Catholic 
Church, Mesa, AZ, Tuesday July 26, 1994. Inlieuofflow- 
ers, donations can be made to Alexlan Brothers 
Hospital, Elk Grove, IL 

Ronald Edward Garstkiewkz, 

Age 57 of Phoenix, AZ passed away suddenly August 
1, 1994. He is survived by his wife Arlene, of Phoenix; a 
daughter Melanie and son Cory; modier Lillian Getz of 
LltUeton, Co; brothers Philip (Carol) of Buffalo Grove 
and Clarence (Libby) of Uxington, KY. Funeral services 
will be held in Phoenix. AZ. 



Betty P. Ferrier, 

Age 72 of Trevor, WI formerly of Antioch, IL passed 
away Tuesday August 2, 1994 at her home. She was bom 
April 18, 1922 In Chicago and moved to Antioch in 1950 
and then to Trevor, WI In 1993. She was a member of 
Trinity United Methodist Church of.Undenhurst. She 
was also a member of the Northern Illinois Church 
Women United and was past president of the Grass Lake 
Grade School PTA and the Antioch High School PTA, 
Mrs. Ferricr retired after 25 years at Great Lakes Naval 
Training Center as a Flnancial.Ofncer. On June 1, 1943 
she married James A. Ferrler in Chicago, IL 

Survivors include her husband, James; one daugh- 
ter, Patricia (Irving) Metz of.Trevor, WI; and one sister, 
Pat Bye of Antioch, IL She was the Grandmother of 
Reglne (Royce) Brooks and Tracy (Jerry) Brewer and the 
Great Grandmother of Andrew Brooks. She was preced- 
ed in death by one sister, Isabel Bobek. 

Funeral services were held at 11:00 am Thursday, 
August 4, 1994 at the Trinity United Methodist Church, 
Lindenhurst, ILwith Pastor Scott McClellan, ofTiclaUng. 
Interment was private. Friends called at the Strang 
Funeral Home, 1055 Main St (Rte. 83) Antioch, IL from 
4 until 8 pm Wednesday and at the Church Thmsday 
from 10 am until time of services. In lieu of flowers, 
those desiring may make contributions to the Northern 
Illinois Church Women United in her memory. 

John D. Parham, 

Age 63 of Mesa, AZ, formerly of Round Lake Park 
passed away July 29, 1994 in Phoenix, AZ. He was bom 
in Chicago and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. 

He is survfved by his wife Patricia, of Mesa, AZ; three 
daughters Lynn (Gary) Untermeyer of Phoenix, AZ, Rita 
(Michael) Schmidt of Round Lake Beach, IL, Joan 
(Randy) Mack of Phoenix, AZ; eight grandchildren; one 
brother, Edwin Parham of AZ; one sister, Elizabeth Auld 
ofAz. 

Interment will be at National Memorial Cemetary in 
AZ. 



Someh'mes an o[a-fas£ioneJ sonq 

,'"' Hirings us a i£oug£i of you; 

Someh'mes a flower as we pass afon^, 

Or'as£ui£aiisazureS[aey 

Or a Silver fining in i£e cfoudsy 

ls)£en i£e sun is peeping i£rou^£ 



,■■>JJU^*,;<lH.. 



i^4tmi\^^.'y!>4^r\^a3c^rx^A ^t3f5(W«i*i^* 



i£ese i£in^s^ 

ma£e us 
i£in£ofyou. 



crbteuia^ dfune^tcUwAa/tel, mcC. 




tyOLJLdmi 



Fourth. Qcneration Family offering 
sincerity sensitivity Si con\fort in your 
time qf need. 

We work with your best interest in 
mind to help ease your burden. 

We encourage you to learn more about 
your options. It's neuer too early. 
Inquiries €u-e always welcome. 



•Pic aiTangemeiita 
•Vetenni ft SocUl 
Security Bencflts 
•Air Shipping Scrrtce 
•Trz Free Tnut 



•Uedlcal Science 
•PtibUe Aid 
•Direct Cretnstlon 
•Fore Thought 
Iniurencc PUn 
•Poymcnt PUns 



fPersoimf caring for over 90 years 

410 East Belvidere Rd. Grayslake 

223-8122 






Death Notices 




BARTELSON 

Heather E. Bartelson, 18, 
ofAntloch, ILArK Strang 
Funeral Home, Antioch, 
IL 

CVITKOVIC 

Marlja Cvldcovlc, age 80, 
of Libertyville, IL Arr: 
Gurnee Funeral Home, 
Gumee, IL 
ECKERT 

Thomas J. Eckert, 48 of 
Lake Zurich, IL Arr: 
Ahlgrim & Sons Funeral 
Home, Lake Zurich, IL 
FONTAINE 

Kathleen M. Fontaine, 40, 
of Lake Zurich, IL Arr. 
Ahlgrim & Sons Funeral 
Home, Lake Zurich, IL 
HANSEN 

Leland E. Hansen, 75, for- 
merly of Lindenhurst, IL 
Arr Private. 



KUPP 

Geraldtne M. Klipp (nee, 
Hallett) of Grayslake, IL 
Arr: Wenban Funeral 
Home, Lake Forest, IL 

MUTCHEK 

-William Ralph Mutchek, 
66, of Gurnee, IL Arr: 
Marsh Funeral Home, 
Gurnee, IL 

OLSON • 

Warner G. "Ole" Olson, 
83, of AnUoch, IL Arr: 
Strang Funeral Home, 
AnUoch, IL 

PETERS 

Judith Ann Peters, 49, of 
Antioch ,IL Arr:. Strang 
Funeral Home, Antioch, 
IL 



URBONAS 

Roman Urbonas, 71, of 
Uke Villa, IL Am Ririga 
Funeral Home, Lake Villa, 
IL 

STONE 

Mable D. Stone- (nee 
Knlgge), age :89, of 
Wauconda, IL ^ Arr: 
Wauconda Funeral 

Home, Wauconda, IL 

KLATT 

EmU W. klatt, 87, of 
Round Lake Beach, IL 
Arn Strang Funeral . 
Chapel, Grayslake. 

KAPHEIM 

Mary Elizabeth Kaphelm, 
71, of Lindenhurst, IL 
Arr: - Marsh Funeral 
Home, Gumee, IL 








K.K. HaiusJier Funeral Home, Ltd. 
offers Forethought Alert ^»> Card 



tM^' Ale rt. 



Moryionei 

123AnyStT««il 
AnytOMTi. USA 13345 

tvmi i \l a rm.ViL 

cnoui'iroo 

H »• aboM Ivwiti nom* 



AyiPLI 



If you're away from home 
and become ill or seriously '< 
injured, how easy would it he 
for someone to contact your \ 
family? Your doctor? Or any- 
one who might have knowl- 
edge of your medical history, 
insurance coverage, or rela- 
tives? 



Now you can avoid this dilemma by carrying a Forethought Alertm identifi- 
cation card which contains your vital medlcalinformation on microfilm. 
Emergency personnel can view this information through a special lens, 
encased within the card, thereby providhig immediate aid. 
Whe Forethought Alert program is available to you FREE from 
IK.KMamsher Funeral Home, Inc. just for talking to us about 
IForethougbtJimeral planning*! 

To learn more about how you too can participate in the Forethought 
Alert program, call us today. .. 



% % 9{amsfier 

^unerdtHomc Ltd. 



m 



12 N. Pistaka* Uk« Road, Fox Lake. Illinois 
'^IheChaptConthtLaf^f' 

Serving you Anytime ... Anytofiere 

Phone: (708) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 



■ 



i - 



lit 




CLASSIFIED UblArd Newspapers AuqusT ^, 1994 



LEGAL NOTICES 

Ivakcland Newspapers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ADVERTISEMENT 

FOR BIDS 
HAWLEY COURT 
RESURFACING 
VILLAGE OF 
GRAYSLAKE 
I.Time and Place of 
Opening Bids. Sealed pro- 
posals for the WORK 
described lierein will be 
received at the office of 
the Village Clerk, Village 
of GrayslaKe, Lake 
County, Illinois, until 2:30 
o'clock p.m., August 12, 
1994 and publtely opened 
and publicly read at that 
time. Bids transmitted 
electronically by fax or 
other similar means wifl 
not be accepted. 

2. Description of work. 
The proposed WORK is 
officially known as The 
Hawiey Court Resurfacing 
Project and Is further 
described as the bitumi- 
nous asphalt overlay of 
1 ,050 feet of Hawiey Court 
located just east of Lake 
Street The project shall 
also Include bituminous 
surface removal, pave- 
ment patching, curt) and 
gutter replacement, struc- 
ture adjustment, sidewalk 
replacement and land- 
scape restoration. 

3. Not less than the cur- 
rent prevailing rate of 
wages as found by the 
Department of Labor or 
determined by the Court of 
Review shall be paid to all 
laborers, workmen, and 
mechanics performing 
work under this contract. 

4. Instructions to Bidders 

a. Plans and proposal 
forms may be obtained 
from: The Village of 
Graystake or Dames & 
Moore/MCE, Inc., 1701 
Golf Road, Suite 404, 
Roiling Meadows, Illinois 
60008 upon receipt of a 
deposit of $20.00 which is 
non-refundable. 

b. All proposals must be 
accompanied by a bid 
bond, bank cashier's 
check, bank draft, or certi- 
fied check for not less than 
five (5) per cent of the 
amount of the bid. 

c. Ail prospective bid- 
ders shall present an 
I DOT Certificate of 
Eligibility as evidence of 
prequalification as a con- 
dition precedent to the 
receipt of proposal docu- 
ments, 

d. The Certificate of 
compliance with Article 33 
of the Criminal Code, 
attached herein, will be 
executed by all bidders. 

e. Bidders' questions on 
the intent or meaning of 
the bid documents shall be 
In writing submitted to 
Dames & Moore/MCE. 
Dames & Moore/MCE will 
respond in writing with the 
question and response 
submitted to ail bidders 
and made publicly avail- 
able for Inspection at the 
Village Hall. 

5. Rejection of Bids. The 
VILLAGE reserves the 
right to waive technicali- 
ties or to reject any or ail 
proposals as provided in 
The IDOT Standard 
Specifications for Road 
and Bridge Construction. 

By order of 

Village Cterk 

Village of Grayslake 

July 28, 1994 

0894A-026-Gen 

Augusts, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

VILUGE OF GURNEE - PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

NOTICE TO BIDDERS 
TIME AND PLACE OF BID OPENING 

Sealed proposals for the Installation of Cured In Place 
Pipe (CIPP) at various tocations within the Village of 
Gumee will be accepted by the Gurnee Public Works 
Department until 10:00 a.m., Thursday, August 18, 1994 
at the Village of Gurnee Municipal Building, 325 N. 
O'Plalne Road, Gurnee, Illinois at which time they will be 
opened and publicly read. 
INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS 

All pertinent documents for this project are available at 
the Village of Gurnee Public Works Department, 1151 
Kilbourne Road between the hours of 7:00. am and 3:00 
pm Monday through Friday. No proposal will be accept- 
ed unless it is made on the proposal form furnished with 
the contract documents. Sealed envelopes or packages 
containing proposals shall be marked Cured In Place 
Pipe Bid. 
REJECTION OF BIDS 

The Village Board of Trustees reserves the right to 
reject any or all proposals and to waive technicalities. 
Tiie Village Board further reserves the right to award a 
contract, which In Its judgment Is in the t>est Interest of the 
Village. 

0B94A-O34-GEN 
Augusts, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

WARREN ROAD DISTRICT 
Notke is hereby given that sealed proposals will be 
received at the office of the Warren Township Clerk at 
17801 Washington Street. Gurnee, Illinois 60031 until 
10:00 o'clock, am, on August 15, 1994 for furnishing of 
the following material: 

BITUMINOUS CONCRETE SURFACE COURSE, ■ 
MIX C, CLASS I, TYPE 2 
5000 TONS 
Proposals shall be made on forms furnished by the 
Highway Commissioner, and shall be addressed In a 
sealed envelope to Frank Thomas, Warren Road District 
Highway Commissioner, 17801 Washington Street, 
Gumee, Illinois 60031 and shall bo marked "MATERIAL 
PROPOSAL • Letting of August 15, 1994, Warren Road 
District" Further Information regarding this letting may be 
obtained by contacting the Highway Commissioner at 
708-244-1 lot. The Road District in accordance with the 
laws of the State of Illinois hereby notifies all bidders that 
it will affirmatively insure that the contract entered Into 
pursuant to this advertisement will be awarded to the low- 
est responsible bidder without discrimination on the 
ground of race, color or national origin. 

By order of Frank Thomas 

Warren Road District 

Highway Commissioner 

0894A-033-GEN 

August 5, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF WISCONSIN 
IN CIRCUIT COURT FOR ROCK COUNTY 

VALLEY BANK. JANESVILLE 

Plaintiff, FIRST A M EfJDED SUMMONS 

vs. CaseNo. 94-CV-122 

STEVEN D. DUNN, 

ROBERT T. PARR, Money Judgment 

DALE BUCHHOLZ, and (#30301) 

DES AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS, INC. 

Defendants. 
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN: 
TO ROBERT T. PARR AND DALE BUCHHOLZ: 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff 
named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action 
against you. 

Within 40 days after July 22, 1994, you must respond 
with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The 
demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose 
address is 51 South Main Street, Janesville, Wisconsin, 
53545, and to Plaintiffs attorney, whose address Is 303 
East Court Street, P.O. Box 1449, Janesville, Wisconsin, 
53547-1449. You may have an attorney hetp or represent 
you. 

If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within 40 
days, ttie court may grant judgment against you for the 
award of money or other legal action requested In the 
Complaint, and you may lose your right to object.to any- 
thing that Is or may be Incorrect In the complaint A judg- 
ment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment 
awarding money may become a Hen against any real 
estate you own now or in the future, and may also be 
enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. 
DATED this 1 8th day of July, 1 994. 

CONSIGNY, ANDREWS. HEMMING 

& GRANT. S.C. 

By: John W. Holzhuter 

State Bar No. 01000114 
303 East Court Street 
P.O. Box 1449 

.tanesville.WI 53547-1449 ^ 

(608) 755-50B0 
Attorneys for Plaintiff. 

0794D-989-FL 

July 22. 1994 

July 29, 1994 

Augusts. 199^ 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Number: 10413 • 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION Including domestic and foreign subsidiaries 
and for eign brandies o f State Ban k of the Lakes located in Antloch , Illinois at the close of 
business June 30, 1994. PutSllshed In Response to CalI~offlie COMMISSIOf^ER OF 
BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1. Cash and balances due from depository Institutions: 

a. Nonlnterest-bearing balances and cun'ency and coin 7,920 

b. Interest-bearing balances -0- 

2. Securities ' 77,872 

a. Hekl-tO'maturity securities 59,460 

b. Avallable-for-sale securities 18,392 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 

a. Federal funds sold L' v 10,052 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell -0- 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of uneamed Income 138,137 

b. LESS: Alk)wance for loan and lease losses 1 .761 

c. LESS: AJtocated transfer risk reserve -0- 

d. Loans and leases, net of uneamed Income, allowance, and resen/e 

(Hem 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) . 136,376 

5. Assets heW In trading accounts -0- 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) , 5,616 

7. Other real estate owned 253 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies , -0- 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding -0- 

10. Intangible assets -0- 

11. Other assets 2 722 

12. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 11) - 24o',811 

UABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 219,732 
(1) Nonlnterest-bearing 22.565 

. (2) Interest-bearing 1 97,1 67 

b. in foreign offkses, Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBPs -0- 

(1) Nonlnterest-bearing ' .q- 

(2) interest-bearing . -0- 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased -0- 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 750 

1 5. a. Demand notes Issued to the U.S. Treasury -0- 
b. Trading liabilities -0- 

16. Other bomswed money: 

a. With original maturity of one year or less -0- 

b. With original maturity of more than one year -0- 

17. Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases -0- 

1 8. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding -0- 

19. Notes and det>entur6s subordinated to deposits • -o-- 

20. Other liabilities t.278 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 221,760 

22. Limited-life prefened stock and related surplus -0- 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus -0- 

24. Common stock 993 

25. Surplus (exclude alt surplus related to preferred stock) 14,007 

26. a. Undlvkled profits and capital reserves 4,398 
b. Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on avallable-for*sale securities (347) 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment -0- 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums of items 23 through 27) 1 9.051 

29. TOTAL UABILITIES, LIMITED-LIFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 

EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of Kerns 21, 22, and 28) 240,811 

I, Roger V. Manderscheld. Exec. VP of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this 
report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 
Correct- Attest: Roger V. ManderschekJ 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th day of July, 1994. My 
Commission Expires 8/27/95. ' • ' 

Donna M. Gelger 

. Notary Public 

Lake County, State of Illinois 

0894A-025-AR 

Augusts, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Number: 20883 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION Including domestic and foreign subsidiaries 
and foreign branches of HAWTHORN BANK located In MUNDELEIN, ILLINOIS at the close 
of business JUNE 30. 1994. Published in Response to Call of the COMMISSIONER' OF 
BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1 . Cash and balances due from depository institutions: ^ 

a. Nonlnterest-bearing balances and cun'ency and coin ' 1125 

b. Interest-bearing balances 209 

2. Securities 8187 

a. HeW-to-maturity securities 6232 

b. Avallable-for-sale securities 1955 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: ■..'"^ 

a. Federal funds sold NONE 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell - NONE 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of uneamed Income 16412 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 1 67 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk reserve NONE 

d. Loans and leases, net of uneamed Income, allowance, and reserve 
(item 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) 

5. Assets held In trading accounts 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized teases) 

7. Other real estate owned 

8. Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets 

1 2. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of Hems 1 through 1 1 f 

UABILrriES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 

(1) Nonlnterest-bearing 3138 

(2) Interest-bearing 21601 

b. In foreign offk:es, Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBPs 

(1) Nonlnterest-bearing NONE 

(2) Interest-bearing " NONE 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased 300 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase NONE 

15. a. Demand notes Issued to the U.S. Treasury NONE 
b. Trading liabilities NONE 

16. Other boffowed money: 

a. With original maturity of one year or less . NONE , 

b. With original maturity of more than one year NONE 

17. Mortgage Indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases NONE 
16. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding NONE 

19. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits NONE 

20. Other liabilities 109 

21. TOTAL UABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 25148 

22. Limited-life preferred stock and related surplus NONE 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus NONE 

24. Common stock 750 

25. Surplus (exclude all surplus related to preferred stock) 1750 

26. a. Undivided profits and capital reserves 1 87 
b. Net unrealized hokling gains (tosses) on avallable-for-sale securities , (46), 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment NONE 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums of items 23 through 27) 2641 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES, LIMiTED-LlFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 

EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 21 , 22, and 28) 27789 

I. Erich Laumer, Vice Pres. of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this report of 
condition is taie and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 
Coffect-Attest: Erich Laumer 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) Swom to and subscribed before me this 21st day of July, 1994. My 
.Commission Expires 12/14/97. 
Melanle M. Slonaker 

Notary Public, Illinois 
Oa94A-022-MN 
Augusts. 1994 



16245 

NONE 

1722 

NONE 

NONE 

NONE 

10 

291 

27789 



24739 



NONE 



8 



,r.,'. -t "■%•*; 






1 




:.i_;:t^— .•..v'ct,.i-^';»ri 






tfMfttfttrfiitfveatsZiH^titiiiis 



SS^tf^rMu iiHirWTOfiiiT 






AuqusT 9, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED. 




LEGAL NOTICES 



Ivakeland Neivspap 



ers 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Woodland School 
Community Consolidated 
District 50 Is seeking bids 

for: 
STUDENT FURNITURE . 

Specifications may be. 
obtained from William M. 
Linning, . Assistant 
Superintendent of 

Business Services at the 
District Office, 17370 W. 
Gages Lake Road, Gages 
Lake, IL 60030. Bids are 
to be turned In on or 
before 2:00 pm, Monday 
August 15, 1994 to the 
above address. The bid 
opening will take place at 
the District Office, 17370 
W. Gages Lake Rd., 
Gages Lake, IL. 

The Board of Education 
reserves the right to reject 
any or all bids, to waive 
trreguiaritles and to accept 
that bid which is consid- 
ered to be In the best inter- 
est of the District. Any 
such decision shall be 
considered final. All Items 
shall be new unless other- 
wise specified. 

0894A-036-GEN 
Augusts, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 
ADVERTISEMENT FOR 
BIDS 
THE VILLAGE OF ANTI-. 
OCH Is accepting sealed' 
bida, fof'the entire lot 
QHLX. of approximately 
thirty-four (34) bicycles 
that are now in the pos- 
session of the Antloch 
Police Department. 

Separate sealed BIDS 
will be received by the 
Village of Anttoch, Illinois 
at the Office of the Village 
Clerk, Candl L. Rowe, 
Village Hall. 874 Main 
Street, Antioch, Illinois 
60002 until 2:00 pm, 
August 23, 1994, and then 
at said office publicly 
opened and read aloud. 

Viewing of the bicycles 
may be made on August 
15, 1994, during the hours 
of 9:00 am to 5:00 pm at 
the Antioch Police 
Department, 882 Main 
Street, Antioch, Illinois. 

The Village of Aritioch 
reserves the right to reject 
any and ail bids and bid- 
ders and waive all techni- 
calities. The village 
reserves the right to award 
all or any portion of this 
bid. 

Candi L. Rowe 

Village Clerk 

Village of Antioch 

0894A-038-GEN 

August 5, 1994 



/IRT S 

T€KE 

Because we are local, we 
take the time to get tlie 
whole story. 

Each week in your 
Lakeland Newspaper you 
can expect line tuned 
coverage o( events tha* 
affect you and your family 
in detail. 

Stay in tune willi your 
Lakeland Newspapers, 
Subscribe today 
(708)323-816 1 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDI- 
CIAL CIRCUIT 
LAKE COUNTY - IN PROBATE 
In the Matter of the Estate of 
Gregory M. Hanan 
No. 94 P 641 

Deceased 

CLAIM NQTICE 

Nottee Is given of the death of Gregory M. Hanan, of 
Antioch, Illinois. Letters of office were issued on July 25, 
1994, to Dorothea M. Hanan, whose attorney Is self-rep- 
resentation, Dorothea M. Hanan, 25420 W. Madison, 
lngleside,IL 60041. 

Claims against the estate may be filed in the office of 
the Clerk of the Circuit Court at IB N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois 600S5 Room 0-104 or with represen- 
tative, or both, on or before February 7, 1995 which date 
is not less than six months from the date of the first pub- 
lication of this notice and any claim not filed within that 
period is barred. Copies of this claim filed with the Clerk 
must be malted or delivered to the representative and to 
the attorney witfiln 1 days after it is filed. 

Dorothea M. Hanan 

(Representative/Pro Se) 

0894A-017-AR 

Augusts, 1994 

August 12, 1994 

August 19, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
INVrTATION TO BID 

Notice Is hereby given that bids for reroofing of Indian 
Hill School, 1920 North Lotus Drive, Round Lake, ILwIil 
be accepted. 
Bid speciflcaUons and documents may be received from: 
■ Round Lake Area School Distrtet #1 1 6 
Attn: Edward A. Sauid 
811 North Sunset Drive 
Round Lake, IL 60073 
Tei: 708/546-8913 
Bids are due no later than 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, 
August 18, 1994. 0894A-020-Gen 

Augusts, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

TAX DEED NO. 91-TX-5 FILED July 27, 1994 

TAKE NOTICE 

TO: ROBERT W. SMITH: U.S. ATTORNEY GENERAL: . 
ASSISTANT U.S. ATTORNEY: DISTRICT DIRECTOR - 
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE: LINDA lANUZI HESS. 
Lake County Clerk: UNKNOWN OWNERS OR PARTIES 
INTERESTED: AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS . 

This Is NOTICE of the filing of the Petition for Tax Deed 
on the following described property: 

Unit 2 in Building 3 together with Its undivided percent- 
age interest In the common elements in Diamond Harbor 
Condominium, as delineated and defined in the declara- 
tion recorded as Document Number 2071602, In the 
Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 3, 
Township 45 North, Range 9, East of the Third Principal 
Meridian, Intake County, Illinois. 
Parcel Index Number 05-03-100-021 

On December 15, 1994 at 1:30 p.m. the Petitioner 
intends to make application for an order on the petition 
that a Tax Deed Issue. The real estate was sold on 
December 9, 1991 for general taxes of the year 1990. 
The period of redemption will expire December 9, 1994 at 
4:00 p.m. 

John Barr, Attorney for Petitioner 
(217)875-5311 

0894A-018-FL 



PUBLK; NOTICE 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

THE VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH ts accepting sMied bids 
for the purchase of two (2) 1 994 police squad cars. 

Separate sealed bids will be received by the Village of 
Antioch, Illinois at the Office of the Village Clerk, Candi L. 
Rowe, Village Hall, 874 Main Street, Antioch, Illinois 
60002 until 2:00 PM. Friday, August 12, 1994, and then 
at said office publicly opened and read aloud. 

Specifications for the said 1994 pursuit vehicles are 
available durlftg regular business hours at the Office of 
the Village Cleri<, Village of Antioch, 874 Main Street, 
Antioch, Illinois. 

The Village of Antioch reserves the right to reject any 
and all bids and bidders and waive ail technicalities. The 
Village reserves the right to award ail or any portion of 
this bid. 

Candi L Rowe 0B94A-019-Gen 

Village CIeri< August 5, 1 994 

Village of Antioch , 



Augusts, 1994 
August 12, 1994 
August 19, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

IN THE CtRCUrr COURT FOR THE NINETEENTH 
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY. ILLINOIS 
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION 
OF Sharon Jean Dethtefson 
For 
CHANGE OF NAME 

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION 
Public notice is hereby given that on August 26, 1994, 
being one of the return days In the Circuit Court of the 
County of t^ke, I will file my Petition In said Court pray- 
ing for the change of my name from Sharon Jean 
Dethtefson to that of Sharon Jean Hatfield, pursuant to 
the Statute in such case made and Pro\^ded. 
Sharon Jean Dethlefson 

0794C-960-VH 

July 15, 1994 

July 22, 1994 

July 29, 1994 

August 5, 1994 



52516 



2340 



2336 

625 

92573 



77217 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITlbN 

Account Number 16352 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestk: and foreign subskliaries 
And foreign branches of FOX LAKE STATE BANK located in FOX LAKE, ILLINOIS at the 
close of business JUNE 30, 1994. Published In Response to Call of the COMMISSIONER 
OF BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

1 . Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 3889 

b. Interest-twaring balances ^ 

2. Securities 

a. Held-to-maturity securities 16894 

b. Available-for-sale securities 1 3973 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: 

a. Federal funds sold 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell 

4. Loans and tease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of unearned income 53132 

b. LESS: /MIowance for loan and lease losses ' 616 
c.LESS: Allocated transfer risk resen/e 

d. Loans and teases, net of unearned Income, allowance, and resen/e 
(item 4.a minus 4,b and 4.c) 

5. Assets held In trading accounts 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized leases) 

7. Other real estate owned 

8. investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets 

11. Other assets 

12. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 11) 

UABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 10625 

(2) Interest-bearing 66392 

b. In foreign offices, Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBPs 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing 

14. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 6435 

1 5. a. Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 
. b. Trading liabilKies 

1 6. Other borrowed money: 

a. With original maturity of one year or less 

b. With original maturity of more than one year 

17. Mortgage indebtedness and obligations undercapitalized teases 

18. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

19. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits 

20. Other liabilities 408 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 84060 

22. Limited-life preferred stock and related surplus 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 

24. Common stock ' 180 

25. Surplus (exclude all surplus related to preferred stock) 7731 

26. a. Undivided profits and capital reserves 724 
b. Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on available-for-sate securities (122) 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums of items 23 through 27) 8513 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES, LIMITED-LIFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 

EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 21, 22. and 28) - * 92573 

t, Daniel A. Caravelio, Vice Pres, of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this 
report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my Knowledge and belief. 
Correcl-Allesi: Daniel A. Caravelio 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27lh day of July, 1994. My 
Commission Expires 3/2/97. 
Phyllis B. Lahman 

Notary Public, Illinois 

0894A-030-FL 

. Augusts, 1994 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
REPORT OF CONDITION 

Account Numben 24612 

CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF CONDITION including domestic and foreign subskJiaries 
and foreign branches of FIRST COLONIAL BANK OF LAKE COUNTY k)cated in VERNON 
HILLS, ILLINOIS at the cbse of business JUNE 30, 1994. Published in Response to Call of 
the COMMISSIONER OF BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES of the State of Illinois. 

BALANCE SHEET 

(THOUSANDS) 
ASSETS 

I , Cash and balances due from depository institutions: 

a. Noninterest-bearing balances and currency and coin 1461 

■ b. Interest-bearing balances . ' ' ■ 

2.Securrt!es 16857 

a. Held-to-maturity securities 14155 

b. Available-for-sale securities 2702 

3. Federal Funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell: ' 

a. Federal funds sold 

b. Securities purchased under agreements to resell 

4. Loans and lease financing receivables: 

a. Loans and leases, net of uneamed Income 33047 

b. LESS: Allowance for loan and lease losses 360 

c. LESS: Allocated transfer risk resen/e 

d. Loans and leases, net of uneamed income, allowance, and reserve 

(item 4.a minus 4.b and 4.c) 32687 

5. Assets held in trading accounts 

6. Premises and fixed assets (including capitalized (eases) 640 . 

7. Other real estate owned 

a. Investments In unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies 

9. Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding 

10. Intangible assets 

II. Other assets 480 

12. TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 through 11) 52125 

LIABILITIES 

13. Deposits: 

a. In domestic offices 43148 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 7578 

(2) Interest-bearing 35570 

b. In foreign offices, Edge and Agreement Subsidiaries, and IBFs 

(1) Noninterest-bearing 

(2) Interest-bearing 
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase: 

a. Federal funds purchased 

b. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase 3780 

a. Demand notes issued to the U.S. Treasury 421 

b. Trading liabilities 

16. Other borrowed money: 

a. With original maturity of one year or less 

b. With original maturity of more than one year 

17. Mortgage indebtedness and obligations under capitalized leases 

1 8. Bank's liability on acceptances executed and outstanding 

19. Notes and debentures subordinated to deposits 

20. Other liabilKies 148 

21. TOTAL LIABILITIES (sums of 13 through 20) 47197 

22. Limited-life preferred stock and related surplus 

EQUITY CAPITAL 

23. Perpetual preferred stock and related surplus 

24. Common stock 495 

25. Surplus (exclude all surplus related to preferred stock) 3280 

26. a. Undivided profits and capita! reserves 875 
b. Net unrealized holding gains (losses) on avaiiabie-for-sale securities (22) 

27. Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustment 

28. TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sums of items 23 through 27) 4628 

29. TOTAL LIABILITIES, LIMITED-LIFE PREFERRED STOCK AND 

EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 21 , 22, and 28) 52125 

I, Daniel A. Caravelio, Sr. Vice Pres, of the above-named bank, do hereby certify that this 
report of condition is true and correct, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 
Correct-Attest: Daniel A. Caravelio 

(OFFICIAL SEAL) Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th day of July, 1994. My 
Commission Expires 5/25/98. 
Karen Bouas 

Notary Public, Illinois 
0894A-031-VH 
Augusts, 1994 



14 



15 



.i...w,^'l-.-i'.-. 




CLASSIFIED UkclANd NEWspApERS AuqusT 5, 1994 




CUSSIFIED 
GUIDE 

^mm^^ .^NCCMGNTS 

NoUccs 110 

Lost & Found „ „„.„ 11$ 

Free „ .: 120 

PcRonals 125 

Auctions 150 

Business Posonib „ ........135 

Financial ..» .....140 

<■;-:■:■:■:■:■;.::::■;.::■■,■;•:■:■: :;X'>:vS^ J . ■-• ' f a, '. .ji>i4/-.,/jt--'' ' t . ■• jv's. A 

Hdp Wjuiicd Part-Time „„ „ „219 

Hdp Wanlod FuU-Tlmc 220 

Employmcnl Agcndes „ 221 

Business (^ipoituol tics » 225 

SiUnllOQsWmled 228 

Child Care 240 

School/Instruction.... „ 250 

Market CuidE \ 

Antiques » » : 501 

ApplbDicGS , , ,.„ .304 

Baitec/Trule 308 

Baisaxs/CrsHs 310 

BuildlDgMaleriils 314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

EloctroalcsAkiinputcis. ...320 

Fann Guide „ 324 

Firewood „ 328 

Garase/Ruinaui^ Sales „. 330 

CoodlUngs (0 EiL „ 334 

Horses a Tack „ .". 338 

Household Goods/Ftiniitu re. , ..........340 

jcwdiy „ ...344 

Lawn/Garden 348 

MlsccUanoous 350 

Medical EquJp/SuppUcs „... 354 

Musical Instrumcnls ...358 

Pc(5&Supptlcs i60 

Rcslaurani Equipment „..„. 3^4 

WaaUjdToBuy ,.".. .....T, ...,:...'., ......... ,370 



ReaI Btate 



I:? 

Homes For Sale....„ 500 

Homes For Rent 

Homes Wanted.. 






I •»■•«« l»«ii, 



...504 
508 



Homes BJlden ....„..„......„ 510 

Condo/ToWD Homes , »... 514 

Mobile Homes 518 

Apartments For Rent 520 

ApailmcBis Vaaled ....524 

Apt/Homes To Share 528 

Rooms For Rent „ 530 

Business Propetty For Sale 534 

Business Property For Rent ; , .538 

Investment Propcity , 540 

Mortgage Services ., $44 

Farms , 548 

Vacant Lols/Aae^ 56O 

Rcsorls/VicaJloa Rentals $64 

Out of Area Property 5^ 

Ceroeteiy loty ««»«,•..«..- 570 

Real Estate Wanted .I..„..'..l... , 574 

Real Estate Misc 578 



RECREAliONAl 



Recreational Vehldes 704 

Socwmobllo'AIV's - 708 

Boals/Mo(ors/E(c .„ „ 710 

Canqring.. » » ...714 

Tnnd/VacaUon „ 718 

Sports Equipment 720 

Airplanes ....» »..» 724 

Transdormjon 

Cars For Sale „ „ „„ „ 804 

Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Can » 810 

Car Loans/Insurance.... 818 

Vans. , „ 824 

Foiff Wheel Diiv^eeps 828 

Tnicks/FraUcis 834 

Heavy Equipment „ , 838 

Motorcycles , „ 844 

WanledToBuy. 848 

ScRvice DiREcroRv 

.«.. '..% '. . .% .' . .'. '.^ .V.-: " f 

Appliances Repair ». » S03 

Builders S09 

Carpeniiy „ « «..S12 

CarpelClcanIng , ...SIS 

ConcretoCemeaL SIS 

Dry Wall S2I 

EducatloD/lDStiudion S24 

BectrtaJ S27 

llXvWCNXIti«««l|(l««*fl«< ■«■■•• !•• »(***»*«l* II «■« ■«■■«■■■* t*l**l«llll«ll*ll«IPt«:««*«l<tf Jv 

ltJUluyiUMl4»iiBi««aitii»i4**i<»i4«ii**i»««M *«i«*ii«»>»*iir««iii«tR4*ii*iPl«*4*i*i4i«r>4*wj3 

If , ^l'"n|^n T *■***"'**'''*''*? r T'lT'T'l'T IT" T1 T ' ■■%jtl 

itOUScKOvptllJ I *»t*i|*«**|i«««r>l»*l*«IM««f4llMt*it4l*«l«t*«i*l«*l**IIMlal*ll«4C^jr 

landscaping ...» ». « S42 

LaundryAleanlng ;......... ,..S45 

Legal Services „.„ S48 

Medical Services S51 

Mcntng/Slonge » S54 

PaintlnBDecorallng ..» S57 

PvaLesil/ryplngSetvlces S60 

Ffumfateg ...963 

Pools S66 

Pressure WasMog S69 

I^OiCSSlODJi U^tVlvv5i*Miiil«ir«i««iiil»««»i**t*lt*l*»*ki*i*«i*«***«ti4«*1>t**tlMa4*i>d/ H 

RadlQ^ Repair. S75 

RfmntHtng, ..„...„....„..» S78 

Resumes S81 

Roo&ng/StdinK SB4 

Sloiase « S87 

TttSenloe SJO 

Traes/Ffaab „.... S93 

Weddtng. „ S96 

MlsoeOsteous Services „ S99 



disTRibuTioN 



Twin 



KcnoNlin 
County 



■SItmrLilit „,., 



Richmond 



Johnitairig 



Crysm 
Like 

Alcllcnry 
Count.v 



.lata •UntfMihvnt 




•btadUto 



■«iringtOfl 



Onm 



•Pa)2|inr 



' Bullalo Grovs 



Metra 

:Mllwaukee 
RR 




4Jkie()lniMM ^^' Foresl\ 



HlohlandP3t1(\^ 



•Deertleld 



Notlhbrook 



(!uok t'ouiil.v 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Antlocli News-Reporter • Round lake News • Lake Zurich Enterprise • 

Lake Villa Record • Mundelein News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Crayslake Times • Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Llndenhurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • Wauconda Leader • Libertyvllle News 



HOW rO PUCE A CUSSinED AD 



Call (708) 223-8161 



® 




BY 
PHONE ... 

BY 
MAIL ... 



IN 
PERSON .. 



Lakeland Newspaper! 

P.O. Box 260 
Crayslakc, IL 60030 



30 S. WKitney St., 
Grayslake 



[r=^ BY FAX... (708)223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line .....Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm ..Friday 



CLASSIFIED 




110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



CHRISTMAS IN JULY! CALL 
FOR FREE CATALOG. SEE 
HOW YOU CAN GET FREE 
MERCHANDISE(708) 
487-7743, Amy. 

LIFE CHANGING GOSPEL 
Just Like In tt)e Book of 
Acts. Why Settle for any- 
thing Less? Rrsl Church o( 
Lberty Pentecostal. Person- 
al Home Bible Studies also 
Ottered. (708) 526-7609, 
leave message for Inlorma* 
lion. 



TriheSf Ltd. 

Cherokee art and master 

crafts. Finest selection 

of handcrafted items 

anywhere." 

210 N. Lake Atc. 

I Lake VOla/Nklscn Plaza ( 

Man. & TliUTS. 12-7 

Sat. & Sun. 10-4 

(T08) 386-1838 



BRAZILIAN BOY INTERESTED 
IN READING, SPORTS. 
OTHER SCANDINAVIAN, 

EUROPEAN. S0UT>1 AMERI- 
CAN. ASIAN HIGH SCHOOL 
EXCHANGE STUDENTS AR- 
RIVING AUGUST. BECOME A 
HOST FAMILY/AISE. CALL 
BARBARA (217IZ43-8453 OR 
l-SOO-SIBLINO. 

PARENTS- roOGHLOVE a 

support group for parents of 
troubled chlldren/teens, 

meets each week, at Round 
Lake Area Park Olst. room 
114. Located on Hart Rd. 
and Rte.134, Round Lake. 
GET THE SUPPORT 
YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING 
FORI Or call (800)92&-KIDS, 
For lnlom)aik)n. 

SINGERS NEEDED. CON- 
TEMPORARY CHRISTIAN 
CHOIR, "TELL THE 
WORLD-, NEEDS GOOD 

VOICES. HIghschool Fresh- 
man thnj Late 30's, No Pay 
BUT Lots of SATISFACTION. 
CHURCHES: BOOK NOW 
FOR 1995 SEASON! Call for 
Details, ask for Walt or 
Miriam, (70B) 526-8306. 



WANTED. 65 PEOPLE to 

k)so up to 30lbs. 30/day pro- 
gram, Start for under $100. 
(708) 360-O690. 



LAKE COUIVrV 

VnUMG 

fFOaiBAIX TEAMI 
vs 

PALOSORLAIWi 

FORCE 

Semi-Pro Football 

Sat. Aug. 6 @ 6 pm 

Round Lake 
High School 



115 



Lost & Found 



A VERY SPECIAL 

THANK YOU 

to the VERY HELPFUL PEOPLE 

at LEE AUTO PARTS - 

MUNDELEINl 

We Are Very Grateful! 

The folks with the '77 Cutlass 



FOUND- CAT- Beautiful 

longhaired friendly, de- 
clawed cat, female. Llndert- 
hurst area. (706) 356-3741. 

HEATHER RIDGE Sub. Lt>- 
ertyville/ Gurnee area. Cat 
found gray and wtilte. Call to 
Menllty. (708) 660-a91&. 

FOUND: ATTENTION RO- 
BERT KLAGES I FOUND 
YOUR CLASS RING! 

CALL(B15) 355-5622. 

LOST - BRACELET Reward 
Ladles GokJ & Diamond Ten- 
nis Bracelet, Lost 7/22, Anti- 
och AreaJ708) 361-3278. 



125 


Pcfsoruls 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST Insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsible for 
ONLY the FIRST incorrect irisertion. The newspaper will be 
responsibte for only the portion of the ad that Is in error. 
Please notify the ClassKiad Department In the event of an 
error within 1 week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be 
made prior to 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before puttlteation. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to properly clas- 
sffy aii advertising, edit or delete any obiectlonable wording, 
or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Ljikeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that In any way violates the Human 
Ftights Act. 

Payment in Advance is Required Fon These Aos: 

•Advertisers out of L.akeiand circulation area 

•Business Opportunities •Mobile Homes •Situations Wanted 

•Debt Disclaimers •Garage and Moving Sales 

'Found and Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

Nop9t3 wUI be considered for giveaway. 

WE ACCEPT: BWH 



ADOPTION- A FAMILY 

DREAM. One of the reasons 
there Is a little extra sunshine, 
laughter and happiness In the 
workl Is because of children. 
Because we are childless, 
there haveni been too many 
sunny days. We know you can 
brighten our world with a child 
that will be guided with love 
and tenderness, and guar- 
anteed security. Medlcat/Le- 
gal/Counsellng/Caurt ap* 
proved living expenses paid. 
Gonf ktentlal. Contact our atlor- 
ney at (708)957-6835. 

SINGLE WOMAN SEEKING 

correspondance/ friendship. 
En]oys the outdoors, camp- 
ing, plcnlclng, tennis, golf, 
travel. Writ« M«: 304 S. 
13th Ave,, St.Charles, IL 
60174. 

SURROGATE MOTHERS 
WANTED. Foe plus Expens- 
es for carrying a couple's child. 
Must be 10-35 and previously 
had a chUd. Steven LItz. attor- 
ney. (317)996-2000. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



125 





125 


Personals 



FINANCIALLY SECURE 
COUPLE wants to adopt 
newborn. Call Debbie and 
Stove coltoct (708)295-9515. 

IF YOU LOVE TO COOK, 
hate to cook, or Just need new 
Ideas, share a PAMPERED 
CHEF KITCHEN SHOW with 
your Irtendsl It's funl Call for 
dstaUs (312)761-9148. 

NOVENA TO ST.CLAIRE- 

Ask for 3-favor3, one busi- 
ness, and 2- Impossible. Say 
(9}Hall Mary's with a lighted 
caiKtle every day for 9-days. 
Pray wtvether you believe or 
iKt. On the ninoth day, pub- 
lish. Powerful novena. Thank- 
you St. Claire. CQ. 

POWERFUL PRAYER TO 
THE HOLY SPIRIT. Most 
Holy Spirit, You Who solve 
all problems, Who lights my 
path so I can reach my 
goals. You Wtw give me the 
divine gHI to forgive and for- 
get the wrong that Is done to 
me and You Who are with 
me. I, In this dlak)gue, want 
to thank You for all You cave 
given me and to confirm that 
I never want to be separated 
from You. I want to be with 
You In Eternity. Thank You 
tor Your mercy towarcb me 
and mine. -Persons must 
say this prayer 3-llmes lor 3- 
comecutlve days. Your favor 
will be granted even though 
ft may appear dIfftouR. Pub- 
lish this prayer Immediately 
alter your favor ts granted 
without mentioning the favor. 
CG. 

WE CAN PROVIDE A 

CHILDHOOD tilted with 
warmth, security, values, and 
uncondHlonal k>ve from Mom 
and Dad; a spacious home In 
a wooded setting complete 
with a friendly golden retriev- 
er: and k)Vlng Granc^arents 
neatby wailing to give pony 
rides. If this life is wtiat you 
would want for your baby, 
please call our attorney, Glon- 
na at 1-800-241-5364. She'll 
explain tiow we can he^ each 
other. Jack and Andrea. 



ADOPTION- PLEASE 

HELP. Loving professional 
couple happily married for 14 
years desperately wants to 
complete our family. Our only 
chance is you. Wo can fulfill all 
[ho dreams you have for your 
precious baby. The baby will 
have a lifetime of tove and 
happiness and a devoted full 
time Mom and an adoring 
Dad. We live In a beautiful sub- 
uiban home wllh tots of kkls 
and parit neatby. We will prE>-.. 
vide an excellent education 
and financial security. Conft- 
dentlat, medical, counseling, 
and court approved llvlr^^ ex- 
penses pakl. . Please help by. 
calling our attorney at 
(708)957-6843. 

ADOPTION- A LOVING 
ALTERNATIVE. Dr. Dad and 
creative, at honte Mom thank 
you lor considering the gift of 
lite. We understand this Is a 
tough time but your concern 
tills our hearts with tove and 
hope. Our loving, secure 
home -is fust wafting for the 
laughter of children. Medical, 
legal, counseling, and court 
approved living expenses 
paid, Informalton conlktontlal. 
Please call our attomey at 
(708)957-6446.;. ' 

ADOPTION-TRUST US 

WITH YOUR GREATEST 
GIFT. Let us help you to give 
your predous baby everytfilng 
you could wish for. tf for any 
reason you are unable to raise 
you baby yourself- please 
tnjst us to fulfill your hopes 
and dreams. Your tmsl and 
wishes will be honored. The 
t>aby will ttave a lifetime of love 
and happiness writh a full time 
Mom and adoring Dad. We live 
in a beautiful suburban fwme 
and will provkle an exoeilent 
educatton and financial securi- 
ty. Conlklenllal, medk:al, legal, 
counseling and court ap- 
proved living expenses paid. 
Please let us. help by calling 
our attomey at (706)957- 
6843. 





'" Are You looking "^ 
for a Synagogue? 

CONGREGATION 
AMECHOD 

1 500 Sunset Ave., Waukegan 
336-9110 

SabtMlb Serpent Frtdtys, 7 JO pm; 

Stluidqfs,9>-in. 

Suotky SdMol 10 UD. - DOOQ 

Hebmr Scfaool in UodeobunlL 

"niesdiyi ft IliundqfS 

!■ 4:30-6pm a 



'' 



I 

i 



•Vi- > J-Z-i. J-^ ■«!* 



M^W-VL.m^^t» i mi U *TJttfcMWj»nHt i^*g: ^*-?*^ ;|— -^^'^-^^j^: 



SSS^^^^i^ 



■•:r^*i3g*=^«X''.---- -Li' •"•»T.'--~'.r,-;: j -^g ^ W. ' jjiJ i m cgj aj M'ii f .T ifc wuiB n ii»<i » »ii ^ iii '»nry r » ■, 



AuqusT5,.1994 UIceIancI NewspApERS ClASSIFIED. 




! 

i 

I 



I 



s 



i 

! 




219 



Ildp Wanted 
Pait-TbDC 



220 



HelpWimted 
FtaU-Time 



219 



BelpWaated 
Part-Time 



219 



IldpWiflicd 
Part-TJmc. 



FRIENDLY TOYS AND GIFTS 
hai opuningi for demonttra- 
tora. No caah Inveatmsnt, 
Pan tims hourt with full timo 
pay. Two eatalogi, over 700 
Itoma. Call 1-900-488-4876. 



PART TIME 

BAMLROOM 

Tburedays in our 

Grayatake office. 

Perfect for retirees, 

married couples or 

someone wanting to picl< 

up a little extra money. 

Call Bob Schroeder 

(708)223-8161 

Lakeland 

NewBpapen 



FRECEPTIONISTr!^ 

^ Chiropractic office 

M-W-F Evenings 

and Saturday 

a (70S) 680-3900 ffj 



INVENTOmr 
TAKERS NEEDED 

Part time. WiU train, 

CaU 
(708)662-9277 






PHOTO 
STRIHQERS 

Lakeland Newspapers 
has openings on its 
expanding editorial 
staff for photo 
stringere. Will handle a 
variety of assignments. 
Must have a reliable 
car, camera equipment 
and be able to work 
under deadline situa 
lions. For interview 
appointment bontadt 

Rhonda Vinzant 
Editor-ln-Chiof 

(708) 2 23-8161 

■BBBGBQI 



ATTENTION DRIVER -TEAMS 
.915,000 In Bonua Paid' 
monthly, quartarty & ys^riv 
PLUS Top miloaga pay .401 (K| 
Plan. »500 StGN-ON BONUS . 
Other paid bensflts. •Vacation 
•Health and Ufa -Osad Maad - 



Motel/Layovsr. 
Unloading* 
TRANSPORT 
4394. Solof 
walcoma. 



Loading fit 

COVENANT. 

1 •800-441 . 

and ttudanta 



WANTED 54 MORE PEO- 
PLE to Lose up to 30 
pourKto. - Programs start 
under $100. If you don*t 
n«sd to lot* wtlghl, 
•offl«on« you lov* doM. 
(708)223-2517. 



HOME TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 
' . $35,000 potential. 

Details 

|Cin(1)805-962-8000| 

EKtM4S> 



220 



Help Wanted 
.RilI-Tlme 



DRIVERS/OWNER OPERA- 
TORS • Pools Tnjck Una ha* 
Immedlato opentnge for driv- 
art.and 0/0. Driven starting 
pay up to 28c. /mi. with great 
benefits. Company-tponiorad 
training for thoie with no 
experience. 0/0 top pay all 
miiea. Mutt' be 23, For more 
info. Call 1-800-BS3-g443, 
' Dept. CB-50. 



DRIVERS: OTR STI OF: 
QUINCV, IL. HIRING LONG 
OR SHORT HAUL DRIVERS. 
DRY. REFRIGERATED OR 
FLATBED - YOUR CHOICE. 
PERCENTAGE PAY. FULL 
FAMILY HEALTH AND MORE. 
CALL 1-800-666-g771. 



Driveri-OTR Driva-'For Tha 
8attt Gat Home'Guaranteed- 
6*10 Daya. Earn top pay and 
have time to ipend iti No 
NortKeaat. Freightl No-Touch 
Fralghtl-1 yr, OTR, CDL & 
Haimat req. 1-800-848-0405 



FRONT DESK/ 
NIGHT AUDITOR 

20 to 30 hours per weeV. 
Apply within:' 

Waukeganlhrift Lodge 

222 Grand 
.Waukegan, IL - 



|ll£iVX4I/| 

i (Mside/Wltli Experience i 



219 



lldpWfflled 
Part-Time 



219 



lldpWtntcd 
Part-Time 



• • • • 



s Receptionist M 

^ Pttase send resume to: a 

I Dental § 

i P.O. Box 218 B 
s Gurnee, IL 60031 1 

sitiiiintiiifitiijitiiiifittiiiiiiitiiiiiiitrrs 



5>^« SJ>^^) 



HELP WANTED SCHOOL TREASURER 
FOR WOODLAND DISTRICT #50 

Financial background and coliege accounting required. 
Send , letter of interest and resume to: Bill Unnlng, 
Assistant Superintendent of Business Sen/ices, 17370 
W. Gages Lake Road, Gages Lake, IL 60030. 



Haw Hiring Far 

Cashier/Stocker 

Full or Pari Time 

2nd, 3rd Shifts & Weekends 

Will train. Stop in your local J&L 

and the following Union 76 locations 

for. an application; 

Gurnee Grayslake 

18450 W. Grand Ave. 331 99 N. Highway 45 

Antioch Lake Bluff 

251 1 2 Rt. 173 21 8 Waukegan Rd. 

Ingleside/Fox Lake 
500 E. Rollins Road 






We arc currently scckliig a delivery peraon 
to work flexible hours. Part time mornings 
' and afternoons. 07.(X)/hour. Ideal for 
Housewives and Retirees. 

Apply in Person 

Lovih Oven Cakery 

655 Railroad Ave. (Rte. 134) 

Round Lake, IL 

C708> 740-6836 

1-^00-708-7400 

Between Tues. thru Sat, QamSpm • 



flfi veil LCIVE 
ANIMALS? 

Do you have 2 hours per week to spare? Assist 
Animal Foundation, the area's only no-kili shelters Is 
seeking volunteers for work that is highly rewarding 
and funi We need men and women who: ' 

*Can work with cats and dogs 

•Do light repair work 

'Answer phones and other office duties 

We are located in Crystal Lake 
For more information call 

ADELE BOWEN 

815-455-3487 




PART-TIME 
CAREERS 

If you are at least 2.6 and have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could' qualify for a career In the 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits include: 

^Pension Opportunities 
'Discount Shoppf ng Privleges 
*RBld Ihilning 
'Educational Benefits 
'free Unlfbrms 
*One Weekend a Month 
niio Weeks per Year 
'NOBOOTCMVIP 

This Is an excellent opportunity for yoii 
to put your civilian experience to work. 

[^ lor mora Infoimatloni 
^^ Rich Hoffman 




lESEiTE ro8.688.3?73 





Consider Jockey international Global, 
Inc. We represent tlie finest tn men's 
and women's apparel, and search 
for candidates who will uphold our 
exemplary standards. We cur- 
rently have the following oppor* 
_ . |. tunities available. 

3rd K^ 

Cumee Mills store 

Requirements include: 

• Cash register and customer sales 
experience 

• Positive attitude 

• Team player orientation 

F^rt-Tlme Opportunities 

Gumee Mills and Factory Outlet Centre stores 

• Cash register experience 

• Customer service skills 

• Team player attitude 

Compensation, bonuses and advance- 
ment potential make these jobs appeal- 
ing to the highest-calibre candidates. For 
consideration please apply in person at 
either the Gumee Mills or Factory Outlet 
Centre locations. An equal opportunity 
employer m/f. 





rn SoGtcCy OR MoTMU^^ 

JOCKEY 

Store 



220 



lldpVantcd 
Pull-Tlmc , 



WAREHOUSE WORKER 

Equipment Distributor seeks 

a motivated and reliable 

warehouse worker. Benefits. 

CALL CUFF 

(708) 362-76 1Z 

9:00 am to 4:00 pm 



Andres's 
Steak Honse 

• Hostess 

• Dining Room Waitress 

Please Call 

<815> 678-2671 



WANTED 

Full Time 

PARTS PERSON 

flora John Deere I Oehf 

M^cuHural I 

lawn Orountfs Care 

equipment Dtakr 

Call for an 
appointment 

414-843-2326 
'Dnnnis or Bob- 



6 



HZl/illOi 




IMPLBiEliT , . 
COMPANVil^ 

FARM, LAWN & GROUNDS 
CARE EQUIPMENT 

OUTSTANOINQ CUSTOUER 
SERVICE SINCE 18S3 

SALEM, WISCONSIN 

HWY. 83, S Ml N. OF ANTIOCH 




£ 



HdpWiQled 
FUll-Time 




RclpWMkd 

MItTIbm 



DRIVERS - IF YOU WANTING 
EAST COAST ♦HOME 
WEEKLY 'COMPETATIVE 

PAY •QUARTERLY BO- 
MUSES. MAKE THE RIGHT 
MOVE— BE A SUCCESS WITH 
FOX MIDWEST TRANSPORT 
INC. 1.800-333-22e8 

ORIVER-QET HOME EVERY 
WEEKI OTO/Shorthaul oppor- 
tunitQS, ho ma weakly 

(ihorthaul), aitlgned lata 
model equipmenf, $750 ex-' 
pertenced ttgn-on bonua, 
BURLINGTON MOTOR CAR- 
RIERS: 1-800-JOIN-BMC, EOE 

DRIVERS COME FOR THE 
MONEY, STAY FOR THE 
STABILITY. J.B. HUNT, ONE 

OF AMERICA'S URGEST 
AND MOST SUCCESSFUL 
TRANSPORTATION COMPA- 
NtES. OFFER ITS DRIVERS 
STARTING SALARIES ' IN 
EXCESS "OF $2,000 

MONTHLY. LET US HELP 
YOU WfTH YOUR TRAINING. 
INEXPERIENCED PERSONS 
CALL: 1-800-845-2197. 

EXPERIENCED DRIVERS 

CALL: 1-BO0-368-8538. EOE. 
SUBJECT TO DRUG SCREEN. 

DRIVER-NO BULL! JUST THE 
FACTS! ASSIQMED EQUIP- 
MENT. HOME EVERY 10-14 
DAYS, 95% NO-TOUCH 
FREIGHT. EXCELLENT 

PAY/BENEFITS-CALL DECKER 
TRANSPORT: 1-800-634- 

6150. ASK FOR STEVE. EOE 

Wetttlde Traniportatlon 

Attn: OTR, Teams, 0/0, 
Hoppers & Recent Driving 
School Grada!! 1-80D-373- 
2957 ext. 183 'We Offsr'lllll 
• Assigned Units, Teams, &. 
Single 'Paid Vacation 

•Performance Awards 

'Family Medical & Dental 
•Strong Hometime Policy 
•Outstanding Equipment 

•Sign on Bonus '22 Yrs of 
Age 'Tuition Reimbursement 

PFT ROBERSON HAS TRAC- 
TOR TRAILER FLATBED 
OPENINGS,- . SHORTHAUL 
FULL TIME AND PART TIME 
POSITIONS. SALARY AND 
• MILEAGE. FULL BENEFITS 
FOR THE FULL TIME. CALL 
800-473-6E81 

ATTENTION DRIVERS Want 
good equipment, good miles, 
a company to grow with, 
conventional tractors? You 
have -got itI Ba Proud. Be 
SRT. Call today 1-800-28a- 
7785 



ayNNfisiKiEmiER 

For preachoot and school- 
age gymnastics. Some gym- 
naatio experience helpful. 
Will train right person. 

FfaaaeCa/f 
(7081381-6141 



LEGAL 
SECREEAinr 

Experienced only, friendly 
non-smoldng office, 

WordPerfects.!. . 
(708)234-6680 



Ctsrloil ' - ' 

ORDER EDITOR 

Intrupa Manufacturing Cornpany it 
(•eldng ■ penonsbla IndivHUBl to 
■niwer tolephon* calls from dis- 
tributori and anief phons and fax 
ordsri Into lh« CRT. You will si to 
be responsibls lor IHmg, typing and 
ganaral darloal duties. 

Quaimcatlont Indude: 

* CRT axparlanca 

* Ability to project prof etatonallsm 
oysc the phone 

* Qood organizational skills 

* Ability to work wsR ttHh cUiara 

* Excellent vetbaVwrinan 
communlcalton tkillt 

* High school graduile or 
equlvalsnl 

* 1 year eustotnar aanlee ' 
axperianca pratsrrtd 

We olTer a campatNtve oompenia- 
tton and b«n«1tts package in an 
environment that encourages 
growth. For immediate oontida ra- 
tion, app4y in psnon at: 

Intrupa Manufacturing Co., Inc. 

95 South Route 83 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

. Equal Opportunity Employer 



HUMAN RESOURCES 

LirMCOLNSHIRE AREA 

$13.00 PER HOUR 

Midwest headqualars of major 
pharmaceutical ftm cseks indi- 
vidual to assist In targe Human 
Resource department. Wil h&n- 
dts a wkie oiiety of HR related 
functions and edditbneV/ make 
travel arrangemsnts and coon£- 
nata meetinga aa needed. 
Posilkin requkea 1 -2 years prhy 
secretariat background, good 
intarpsrtonal skit, strong typing 
and word procectkig experience. 
VIbrdParfect is prefened Long* 
term temporary assignment has 
excelleni oppotunily to become 
penranert wkh superior benefit 
package. Seaulifu), cormnienlly 
kxsted ofTIoee. 

Contact Jtsnn* Randolph 

for interview a! 
(708) 634-6622 



MARman^fi Lincouvuhire RESoirr 

FaO Time Hooickeepers A.M. Shift 

I We we in search of several houiekeepcn with good comrnunicalloD| 
Is kills and on cagerDCSi to asilst our guests. 

[Prior experience helpful, mut clean 18 rooms per. day. Weekcndi| 
|and holidays are required. Repealed bcndisg and stopping. 

Apply in Person 
Monday and Tuesday 

9am. -4:30p.m, ■ ,. 

(708)634-0100 

We oITcr i coinpclliiM: wi^e ind benefit package 
We *re *n EEO/AA Employer. 



MANUFACTURING 
PRODUCTION WORKERS 

1st and 2n(l shift Due to tremendous growth, Decoiel, Inc., a 
leading mfg of picture frames & framed art, has immediate 
openings available in our Mundelein mfg facility and for order 
pickers & packers tn our Waukegan distribution ctr for 1st & 
2nd shift . , 

Apply in person M'F 8'10 am 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courlland, Mundelein, IL 
and 3860 Sunset Ave., Waukegan, IL 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Ql I. was, one of those tDdividuals who had been employed 
with the same company for 12 years when the company fold- 
ed due to loss of contracts. Rather than wait for the perfect 
job to come around, friends told me to sign on with- a tem- 
porary employment service. I have been employed as a' 
"Temporary* for the past 11 months. It was my first experi- 
ence with this type of employment and 1 must say it has 
worked well for me. Fortunately for me, I was placed on my 
first and only assignment that has lasted the entire time. The 
person who normally holds this position had taken a year off, 
and la her absence, I have handled adtninistrative support for 
a V-P and 14 sales professionals all of which has their own 
style and way they expect things to be done. The position 
will be coming to an end In the next month. I will be starting 
to seek future employment and I was wondering whether or 
not it is proper for me to ask the V-P of the department I am 
working in for a letter of recormnendation, or should I seek 
letters from these sales professionals & V-P individually? 
E.M. -.Lake Villa. P.S. Thank you for your column, I look 
forward to reading it each week. 

A: The answer to your question is, "yes". Ask the V-P and 
anyone else you feel will be beneficial .to your future 
enqiloymenL iCeep in mind that employers often verify those 
letters of recommendation and so it is important when choos- 
ing those persons for letten, to be sure to ask if they mind 
being contacted by telephone as well. That way, in asking 
ahead of Ume, that person will not be caught off guard if he 
or she is contacted. Also, it is important to "networl^' with 
these people at this time. They have had the better part of a 
year to observe your skills and talents. If there is not a place 
open within the company for them to further utilize you, then 
perhaps those 15 people, know 15 people, who know ISpco- 

Ele, who know of a company just dying for your skills. Good 
uckl 

Q: A friend told rae of a few summer positions h-s heard 
about that we should both apply for. School will be letting 
out soon, and I need to earn some money for living expens- 
es for my first year of college. The positions are offering 
minimum wage. How much is minimum wage? F,.P. - Round 
Lake Beach 

Al Currently the minimum wage is $4.35 per hour. With 
summer vacation just around the comer, (ht best time to line 
up that summer job is nowl . , -j ' 

Note: Nancy Sakol is a licensed personnel professi'joal 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gumee. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 5101 Washington St, 
Gumee,IL 60031. 



L';^iS: 





9 CLASSIFIED LAkclANd Newspapers AuqusT 5, 1994 




220 



Help Wanted 
Fnll-Tlmc 



A TREE SERVICE J|[ 

- Experienced or wilUxerfn. j^ 
2 Cllmbora/GToundBinen . 
. Health Insmomce . 
^ and other benefits . . 

I Call (708) 838-4317 a 
A A A A AAA A A A A A 



SIDERS 

Experienced. Good 

truck & eauipment vinyl 

$60/square. 

Call Rich "TUdor 

(815) 943-2002 



RE3TAURA^^r SERVERS 

HAMBURGER HAMLET 

Of Vemon Hills & Glenview 

FT/PT positions, Rexiblehre. 

Apply In person, 1000 Lakevlew 

Pkwy, Vernon Hills (1/4 ml. W. of 

Hawthorn Main 1432 

Waukegan, Glenview {Carillon 

Shopping CenleO (708)916-0505 



Developmental 

Trainer 

Full time, entry level, 
willing to train indi- 
viduals with develop- 
mental disabilities in 
skills, oral hygene, 
domestic, pre-work 
and community. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

(708) 438-5050 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

Lake Zurich 



PC SKILLS? 

LINCOLNSHIRE AREA 
$10.00 PER HOUR 

Midwest headquarters of 
ma[or pliarmaceutical firm 
seeks Individual to assist 
with a variety of PC duties. 
Any experience with on- 
line applications helpful. 
Requires a "Jack-of-all- 
trades" with prior office 
experience, accurate typ- 
ing, and a flexible attitude. 
Long-term temporary 
assignment has excellent 
opportunity to become per- 
manent. Beautiful, conve- 
niently located offices. 

Contact Jeanne Randolph 
for Interview at 

(708) 634-6622 



Bankttig 

Join A 
Winning Team! 

NBD Bank, a respected and well 
established llnanclal institution 
has the following opportunities 
available: 

• TELLERS* 

Various Schedules 

Availabiel 

Our Bank Tellers are talented, 
detall-orlented professionals with 
excellent people skills and pleas' 
ant personalities. Heavy cash 
handling experience and a strong 
math aptRude are required. 

TELLER/ 

PERSONAL BANKER 

Part*tiine 

• Vemon Hills 

Experience with sales/retail, and 
preferably a background In bank- 
ing required. Excellent communi- 
cation skills & the ability to work 
weekends a musti Heavy cash 
handling experience & a strong 
math aplltuoa essential. 

Make your move today and enjoy 
a compettttve salary and beneiiis 
package in a trienoiy and profes* 
Blonal work environment! 
Qualified candidates should call 
for an Interview appointmerrl: 

Human Resourced 
708-364^330 



NBD 

eoenVf/d/v 



220 



Help Wanted 
FnUrTlme 



TRACTOR 
TRAILER DRIVER 

North Chicago area. Local 
runs. CDL (A) Llcenaa 
required. Call between 
9am - 4pni. 

(708) 578a 066 



Madilnlst 

MACHINE SHOP 
FOREMAN 

Wilson madilna woukj like to hire 
an aggressive Machine Shop 
Foreman sMtled In Lrg lathes, vor 
lido & horizontal mills & gear cut 
ting. Knowtedgo In blue print read 
Ing & math, Types ot work: Sloel 
mill, pipe mill, aJI types ot heavy 
industrial. Reloc. assist, avail. 
Contact Rfcr^airi V/iIson, 4787 Hwy 
78, Cordova. A1 355S0. 

205-648-3203 



Fmflooff)(T(ffiif)G71 

SHIPPIOO 

Due to continued growth, 
foet-paced gourmet cof- 
fee roQslef In Voto otea 
hoe 6 petmonent fuD-tlme 
copeningo. SinShlpphg 
end 1 In Manufacturing. 
Btperienoe helpful. Mual 
be able to lift 70 lbs. 
Competitive ealary and 
good benertta. 
Appty h person f^ease 

(o//ee fY)Q5ter5 

27709 Concrete Dr. 
^ tngtestde, IL g 

Data Processing 



SYSTEMS 
PROGRAMMER 



Metra is currentiy seeking 
qualified candidates to (ill 
an Immediate vacancy In 
our progressive, high tech- 
nology Information Sys- 
tems Division (\BM 3081/ 
MVS/XA) tor the position of 
Systems Programmer. 

Qualified candidate will 
possess a B.S. in Com- 
puter Science or equivalent 
work experience plus 5 
years as a Systems Pro- 
grammer In MVS/XA, 
JESS. CICS 2.1. SMP/E, 
TSO/ISPF, VTAM Operat- 
ing environment. 3 years 
experience installing and 
maintaining CICS 2.1 or 
installed systems on IBM 
3081 or higher required. 
We offer an excellent ben- 
efits and compensation 
package. Only resumes 
including salary history 
and requirements, will be 
considered. 

Director, Office of 
Employment ■ 




547 W. Jackson Boulevard 

Chicago. IL 60661 

HXInority candidates are 

encouraged to apply 

EEO M/F/D/V 



220 



Help Wsuted 
FuU-Tlme 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuUTTlme 



2nd Shift 

4 pm-1Z:30 am locil nuiUnc conrciny 
looldiiE rorlrmtlns m.ichlJwq¥T]ton 
WlU train, pkue jp)ilf In pcnon it 

American 
Narkbtino Sbkvicb 

95S Canipiis Dr. 
Mufldcldn, IL 

(708)680-4545 

Betterrm ^ «n • 12 pm 
tmd 1 pmlo4pmor€*ll 



S Full AND PahtTi/v^eS 
JaPPLY IN PERSONS 

^PEPPERMINT STICKS 

k 848 /v\AIN ST. K 
g ANTIOCH J 



'iJIDHIilllllttllllDIDIIflllMniilimill^' 

drivers-otr| 

I StNqlES & TEAMS | 

I nEQuincd. Must Iiave i 
IcIassACDLHazmat.I 
VERN . I 

1(708) nsoiwl 

.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiimmniiiiiiiiiiiii?. 



We Need Homenuikers 

To Miiil lenjon in llvir tiomc*. 

No otjialenco neceuajy, 

will (raiiL Cv ticlpriil. 

Emu lip Id S6.CKVlio(ir 

plur Iwierili. F))]l/Parl Time. 

Apply in ponon or call: 

Mi.WUliamt 
nelpAtnomCtlnc. 

2504 Wutiin^toii, Suite 101 
Wiukccam IL 
(708) 62M.W0 



PACKAGE HANDLERS 

PERFECT FOR COLLiQE STUDEMTS 
RPS. a small pkg delivery 
service, hires pkg handlers to 
load & unload trucks. If you 
are not afraid of hard work, 
are at least 18 yrs. old & can 
work 4-5 hra, per day, Mon.- 
Frl., 4:30 pm - 9:(XI pm, 9:00 

?m - 2:00 am or 2:00 am - 
:00 am. then RPS has an 
oppty for you. We offer you up 
to $7/hr. + $1/hr. tuition assis- 
tance. Apply In person: 
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYS- 
TEf^S, 2945 Shermer Rd., 
Northbrook, IL 60062. 

708-272-4310 

EO/AAE 



FLOOR CARE 

Experienced floor 

care for health care 

facility in McHenry 

Co. Must be 

responsible & 

dependable. 

Call Vivian 
(815) 344-2600 



DATA ENTRY 

Immcd. opening, 2nd shift. Fast-paced pos. requires heavy 
data entry, production & time keeping entry cxp. prcf d but 
not req'd. Will train qualified candidate. Must l^e able to work 
independently & verify own work. 1/2 yrs. cxp. in some cler- 
ical office functions req'd in relation to production control 
M[usl apply in person: 

Decorel, Inc. 

444 E. Courtland, Mundelein, IL 

EOE 




\ 
} 

I- 
I- 

J 



L 



0(d Country Store 

IS fflRING . — 

•3 Servers 
•1 Cook 
•2 Hosts 

DAY, NIGHTS 
& WHEEKENDS 

•Great Benefits 
•No Tip Sharing 
•Weekly Paycheck 

Come by Mon.'Fri. 

CRACKER BARREL 
GURNEE 

(708) 244-1512 

An Equal Opportunity 
Employer 






\ 

i> 
i 

■• 



Aurora Healthcare 

MARKET AlVALYST 

Aurora Health Care is seeking an experienced Market Analyst to. join its Ma^el Research 
Department. As a member of our team, you will be a part of an active and growing research depart- 
ment. Our staff supports all market research activities for Aurora Health Care and its affiliates. We 
are located conveniently off the freeway on llic south side of Milwaukee. 

The qualified candidate must have at least two years of progresive market research and pro- 
ject management experience, preferably in a health care setting. You must also have substantial 
experience as a primary market researcher with the ability to conduct multiple ongoing projects. 
Strong written and verbal communication and presentation skills, well-developed analytic and 
report writing abilities, along with PC and mainframe computing experience are essential. Theedu- 
cation requirement includes a Bachelor's degree in Marketing, Market Research, Health Cai« 
Management, or a related field, plus at least two statistics courses. A Master's degree in a social sci- 
ence is preferred. 

You will be offered an excellent salary and a comprehensive benefit package. Qualified can- 
didates should apply to: 

Ms. J. Okoro 
Aurora Health Care, Inc. 

P.O. Box 342 
Milwaukee, WI 53201. 

(414)937-5166 

Equal Oppoitunily Employer 

IVS/F/D/V 

WE SUPPORT ASAfE, HEALTHY AND DRUG FREE WRK ENVIRONMENT niROUCH PRE-E.MPLOWElfr DRUG TESTING 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fiill-Tlmc 



iiujiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiinni 

HVAC SERVICE 

TECH 

Must have 

some experience. 

Good payl 

Please Call 

(708) 587-1698 

biHIlllllllllilllllllDIIIIIIIDIIIIItll 



COOK 

231 Bed North shore LTC 
Facility seeking experi- 
enced cook for day shift. 
Comp. salary/benefit pack- 
age. Contact Erma Fowler 
at 295-3900. 

Lake Bluff 
Health Care Centre 



SALES 
COORDINATOR 

I for auto leasing division I 
of a suburban teasing | 
I company. Duties include: 

* T«lophone contact 
with cuttomar* and 
doalershlps 

I •Sanding out 
documantaand 
folktwing up for title*. 

Full Benefit Plan 

CanPtMrilll: 

(70t) 223-1212 



Smith 
SacufHv 

has openings 
inyour area. 

■ We offer: _ 

•Premiuih Fay 

•Free Unifonns 

•Required State 
Training 

•Paid Vacations 

•401KPlan 

Full lime positions are 
available for candidates 
with their own phone and 
transportation and no 
police record. 

For a personal 
interview, call: 

PlitiuilDipl.il 

(815) 397-0630 

iiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii 



220 



Hcljp Wanted 
FtaU-Tiflic 



220 



Help Wanted, 
FuU-Tlme 



HtUll Sales Mmw 
snd Sites AssKiws 

Immediate openings for 

established high-volume 

unisex apparel store 

in Gurnee Mills. 

Send resume to: 

Dept. LP. 

P.O. Box 7094 

Dcerfield,IL 60015 



Englnoortng 

REFRIGERATION 

Deslgn/Qulklar w/proiects 
across US seoks englnoGr 

w/mln. 4-B yrs. exp.ln dosign of 
Industrial ammonia syslams, kw 
temp process & storaga lacll! 
llQS. FtokJ Dxp. a plus. Strong 
Comp/Autocad skills req'd. P.E. 
or ability to obtain a must. Raloc. 
assist avail, Resumo in conH- 
donee to: THE STELLAR 
GROUP. 2900 Hartley Rd.. 
Jacksonville, FL 32257, 



CUSIODIAN 

Gumee Park District 
Ftttt Time Maintenance 

Wc arc seeking a responsible Indi- 
vidual 10 perfonn cleaning, prcvcn' 
tallw maintenance, small repalis 
and rocreaUon program duUcs. 

Mondi^friday 

ISQptn- 10:00 pm 

Some weekend work 

Applications available at 

VnONGPARK 

4374 Grand 
Qumee, IL 




Small job shop ' i 
I needs welder for ! 
I close tolerance \ 
I work. Must read i 
I prints. Salary based I 
\ on experience. 

; Please (oil 

1008) mm 



RECEPTIONIST 

1 Full time, 1 Part lime. Medical facility seeks front 
office support. Meet-Greet and Schedule Appts. 
(708) X44-0016 



ipeiior Xersonnel 






ADVERTISING SALES 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Position opening for advertising sales 
representative with Kenosha County's 
home-grown community newspaper, the 
Bu/tetfti . We seek a high energy individ- 
ual who will help us build our sales in a 
geographic territory with potential for 
growth. 

Join an enthusiastic team in a dynamic 
atmosphere. If you have the ability to 
communicate with clients, and then help 
them communicate with our readers, 
then you may be for us. The position 
requires commitment and determination 
to succeed. Advertising sales experience 
helpful. 

Compensation will include, base salary, 
commission and benefits. To apply, send 
a resume and cover letter telling us why 
you are right for us. 




715 58th St. (Lower Level) 
Kenosha, WI 53140 

Or stop by our Kenosha office at Uie above address and 
fill out an application with your resume & cover letter. 




TARGET 




Back To School 

JOB FESnViayL 

August I2iii: 12 pm - 8 pm 
Auitust 13th; ID am - 5 pm 

Target Greatland is the leading upscale discount store In the nation and 

our Vernon Hills location is looking for "fast, fun, and friendly" entry-level 

and supen/Isory team members. 

We are holding a Job Festival in our partdng lot which Includes: 

. Information 
Applications 
& Free Popcoml 

Tariget offers competitive wages, benefits, and opportunities for 
advancement. Interviews will be held Imrnedlatelyl 

Now Hiring Fon 

Cashiers, Food Avenue, Sales Teams, Overnight Stockers & Price Change 

Teams, Asset Protection Specialists, & Department Specialists 

313 E. Townllne Road • Vemon Hills, IL 

<7d8> 680-0390 




*■ 'r^fr...^-;, , i 11:21 4ir 



AuqusT 9,. 1994 Uh\m6 NewspApERS CLASSIFIED 





.^ 



mcfflcciA Pcimltfii lllccllciA« 

WALnYCABE BY BOARD CEBTIFtED FMMILY PHYSICIANS^ 
Dr. Rarfter & Dr. Claric 

DON'T ACCEPT ANY IMITATIONS 

SCHOOL PHYSICALS $30 

- ■ Musi presont adal Ihe lime of sorvtce 
922 E: Rollins Rd. • Round Lake Beach • 223-9494 




«ccMM« Ills CcM«» UIs'm TImi«. 

Assistance in the home for seniors. 

Nurses - Aides - Homentakers 

Live-in or hourly 

Help At Home, Inc. 

Waukegan, IL 60085 
Call: (708) 623-4300 

Now Hiring (sec our ad under help wanlod) " 




hlfopfaclor 



Family care, because we care 



Dr. John D. NIkitow, D.C. 

CENTER SQUARE CHIROPRACTIC 

15 Commctxic Drive, Suite 1 10 • Grayslakc, IL 60030 • phone: (708) 548-8900 




|«nll/lffi| 

THE FAMILY DENTISTS, LTD. GENERAL DENmnrr 
DR. STEVEN B. EATON * DR. PATRICIA L. EATON 

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME 



24 HOUR EMERGENCY CARE 






680-0123 



•CONVENIENT & FL£XIBLE HOURS -INSURANCE ACCEPTED 
520 N. MILWAUKEE UBERTYVILLE 





H«rct/c 

^^ The Exercise Place 

Gray$take*a Fint & Only 
Tntai FitneM Center 

Center Street Square, Grayslakc 
(next to Piggly Wiggly) 




ic« Ii«cifln9 T«/l 



j^e/Sk 



"o/ie 



.« 



Beltone Hearing Aid Center 

1702 Washington St. • Suite 200 
Waukegan, IL 60085 

(708) 336-0355 . 




lymnci/llc/ 
THE C^YMNASTICS FACTORY 



•Toddler Program/Pre-School 
•Cbeerleading 
•Competitive Team 

REGISTER NOW FOR FALL 




«<illh 

AU Ways HealtlAy 

Natural Food Center 

Houn: Mon.-Fii. 9:30^:00, Sal. 9:30-6:00, Sun. t2:00-4M 

• Natural VBamhs • BodybulkfingfAerobic/ExQrclse Supplies * Special Oletaty Foods 

• telural Foods/DfQanlcaJly Grown Produce • Chemical-Free Meat. Pmtvf, & Eggs 

• Allergy Cou nselkig • Cruel^-Free Personal Care PnxJucts •NalualOvonThffltOutlel 

123 S. Rand Rd.. Uke Zurich (708)436-9200 




A/UfCMIC« 

Catl about our new health plan 



William D. Stanley 

111 Cedar Av9., Like Villa 
Call 356-7672 



iuniHommjsmnsmAimiK 

61992 American Family 

Life Insurace Compat\y 

Home Office: Madison. Wl 53783 



mm^^i 





cnlol/ 

Ho^pM Beds, Wheelchairs, Scooters, Oxygen and much more!!! 

400 E, Grand Ave. 2727 Wwhbglon SL 

(Route 83 & Route 132) (West of Sl.Thcrue Medical Center) 
Ulce Villa WoukcEan 

708-356-0600 , 708-623-7520 

RentabA Sales For All Health Can Needsl 





|cifncilc<i?? Hnuioll?? 
'When a raeation is what you need!!' 

STAiircF^ts Travel Cestter 

500S. Rt59 Fox Lake, IL 60020 
C70S> S87-d446 <S00>(i60^9S78 

'*Our Service Is Fr^ ... Our Advise Priceless" 




pofi/ fn«ciicifi« 



( )ithit|)f(lii tV Spmis Injurx Cfritii*. I.lil. 



Specialixing In: Prevention and correction 
of injuries of the bone. Joints and muscles of the body. 

2626 Washington Street • Waukegan, IL 60085 

(708)623-9383 

24 Hour Answering Service 





\\t$ Vow M^h Blood Pit#/W€ Goodbiftl 
^^r OSCAR S. GIRON, M.D., S.C. 

internal Medicine 

1 826 East Belvidere Road 

Grayslake, Illinois 60030 

Phone (708) 548-2000 




lolol P<imili| Coff« 

Dilip K. Shah, M.D. 
*8CUOOh FHYSICAL 5PSCIAL IHRU SKPISMISM * 

▲ Total Family Care 

A Convenient Day, Evening and Weekend Hra. 

▲ New PaUcnta Welcome 

Grccnlcaf Center (708)336-7424 

1 S. Grccnlcaf Suite D 24 Hour Answering Service 
Gurncc, Illinois 60031 (708)360-6966 




ll8'Clll*&l TnIN puts you in control of your appetite. 

•Doctor Approved • •100% Natural & Organic 
•No Caffeine •1j03o Pounds & Inches . 

•Qtvea Feeling of Fultneas * 

For more information call 
(70S) 949-09O9 




nlv«f/lli| Clinic/ 

THE ROBERT MCCORMICK UNIVERSITY CLINIG 

. 3333 Green Bay Rd, KTorth Chicago, IL 
(708)473-4357 
Primary Care & Specially Health Services 




<I//€I9« 



/' 



Hair, Skin, Nails & Body Care ^^^ 

106 N. Main St^ Wauconda 526^162^^ 
Massage Therapif Tuesday-Saturday . ^^ 
Appointments Necessary ^^ 




l/lon Pfobl<m#??? 

EyeCare Physicians 

of America 

'FREE eyd exam (65 yrs. •(-) 'Board C«rtined Ophtfialmoiogist 

'FREE solar shields (65 yrs. i\ *No Stich No Patcti No Shot 

'FREE Transportation (65 yrs. +) 'Medicare assignment accepted 
161 Grand Avmiuo, Wauksgan, IL 
(708)263-7700 




ulflllen 



MNUuu NununoM cuniM 

708*855«8654 

Gumee Mills Mall 

(Across.lrom Buiilnglon Coat Factory) (Entrance G) 

BniHG THIS AD IN FOR A FREE SAMPLE 




ozfilcik Chiffopfocllc 

"We Care About Your Health" 

DR* LINDA WOZNIAK 

549 N. Lake • Mundelein, IL 60060 

(708)566-9400 

OpeT\^6 days a week. Next to Ker^lucky Fried Chicken 




|/ce 

Ask Your Pharmacist 

/ Drug Intcraalon/ , 

Drug Allergy Screcntng 

/ Non-prcscrfption 
medications 

/ Generic Drug Savings 

/ Fast Prescription Refills 

Juil ask your new ncigtiborhood 
Osco rhamiaclst 



TC 



9010 



Pr«s5cri|ilioii S.iviiiijs 



1 

I 

Good thni Wed VI 7J94 only al Ihe Ul« I 
ForKrtOsa)Dmg-BMN.VtelemAye.7JS-1082 I 

{ Any New orTransfefred Prescriplion \ 



i A precifpllon unckrJIO 
jlilREE.rtolviirdon 
' pnsofptiws Irans/enwi 

• fnwi nP4i*f rW^"n Ctn/w< 



(mm olJief Osco SSoro. 



$10 



OFF I 

ihc rtgular j 
price wilh I 
ihii coupon 

i OscOOffKI tlmitOnc PrcKriplion PcrCoupon i 



I Coupon must be preenled 

I il Ihe phirnacy. 

I 




mmk/ Ihc #pol for youf 
i^RCC fpliicil CHom 

CALL 740-2800 TODAYl 

Dit ICOTT C. RCIICR 
ROUnD IIIHE DCfKH CMROPRIKTIC 

714 W. ROLLINS RD. 

On litE CORNER of Rolii^7i & CecIar LaI(£ Rds. Nexf to EAqU Foods 




odlolil/l 



t-ooi Care 
Specialist 



DR. GRIFF i. WINTERS ft ASSCX:. 

SPtOMUNG K KcoHsmuciirt sflMBva tic fooi 4 nva. 



770 Barron Bh/d. (Rt. 83J 
GrayslaXe 



223-4000 



10 Philip Rd. #121 
Venwn Hills 




men 

Do you need to get away? 

Lake County Family YMCA 

Women*s Fun & Fitness Camp 

^ Thursday, September 22 through Sundi^, September 25, 1994 

For additional information call the lake County Family 
mCA at (70S) 360-9622, ask/or Ten White or Aluon iluniley 

I>cadliac to Register • September 2, 1994 




uollln D«fill/lf!| 

Stephen T. ReiUy, OJDJS, 
Michael Siegel, D.D3. 

Located in CondeU. Acute Care Center 

2 Bast RollliM Rd.. Ste. 4 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

•We Cater To Cowards " 

E^rcnlng & Saturday Hours 

(708) S4e-SSS0 




Flotation Sleep Specialist CHRIS SORENSEN 

Fine Furniture * Owner 

1GHT+M0VB 



NIGHT MOVES 
454 N. Qreenbay Rd. 
Waukegan. IL 60085 



(708) 336-1011 
Fax (706) 336-1524 







ClASSIFIED UIceUnc) Newspapers Auquir 9, 1 994 




lldpWanlod 
FuU-Time 



220 



HdpWiuCed 
Ftall-Tlflie 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fnll*Tlme 



220 



HelpV«nted 

ItillTTlme 



220 



HelpWuled 
niU-Tlme 



220 



Help Wauled 
Fnll-rTlme 



Millworker 

For Custom Wood Stair 

Company. Full Benefits. 

CALL 

(708) 223-9663 

Between 7:00 am & 3:00 pm 



RECEPTIONIST/ 1 
SECRETARY 

For Btnall, busy consuttlngl 
firm. Phones, databam man-| 
agcment sccrctarial respon- 
sibilities for President & VP.I 
Minimum 2 yean ofnccl 
experience using MaclntoshI 
lor Windows required.! 
Ismoke-frcc environment.! 
|CalI7(»/234.«»5 to apply. 



HOMEMAKEHS 

Would you like lo be involved 

wllh helping people? Do you 

enjoy working with Senior 

Cillzensf We arc looking for 

homcnukcn A liousckcepcrs & 

other qualified applcants lo 

work with our clienu In the Lake 

County Area. 

We offer: 

• Bonuses and ?sf Raises 

• Free Training 

One year experience ii requited. 

Must have a car with innirance. 

Please call for an Immediate 

interview. We have many 

poftilons available In your area. 

Call Susan: 

NATIONAL HOM£ CARE SYSTEMS 
(708) 965-9269 



^^-'S? 



BIVsLPIVs 

Ready for a change, 
long term care facility 
in Round Lake Beach 
is ready for you. 
•Sign on bonus 
•Competitive 
wages 
•4011c plan 
•Vacation pay 
•Good attendance 
bonus 
•Float pool 
Stop by today for 
more information 

Hillcrest 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 

Round Lake Beach, IL 

60073 

(708) 546-5300 
Mrs. Lemar 



[WEDNESDAY 10 A.M. 

Is the deadline for 

classified adsl 
(708) 223-8161 



220 



Help Wanted, 
FuUrTlme 



Courtyard By 

Mairiott/Deerfield 

•Desk Clerk -FT 

•A.M. Servers 

Competitive pay, 

Excellent working 

environment. 

Best Benefits 

In the Business! 

Please stop by to fill 

out an application - 

800 Lake Cook Rd. 

Decrfield, IL 

(708) 940-8222 

EOE M/F/V/D 



[CUSTOMER service: 

REPRESENTATIVE 
(Casliier) 

I Full timo ail shifts, Full limo| 

) benofits inciude: 
•Medical &Lif 9 Insuranco 
•Paid Vacation & HolWays 
•Educational Assistanco Program \ 

) •€() Day Review 

AMOCO 
FOOD SHOP 

•QURNEE 

350 N. Hunt Club Rd. 

•GRAYSUUCE 

34225 Rt 45 
& Washington St 

•MUNDELEIN 

2029 W. Maple Ave. 

•LAKE ZURICH 

450 S. Rand Rd. 



ASSEMBLY 

Production control panel 

mfr. requires person for 

electrical/meclianical 

assembly. Exp.w/tools, 

non-smoker. Wauconda. 

(708) 487-1390 



INSTALLER 

for automotive paint spray 

booths for body sliops. 

Carpenter of handyman 

would be best suited for 

this type of work. 

Call Jim at: 

(708) 356-88SS 

Between 8:00 pm & 6:00 pm 



1^ 



Vernon Hills - High energy, great phone ^ 

skills, accurate word processing. J 

t708J »44-001b ^ 

S J__I^upcrior JbersonneL- jk 



STYUSTS 

for new Graystake 

GREAT CUPS 
SALON. 

- • Hourly Pay 

• Product Bonus •' 

• Performance Bonus 

• Benefits 

• Paid Training 

Full & Part Time available. 

Please Call lupa 

(708) 884-1918 



CASHIERS 

We are seeking FT/PT 

cashiers. Weekdays 

and Weekends. No 

experience necessary. 

Wewilirrain. 

Apply In person at 

Midlothian Unocal 

1080 W. Maple 

Mundelein 




We have Immediate part time openings for 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Mornings or afternoons. 
Must be able to woric Saturdays. 

DATA ENTRY 

Flexible evening hours. 
Must be able to work Saturdays. 

CLERICAL 

Mornings & SatiJrdays; 
Call for Appointment 
708-948-1691 

SEARS REPAIR SERVICES 

1951 Waukegan Road Bannockburn, IL 60015 

equal opportunity employer m/ifdN • 



MINIMUM WAGE $$$777 

CURRENTLY HIRING 

CHERRY ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS Is looltlna tor 
individuals to join the Cherry Team. WILL TRAIN. 



Assembiar • Machine Operators 

2ND SHIFT 

Shipper • Layout Irispactor - 
Plasma Lux Operator* Punch Press Supervisor 

sub SHIFT 

Mold Maker A • Mold Changer B 
Mold Inspector •Automation Technician 

Wa otter competitive salaries, comprehensive benelits, 
and opportunities for growth. 

APPLY IN PERSON. 



3600 Sunset Avenue 
Waukegan, IL 60087 



eoe 



tfiER HOW HIRING 
[ING FOR FALL 

Across, from Great America 
Starting up to $5.00/hour 



PART TINE DAYS & NIOHTS 



PERFECT FOR STUDENTS 

Flexible hours 

3-4 hour shifts available 
Weekdays Monday - Friday 

At Our Gumee BURGER KING 

Across the street from Grcndt America 

5300 Grand Ave. 

(708)336-3427 



iVlEdicAl Opportunities 



CNA's 

Needed Full Tune 

7 am-3 pm 
and 3 pm-ll pm 

Shifts pay according • 

to expeiience. 
Apply in person: 

Pavilion of Waukegan 
2217 Washington St. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



PHYSICAL -mEnAPIST/P.TJL'S 

OCCUPAHOHAL THERAPIST/C.OTA.'S 

SPEECH PATYtOLOGIST 

Quest Therapy SenicftS, a fun 

Washinglon Slale rehab co, has FT/PT 

openings (or pralessloruts for Uie 
above positions. Candidates must t» 
Iteyelig. WA slats. Comp. saJybens 
IncI'dg innovailva schedules, generous 
ed. bens,, exceJ. haatiWdental, sign-on 
bonus, reloc. asst. Send resume or 
contact: QUESTTHERAPY SER- 
VICES, 511 W, A SUeet, YaWma, WA 
98902. (509) 243-0696. EOE M/F 




••• UN'S ••• 

• ICU 

Earn Top 

(Niusing Agency) Pay Rates 

$$$ Inunediate 

Sign-Ori Bonus $$$ 

Must have recent hospital 

experier^ce. All shifts currentiy 

available. . 

Call TODAY for an 

IMMEDIATE APP01NB1ENI 

(708) 918-8300 

HEALTHCAREPERS0NNEL,1NC 
(Your nursing agency of choice^ 



IFELTIMENDBSE 

With supervisory skillsj 

needed on 3 to 1 1 

shift Good manager. 

Salary commensurate 

with ability. Chance 

for advancement. 

New pay scale. 

Apply in person. 

Pavilion of 
Waukegan 

2217 Washington St 
Waukegan, IL 60085 



Make A Career 
Out Of Caring 

Earn a Certified Nursing Asst 
Ceitiflcatlon while you (earn & 
grow In a vciy regarding Held. 

Hillcrest Nursing 
Cenier 

will help set your course 

Come visit Hillcrest 

for information on 

Qurprogrttm. 

1740 IS. Circuit Dr. 
Round Lake Beach 60075 



Occupational TYierapist 

Certified Occupational 

Therapy Assistant 

Loc'd in the north Ozarks In the 

heart of lake country, come Join 
our subacute Interdisciplinary 

team. Beaut, rural setting within 
1-2 hrs. of major cities like 

Branson & Kansas City. Enjoy 

activities of boatlrig, biking, fish- 
ing, hiking, camping & horse- 
back riding. Comp. Sal., 
Continuing Education, 401 K, 
Flexible Schedule. This 120 

bed facility is focusing or^ build- 
ing its subacute & outpatient 
therapy programs, offering a 
variety of caseload with an 

oppty. to specialize. Adynamte, 
progressive team approach Is 

requ'd. For more info., contact; 

Susan Schaefer, N0RTHWCX3D 
HILI-S REHAB. 621 N. Arthur, 

Humansville, UO 65674. (417) 
754-8517 or (417) 754-2208. 



Hctfllh Care 



CNA/NA 



We arc seeking CNA's for all shifts F/T & P/T. Flexible sctied 
ulin'g available. Sign on Bonus. Facility will reimburse for 
certification. Contact M. Mc Adams at 295-3900. 

Lake Bluff Health Care Centre 



doOcc 



ACTIVITY DIRECTOR 

Siifclif iifirtiiciJ Dinettr of Activity Sitvieii far tl\'Ui Ntrih 
Shirt Qiriilrie fitllitf. SiUctii (•JlvliBil matt biM Mfantiiity u^i- 
riiiei u4 Iha lUlitY t« iffielWily eommuileiti %*k orjiiiit viibli 
lellvify iinicii fir isr ritUmii. CirHfleilUi }t%Umi, CinififhiM 
tiliry i*i kiiifit rieki|i. Ctiliet R. Jih t 29S-3900, 



NURSES RN/LPN 

We are looking for caring individuals who arc willing 
to give quality care and support to our residents and 
families. F/PT hrs - flexible sched/benefits. Current IL 
license required. Contact M. McAdams at 295-3900. 

Lake Bluff Health Care Centre 



1 

It 



DIRECTOR OF NURSING 
HEALTH DEPARTMENT ' 

Cionvcnionlly located twtwcen Ctiicago and Mil-, 
wfliiktw on the tKrautiful stioros of I akt Michigan, 
Knnosiia County (Wisconsin) has a highly rospon- 
sibln |)Osit(on for a snlf-rnotivaintl individual lo 
plan, promote, coordinatn and implomcnt ' ihe 
County of Kenosha's public health program, the 
person in this position will carry out administrative 
and supervisory rcsporisihjlltlns, acting as assistant 
lo the Director of Healfh and as Director in his/her 
at)sence. 

Requirements inclurlcgradualion from anaccrori- 
ited school of nursing with a Master's Degree in 
f^lursing preferred: Three to five years supervisory 
nursing experience. 

.Starting salary is $44,381 -$4f»,401 with an excel- 
lent benefit package, lo apply, suhmit a com- 
pleted County application or send resume with 
cover tetter to: Kenosha County,. Personnel 
Department, Courthouse Annex, Room A-3, 
912 - S6th Street, Kenosha, Wl 53140. 

Wo encourage applications from minorities, dis- 
ablr;d, fetnales, veterans and others.. 
Appllcaliom must be received by Monday, 
AugmtIS, 1994 

An iifflrmjilve flclton equal opfXHlunily employpf 

. l Ib 



I 




CNA's 

1. Are you looking for flexibility m your schedule? 

2. Are you looking for a facility that is progressive 
and that offers competitive salaries? 

3. Are you looking for benefits and health packages 
that are optional and tit your needs? 

If you answered "yes" to any of the above, we would 
ettioy the opportunity to meet with you and discuss 
your future with MAPLE HILL NURSING CENTER. 
Call Suzy for further details on how you can become a 
member of our team. 

(708)438-8275 . 



; CNA or NA ■ { 

S Employment Opportunity J 

{ Full and Part Time Positions Available J 

2 OM/PR Available { 

* All shifts, with PM and Night differential * 
Training on sight. Classes available 



* 

* 

* 
* 

* 



Terrific Summer Employment 

Excellent Starting Rate. 
• For more information call: 

Debi Jung, 

Director of Nursing 

708-S26-S551 

Care Centre of Wauconda 

176 Thomas Court 
Wauconda, Illinois 60084 



* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 

* 



MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH 




DIRECT 
CARE 



NIGHT 
SHIFT 



<==:^ 



.*«***«*****«*****************«**** 



TH E RE 8IDEWT IS 

AT THE HEART OF 

AIXWEDOI 



Immediate 
openings for 

Direct 

Care 

Workers 

Full or 

Part Time. 

WUUngto 

train for 
poBttlons. 

(708) 438-5050 



RN/LPN 

. bnmedlAte 
openli^. NIflhts 
9pm - 5:30aiii. 

Contact 
Candy Sabay 



W ii, v-|l 



p.-i -i .J'. 





AuqusT 9f 1 994 UkflANi 




RsXlASSIFIED 





220 



HelpWaated 
fUll-Time 



220 



RelpW«ated, 
FnUrTlroe 



TEACHER^EACHERS AIDES 

Now hiring for our 

Grayslalte and Ubertyvllle 

[3ay Care Center. Full and 

Part Time, Experience a 

must, education a ptua. 

(708)548-3455 



f ELEHAIIKETEIIS & 
UCAL ilLIVERY 

Earn $200+/week. 

Cash paid daily. 

No experience, will train. 

Apply today, start lodayl 



(708) f 4f -9140 



HOUSEKEEPER 

Looldng for well 

organized and 

dependable full 

and part time 

housekeepers. 

Apply in person only please 

11:00am -3:00 pm or 

6:00pm -9:00pm 

GVRNEECONrORTlNN 

60S0 Gumee MUb Otcle East 

Gumec, IL 60031 



MOLD 
MAKB^ 

Fast growing, progrei- 
tlv* comptny has Imnw' 
diBta op«nIng for person 
axperiinccd in building, 
repairing and maintaining 
piattic Injection motda. 
Clean, modem, air condi- 
tioned tool room. 
Competitive wage. 45/50 
hr week. Automated 
Mould Industries, 5001 

I AMI Drive, Fllchmond, IL 
60071 ei&47d-4S61 



Engineering 



METRA, Metropolllan Rail, 
the ctjfporaliofi responslbe for 
commuter rail activity In North- 
eastern Illinois, is currently re- 
cruiilng for qualiiied candl* 
dates tor the position of 



SIGNAL 
ENGINEER 



Under the direction of the 
Director, Signal Engineering, 
provides services for the 
analysis, planning, specifying, 
and design of signal systems 
and equipment. Designs cir- 
cuit prints for capital improve- 
ments; reviews signal system 
spectiications from signal con- 
sultants and monitors field 
construction for capital Im- 
provements. Designs signal 
circuits for highway crossing 
warning systems and writes 
specifications for signal sys- 
tems. Inspects signal equip- 
ment and Installations to 
ensure compliance with Metra 
Standards & Specifications. 

Bachelor's Degree In Eledri- 
cal Engineering or equivalent 
signal design and construction 
Qxpenence. Must have a mini- 
mum of three years of signal 
design and conslnictlon ex- 
perience; and have knowl- 
edge of signal system op- 
erations and signal design 
principles; the ability to apply 
rules and regulations of the 
Fiederal Railroad Administra- 
tion, State of Illinois, and As- 
sociation of American Rail- 
roads. Good oral and written 
communication skills a must. 

Position provides excellent 
benefits with compensation 
based on qualifications as 
compared with position re- 
quirements. Resumes without 
salary histories cannot be 
considered. 

DlTBCtof'Office o/Emp/pyment 




547 W. Jackson Boulevard 

Ctiicago, IL 60661 

Utnorli/ candidates are 

encouraged to apply. 

EEO WF/DfV 



ywassfMwwwsiw 


^^^^^ 


CNC 

MACHINIST 

Dpabte of sct-<jp and opera- 
tion of machining and turning 
centers. 10 hour 4 day week. 
Fxpericnccd only. 

Apply in Person 
Rago Machine 

Pvodncta, Inc. 

3001Rte.12 

Spring Grove, IL 60081 

(815) 675-2346 

EOF 


220 


HelpVaaled 
FDll-Time 


EXPERIENCED SHEET . 
METALWORKER WrtH 
SOME HVAC SERVICE 
BACKGROUND WATfTED. 

• Beneflu 

• Pull Time 
(708) 526-6286 




SECURIY OFFICERS 

Immediate Openings 
in Lake Co. Area, 
II Full and ftrt "lime.. 
II Experience Helpful. 
H We Will Train. Must Have 
■ Dr and Home Phone. 
OLSEN SECURITY SERVICE 
1 {708)623-6300 




NOW 
HIRING 

•Coolcs 

• Customer Service 
Woflcers . 
Part time evenings 
& weekends 

Starting Rate 
$5.00 per hr;- "■ 
Apply In Person 

501 W UBEIOY 
WflUCONDII 




! ■ Bxperiencea ■ ! 

NUNTiiisft |; 
::wuiMmHMNiis:; 

■: Needed \\ 

\ iQualified Individuals; musti , 
1 'be self-molivated and con-J i 
1 [fldGnt in all painting ^^ay-j i 
• ,ing and wallpapering pro-, ' 
' icedures. 5 years experl-i ! 
1 lence required. « , 

; ! (708) 831-3421J ; 


JVVVVVVUVVUVVVVnrW 






SUBSTTTUTE BOOKKEEPER AND PAYROLL CLERK 

Position requires experience in accounts receivable and 

payable as well as basic payroll functions. Must be computer 

literate. Contact: Stephen A. Shuda, Superintendent, Fox 

Lake Grade School District 114, 17 North Itirest, Fox Lake, 

Illinois. Phone: (70B) 587-8275 or Fax: 587-8296 



220 


HetpWaatcd 
FnU-Ttme 




220 


HelpWnled 
FaUrTime 


1 SHEET 

1 METAL 
1 SHOP 

1 seeking a responsible 

person with experience 

setting up Amada ' 

Brake Presses. 
Jj- Please Call 
1 (708) 473-1047 




BEAUTICIAN 

Ourteng lerrn care facility 
has a part-time opportunity 
for a Beautician to work 
with the elderly. This posi- 
tion offers the chance to 
work Independently with 
flexible hours. Call or 
apply in person. 
{708)249-2400 
North Shore Terrace 
2222 W. 14th St. 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
equal opportunity employer 1 


- MAKE YOUR OWN HOUHSt 

Nalioiul catalog company seeks full and part. time 

CUSTOMER SERVICE reprpvnlatives. Excellent 

oommunleation skills neassa7. Attractive wage/benefil package. 

Flexible hours, days, evenirvgs and weekends • you chooscl 

CALL SILVIA: (708)615-2110 



r 



DIRECT CARE 



1 



staff needed to work In a specialized program 
w/adolescents w/autlsm. 2 yrs. exper. working 
w/the developmentally disabled & prior beiiavior 
mgmt. exper. required. College degree preferred. 
Pay negotiable dependent on exper. & education. , 
Send resume to: BLARE House, Inc., 4010 Lake 
I Park, Park City, IL 60085. EOE. No phone calls, j 



Saks Fifth Avenue, The Clearinghouse 

is looking for friendly energetic people to fill the following 

cntry-lcvcl full-time and part-time positions: 

, • Cashiers 

• Customer Service Representatives 

• Loss Prevention Detective 

Our positions include day, night and weekend hours, we 

require flexibility when scheduling. Please apply in person at 

the store located in the Gumee Mills Malt, Suite 421 (right 

across from Waccamaw). Our phone number is 

(708)662-0988. We an; an E/O/E, M/F. 



Bj^^jj ^ if^i^ s ^sbiim^^^^i^^^SSisi^^ss&BimsaB^imi&M 



ELECTRICIAN 

North side manufacturer is looking for an experienced elec- 
trician. You wlli be working on several projects. 
Apply In person at: 
NU.WAY SPEAKER PRODUCTS, ISlC. 
945 N. Anita Avenue 
Antioch. IL 60002 
or call Jack Slegel at (708) 395-5141 



i[piafan3JBf^^i^jasmiS^SSSSSSSSS!SSSim 



iuper 



renter 



tOPEN 24 HOURS) 

ONE STORE ONE STOP 
ONE OREAT IDEA 

Wa are boklng for applicants tor positions In the following areas: 

*OVERNIQHT QROCERY STOCK 
*OVERNIQHT FASHIONS 
Part Time 
^UTILITY CLERKS 
•QROCERY STOCK 
•CUSTOMER QRBETERS 
.*LUBB TECH 

•AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE WRITER 
•PHONE OPERATOR 
•DELI SERVICE 
•CHECK-OUT SERVICE 

ExptrttncMl Pari Tim* 

•CAKE DECORATOR 

W« EncoungoAppSoMtiom From All InttnsM Sanior 
Ciiaent A StuSonta Wanting Full orPMrt-Tum Emphytmnt 

EXCELLENT STARTING WAGES AND BENEFITS 

APPLICATIONS WILL ■■ TAKIN AT) 
419 N. MHwaukM Av*. 
Vtmon Hllli, IL tOOtl 
Afiply at ttia Layaway Dapartmant 
Mon.-tat 10 a.m. to ■ p.m. 
Iln th« Inletast of lalaly and to pronwis » aBfe production worki 
LnvifonfTMnl K-Mart itorai conducts « prt-tmploymani drug till.' 
I An Equal Opportunlly Emptoyar. 



PRINT SHOP ASSISTANT 

Decoiel, a fast growing picture frame manufacturer, is 
seeking a well-motivated individual with 1-2 years 
experience operating a Multilith 1950 and 1250 two- 
color off-set press. Some camera knowledge a plus, but 
not necessary, Apply in person or send resume to: 
Personnel Dept., Decorel, 444 E. Courtland, 
Mundelein, IL 60060. 



Now Accepting AppHcatlo na Fo r 

PROBU€XEO]!ir WORfiXiRS 

For Iflt & end Shifts 

Full Company Benefits 
Apply In Person 8 a,m. to Sp.m, 

MPRTM SnSAfiffi FRODCaS 

945 AnHa Antioch, IL 

Equal Opportunity Employer . 



m 




KinderCare" 

'Now hiring for our new "State of the Art" 
KinderCare in Gumee, Illinois 

TEACHERS 

Intmsted Applicants Please Call (708) 360-1135 




IS NOW HIRING FOR 
THE FALL SEASON. 



• Day and Night shift hours are available. 
Schedules can work around school. Premium 
pay for dayshift and closers; We also have 
management opportunities available. 

If interested apply at: 

20 S. Route 12 in Fox Lake or 

118 W. Rollins Road in Round Lake Beach 



MACHINE OPERATORS 

2xtd & 3rd Shifts 

Operation and monitoring of our automatic 
machines. Requires careful observation and 
attention to detail. Familiarity with everyday 
' tools is a plus. 

2nd & 3rd Shifts 

. Visually inspect microelectronic components 
under a microscope. Experience is not neces- 
sary for this inspection position. 

Generally, 2nd shift hours 3:00 pm - 11:30 pm 
3rd shift hours 11:00 pm - 7:30 am 

Please apply In person weekdays between 
8 am - 4:30 pm, asl< for Linda In Personnel. 

COILCRAFT is an International manufacturer of 

precision electronic devices located In Cary, 

tIKnoIs at the corner of Silver l^ke Road and 

Three Oaks Road. 



Scrt&yuz^ 



1102 SILVER LAKE iOAD • CARV 



220 



IldpVantcd 
mil-Time 





HcfpWMted 
FHU.Ttaie 



CHILD CARE-RELATED PROFESSIONAL 

OPPORTUNITIES AND EDUCATION 
YWCA of Northe3utem4llinois 
C3iitd Can Resource and Kefernl Pro ff^tn: 
•Program Director (Director Qualified) 
•Child Care Provider Training and Recruitment 
•Corporate Specialist . 

Early ctillclhood experience, BA degree, excellent oral,and written 
ikllls; must meet IL'DCFS requirements. Salaries cornmcnsuratc 
with qualifications. Resume to: YWCA of Northeastern illinots, 
2 1 33 Bel vidcre, Waukcgan, IL 60085, attention Lee Ann or Mary. 



• M s^f^fms^mi^s^m^ s ^s^t^m^f ^ 



Red^ 
Lobste£ 

LAKEHIillST HAS A LINB ON FUNft FUnBIUTr 

NOW TAUNfi APPUCAHONS fOR: 

SERVERS 

HOSnrS/HOSTESSES 

BARTENDERS 

rttasaap^ in person between 2pm - 4pm 

900 LakeMirst Rd. Waukegan 

Tt tn u equal oppottiulty ei^ilafcr 



• Kindergarten • Preschool 
• After School 

YMCAis looking for reaponsible, 

energetic, and professional people to 

teach at our Lake VUla child care center. 

Must be DCFS certified. Part time and 

fuU time available with benefits. 

Please call Andrea 

(708) 356-400a 



miDAS 



Full Time 



AUTO TECHNICIAN 

We have an Immediate opening In our busy shop. 
Must have brake and under-car experience. ASE 
certified preferred but not necessary. Only motivat- 
ed indlvlauats need applyl 



We offer. 
'Excellent Pay Plan 
*Pald Vacation 



'Good Insurance 
*Paid Holidays 



Also have an opening for a 

COUNTER PERSON 

$5 to $7 per hour. No experience necessary, will tain. 

Apply In Person To Bob OrArmondo 

MIDAS MUFFLER 



1950 Rt. 83 



Round Lake Beach, IL 



NOTICE OF VACANCY 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. The Hotjsing Authority 
of Champaign County (HACQ, Illinois, seeks an Executive 
Director. This person will have overall management and fis- 
cal responsibility for 706 owned/managed uoits.and 471 
Section 8 units. The HACC also administers a multi-year 
modernization program and a dnig elimination grant. The ' 
HACC also adrainistcre two self-sufftciency programs. 

This is highly responsible administrative, supervisory, and profcs- 
sioEial position directing the operation of the Housing Authority. 

Work involves directing and coordinating, through subordi- 
nate supervisors, the activities of the various operating divi: 
sions comprising Uie Housing Authority and acting as policy 
and procedures administrator Work also involves determin- 
ing operating financial policies; and acting as a liaison to the 

community, keeping aware of current housing and social 
problems and developing plans accordingly, an employee in 
this class is expected to exercise considerable bdependent 
judgment and personal initiative within the framework of 
established policies and legistativ-e requirements. Work is 
performed under die general policy direction of the Housing 
Authority Board of Commissioners and in compliance with 
legislative requirements. Supervision is exercised over pro- 
fessional, technical and clerical subordinates. 

Salary Range: SSO.OOO • S60,000 per year based on 
experience and qualifications. 

Complete application kits with a complete job description 

may be obtained by writing to: 

Roger B. Marcum, Interim Executive Director 

Housing Aiithority of Champaign County 
102 E. University Ave., Champaign, IL 61820 



..,-» -.'■«. -.((is..-.' 




CLASSIFIED UkclANd NcwspApcK AuquiT 9, 1 9t4 



i 




Help Wanted 
FaU-Tfane 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU-Tifflc 



ASSISTANT 

If you arc enthusiastic, 
moiivatcd, and enjoy ihe 
elderly, then wc have (he job 
for pu. Join our Activity 
Department team and look 
forward to a rewarding 
career In long tenu care. 

Call 
Jerri 

M-F 9-5 
|(708) 438-8275J 



LOAN 

PROCESSOR 

Richmond Bank is seek- 
ing a highly organized 
individual to assist with 
loan processing, credit 
investigations and file 
organization. Excellent 
time management and 
customer service skills 
are required. Call 

(708)549-5831, 

cxt 510 anytime to 

complete an automated 

phone application. 



Receptionist 

North suburban non- 
smoking office fieeks 
receptionist with, excel- 
lent telephone manner. 
Must be experienced, 
well organized, able to 
handle volume of calls 
and help with a variety 
of clerical duties. WP 
6.1 required. We offer 
beautiful offices, co*m- 
petitive salary and ben 
efits. 

Please call 
Joan Brown at 

708/295-4404 



Production 
Assistant 

A full service Direct 
Mall Marketing Co. is 
seeking an entry-level 
production assistant. 
Qualified candidate 
must have excellent 
organizational and 
communication skills. 
Will be trained to coor- 
dinate all aspects of our 
clients' Direct Mail pro- 
grams. Send resume to: 

Attn: Ian 

AMEfucjiir 
Narkctdiq Sehvicgs 

955 CcunpuB Dr. 
Mundelein, TL 60060 | 



^', 



Warehouse 
AreVsaLooUniRn- 

nofKGbutiir 
lUtioo RdmbnnemoBtr 
Jkhrucemeot OpportanlllcAT 
KsepReadlni^ 

Wa are looking for a laboratory 

products manufactuior in 
Sanington, and due to growth, 

we need indtviduaJs for. 
WarahouMi/ShippIng 
You win pack linished goods, ' 
bad and undload trucks, and 
assist In the shipping and ware- 
house depailnfwnts;. Some 
heavy lifting naqulred. Stable 
work history requirad. 

Ws offer a gi^at work ervimn- 
ment with an excellent Iwnerils 

package. Please call (708) 
381-7050, 28W092 Commeicial 
Ave,, Barrington, IL 60010. EOE 

BARNANT COMPANY 



220 



HelpWaolcd 
FuU-Tlme 



MACHINE SHOP 
FLOOR SCHEDULER 

MMS Automation la seeking an 
individual with 3-«- years 
mactilned parts, {ob shop 
schoduling and MRP experi- 
ence. APICS cerllllcatlon pre 
ierrad, 

Wa offer a conTpellilve corn* 
pensatlon and bensllla pack- 
age In an environment- that 
encourages growth. For Invne 
diate consideration, apply In 
person between the hours ol 
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at: 

MHS AUTOMATION 

1655 North Woods Street 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

EOE M/F/D/V 



Cooks 



Full Time 

Cooks for 
Dietary Dept. 

Contact 
Vol Johnson 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(708) 438-5050 



MaRRIOIT'S LlNCOUVSHIRe RiSORT 

FuU Time G.S.A. Flex. Shift 

A combination of Front Desk, BcII Stand, & tclccommuni- 
calions. Ideal applicant pos.^csscs prior customer service 
experience w/desirc to. satisfy & exceed guest needs. 
Weekends & holidays ore required. Excellent hospitality &, 
communication skills. Cash handling & computer expxui- 
cncc is a +. 

Apply in Person 

Monday and Tuesday 

9 a.nu - 4:30 p.m 

(708) 634-0100 

We efter ■ canpeilUw wigc tnd bcicnt ptdafc 
We ve Ul EGO/AA Bnqilaycr. 



Recuaud yoauseLf 

Professional Secretaries, Word Processors & 
Receptionists 

choose to work in LibertyviHe, Mundelein, 
Lincolnshire, Lake Forest or Vernon Hills 

vacation pay ** insurance ** bonuses ♦* discounts 

Interim Personnel 

Libertyville (708)680-0115 



MAINTENANCE MECHANIC 

Decoi^l, Inc., a leading manufacturer and di.stributor of 
picture fi^mes and frame art is currently seeking a reli- 
able individual to join our maintenance department on 
the 2nd shift. Candidate must have their own tools, 
strong electrical background, and good mechanical 
ability. E?cperience with automated equipment a plus, 
Have knowledge of building maintenance and 3 to S 
years experience in maintenance field. " 

Apply in person M-F 8-10 am 

Decorel, Inc. . 

444 E. Courtland, Mundelein, IL 

EOE 



A GREAT PLA CE TO BE... 

KFC* 

This nswiy-ownad KFC Is ranked among tha top In Ihe qulck-sonrtce 
restaurant Industry ami we're proud ol IL To slay on top, we need ser- 
vIc«-orlQn(ed, customer-focused Team Members and Snifi Supervisors 
who care about a ^ob well done* and have smiles and enthusiasm to 
pnjvfde 101% customer satlsJactJon. 

*Exceltont Starting Pay 
'Meal Privileges 
'Career Advancement 



'Flexible Hours 
'Flexible Scheduling 
'New Owners 



Immediate lull-Hmo and part-time openings now avallabta. 
Please ask for and comptote an application at your Anlloch. IL KFC. 
New owners, a great team. Apply Nowl Mom, too • We hava great 
hours lor youll 

325 Route 173 

Antioch, IL 
708-395-05S5 



THE ROUND LAKE ARM PARK DISTRIQ 
CHILD DEVELOPMpr CENTER 

is now accepting applications for 

Lead Teacbers 

Full time & Part time positions available 

Qualifications - 1 year of college with 

6 credit hours in Early Childhood Education 

and 1 year experience working with children. 

also 

Afterschool Assistant Recreation Counselors 
Part time, 2:30 - 6 pm, Monday through Friday 
Qualifications - 18 yeats or older, ^ 
H.S. Diploma or GED 

Apply at 814 Hart 
Round Lake, IL 



220 



flelpWniled 
ndl-rTlflie 



220 



Help Wanted 
mU-Tlme 



CONSTRUCTION - GENERAL LABOR 

Kimball HIU Homes, a leading Chlcagoland 
homebullder. Is looking for an experienced con- 
struction laboiier to perform general clean up 
duties at our Haiyan Farms project located In 
Grayslake. Please caU Jeff at (708) 548-1095 
(Monday through Friday -- 7:00 A.M.-3:30 P.M.) 
to schedule an appointment THIS IS A TEM- 
PORARY POSITION. 




Growing TelccommunicaUons Company needs 

experienced outside sales personnel in N & NW 

collar counties of Chicago, We offer an attractive 

compensation package with company benefits and 

training. Call or send resume to: 

Carl Meyer, RADICOM, INC. 

2604 N. Chapel Hill Rd., McHenry, IL 60050 
Phone: (815) 385-4224 Fax; (815) 385-4368 



D 
O 
n 

D 

n 

D 
D 
D 
D 



GENERAL 
FACTORY 



a 
a 
a 

s 

a 
n 

n 

D 



nTransfoirmer mfgr. neecfe m^n & women for assembly, n 
D inspection, and packing assignments. Wa need ener-gj 
ogebc, self-starters A team playersi n 

D 5 

•4 Day - 40 Hour Work WMk, Mon.-Thurs. 

•Life, Health & Dontal Benanti 

•401 K Ratlramant Plan 

•Paid Vacation & Holidays 

Apply in Person To: 

ACrOWN ELECTROCOIL 

2414 Hlghview St. Spring Grovo, IL 60081 
(815) 675-6641 



D 

D 
D 

D 
D 
D 
D 
Ml 
D 
D 
D 
D 

n 

HBayBBBiai 



n 
d 

n 
a 
a 
d 

n 

3 

d 

a 
a 

s 



BANKING 

I North suburban bank has the following positions available for 
rcspoQsible individuals with excellent intcipersoQal skills: 

TfAtr. - FT - GuraceAVaukegan - heavy cash handling expe- 
rience with excellent balascing record, computer literate 
helpful. 

Proof Operator - FT - Mon-Fri - Waukegan - 2+ years 
experience in single pocket proof. Excellent keystroking 
accuracy ability. Other duties include microftlming, 
I research, etc. 

Good salary and benefit package 

Bank of Northern Illinois, N.A. 

Call 708-623-3800 for interview appointment 

e/o/e m/f 






Analyst/Programmer 

Thelen Sand & Gravel, Inc, Antioch/ IL 

Duties: Plans, develops, tests and documents com 
puter programs, applying knowledge of programming 
techniques and computer systems. Evaluates user 
requests for new or modified program. Consults with 
user to identify current operating procedures, cmd clari- 
fy program objectives. Formulates plan outlining steps 
required to develop program using structured analysis 
and design. Minimum 2 yis. experience with each of tlie 
following: Systems PDP-11 RSTS/E, VAX VMS, MacOS, 
DOS & ■ Windows Networks Ethernet, Appletalk 
Language VAX Basic, Oracle, Data Base Oracle, 
HyperCard. Understanding of Telephony, Spreadsheets, 
and any OOP language a plus. 

Send resume to DP Search Conunittee, Thelen Sand & 
Gravel, Inc. 28955 W. Rt. 173, Antioch, IL 60002. 

eoed/v 



ADTBRTISnfG HMM 

Lakeland Newspapers, Lake County's largest weekly 
newspaper group, is seeking an Advertising Aooount 
Execuive. 'The candklate will be responsi)le for fiekl 
sales calls, devekiping a key area in Lake County 
and must possess excellent skills In interpersonal 
oomfnunkalkKi, creativity and personal responsibility. 
Ibe candkjate must also be sislf motivaled and able 
to work with minimal amount of superviskin, enjoy 
variety and be able to handto multiple tasks. An auto- 
mobile Is necessary (gas compensation will be 
made.) If you are professtonal, energetx; artd pos- 
sess al of the above characteristics ws are interest- 
ed in talking to you. A candklate shouM have previ- 
ous sales experier)oe. Please send resume or call: 

Jill DePasquale 

Lakeland Newspapers 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(708) 283-8161 



A 



J 



220 



Help Wanted 
Itall-nme 



] 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fan-Time 



ACCOUNTS PAYABUE CIHK 

We have an Immcdiole opening for nn experienced accounls 
payable clerk. Musi be mature, reliable and moUvalcd, 

CaU GaU at State OU 
(708) 546-2161 



Sales 

CENTRAL VACUUM SVSTElltS, INC- 

is 
HIRING 3 SALES REPRESENXiTTVES 

to ca II on radio genera ted leads 
in the Chicago suburbs. 

Prefer vacuum backgrourici but 
will train in-home experienced salespersons. 

Call Dale Smith 

(708)940-1155 



ASSISTANT DEPT. MANAGER/ 
LEAD PERSON 

1ST AND 2ND SfflFTS 

Due to tremendous growth, America's largest mfg of picture 
Trames and framed on has immediate openings for Asst. Dept. 
Manngcrs/Lead People on the 1st & 2nd shifts. Must be expe- 
rienced, self-motivated individuals working in a high-voiume, 
fast-paced environment Qualified candidates will bcrespon 
sjble for 2 assembly production lines containing 25-30 pro 
duction workers. Salary range $8-$12/hr plus benefits. Send 
resume to: • 

Decorel, Inc. 

. 444 E. CouHland, Mundelein, IL 60060 
Attn: Dan Marquez 

EOE . . -/_ . . 



Inside Sales 

Do you enjoy variety? Do you enjoy a challenge? 
Do you thrive in a fast paced, dynamic environment? 
If so, you could be the person we 're look tng for! 

Lakeland Newspapers is looking for someone to 
join our exciting Sales Dcpartmcnl. You will be a 
success if you possess organizational and 
communication skills and arc self motivated. To 
find out more about this exciting opportunity, call 
Ann Roberta at: 



(708) 223-8161 

or send resume to : 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 
. Attn: Ann Roberts 



-.n 



INJECTION MOLDING 
TECHNICIAN 

Our newly establishetl molding department is in 
need of an experienced molding technician to do set- 
up and on-gomg cycle improvement in an automat- 
ed molding environment. Applicants must have a 
strong background in close tolerance molding and 
be able to work with minimuin supervision. 
Quartex Offers: 

Liberal Benefit Program 

Competitive Wages 

Pleasant Working Conditions 

Please mail or fax resume to: 

QUARTEX 

1012 Host Drive 

Lake Geneva, WI 63147 

Fax #: 414-248-8552 

Attention: T.L.N. 

»»;^»Ht*»»*»»»»»* ***** **** 



TRUCK TECHNICIANS 

We are expanding again. Additional business and 
the resulting promotions have created immediate openings 
in our Waukegan location. If you aie looting to learn heavy 
duty truck maintenance and want to grow v^th the most 
dynamic company in the tmck leasing industry, call us now 
and apply for one of the following positions. 

(2) Customer Service Representatives - 

Duties Include: Vehicle inspection, vehicle fueling, light 
vehicle and bulldhig maintenance. Entry level position. 

(1) Service Technician- I 

Duties Include: Vehicle maintenance, vehicle fueling, 

minor mechanical and electronic diagnostics, equipment 

repair, bcperience prefened. 

We offer an excellent starting salary and competitive 

benefit package hicludlng, health and dental Insurance, 

company paid retirement and 401iC plan. 

PENSKE TRUCK LEASING 

3069 Washington Street 
Waukegan, IL 60085 
(708) 623-3069 

■ AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 




tf 



1 

I'i 



i 



Good beginnings do make a difference 



The theme "Good Beginnings 
' Never End" was adapted by the Child 
, Care Coalition of Lake County 
3 betc'ause the members believe ttrat 
>y/lth good, early childhood beginnings 
? we can reduce the many problems In 
.(our society. The logo Joining hands, 
f represents the collaboration effort 
Iffeeded to aGhleve'"a:g6al of good 
i beginnings for all children. When we 
'utilize the forces of the business 
^co mm. unity, parents, 

teachers/providers, policy makers, all 
I working In a united way. we will make 

a-dlfference. 
■■•■■■ High quality costs. Poor quality 



costs more In the long run. The 
Carnegio report has clearly verified 
this fact and recommends that as a 
society we address four key areas; 
•Promote responsible parenthood 

. •Guarantee quality child core 
choices 

• Ensure ,„Q.qpd ^healthy and 
protection ' ■■ 

; •fVloblllze communities to support 
young children and their families 

The Coalition Is a not-for-profit 
organization of agencies and 
Individuals working In partnership on 
behalf of young children and their 
families. The Coalition's energies have 



open House 
3:00-5:00 

Aug. 28tfi 
(Sunday) 
Kindergarten 
Program 



A FREE MORNING AT 
A 




Creative Montessori 

Year Round Pre-School & Child Care 
For Children 2 - 6 Years Old ~ 
Please Call For Appointment • 949-6340 
1 220 Lake Street in Mundelein 






^ofm 



mters 



focused on quality care and strong 
families. During the past five years, 
since, the organization was founded 
the Coalition has. Implemented 
advocacy, public policy and 
education Initiatives to address 
responsible parenthood, quality 
choices, protection and community 
moblilzatlonrExampIes Include; ■;:^:~'"," 

"Employer's Roundtable, employer 
education through Workshops 

•Week of the YoUng Child, parent 
education and celebration of children 

•Collaboration to address issues 
regarding Intergenerational care, 
violence Intervention, parenting 
education, licensing standards, etc. 

•Cosponsorship of various forums 
as the Voices for Illinois Children, Kids 
Count . .. 

■ •Linkages through newsletters, 
meetings and networking with other 
statewide agencies 

•Partnership project with Lakeland 
Newspapers 

We look foHA/ard to expanding our 




advocacy and services In the 
community to help ensure high quality 
care for all children In Lake County. 
We Intend to become a leader in 
Illinois. 

For more information contact the 
Child Care Coalition of Lake County, 
P.O. Box 1252, Highland Park, IL 
60035.— by BARBARA HALEY, 
Director, Health Facilities Div., 
Lake County Health Dept. 



QfiQ«QiQ§Q§Q.0SQgQ.QSQSQ.QHQg OIQ.01QgOSy.0 gtJlQm' 









I 






McCardiy's Create-A-Book oiLindeiihurst, IL 

Personalized Children's Stoxy Books & Baby Books 




2.00 Off 

(HetnU Price *14J95 + »2.00 S/H) 



Fall 
Pre-School 

•2 1/2-$ Ttv m 
•9«Rhll:]Sain/l}:30pin-}pni 
•Not comb'mid w/D>jr Itn 
•JodaGmim StnKtNnd 

•4 yr. Htfftti Ttachth 



Full Day Private 
Kindergarten 

•Cirtifitd Tcadien, lO-i ntio 
•individnlaed ctnitn 
•Computtn, cduotional gunn, 

art, phfiiol dcvilopnt 

•Nutrknnal lendw 

andiracki ' 

BtfmiAfttr 

SdmlCut 

incMid 



•Bound In Hard Cover 

•36 Pages-Laser Printed 

•Fun and Educational 

•Beautiful Color Illustrations 

•Personalized Baby Books 

•Over 18 Titles 

Place Child's Name, Age. Town, Friends In Hach Story 
Making Your Child The Star! Order By Phone Or Mail. 

McCarthy's create-a-book ^jsi, box io8s •. limdenhurst. il mu • (708) 356-0031 



i 

I 

i 




Full Day 
Care 

•2 m-i jtu oldi 
•Stnttartd Scttinf 
•i:li-iM f.tiL Covtnft 
•WctUy Thtim I Topw 

Ind Sfcakm I Tfip 
•livloffn Compiten 




>7\^ 



708-556-2288 

309 Granada BKd. • Undenhurst, 11 
1/2 Bik* So. of QtsaiiL Ave. 



'Good BEqJNNiNqs Never EncJ' 

In conjunction with the Child Care Coalition of Lake County, we are proud 
to publish this very special section to help raise consciousness of the adult 
community regarding quality child care. 

Lakeland Newspapers is committed to providing comprehensive informa- . 
tion on quality child care to parents, providers and businesses alike. 

We welcome your support and invite your comments. 



Jiil DePasquale — Advertising Manager 

Rhonda Vinzant — Editor fn Chief 

Roseiie Love — Layout Coordinator 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 




I^XOOD BEGINNINGS- bMMid Newspapers ' Auqusr 7^ 1994<> 



^00\) $,E6iVMM^5 '^^^^'^ '^^^ ^-^* 



Recommended schedule for routine acllve Immunization of normal Infants and children. 



Vaccine 


2 months • 


4 months 


6 monhts 


12-15 
months 


15 months 


4-6 years 
(before 
school 
entry) 


DTP 


DTP 


DTP 


DTP 




DTaP 
(DTP)" 


DTaP 
(DTP) 


OPV 


OPV 


OPV 


OPV 






OPV 


MMR 








MMR 




MMR'I 


Hib 

A§ 

B§ 


Hib 

Hib 


Hib 
Hib 


Hib 


Hib' 
Hb* 






Vaccine 


At Blrtl 
Hosplt 
Dlscha 


h (Before 

al 

rce) 


1-2 months 


4 months 


6-18 months 


HB# 
Option 1 


Hepatitis B 


Hepatitis B# 
Hepatitis B* 


Hepatitis B* 


HepatiUs B^ 
Hepatitis B;^ 



NEW FOR '94: Half Day Preschool 



YMCA Before and After 
^^ School Camps 



Plus 1/2 Day Kuidergarteii Enrichment 







mJNNROAD • LAKE VILLA, ILLINOIS 

CaU 336-4000 



■i)! 



Simply said: "This is wonderful"... 
Minee Subee in the Park 

...Offering a warm and caring environment with quality 
programs and equipment for each age and individual attention 
within each group. ..in a new day care center said to be the 
premier one in the Midwest. Child and life long successes 
begins with our education, social and physical development 
programs. These are nurtured with nutritious home made 
food. ..within a secure and joyful environment. 



0: 





400 Marriott Drive, Lincolnshire 

Call us: 634-1982 

In the Lincolnshire Corporate Center 



Immunization: The right thing do 



DTP: Diphtheria Tetanus, and Pertussis 
Vaccine. A combined DTP and Hib vac- 
cine Is also available. 
DTaP: Diphtheria. Tetanus, and acellular 
Pertussis Vaccine; OPV:Uve Oral Polio 
Vaccine; MMR: Measles. Mumps, and 
Rubella Vaccine. 

Hib; Haemophilus Influenzae type b 
Conjugate Vaccine. A combined DTP 
and Hib vaccine Is also available. 
Recommended schedules vary by 
manufacturer. For recommendations 
specific to the vaccine being used, 
consult the package Insert. 

§Schedule A:HbOC (Lederle Praxis) 
or PRP-T (Pasteur Merleux distributed by 
SmIthKllne Beecham. and Connaught) 
or DTP-HbOC (Lederle Praxis) 

§Schedule B:PRP-OMP (Merck, 
Sharp & Dohme) 

HB:HepatltlsB Vaccine 

+Can begin at six weeks of age. 

• 'Some experts prefer to give these 
vaccines at 18 months. 

ITThe American Academy of 
Pediatrics recommends this dose of 
MMR vaccine be given at entry to mid- 
dle sctxjol or Junior high school. 

•After the primary Infant vaccination 
series Is completed, any of the licensed 
Hib conjugate vaccines may be used 
as a booster dose at age 12 to 15 
months. 

#For Infants born of HBsAg-nega- 
tlve mothers. Premature Infants of 
HBsAg-negatlve mothers should 
receive the first' dose of the hepatitis 
B vaccine series at the time of hospi- 
tal discharge or when the other rou- 
tine childhood vaccines are Initiated. 



(All Infants born of HBsAg-posltlve 
mothers should receive Immunopro- 
phyloxls for hepatitis B as soon as pos- 
sible afterbirth). 

9tHepatltls B vaccine con tse given 
simultaneously with DTP (or DTaP), OPV 
MMR, and/or Haemophilus Influenzae 
type b conjugate vaccine (Hib) at the ' 
same visit. 

(Nov. 1993, National Immunization 
Program, Public Health Services, 
Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention). 

The above schedule shows several 
approved changes In ttie cNidhood 
immunization program. As stated, ttiese 
are recommendations and Individual 
physicians or immunization clinics may 
follow a slightly different timetable. 
Discuss any concerns or questions with 
your health care provider. These new 
recommendations will help young chil- 
dren become appropriately Immunized 
sooner thus ensuring protection against 
ttie vaccine preventable diseases at an 
earilerage. 

Unfortunately, many people believe 
these contagious lllr>esses areno longer 
a problem among children. These com- 
municable diseases ore still present and 
could cause serious Illness In unprotect- 
ed children. 

It Is never too late to begin Immu- 
nizations In a child, no matter what 
age. Contact your physician, or the 
Lake County Health Dept. at 360-31 14 
for Information.— by CHARIENE HEN- 
DRICKSON, BSN, RN, C. NHA. 
Institutional Nurso Consultant. Lako 
County Health Dept. 



'^"v;. 






V=D 




^^£) Pitter Patter Child-Care,Inc. 

ofLakeVJUa 

Tip toe Into our child care and register 

with no money down for 

August I 



Reaerve your child's placement at 
Brand l\lew Location 



Pitter-Patter Child Care, Inc. 



Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Spots Available for 6 weeka to 5 yeara 

Open Monday through Friday 
6:3Q am to 6:00 pm 



CALL (815)675-^667 
ask for Tina 

Pitter-Patter into our quality child care and we will show your child that we care! 

DCFS License Applied for 



.It 









n 




^00\> $,E6iVMN^5^t^E.X^^^ i^-^* 



f 



'Raising Your Spirited Child: A Guide for Parents' 



Book 



If you have a child who seems more 
Intense, sensitive, perceptive, and per- 
sistent than other children, you'll want 
to read this book by :^^=^=^=^= 
an early childhood 
educator who also Is 
the mother of a spirit- 
ed child. 

Sheedy Kurclnka — ^^— ^^— 
combines humor with current theories 
about personality development In a 
style ttx3t makes the reader feel she's 
sitting In ttie author's kitchen, talking 
with a wise and empathic friend. 

She sets the tone by describing how 
some parents discover they have a spir- 
ited child; "It could have been the birth 
of your sister-lnlaw's child, the one who 
could be laid down anywtTere and 
promptly went to sleep. Your 
sister-ln-law proudly beamed as ttiough 
stie tiad done something right, while 
your child continued to fume and fuss, 
causing ail \he eyes In ttie room to turn 



with yours?" 

The book assures parents that their 

actions have not made the child splrit- 

==^=^=^= ed. Instead, their 

child— like all chil- 
li £-«/■ cwi dren— !s born with a 
IV t V 1 1 W temperament that 

produces a first arri 
"— '"^""■^^^~~ most natural way. of 
- reacting to the world. For example, ttie 
spirited child might move all over ttie 
bed while sleeping, hold back before 
parttelpatlng. or get upset by surprises. 
. Kurclnka describes how ttie parent's 
own temperament comes Into play. 
Her book Includes charts to tielp par? 
ents develop, "self-portraits' a\ the 
same time ttiat ttiey look at ttielr child's 
temperament, determining whether 
ttie child Is 'cool, spunky, or spirited,' 
Stie also suggests a new yocabutary. In 
wNch parents replace words such as 
■picky" with "selective," 'whiny' with 
"arralytlcal,' and "wild' with "ener- 



Indeed, Kurclnka steers parents Into 
positive thinking from the start when she 
discards the common labels of "diffi- 
cult' or "strong-willed' and calls the 
children ■ "spirited' instead. And— she 
reminds parents often— progress, not 



to you, silently accusing, 'What's wrong gettc* 




Program for Infants 

6 Weeks through Kindergarten 

DCFS Licensed 

Hours; 6:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 



For more Information 

or to schedule a 

tour of the facility 

Call (708) 473-9088 



Accredited by the 

National Academy 

of Early Childhood 

Programs 



i 



• SUPER HEROES ROOM • ENCHANTED FOREST • 



"!«■;,»'; 



F"""^ 



?:-^H^ 



^v:; 









ir TEATIME, 
irPARTTTinE at\ 

Let's fretend"' 



Let*s Pretend is a theme party 
entertainment center where kids 
and adults alike can make-believe. Located at 469 N. Lake 
Street in Mundelein, Let's Pretend was created with the basic 
idea that children need an outlet for their imagination. Eight 
theme rooms and two party rooms provide all the costumes 
any little superhero, cowboy, sports fan, Robin Hood, fairy 
princess, superstar, maiden or shining knight could need to 
make their fantasy believable. 

Children can explore all the rooms and visit a "Vanity 
Station" where they receive the option of face painting, 
washable tattoos, glitter nails, or make-up. 

To reserve a PARTYTI9IE or a TEATIFiB^ just call 
and Let's Pretend will take care of everything, from cus- 
tomized invitations to unique enchanting treat bags. 

Tlhytime is Ham to 6pm 7 "Days a Weei! 



cK. ' 









SM 



't's Trctcni 



:JJj 



perfection is the goal, 

"liaising Your Spirited Child/ pub- 
lished by HarperPerenniol, Is available 
In paperback and at your local library. 
—by CAROL BRUSSLAN. Todchor at. 
Family Network In Highland Park. 



Children's Theme Party 
& Entertainment Center 



TO RESERVE YOUR PARTY 

Call 566-6900 

469 N. Lake St., Mundelein 



• HOLLYWOOD ROOM • SPORTS ROOM • WESTERN ROOM 



A Credo for parents of spirited cMdreni 

(Adapted from Tour Spirited Child') 



1 . You are no\ atone. Research 
Irxiteates ttxat 10 to 20 percent of 
all American children fit the 
description of ttie spirited child, 

2. You did not make your child 
.spirited. You are but one of 

'I many Influences In your child's 
- life. 

3. You are not powerless, You 
con reduce hasstes.and live In 

,, harmony witti your spirited child 
"' with ttie help of Information In 



thls,book, 

4. You tiove permission to take 
care of yourself. Your own need for 
sleep, quiet, uninterrupted adult 
conversaltoa arid tefeure are legiti- 
mate, 

5. You may celebrate arxi enjoy 
tt^ delights of your spirited ctilld. 
By coricentratjng on strer)gtt>s, you 
con appreciate peisorKtHty^trolts 
ttxit will be valued wtien tho^hld 
grows up. 




KIDDIE UNIVERSITY 



We welcome your 3-5 year old chUd for our 2-1/2 hour 
pre-school programs. The school is slate licensed and 
employs a staff of certified teachers. 

Call rtowfor Fall *94 Registration 

356-2718 

37240 Granada, Lake ViUa 



ClU^ 



TM 



Before Se 
After School 
Care! 



We are moving to a new location, 

the United Protestant Church, 

at 54 S. Whitney St. and will continue to 

offer oiur program as we have since 1986. 

(Busing will be provided) 



We offer an educational 
enhancement and recreational 
program geared for school-age 
students (K-G Grade) in a 
supervised andjiin atmosphere. 



NcuJ 
Location; 



CURRICULUM 

• special Interest Activities 

• Arts & Crafts 

• Cooperative Games 

• Playshops 

• Outdoor Games 

• Gym Games 

• Homework "Quiet" Table 



SESSIONS 

• AM Session 

(6:00 a.m. until school) 

• PM Session 

(dismissal until 6:00 p.m.) 

• SCHOOL DAYS OFF 

(6:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.) 

• KINDERGARTEN PROGRAM I 

(6:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.) 



Proudly Serving: Diamond Lake, Grayslake, Lake Villa, 

Ubertyvillef Oak Grove, Vernon Hills, 

Winthrop Harbor, and Zion 

CALL 548-2283 NOW 
to register. •••Space is available. 




n GOOD BEGINNINGS lAkdANd ,<.vvs(>ApERS AuqusT 9, 1994 



i 

■ill 

n 



r — ' '■ ■ ■ 



Is a family care provider the right choice for day care? 



Of all the decisions we make as 
parents, choosing child care Is one 
of the most Important and difficult. 
For many, the choice narrows down 
to center-based child care or 
home-based child care, often 
called family care. 

As working parents, my husband 
and I had to go through the process 
of deciding about child care for our- 
selves. Home-based care was right 
for my Infant son. Then, over the five 
years of providing family day care, 
I've observed many parents making 
their own decisions on child care. 
The following thoughts will help par- 
ents think through this Important 
choice. 

Very often a home-like setting Is 
desirable because it is most like the 
child's own home. The child Is able 
to obsen/e and participate In daily 
domestic activities. Like a parent, a 
sole caregiver offers stable, consis- 



tent care every day without the 
turnover sometimes found in cen- 
ters. The limited number of children 
being cared for provides opportuni- 
ties to nurture wtien needed. 

Since family care sen/es mixed 
age groups, parents can keep sib- 
lings together. There are benefits a 
child receives from forming close 
relationships with other children of 
mixed ages. Cooperation, toler- 
ance, and empathy are a few 
strengths that mixed age groups fos- 
ter. 

When parents can find the right 
day care home in their own neigh- 
borhood, children develop a sense 
of belonging to that neighbor- 
hood. They are able to take part In 
the day-to-day happenings with 
neighborhood children. Children 
develop friendships with the same 
children they will see when they go 
school. 



Bring In coupon and receive 
10% OFF on any program 

Preschool, Full Daycare & 

Klndofgarton, 

Call aboul our other progrema 



1401 S. Lake St. 
jRt* 45f Mundelein 



-USE IHIS COUPOH — — — — ————— — - 

NEW BEGINNmCS 

Montessori 

SCHO 



Progrim* For Children 15 Months Thm 24 
lionth3A2Yn.Thru6Yein. 
CALLFOHMOREINFORHAI 



566'434S 



Located in the Century Assembly 

of God Building just Norlii of Ihe 

Jewel Center on RL 4S 



■«v^ 







B6i$KttalXVAN:fOili0^] 






^plimited Mileage 



^^<|)^r0iR Variety Of timt^ 

;^!^«>pM9tcimBr Service .,- ^ 



lIourA: 

5:50 a.in.-10:30 p.m. M-F 

7 SLm.-7 p.m. SaL & Sun 



^ *i»t«M Ay«a$Dfl'{y o( GMi«{K»« ) 



> V.WHAT MAKES VS OIFFERENTf WE 






o^^^^^^^^ 



^MfeS^a^TOOO 



S^^3^i 



LAKEBLUFF 
VILLAGE CHILDREN'S CENTER 



906 Mulr Avenue 
295-1455 



^hasi 



=K. 



"fl'/^ 



^ffsnt4jji 



w 



'ON 



Daycare 
Hourly Drop-in 
Before & After School 
Preschool 
Ages 2-12 

^^ The Center is a non-profit organization, licensed by the State of Illinois, 
IJGiP and an Affiliato Agency of the United Way of Suburban Chicago. 

""i^S^' Funding is received from the Lake Forest/Lake Bluff United Way. 

CENTER OPENS FOR FALL PROGRAMS AUGUST 22 



Flexible hours are necessary for 
many families. Part-time or irregular 
child care schedules might be avail- 
able from family providers. 
Caregivers sometimes make early or 
late hours of care available for an 
extra fee. 

Often the family needs addition- 
al support. Some providers may be 
willing to run occasional errands for 
parents or be able to transport chil- 
dren to activities such as preschool, 
religious school, or lessons. 

individual "time clocks" of chil- 
dren need to be considered first. 
Although day care home providers 
follow a daily routine, smaller group 
size allows less regimented schedul- 
ing. With fewer children, the 
provider can get to know and be In 
tune with each child's needs. Nap 
time, meals, and quiet versus active 
play will vary with each child. 

With a flexible schedule, coupled 
with smaller group size,. a provider Is 



available to practice good guid- 
ance techniques. A provider can 
help children gain self-control and 
positive behaviors. When parents 
choose home-based child care over 
centerbased care, the parents can 
select an Individual with values simi- 
lar to their own. In a center, the 
director selects the individual care- 
giver. 

Though cost Is another consider- 
ation, the most Important factor 
should be the quality of the pro- 
gram. The Child Care Resource and 
Referral Service of the Waukegan 
YWCA has materials that can help 
parents select a quality family care 
provider who will best meet the Indi- 
vidual family's needs. The informa- 
tion Is available by calling 
662-4247.— by JILL ' ROESNER, 
llconsod day care home provider 
and former licensing representative 
for the Illinois Department of 
Children and Family Servlcef . . 



A 



SMALL WORLD PRE-SCHOOL 



^ 



"WE GIVE YOUR CHILD THE BEST IN LOVING CARE 

¥4 




•QUALIFIED STAFF 
•STATE LICENSED 
•FULL & HALF DAY SESSIONS 
•YEAR AROUND CREATIVE 
PROGRAMS AGES 2 TO 9 
•5 ACRES SUPERVISED PLAYGROUND 



BEFORE & AFTER 

SCHOOL CARE 

WOODLAND 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 



iU,18749 GRAND (RT. 132) GURNEE 

■g (1/4 MILE E. OF RT. 45 ON RT. 132) 



356-13503^ 




We specialize in giving 
our students THE BESTII 

Professional Teachers! - "Sprung" Wood Floors (IHE BESDII 

Performing Opportunities - Private LessonsI 

Runway Modeling & Pageant Training Worksttops! 

Convenient Payment Plans! - MuttI Class & Family Discounts! 

Studyroom&PiayroomI 

Join us at our convenient "uptown" locotlonl 

Plenty of PARKING 



• BALLET 

• JAZZ 

• LYRICAL 

• TAP 

• POINTE 



CLASSES OFFERED: 

• TIPTOE TOTS (AGES 3-4) 

• NEW BOYS-ONLY TAP/JAZZ (AGES 5-7) 

• BALLET/TAP COMBO 

• tVIINI-JAZZERS 

• MODERN 



For Class Schedule Call 949- 1414 

OR STOP IN TO REGISTER TODAY AT 

^Ifte (Dance !Factori/^^ 

321 N. Seymour • Mundeleig ]l 









AuqusTlF, 1994 UkElANd Newspapers COOD^BECINNINCS 




Jf 




m 



L^ 



care questions answered when using referral services 



Parents looking for child care In 
Lake County tiave several pairs of 
helping hands right at their finger- 
tips, OS do the child care providers 
themselves. Just one phone call has 
settled the mind of many an anxious 
parent. To assist you In locating the 
care you need, call the Child Care 
Resource and Referral program at. 
the YWCA of Northeastern Illinois 
between the hours of 9 a.m. to-3 
p.m. Monday through Thursday or 9 
a.m. to noon on Friday, trained staff" 
are on hand to provide a wide array 
of services, guiding you step by step 
through the process of iselecting a ' 
caregiver or providing quick 
answers to a few questions you may 
have. 

The goal of CCRScR counseling Is 
to provide enough Inforrnatlon to 
enable parents to make informed 
choices about 

what's best for their particular situa- 
tion, it involves much more than just 
providing parents .with a listing of 
names and phone numbers, 
although the R&Rfs lists contain up 
to three zip codes of providers cur- 
rently accepting Including name, 
address, phone... ages accepted, 
hours served and closest school. 
That alone Is more Information than 
many parents hoped to find from a 
slngle.sourcel 

., Beyond the list, the R&R provides 
cpjnsumer education about child 
care; lie. basic tnforrridtlon about 



average tuition, public subsidy for. Involved In choosing sorhe form of 

child care, tax credits and provides child care, be it a child care center 

each parent that calls with d copy or a.prlvate home. When neither of 

of llllnols's regulations for licensed these forms of care Is desired, the 

home child care and the, R&R can put parents In touch with 

Department of Children and ■ various forms of In-home care. 



Family Services' publico 
tion "Child Cared 
C h o Ice s . " 
addressing 
many 
Issues 



such as nanny agencies 

and au pairs. There 

Is a fee to par- 

Cl ents for the 
!>• R&R's ser- 
W ^ .vices 




based on a sliding scale that Is 
according to family size arid 
Income. The highest fee .is $30. All 
families are served Immediately, the 
day of their first call and referrals ore 
rnalled with a return envelope for 
their fee. If applicable. Families 
whose fee Is waived (SO) and fami- 
lies who return their payment a eligi- 
ble for further referrals for the next 
12 months, even If t find they need 
referral information from another 
county. 

The R&R Is part of a statewide 
network, and no family pays a fee 
more than once per year for ser- 
vices related to finding child core. 
Parent may decide to expand their 
geographic search area or obtain 
an updated list of providers, as the 
R&R adds providers new to the child 
care field to their database each 
month. 

The R&R does not monitor or rec- 
ommend any provider, but will dis- 
cuss with both parents and providers 
the business aspects related to a 
child ca arrangement and offer 
technical assistance In such matters. 
Keeping In touch' with the needs of 
providers, the R&R offers mar free 
workshops, offering Ideas on new 
age-appropriate activities for chil- 
dren, nutrition, safety and discipline. 
All are welcbmel Coll for a training 
calendar.—by LEE ANN STINCH- 
COMB. 
Parent Servlcos Coordinator 



a; 



Miii 





MONTESSORI 
- SCHOOL 

101 S. BECK ROAD, LINDENHURST 

Register Now! 

PRE-SCHOOL KINDERGARTEN . Ages 3^ 

Because the MONTESSORI PROGRAM is an individualized learning 
program, children are allowed to enter the school at any time during the 
year. In a fim and relaxed atmosphere your child ^vill learn from the fol- 
lowing areas: PRACTICAL LIFE, SENSORIAL, MATH, LANGUAGE, 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE (French or Spanish), SCIENCE, NATURB, 
GEOGRAPHY, MUSIC, ART, MOVEMENT AND OUTDOORPLAY. 

Call now to find out how the Montcssori metltod ^«f| QSfi M9S9 
can have a positive effect on your chad's life. V31I 090*4w9w 

Half-Day prognuns available 



11—- .f 



■f) 



Little Lamb 

Christian 
PrC'School 



"WE SPECIALIZE IN LOVING CARE" 

SERVING AGES 3-12 

MORNING PRESCHOpL, FULL DAY CARE 

& AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS 

•KINDERGARTEN PROGRAMS AVAILABLE* 



36448 N. FULLER RD. GURNEE 



CALVARY 
CHILDREN'S CENTER 

FULL DAY CARE 6:30 AM - 6:00 PM 

PRE-SCHOOL ALSO AVAILABLE 

EXTENDED DAY KINDERGARTEN 



THE EATING RIGHT 
PYRAMID 



Fats, Oils and Sweets 



Milk. Yogurt, 
and Cheese 
Group 



Vegetable 
Group 



Meat, Poultry, Fish. 

Dry Beans, Eggs, 

and Nut Group 



•Hot lunches •Qualified staff 'Parent view window 
•Fun & friendly atmosphere 
•Christ-centered cuniculum 



A SAFE PLACE 
TO GROW 




Reoesvmr Now For Fall! 



I C/li.1. X6S-OSSO 



134 Monavllle Road 
Lake Villa, IL 




5-11 SERVINGS 



Bread, 
Cereal, 
Rice, and 
Pasta Group 



Quality Catering = My Cliiid's Food For Thougtit 

■ Education In Nutrition 

■ Developing Healthy Eating Habits in Children 

■ Teaching the Importance of Vitamins & Minerals in a Child's Diet 

QUALI I ¥ CATCrlllMva ' •^^•y^g cam about nutrition and we know you do. too. You mako' 

f\t I A I ITV •7nn-Q«;fi-"7*?i 1 the declsfons on nutrition (or your chlldron. When it comes 

UUALI I T /UH-JOO-ZDIO to nvtrmon-aiwayschooso QUALITY. 

QUALITY Nutrition 



^^^ 



"f^ 




, ;c 



jm GOOD BEGINNINGS UkctANcl NcwspAprRS AuqusT 9, 1994 



60 0\) ^ teNNms ^^"^ ^^ ^^^ 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



How to begin the separation process at a drop-m center 




A mottior Introduces her daughter to Family Network wtth encouragement from the 
Baby and Me room teacher. 



Family drop-In centers provide a 
meeting place for parents where ttiey 
can get support from ttie time ttieir 
babies are born. A drop-In center pro- 
vides a perfect setting for parent and 
child to separate from each other 
gradually. A parent can stay In the 
room with her child and the teacher or 
she can be nearby In the parents' 
room, where the teacher can call for 
the parent when needed. 

There are steps we recommend for 



parents to make the separation easier 
at the drop-In center and prepare the 
child for later separation In day care 
or at a preschool, 

1. Determine your goal. Decide 
what your own feelings and wishes are 
about separating. Do you want to stay 
with your child or do you want to 
leave the room? The amount of ease 
or difficulty In separating Is not a mea- 
sure of how good a parent you are or 
how good your child Is. If you want to 






i!.' 



■i: 
•I' 



w 







Lake County Family YMCA 

CHILD CARE & 
LEARNING CENTER 



FUN ■ AFPORDABLrB 




NOW AccEPrma enrollments 



si Competent, 
Caring Staff 
2[ State Licensed 
^Summer Camps 



Unltad^U 



UktC* 



81 Educational 

Programs 
g| Sliding Fee Scale 
2) Newly Renovated Facilities 

Mundelein Center 
706 E. Hawley St., Mundelein 

949-0060 
Y-t«ts 



2f Planned 

■ Activities 

Sf Special Field Trips 



Open Mon. thru Fri. 6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Children Ages 2-5 



work toward leaving the room, It Is 
Important to: 

2. Build a sense of safety and secu- 
rity for your child. Help your child feel 
comfortable with the room and the 
staff by talking about the center 
before coming and by mentioning the 
names of staff and favorite activities. 
When you enter the room, help your 
child connect with teachers by sug- 
gesting, "Let's say hi' to " . 

Try to sit back more each day and 
let the staff take over. If your child 
wants something, encourage her to 
get It from a staff member. Allow your 
child to touch base with you as need- 
ed. 

3. Time your leaving the room. Start 
the process of separation during a 
period of calm. Delay the separation 
during events such as the birth of a 
sibling or a move Into a new house. 
Since drop-In center attendance 
varies from day to day, look for times 
when attendance Is light and the 
teacher has time to support your child. 

4. Make a realistic plan that you 
can follow through. If you think your 
child will cry, leave for only a short 



time at first. 

5. Carry out, the plan by explaining 
to your child what will be happening. . 
(I.e.: "I'll watch you play for a couple 
of minutes and then I'll get a cup of 
coffee and then I'll come back." End 
your explanation With, 'then, I'll be 
back.' not "then, I'll go out." 
Try not to convey hesltance. Your child 
wlil pick up on It and have d harder 
time. Don't give mixed messages by 
telling your leaving and then waiting 
for him to Indicate that "It's okay." 

Tell you child when you're actually 
leaving and you'll be back. Ttien go. It 
Isn't a good Idea to try to "sneak" out 
as this can make your child more 
unsure and Insecure and Increase his 
or attention to your presence and ' 
absence. • .^ . 

During the whole separation 
process, stay In touch with staff so they 
can respond to you and make the 
separation process as comfortable as 
possible.— by LINDA HEWm 

Editor's note: Undo Hewitt was the 
social worker for Family Network h 
Highland Park for five years, Stw Is now 
with the Deerfleld public sctiool. 



Drbjp -in ciehters 

Among drop-In centers where Lake County parents can iDrlrig ttieir chil- 
dren ore; Family <• Network, -High land Pork, 433^0377; Family C'-cle In 

^Uberiyyllle; 3d»7-5991; and pi^ sponsored* by CtilldS^rv, 587-6656^. 

;M6rri's Place at f tie Rourid Lake Community Church In.Rourid Lake; Mom's ] 
Place dt the United MettTOdlst Church In Inghside; arxj Mom's Place Too, at.''' 

:; ttie Rrst United Methodist. Church In Waukegan. 




m^mjm^^'^'^^^:^ff^:^^iM00^ 



rv^ 



^OPENINQ SOON 




Quality Daycare 
Close To Your Home 

PRIME TIME 2 

Call Now About Our 

G RflND OPENIMq RATES 

PURINE TIME HOW \0 
OFFERS 2 LpCOTiUHSi J » 

Our New Location 
leAt 




COUNTRY FAIRE PLAZA 

1838 E. BELVIDERE RD. (RTS. 120 & 45) 
GRAYSLAKEJL 60030 

(708> S48-3455 



23960 N. MILWAUKEE AVE. 

(BETWEEN RTE. 22 & 60) 

LINCOLNSHIRE, IL 



(708) 634-345S ^ 

Licensed By: ^K 

TKo liiinoie Department of Children ( N 

and Family Services (DCFS) Q_y 



C>AC:iPe3«f3VOIkC« 



TiS 




^•^f^tSSTJiVTa 



AuqusrS, 1994 UkdANd Newspapers. GOOD: BEGINNINGS I? 





$)E6iV/ViN^5 /Ve VeR ^^^ l^^]?ad 




( W> ^£ 



Do you rennember, A«/hen you were a 
school-ager, how simple It was for your 
parents to' find quality child care wtien*. 
ttiey needed It? For that occasional 
evening out. they simply called on 
Grandma, Aunt Rosa, or ttie trusted 
teenager next door to look after you. 

But times have changed. Today, 
many working parents need someone to 
care for Itielr children for an hour or two 
before ttie sctxxjj day starts, arrother tv/o 
to fourtx>urs after Iterds, and entire days 
during school holidays and summer 
vacafions. 

That's a lot of time out of q 
sctxx>I-age child's life— time best spent In 
play and creative, productive activities 
ttiat will tielp him or tier develop physical, 
mental, social, and emotkDnal skills. Such 
dally care calls for more than a baby sit- 
ter. It requires skilled caregivers with tralrv- 
Ing or degrees and experiertce In cNId 
development, educattoa recreation, or 
a similar professional field. 

Some caregivers for schipol-ogors 
provkie care for a few ct^lldren Iri ttielr 
own twmes. Ottiers work witti larger 
groups of children In center-based 
school<ige child care programs; In 
schools, churches, comrrujnlty centeis, 
and ottier places. 

But group<:are programs are not all 

created equally. One program may plan 

carefully to provide experiences that 

support cNfdren's growttv anott^r may 

, offer a hodge-podge of activities based 

on convenlerice or cost but not on 

: schbol-agers' needs. What's rrwre, r>ot 

'all good prograrris may be good for your 



care for school-age ^ildren 



child. One irray rrxitch your chlki's Inter- 
ests and needs effectively; another may 
i bore, rattTer than stimulate, him or her. 

The following ctTeckllst wlH t^lp you 
-measure ttie quality of ttie programs you 
are considering: 

•Are the Indoor and outdoor areas- 
safe? 

•Are cWWren supervised .by sight at 
all times? 

•Are battiroorro nearby? ^ 

•Are ttiere written t>eailh, safety, ard 
emergertcy rules? 

•is thte staff qualified In school-age 
child care? 

•Are there ervDugh adults for the 
number of children In the program? 

•Does tt>e staff talk to children often 
In a frieiydiy, help^l way? 

•Does the staff listen to children, 
answering ttieir questlors ard respond- 
ing to tt>6lr requests? 

•Dogs thie staff erx:ourage ctilldren 
to be Independent? 

•Are chldren of both sexes given a 
ctwnce to try ttie same activities? 

•I>>es It appear ttxit ttie staff does 
not use physical or ottier punishment ttx3t 
hurK frightehsi or tTumlllates ctilldren? 

-•Are cNldren er>couraged to solve 
problems wlttx>ut being forced to do so? 

•Are ctiildren relaxed ard txappy 
wtifle tt>ey play? 

•Are tt>ere fun ard exciting activities 
to ctxx)se from each day? 

•Are ttiere erxjugh materials to make 
ttie play areas Interesting? 

•Is tt>ere enough space for children 
to play In groups or alone? ', 



fy\ 



GreenTree at Parkway North 



Now is the time to be making child care arrangements for the upcoming school 
year We want to help you make the best decision for your chiU and your family. 
Discover the high quality that only Green Tree at Parkway North offers. 



We invite you to get to know us better at our 

Fall Enrollment Open House 
August 8-12, aU day 



A^sit GreenTree Child Care Center at Patkway North and discover: 

• A well-trained, caring staff of teachers. 

• A devclopmentally sound program and curriculum. 

• A building designed for children's needs. 

• An ample, tree-shaded playground with a variety of play equipment. 

• Age-appropriate developmental materials and equipment. 

• A consistent, well-managed program supervised by a responsive director. 

In addition to ail this, every child care center operated by GreenTree strives to atain 
accreditation by the National Association for the Education ofYoung Children (NAEYQ , 
a distinction bestowed on fewer than four percent of child care centers nationwide. Ask 
the director about NAEYC accreditation and what it-means for you and your child. 

If all this isn't enough to convince you that GreenTree is the right center for 
your child, we will make it a little easier for you to decide. We will give you 

one free week of child care 

if you enroll your child for the. fall program by August 30. 

GreenTree Child Care Center at Parkway North 

has immediate opening for two- to five-year-olds, including 

full-day kindergarten. Limited part-time openings for infants & toddlers. 

Enroll ycjur child now for the fell program. 




Serving infants through jull-day kindergarten 

Monday through Friday 

6:30 a,m. to 6:30 p.m. 

GreenTree at Parkway North 

5 Parkway North 

DeerfiddJL 60015 



GreenTree 



Childcare b\> Sen^ceMaster 



945-0980 



•Is ttiere an area set aside for quiet 
activities? 

Is there evidence that parents 
receive reports on ttielr children? 

. 'Are ttiere opportunities for parents 
to participate? 

•Can parents visit any time? 

•Are questions artd comments from 
■ parents encouraged? 

Tt^ better ttie program, the more 
"yes" answers you'll flrxi. If you can't 



answer all Itie questions by observing, 
you can' talk with ttie staff during your 
visit. Remember ttiat It's up to you to firxd 
the best possible after-sct>ool care for 
your child. 

This excerpt Is from a brochure by 
Project Home Safe, sponsored by ttie 
Whirlpool Corporation dhd American 
Home Economics Association, A limited 
number of copies are available at (703) 
706-4600. 




LittleJLainbs 
Preschool 



Of 
Trinity Evsingelical Lutheran Church 

jl Cfiristian atmospftere designed 
specificadyforyourS & 4 year old, 

9s(cnv accepting 

faU 1994 reservations \_ 

^iA morning & afternoon sesswhs 
Located at-- 

Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church 

25519 W. Hwy. 134. Ingleside. IL 
For More Information Call 

(708) 546-2109 





**^dmm.U4*idJirJm'*^^r-^ -- 



W^ 



.' J^ 



:J- ' 



I 



"TOMMY'S HAVING 

DIFFICULTY IN 

SCHOOL LATELY... 

ARE THERE PROBLEMS 

ATHOME?" 

" t ■ - ■ 

When Mom and Dad 
have problems, their 
children also feel stress. 
Often a child's grades 
will fall and he or she 
becomes distracted 
and withdrawn. 



The Bradley Counseling Center can help 
work out problems; helping parents to 
overcome their conflicts and help children 
realize that it's not their fault that Mommy 
and Daddy are fighting. 

The center can also help with problems 
such as difficulties in school loneliness, 
depression, suicide, anxiety and stress. 

Health Insurance Accepted 

BRADLEY COUNSEUNG CENTER 



LAKEVILIA 

GRAND AVENUE 

356^322 



. WAUKEGAN 

Y 2635 BELVIDERE ROAb 

AUmMc 244-7177 






I 



/■ 






-T^ VW l j i xi i i^t m i il l^ fi^itiamU 




31 GOOD BEGINNINGS UkctANcI Newspapers August 9, 1994 



>..*.->^ 



^00\) ?>E6,VMM^S'^t^E.'1^^^^ i^-"''^ 



Dear Mar! lyN 



Dear Marilyn, 

My 4-yoar-old son Is often after 
me to Invite his friend or friends to 
our tiouse to play. Wtien ttiey do get 
togettier many times tie refuses to 
stiare his toys, both old and new with 
them. It becomes a really unpleas- 
ant visit. No amount of pleading on 
my part for him to share toys works, 
In fact he becomes more stubborn 
and cries. How can I help my child 



find the enjoyment of give and take 
and make him less selfish? 

Sharing does not come easily to 
young chlidren. Tiiere are times that 
we OS adults do not wont to share. 
Who among us wonts to shore some- 
thing thot is new or beloved? As we 
help our children wori< on their social 
development, remember thot they 
always do not hove to share. They 
simply may not be ready. Remember 



^ SnrCTSON • POLO • VAXDERBILT • iVRiMANI ^ 



AFFORDABLE OPTICAL IN 6URNEE MILLS 

(708) 855-9009 



COUPON 



COUPON 



COUPON 



PROGRESSIVE | 
BIFOCAL i 






$99 



Selected 
SyJes Only 




.-ivijv-, 



itl 



jSt3z.» 



COUPON 



Star^nflliit 



(Single Vbion; Lenses, 
F^lOTalile Fitufnee) 



WEAR 



(SPHERICAlj; 

.With purchase of iany 



I 

i; 

i '.-FIRST TIME PATR0^i30NLY.^' 

iDura So/t Colorsl 
J Contact Lenses 



I 



Have A UtUe Fun For A Changel ^t-J 



Buy 1 



■ glasses and eye examV:| 
■'• •i-:^--.'-:^''.t..-::'' - Kv::^.;n pair For 



^■ar 



'Some restrictions 



fM^^^x' may, apply, ■■ 



Patient Pays: *99 
Less Mail'ln 

I "Price good on Dura Soft 2 Colors. 



'mmsm^t% 



tail 



excluding prolesslonal lees. 
Save £30 on 2 pairs. 



^ rr < OTETSON • POLO • VANDCRBILT 





Discoven the Magic 

Inside... 
OPEN HOUSE I 

L Wednesday, Aug. 17 ^ 
7 A.M. - 7 P.M. 

FRE 

• RiirrshiiuMils 

•Disphiys 
•Toius 
•I'UN! 



Enioll Now For 
guality Childcare... 

Children's 
Discovery 
Center 




ONE 



FREE WEEK 

u ii h <>U'- |i.iiil «'-ik 

I tilt I mil' 

i-iHiilliii>-iii only" 

nil.- iilln pel 

I.I Hilly V«-w 

.•iiiotini'iil "Illy 



700 W. Rollins Rd. 
^Round Lake Heights 

(708)546-3383 



libertyrille Montessori Sehool 

Now accepting applications 

for summer and fall 

enrollment! 



• Wonderful Montessori envlrcmment 

• Meets the needs of each child each day 

• Serving your chlldrens* needs for 30 years 

• Accredited pre-school and kindergarten-programs 

For more infomiation call: 

C708> 36S-5170 



a 



I.'VV'-'-3*,*;:A'l 



NQTiCE OF NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS: Cramer Montessori, 
ltd:, d.b.a. Ubertyvllle Montessori School, admits students of any race, color, national or ethnic 
origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally afforded or made available to 
students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic ori- 
gin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan pro- 
grams, and athletic and other school-administered programs. 



too thot shaming a child to share 
may worl<. but it Is best that they 
learn to shore through more direct 
experlerice. 

Rather than lecturing, try some 
simple Intervention. Why not explain 
to your youngster before a friend's 
visit that you understand his feelings 
about his toys and for that visit you 
will help him put away treasured toys 
not to be used during the visit. After 
that visit and before the next visit 
occurs tali< more with your son about 
feelings. Many children 
respond favorably to having 
the feelings of other children 
explained to them, 
■ When the next visit occurs, a 
simple statement to your son 
explaining how the visitor feels 
about not being able to pidy 
with certain toys, with another 
simple statement to the visitor 
obout your son's feelings may 
help both chlidren arrive at a 
problem solving solution, if they 
can't worl< It out quiciciy, you 
• may have to Jump in and help. 
Give o simple directive such as. 
■five minutes more and then Its 
Choriies's turn with the trucl<.*' 
You OS the role model will assist 
the children as much as any- 
thing. I agree with you that it Is 
Important your son learn the 
pleasures that come with 
thoughtfuiness and kindness 
through sharing. Research has 



shown us that children who ore gen- 
erous have experienced loving 
attention from adults, and hove 
obsen/ed models of generosity In 
their every day lives.' 

Editor's note: Marilyn Straus, an 
Early Childhood Specialist, continues 
her column 'Dear Marilyn" as a ser- 
vice of the Child Care Coalition of 
Lake County. Questions can be sent 
to Dear Marilyn, c/o Child Care 
Coalition of Lake County, P.O. Box 
1252, Highland Park, IL 60035. ' 




) (. 



"•■H. 



REGISTER NOW FOR SCHOOL AGE PROGRAMS 

• Transportation to and from AM/PM Kindergarten 

• Nutritious hot lunch and snack 

• Special trips and events on "No School Days" 

• An experienced and caring staff certified in 
first aid/CPR 

• A relaxing atmosphere 

• Hours: 6:30 am to 6:00 pm 



t." 



r 






Call 546-8558 for information 



Deal naVen 




ICENTB^I 



XO'ilimcfi iiir/i l.iikv I urvM llitsinlnl 



1100N.WestmoretindRd. 

Like Forest. IL 60045 

(708)234-6175 

lhanl<:§ to you — 

Dearhaven is celebrating 

our 5'Year Anniversary 

as providers of 

Quality Child Care 



Care And 

Education For 

Children 

6 Weeks Thru The 

Kindergarten Year 



Accredited by the 

National Academy 

of Early Childhood 

Programs 




AuqusT^, 1994 UkelANci Newspapers GOOD BEGINNINGS I! 




w. 






^aO\> $>E6,VMM^S'^tVE-R^NZ> 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Adults, children have same feelings about saying good-bye 



Have you ever felt sad about saying 
good-bye >A^en leaving on a vaca- 
tion? Started a new Job and wondered 
wtiat your co-workers at ttie old place 
were doing? Or do you miss your 
friends, grocery store, ctiurcti, nelgtv 
bors In a town you moved from? 

If so, you know ttiat growing and 
starting something new— even some- 
ttilng you want to do— also means giv- 
ing somettiing else up. Whettier we call 
It "separation,' "tiomeslckrtess," or sim- 
ply "wanting to keep In toucti,' It's a 
process we go ttirougti all of our lives. 
For many ctilldren springtime means It Is 
almost good-bye-time to familiar class-, 
mates and teactiers and ttie anticipa- 
tion of new classes in ttie fall. 

Adults and ctilldren hiave ttie same 
feelings about saying good-bye, but 
tiandle ttiem In very different ways. 
After all, as adults we t\ave years of 
experience witti loved ones going 
away and coming back, Ctilldren 
don't. And they don't yet have our 
adult ability to reason. It's not at alt sur- 
prising that young children often feel 
uncertain about starting new experi- 
ences, even ones that they are ready 
for and enjoy. 

it takes a long time to learn about 
separatlon-and-return. 

But little by little, day by day. witti 
the- encouragement of parents and 
teachers, children can find out that 
coming to school Is a very natural ttiing 
to do. Such learning Is an important 



part of any good school experience. 

Next fall, whether your child Is mov- 
ing onto a new school or a new class In 
the same school, you will see otfier chil- 
dren going through the same process 
figuring out their own ways of making 
the transition. Here are some of the 
ways children cope by using free play 
time: 

•Some children head Immediately 
for the housekeeping are to pretend 
that ttiey are the very same mommy or 
daddy or former teacher they are ttilnk- 
Ing al^out. 

•Some children play at being strong 
and powerful. Many of the Godzillas 
and firefighters you see on the play- 
ground are mostly Just reassuring them- 
selves. (Like an adult who feels better 
whistling while walking down an unfa- 
miliar, dark street). 

•Some like to play near one particu- 
lar child until they feel comfortable. 
They may not even talk to that child, 
but wlil often end up choosing the 
same toys and playjng nearby for 
awhile. 

•Some children ease themselves In 
by following a set routine— first the 
blocks, then the reading corner, etc. 

•Some children choose an activity 
such as playdough or easel painting 
that allows them to stay In one place 
and watch what's going on In the rest 
of the room until they're ready to Join In. 

There are children who are so thrilled 
to be In sctK)ol that they don't stx>w 



Novsf'sThe 

Write Time 

For A 

Haircut. 



k 



Gel a free precision mechanical pencil with any precision haircut from Great Clips, 
if s only for a limited. So come in today, and get the write cut, at the write price, wnte away. 

Present this ad for your f BEE pencil. Limit one par cuitomer 

Good Only At 

Village Square 

S.W. Corner of Rt. 22 & 12 
Lake Zurich 

708-540-741 1 

Open 7 days a week. Not valid with other offer. 



Great Clips 
for hair 



Guaranteed Satisfaction. 
Guaranteed StyUT* 



any signs of concern until six or eight 
weeks Into Itie year. There are children 
who do just beautifully all day at school 
and save all the strong feelings and 
acting up for those who are waiting at 
home, 

There's a whole range of styles, tem- 
peraments, and ways of getting used 
to a new school. The Issue will surface 
again from time to tom during the year, 
perhaps after a vacation, and absence 



due to Illness, the birth of a new baby or 
for reasons we can't quite see. Each 
time It does. It Is another opportunity for 
your child to learn that getting used to 
a new place and situations Is a very 
natural process, one that he or she, can 
handle. 

Editor's note: Reprinted from 
ParentTlmes a publication of the 
Chicago t^etropolltan Assn. for the 
Education of Young CNIdren. 



Q ni>oD[>ODt>oa>oai>oD[>oD(>oat>oot>oDi>oot>ODt>>oai>oat>oai>"o 



a 
o 

D 
O 
£% 

D 

r\ 

a 
o 

D 
O 
A 
D 
O 

s 

p 

O 
6. 

7S 
D 
O 

D 
O 
A 

D 
O 
A 
D 
O 



Children's Corner Montessori School 

"A meeting place bringing home and teaming together. " 

708-548-2880 



Accepting Enrollments For Our New 
Location On Progress Drive In Grays lake 






A quality tducationif program of dtvalopmflnUl aUB* comMnJng UoMttaoii wHh •nrkhmtnt groiith. 
Age 34 yean Including State Regirtered Kindergerten 



7 
O 

a 

n 
S7 
O 
n 

O 

a 

n 
y 
o 

D 
7 
O 

D 
Q 

o 
a 

V 

o 

o 

\7 
O 

D 

O 

a 
7 



<iDO<iDo<]Do<iao-)<ao<]aQ<]ao<]ao<iiiio<'DO<t-'Q<Do<^QQ^oQ*^P'^ 










2 FOR 1 SPECIAI. 

Cat^t Use 2 Bring a Friend, Some restrictions may apply. 

WAUCONDA OPTICAL ii 

Over 60 Years Combined Experience 

MATT PFEIFFER & GREG BRAUN MASTER OPTICIANS 

DR. HOWARD W. SADOFSKY 

FANTASTIC SELECTION OF FRAMES 

COMPLETE CHILDRENS GLASS FRAMES & LENSES 

STARTING AT $69.00 
The Eye Can Specialistt With Your Family's Need Right In K>«r OtmNeighborhood 



FAST SERVICE 
REASONABLE PRICES 



487-1600 




474W.UiMi1y,Wtuconcfa 
EXP 9-30-94 

•PRESENT AD TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THiiS OFFER* 



^Eap(iRi:sih3TisoiflKi 



PRE-SCHOOLS 



state 
Licensed 



40 S. Whitney 
Grayslake 

223-0611 



At 



And 



31 Park St. 
Grayslake 

223-6151 



Fun and Learning 
go hand-in-hand 



^BllIB 



BH 









t^ 



Ji^\ 



\^ 






1 



I III m ill ii iL ^., 




GOOD BEGINNINGS IaIceIancI Newspapers AuqusT % 1994 



jc-.ia3/ 



■'i^- 



■ *;r-.«=i 



»~t» 



•v.- 



-V' 



/$00\>5,E6iVMN95'^^^^'^^^^ ^-""* 



Separation is difficult aspect of human adaptation 



It's that time of yearl on©. Short stays In day- 
Children ore starting care or nursery sctiool at 
school, going back to first can help a lot. It's a 
school, beginning day- good Idea to stay with 
care or preschool, the child for the first visit 
Routines are about to or two, then talk about 
change for many fami- the place and the experl- 
lles. ence together afterward. 

When parents are (Listen for clues about 

busy reorganizing their what may worry your 

family routines, life Is cer- child: Will the teacher 

talnly easier If everybody help me go potty? \Nhat 

adjusts easily with little or If I don't like my lunch?) 

no pain. But It doesn't The first time the child Is 

always— or every oftert— left without the parent 

happen that way. should be brief. I think It 

Everyone experiences works well for the parent 

some level of stress with to tell the child, "I'm 

change, even desired going to (name the 

ctrange. Children are ryo place or the chore) and 

exception. I'll be back In about an 

It's not just change hour." Then return on time 

that troubles children, and with evidence that 



There's also tt»e matter of 
being separated from 
parents. Separation Is a 
difficult aspect of human 
adaptation. As a species, 
we Irstlnctfvely know that 
staying attached to ttie 
folks who can protect 
and comfort us Is essen- 
tial for survival. So 
change that means sep- 
arating Is especially 
stressful. 

How do children let us 
know that ttiey're having 
a hard time? They may 
make It very clear by 
clinging, crying, or having 
tantrums. These aren't 
fun for the adult, but ttiey 
are open and honest 
expressions of feelings. 
Then there are more sub- 
tle clues— sleep distur- 
bances, nervous habits, 
reluctance to go out to 
play, getting sick, or limit 
testing, for example. 
Because these don't 
r>ecessarily occur at the 
moment of separation, 
they're tiarder to read. 

Sometimes It's difficult 
to kr>ow what to do to 
help children who are 
having a hard time with 
back-to-school (or day- 
care) transitions. Here are 
a few suggestions: 

1. If possible, make 
the transition a gradual 



•■^ 



\:zr' 



you did what you said 
you were going to do. 
This helps the child build 
trust In the situation. 

2. Never sneak away 
to avoid the pain of part- 
ing. Indeed, don't tiy to 
avoid that pain In any 
way; It must be experi- 
enced. If the child Is to 
grow In her confidence 
to handle feelings and to 
deal with reality. Of you 
suspect that your child's 
caregivers or teachers 
are avoiding dealing with 
sadness by urgently dis- 
tracting the child whien 
you leave, or by overdo- 
ing the cheering up, let 
them know that you 
expect your child to be 
sad for a little white but 
that you know she'll get 
over It and Join the play 
soon). 

3. Leave a "piece of 
yourself or home' with 
your child. A picture of 
you, a purse with some 
"mommy stuff in It, 
daddy's old wallet (with 
pictures, of course) , or 
whatever you think might 
help. And don't forget 
the "transitional objects,' 
such as teddy bears and 
blankets— the things that 
comfort your child wt>en 
he's distressed. 

A, Plan to stay for a 



Meeting needs of day care 
children focus of workshop 

"Including AH Children In the Early Childhood 
Care and Education Setting' is the title of an ail- 
day workshop to be presented by the Health 
Facilities DIv. of the Lake County Health Dept. on 
Aug, 31 at the Country Squire Restaurant, 19133 
Rte. 120, Grayslake. 

The workstK)p will Include an examlnafion of the 

Americans with Disabilities Act, discussions of physical 

ard mental disabilities to assist staff to meet the needs 

.of cNldren with ti^ese challenges, and legal aspects of 

Inclusion. 

Presenters for the program will Include Tom 
Berkshire, the executive director and CEO of the Illinois 
Easter Seals Society, and Drina fy/ladden, a specialist In 
early chJfclhood Issues. 

Child core workers and teachers, as well as con- 
cerried parents, are invited to attend ttie workshop, 
which costs $10 person. This fee covers educational 
materials, a continental breakfast, and lunch at the 
workshop. For more Information, call Charlene 
Hendrlckson of the Lake County Health Dept. at 360- 
6733. 



short while to t>elp your 
child settle In a Utile, but 
not long enough for the 
anxiety to build. Too long 
a leave-taking may con- 
vince the child that he's 
Just not going to be safe 
without you. When It's 
time to go, say good-by 
and go. Staff who under- 
stand children can tran- 
dle whatever happens 
ttien. 

5. Don't let an easy 
first few days lull you Into 
thinking that this is easy 
for your child. The second 
week may be much 
harder, as the child real- 



izes that this Is a long- 
term situation, one that 
may not be much fun 
after the novelty Is gone. 
6. Watch for slgr^s that 
it's iTorder ttxin the child 
is letting you know. In 
addition to the ones 
mentioned earlier, there's 
the Interesting phenome- 
non of having your child 
refuse to go liome- or 
othenvlse challenging 
you— when It's time to go 
home. If she refuses to 
cooperate, don't add to 
her anxiety about sepa- 
ration by threatening to 
go home without herl 



Just give tier a few min- separation Is very 

utes to adjust to this new Intense or prolonged, 

transition and tell her that ask for a conference 

you are going and she is with the school staff, 

going with you. because Together, you should be 

she's your child and you able to work through this 

love her and It's time to difficult time and help 



go now (carrying her out. 
If necessary). 

7. Use casual conver- 
sation and play to open 
up feelings about this 
new experience. These 
should give you a good 



your child enjoy new 
adventures, gaining 
confidence In his ability 
to cope without you. 
Most of all. It helps that 
you have confidence In 
the situation, the care- 



feeiing about the people givers, and your child.— 

you're leaving your child by MARGIE SMITH, 

with— how ttiey comfort Cuirlculum and Training 

and care for him. Spoclallst, Groat Lakos 

8. If the reaction to NIC 



L 



The Early Learning Center 




a Quality day care facility 
serving ages 6 weeks to 
6 years 

• state ricensed facility located 
on a hospital campus 

• College certified teachiers 

• Exploration of world through 
art, music and irriaginatr^e play 

• Developmentally appropriate 
curriculum 

• Parent/staff conferences 

• Balanced meals & snacks 
planned by hospital dietitian 

• Toys & equipment inspected 
regularly for children's health & 
safety 

• On campus security staff and 
video monitors 

• Facilities, Toys & Equipment - 
"Hospital Clean" 



. -*■•? 






if 



For tivo-year-old and 

preschool programs. 

Call (708) 360-2733 for 

information or an appointment 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



A Division of FrnncUcuil Sisters 1 leallli Cnrc Corpar.illon 

2615 Washington Strcci 
Waukcgan, Illinois 60085 
Telephone: 708.249.3900 



Early Learning Center 



y. 



':*^i^::^f»^.V: 



AuqusrVy; 1994 lAicEtANc) Newspapers GOOD BEGINNINGS 






Lakeland 

Newspapers 



ow to choose a good i 



When parents of Infants and tod- 
ilers make ttie decision to enter ttie 
/orking world, tfiey are confronted wltti 
task of tiovlng to ctioose ttie best 
:H\d care situation to fit botti ttielr 
leeds and ttie rteeds of ttielr child. To 
insure the appropriate choice there 
ire a few things to be aware of. 

Every Infant/toddler program pro- 
jrldes an environment that Is clean and 



safe. The diaper changing area should 
be near a sink so that hands can be" 
washed easily and quickly. The diaper- 
ing surface should be of a material that 
can be easily wiped down and sani- 
tized. All equipment should be clean 
artd In perfect condition. 

A good child care program begins 
with a philosophy that emptiaslzes a 
developmental approach. Each child Is 








lAlinnUSSEIAUET 







JR.CHDRUSLINE 



Special 

Back-to-School Hours 

AugJ5thm27 



Worth Dancing For'" 



Uos 



^m VJi¥l!Uittt^M!^^^ 506 N. Seymour 

R&AJI'IP"" fVi 32 E.Park 

, MUNDELEIN 566-6832 

starting Aug. ISth we'll be open e:30am-8:00pm Won, thru Fri.. Sal 9-S (Open Sun. Aug. 21it 1<W) 



K 



IDDIE 
ORNER 



FALL REGISTRATION STARTING NOWII 



Nursery & Day Care - 

Learning Center 
423 W.Liberty Street 
WauGonda, IL 60064 

(708) 487-KIDS 




•{First 50 Children) 



• Afts 6 Hfiikt to 12 Yeiri 

• Praselioo! ft KindirsirtiR 

• Ofin 6 in to 6 }m, M-F 

• FatI ft Part Tina Pro)raRis 

• Braaltfitt, Catari4 Uneh ft Sniok 

• Gartifiid Taaekarf 

• Aetivitiii for All Asai 

NO APIOINIMENT NECESSART; ENROU NOW 



CLIP & SAVE 



[ SIGN UP tK)W FOR FULL TIME REGISTRATION | 
I & GET THE 4TH WEEK 1/2 PRICE! | 

I 1 Coupon Per Family • Offer Expires 10/1/94 | 



respected or a unique Individual who 
may grow and develop at a rate differ- 
ent from -the other children. Children 
are loved and nurtured for who they 
are. 

In order to follow this pWtosophy, It Is 
Important that the caregivers are able 
to provide an environment that Is a 
developmentally appropriate; A good 
chtlld care program provides activities 
ttKit are appropriate r>ot only for the 
age of ttie child but also for each stage 
of development since growth occurs at 
different rates. The program stiould 
tKive a variety of stimulating ard cre- 
ative toys that are exciting, ctxilleng- 
Ing, aryJ Interesting. Activities can 
Include tiome made as well as com- 
mercial toys,, Since Infants arxi toddlers 
leam througti their senses It Is Important 
that ttie toys and activities be stimulat- 
ing. 

When visiting a program for Infants 



and toddlers It Is Impprf ant to chteck ttie 
following. 

•Is the environment clean? Is the 
diapering area near a sink, aWay from 
ttie food preparation area? 

•Is there an adequate supply arKl , 
variety of equipment for eacii child? 
Does each child have ttieir own crib to 
sleep In? How often Is the ilnen 
changed? 

•\A/hat is the philosophy of ttie pro- 
gram? \A/hat type of activities are pro- 
vided? What type of discipline is used? 

•What are tt>e qualification and 
experiences of ttie caregivers? 

With ttiesG few questions as a start, 
you can take a good luck at any pro- 
gram. Your Initial vblt shoufcl tell you 
wtiat type of care your child will be get- - 
ting and wtiettier your chlkJ wlH bia 
happy In ttiot situation.— by MARGE 
COLCLOUGH. Dlroctor Saint ThoroM 
Eariy Looming Contw 




Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran 

Chufx:h School 



OPENINGS AVAILABLE 

Preschool thru 8th Grade 



\f9 



''We Care For Your Child 

For more information call: 
1310 N. EROUC AVE. WATJKEGAN 11^9-0011 



P«B« UNDPORNS HERE 

EMMONS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
GAVINJR. HIGH SCHOOL 

ANTIOCH UPPER GRADE SCHOOL 
ST. BEDE'S GRADE SCHOOL 
ST PETER GRADE SCHOOL 



H 




Backpacks, ^m Bass, Team Shirts and Jackets 




ite Cjznbroider 



i. 



(TofflMTly Antlocfi Runflir Sports) 

893 MAIN St« 
ANTIOCH, IL 395-5584 



y 



r 



trA 



,*-'-*fKJ. 



smoL 



THE 

RED BALLOON 
NURSERY SCHOOL 

^^^f in Lake Villa 

^Providing Quality Preschool Day Care 
"^ Age Appropriate Skill Building Programs 

• Arts <£ Crafts • Music • Large Motor Skills 

• Fun-Jilted Days • Safe • Caring Program 

PRQORAM HIOHLIGHTS 




Children 6 weeks - 5 years Welcome 

Fun Activities 

(art, music, free play, large motor 

manipulativci, dramatic play) 

Breakfast Served 6:00 until 7:30 a.m. 

Hot Lunch & Two Snacks Included 

Cloth Diapers & Baby Food Provided 

(except rormola) 

Part-time and Preschool Rates Available 

REGISTER N OW ... CAI.I. 356-3895 

lace is limited ... be sure to register now to assure 
[space for your child In a fun-filled and caring program. 



• Developmental Curriculum 

• Roomy Classrooms 

• Lai^e Playground 

• Caring» well-trained Staff 

• On-site Director 

• Flexible Hours 
(tiiOO a.m. - 6t00 pjn.) 



forfaii 



For Your Child 



Register Now for Fall! 







Your ft^ year old child will Icam how to share, create, cooper- 
'«tei Interact and solve problems - through innovative play and 
proven child development techniques. 

Our school gives >'Our child the gnidance to grow, to e^lore, to 
experiment, to discover - and to become a child of God. 




Get Complete Details 

Call (708) 856-5158 

Good Shepherd Christian Preschool is a division of 

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 

25100 W. Grand Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60046 

G.S.C.P. iB licensed by the Dept of ChUdren & Family Sefrtces. State of Illinois | 



"i 



t'-^yt' 



RH GOOD BECINWIWCS UkclANd Newspapers ^vqv%r9,^9^4 




f^Mt. 



r>^ 









l^mO!!S 



chicacotW|:^T!^« 



j^***^ 



OSMOND 



dreaMCo..- 



(3U)902:15.H..<.-.. 



Vckets Av-.— -^J7ft:;ifffe5 

— TT, poseRecotdb: tJ«'y 









"•m 



J^flnJrtwAwSAS*****"*'; 






NOW 



H-^,^3li 



I* -J 



wm. 









GOOD 

SEATS 

AVAIIABIE 












fM'^m- 



Group* li"^ "■■ 3,1/708 A^cA 
Outslrte the i''_ . 






•^«us>.Dccc«>^^-^^^jr 



CanaOioa 



^r- 



^^^«^'^ 



■>•»»«■■'■■-"* 



If 






■!f)i~ <*; 









I..-- 



^ 
^ 






■■v77i<2 



m 



mm 






■^^ 



P^ 



^niniiiiiijTinrinrM* 



^ * Wi;a«tt ***»*'* 



-f.-^ WWlWt III ■"">«>* 



.«i*s«(*K«is*:s«s^ « 



^^il^Sii^i^^^^^^ 



^pl^l^;^ 



»M. 



> - ^ '*SS 



.Vv. 



«> 









"-•^" :t - .• :■ .:,■■■ 



^: 



ViCl 






Hi 



'or 



AuqusT 9, 1994 UkElANcI NcwspApERS -'CLASSIFIED. ; 




ri 




Belp Wanted 
Fail-Tlnw 



220 



HelpWaaled 



225 



Biistacss' 
Opportunlilcs 



220 



Help Wanted 
FtiU-nme , 



220 



Belp Wanted 
ftall-'nine 



QUE HACERES 
DOMESnCOS 

TIempo compjeto o ilempo 
parclal. Devo podsr trabeJEir 
los lines do semanas y dias 
tesllvos. ApllquQ en perBona. 

ADVENTURE 



.3732 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee 



AenvriY 

ASSISnD^NT 

No Experience Necessary. 
We Will Train. 

[mmediate p«1tlons available. 

Care Centre of Wauconda 
<7o8) 526-5551 

Ask for Bob Coon 



PRODUCTION 

Display Fixture Manufactursr 
seeks production wofkera 
for woodwork operalion. 
Duties to Include light 
assEJTibly and sanding. No 
experience necessary. 
Apply in person. 

W&W Displays 

401 S. Washington #10 
Mundeleln. 



HOUSEKEEPING 

Fult & part time. Must be 
able to worl< weekends & 
holidays. Apply in person; 

ADVENTURE 



3732 Grand Ave. 
Gurnee 






•••POSMIJOBS*** 

$12.26 pertiour to start plus 

benefits. Postal cani'ers, 
sorters, clerks, malntanance. 
For application and exami- 
nation information: 
CALL 
1-219-736-4715 XP9509 
8 am to 8 pm, 7,da^ 



The Round Lake Aiea 

P^ District Is looldng for 

qualified inslnidors in 

BAUROOM DANCE and 

COIINTRYLINE 

. DANCING for the ' 

' Fall sessions. Conlacl 

Heather Molinaii at 546-8558 



RECEPTiONISTl 

lExpetlenced Receptionistl 
Wanted for busy Doctor'sl 
loffice. Must wori< 30-40| 
|hrs./wl<. Medical ofticej 
lexperience ■ preferred. 
Isend resume to; 1828.E.I 
BeivJdera Rd., Graystakel 
llL ^30 and call Maiij 
Beth at 548-2000. 



I HAMBURGER 
HAMLET 

of Vernon Hills 

•SERVERS 

Full & part Time 

iHlsh volume, excellent tips 
[Apply In person Mqn.-Sat 9 
|to 11 am & 2 to 6 pm at 
1000 Uikevt«w Parkway 

Vamon Hllla, IL 
I mile vwst of Hawttnm Center 



INSURANCE 
SALES REP 

For a Stale Farm Insurance 
ofTice In Wiukcgin. Career 
opportunity, not a job. 
Require! commitment and 
self-motivation. Licensed 
persons and or college 
grids encouraged, not nec- 
essary. Salary + 

Send resume to: 

RO. Box 8S80 

StUte 202 

Waukegan.IL 60079 



1^ 



•iisaisms»»ff- 



a Hon wotfAng ^jpflcaloRi for 

H 

* QoodStattirMJPay 
^ &Ber>ent8 

* Apply In Pfwon 



* 

* 

* 
* 



ITACO r\: 

SBELL ^ 

* ■ * 

S 322 Rt. 173, Antioch S 

* 70t-396-00a0 * 
^ . MirftirOon { 
**************** 



UNHAPPY 

WITH YOUR 

HOURS? 

How about daytime 
hours? 

Merry Maids cleans tiomes 

■M-F. No nl^la or weekends. 

Car, driver's license, Insurance 

needed. Mileage paid. 

Merry Maids 

Call for an appointment 

(708) 367-0800 



CASHIERS 

We are seeking 

FT/PT castiiers for 

ail siiifts. Weekdays 

and/or weekends. 

l\/lust be 21 , 

No experience 

necessary. 

We will train. 

''Apply In person . 

JoHNSBURG Unocal 

3514 Rt. 31 
McHenry 



r 
I 

V- 

I 
I 
I 

l: 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

L 



Personnel CiOnsultants 

Superior Personnel is expanding! Our 

growth will provide an opportunity for 3 new 

candidates to join our team of Ucensed 

employment professionals. Interview, test 

and maintain client base for our client 

companies. We offer complete training, 

licensing, salary + commission. 244-0016. 



^ 



CONCESSION STAND IN 
Homor T. Cook Patk In Wau- 
conda. Bathroom ladllilos, iota 
ot sporl3 adivllles In park, 
complQloty oqulppod with 
steam table, slovo, refrlgora* 
tofi microwave, etc., 'some 
slock, fully operatlbnsl. 
$5,150. Call for tuillier Infor- 
matton. (708) 52ft-707B. 

TELECOMH/IUNICATIONS. 
GREAT PART-TIME OP- 
POHTUNITV. VERY 

FLEXIBLE. LEARN HOW. 
UZnflOO. ($100. for 
you). Call (70a)263-€236. ' 

lUIEDlCAL C0N5ULTINQ, 

Etactronic Blillnig, and Con* 
aumer Gtalmt Atslstancel 
Significant Incoma potential. 
Training, Software, and Sup- 
port. Proven Marketingl 
$12,960. Plus PC, FREE In- 
formation! Call |B00)723- 
7111. 

FRANCHISE OPPORTUNITV. 
WE OFFER A PROVEN OPER- 
ATING SYSTEM. PROPIE- 
TARY SOFPWARE, AND A 
NATIONWIDE ADVERTISING 
AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 
SUPPORT PROGRAM. CALL 
JACKSON HEWITT 1-800-" 
277.FAST. 



i^ 



Get Cooking With 



PERSONNEL 

Immediate Openings for Entry 
Level Food Service Positions 

Call For An Appointment 

Today! 

Call (708) 680-0155, UbcrtyviUe 
(708) 336-0164, Waukcgan^ 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
_ I 



• 



WOLOHAN 
LUMBER 



Restauiint ,, , . ; 

Wew Char H^ause 

We are looking for qualified, experienced' 

Walters, Waitresses, and 

Bartenders for Full Time and Part Time 

Apply In Person 

435 Rt. 60, Mundelein, IL 

(708) 566-0020 . 

Monday thru Friday 



WOLOHAN LUMBER 

COMPANY IS 

LOOKING FOR 

AGGRESSIVE, SELF-MOTIVATED 

INDIVIDUALS SEEKING CHALLENGING 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

• IHSIDE SALES • Part & Full Time 

• CASHIERS - Both full and part time 
scheduling flexibility a must. 

Apply in person at 939 S. Rt. 83, Grayslake, IL or 
mall resume to RO. Box 305, Grayslake, IL 60030 

. Wobhin Lumber is an equal oppoi«4)it/ emptoyer 



BEDIVIAKER 

(Full Time) 

A long term care facility has an opening for an 
energetic self starter. Duties consist of: making 
beds, transporting residents (in the building), 
passing out linen, organizing resident's bed- 
rooms. No experience necessary, Contact: 

HBERTYVILLE MANOR 

610 Peterson Rd. Libertyville, IL 60048 
(708) 367-(10(> 



J 



MACHINE MAlNTENAltCE TECHNICIAN 

STARTINQ WAGE OF $11.00 TO $13.00 PER HOUR 

We are seeking an indlvldijal wlro has at ieast 3 years - 
experience or the appropriate schooling in repair and trou- 
bleshooting of semi and fully automatic production assem- 
bly equipment. Basic kriowledge should Include pneumat- 
ics, electronics and understanding of mechanics. 

Rotational days off and overtime will be required. 

Benefit Package Includes: 

• PAID VACATION • 

• 401 K / PROFIT SHARING PLAN • 
• HEALTH AND DENTAL INSURANCE • 

• SHIFT PREfWllUI^ • 
Please mali or fax your resume to: 

QUARTEX, 1012 Host Dr., Laf<e Geneva, Wl 53147 
Attentton: TLN., Fax: (414)248-8552 



BANKING 

Consumers Cooperative Credit Union, one of Illinois' 
largest credit unions has opportunities available in 
Waukegan, Mtindeleb, and Round Lake Beach.. If you 
are an individual committed to providing excellent cus- 
tomer service, enjoy working with the public, dress pro- 
fessionally, and exhibit a good work ethic, check out 

these exciting opportunities: 
•Tfellers: full/part-time • Payroll Deduction Clerk 

• Loan Clerk: part-time • Encoding Clerk Processor 

• Tfeller Supervisor • IfeUer TVainer 

Some positions do require real ted banking experience. 

Bilingual, Spanish encouraged to apply. Call for more 

mformation or apply in person. 

Contact: Human Resources 

•2750 Washington St., Waukegan, IL 60085 

(708)623-3636 Fax: 623-9542 

EOE/Soioke'Free Envinmmont 



^ Hotel ^ 
Desk Clerk 

Red Caipet Inn has opening 

for mature Individual needed 

for front desk position, Exp<slence 

preferred. For more infomuLon 

contact reception " 
Moruiay-Friday Sam • 4pm 
}207 BucUey Rd. 
=^ North Ciilcago, IL 60064 (jr= 



225 



Business 
Opportuoltics 



ROUND LAKE BEACH MOM 

has openings (or daycare, 
lull/part-time. Meals, snacks, 
TLC. ($ao.SlOO) (70B) 
740-6917, 

WAUCONDA FAMILY 

NEEDS MATURE person to 
care (or a/twys; Tuesday- 
Saturday 5am-2pm. Must 
have own transpottailon and 
References. (706) 526-3423. 



240 


CtiildCan! 



250 



School/ 
loitfacttoa 



250 



Scbool/ 
Initnctloa, 



DRIVE BIO TRUCKS EARN 
Bia BUCK4 COL TRAINING 
FREE CALL 800-332-7354. 
DIESEL DRIVING SCHOOL 
H.O. SUN PRAIRIE. Wl. 



BE AN AUCTIONEER. Wxt 
one weak t«mi ftart'i Auflu** 
15, 1994. Frea catalbo-fCon- 
tlnnntial Auction School, P.O. 
Box 346, M«nk8to, MN 
56002-0346. (607)931-0977. 



-HONEY BEE'S? hom* Day 
Car* provides quality child 
care, located In Undonhutsl. 
Degreed -In Earty childhood 
education. Fl/P(. HouHy serv- 
ices available. Substitute 
temp.' services (or summer 
•vactlon. Reasonalbe. Call 
Melissa (70B) 356-3953. 

CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR 

3/chtIdren, (ages:3,5,7). 

Mon.-Fri., possibly wee- 
kends. My Round. Lake 
Beach home. (708) 

546-9539. 

FUN ACTIVITIES AND LOTS 
OF TLC( College educated 
Mom will care for your child. 
Just ot( Grand Ave., Gurnee. 
(708)662-4997. . . :. 

INGLESIDE MOTHER OF 2. 
HAS FulIflfart-lhW openlngs- 
; days. ■ Lunches, ' snacks. 
Larige yard. Newborns wet- 
come. (708) 740-4639. 

LICENSED DAY CARE 

HOME, Woodland School 
DIsl., possible move to Linden- 
hurst area, has openings for 
summer arid faH care. Ages 1- 
12. Kaye (708) 223-5779. 

LONO LAKE/ INGLESIDE 
AREA. LICENSED QUALfTY 
DAYCARE has openings. 
GAVIN South School. (Grant 
School dist.) Ottering 
games, stories, and educa- 
tional acllvttles for your child. 
Non-smoker. Meals, snacks 
included, (Federal Food Pro- 
gram) Well equipped for 
FUNH Call for Inieralew. 
(706)740-1957. ' 

LOVELY HANDICAPPED 
GIRL Needs caring compan- 
ion to take toller skating In 
Round Lake/ Mundeleln 
$6.00/hT. References (708) 

362-5882. 

LOVING CHILDCARE 

NEEDED for 2/gIils (1&3yrs. 
otd) In our Grayslake home, 
2/days week. Good salary. 
Perfect (or student or retiree. 
(708) 223-^023, before 9pm. 

LOVING CHILDCARE NEED- 
ED for B/monlh old boy, 
Wed./ Thufs./ FN., Ill 6pm. 
Round Lake area. (706) 
546-5708. 

LOVING. DEPENDABLE 
ENGLISH speaking woman 
needed to care for our weft be- 
haved 3yr.okl, In our home. 
eam-4pm, Mon-Fri. (708) 
234-3813. ' 

MADELINE'S PLAYHOUSE 
has openings, full-llmo, 1yr. 
+otder. Meats, snacks provki- 
ed. Pembrook Area, Gurnee. 
(706) 662-6828. 

MOM HAS CHILDCARE 

openings, Spring Grave 
home, Full time. Meals/ 
snacks. (815) 675-2532, 
after 6pm. ' 

MUNDELEiN MOM WILL 

care lor your child, ages 2+, 
In ' my Cambridge Country 
home, full-time. Lots ol fun 
acUvHies. (708)566-8921. 

QUALITY INFANT CARE 

6yrs. experience, Antioch 
area, full time openings avail- 
able. Call Kimberty. (708) 
638-4206. 




301 


Antlqiucs 



ANTIQUE DEALERSl 
RESERVE your space Now 
for New Antique Mall on 
Sheridan Road Opening 
SOON In downtown Zlon. 
Call (708) 731-2060 or 
(708)244-5933, for details. 



304 


Appliances 



Pf AFF SEWING MA- 
CHINE,, 20 docorallvo slllch- 
es, blind hemmer, zig-zag, 
button holes, Hobtiy 380, 3 
years oM. S22S or best offer 
(708)395-2824. - ' " '" 



•.v^- 



SEARS IScu.fl. DEEP 

FREEZER, exMllenI condi- 
tion. $140/best. (708) 
497-9413. 

WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC 
RANGE, self deaning, very 
good condition, Copper tones. 
Call to see on Saturday, (708) 
356-1399. 



Refrlsonrtoray 
Waiherty Diyers 

all reconditioned, all 
guaranteed. Also new 
and used parts for most 
major appliarx:es. 

C70B) 949-1110 



318 



Busi0ess 
ounce EqulpmcDl 



BEAUTY SALON EQUIP- 
MENT. (I)hydrauih: chair and 
(l)matchlng hood dryer. 
Chair Is attached. $300. 
(2)statlon, 1 hydraulic chair, 
(l)ceFamlc shampoo bowl. 
All (or $1,800, or win seper- 
ate. Call Vickie. (708) 
816-7444. . 

COMMODORE 64 MONI- 
TOR, data base, 2-dise 
drives, lOO's of Programs and 
extras. $200. (708) 746-0539. 



320 



Qectroolcs 
Computers 



TANDY 1000HL COMPUT- 
ER, 1 /micro-byte Ram, 20rtnk 
crio-byte hard drive, 3.5/inch 
(loppy drive, color monitor, 
printer, accessories, 2/]oy 
sttoks, mouse, 21 -^re InstaDed 
programs. • SSOO/best (414) 
652-8607. after 5pm. 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 



6th ANNUAL DUCK LAKE 
WOODS COMMUNITY GA- 
RAGE SALE. AUGUST 6 A 
7. 9am-4pm. No EarilesI 
Norih on Forest Ave., off 
Rte.134; between Wilson 
arxi Rte.12. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 
Saturday 9-3pm, Giris 
Clothes Like New Intant-5, as- 
sorted housewares, lamps & 
tots of misc. 675 E. Princolon 
Couti, Sliver Oaks Subdlvl- 
ston, (Rte.B3 North of Roillns) 

SPORTS CARD RUMMAGE 
SALE- Former Card Shop 
Owner selling All STOCKI 
Many unopened factory 
sealed boxes and paks. All 
SportsI Singles and Corh- 
mons tool Crafts, clothes, 
Nintendo tapes. Marshall 
Stack amp.-Brand t^ew with 
accessories. Too Much More 
to List. AUGUST 5,6,7. 
10im-7pm 35886 North Fair- 
field, Round Lake, (708) 
546-4178. 



330 



Ginge 
Rummage Sale 



MYLITH PARK SUBDIVI- 
SION SALE- Friday & Satur- 
day (Aug.5,6). gam-4pm. 
Island Lake, oil Rte.176. 
Clothes, books, t oys. MOREl 

LAKE VILLA- MULTI FAMI- 
LY GARAGE SALE. FRIDAY 
AUGUST 12. eam-4pm. 

Rte.132 to McKlnntey I0 111 
Balsam Ct. Household 
goods, Furniture, ctothlng. 

LARGE YARD SALE- CWk*- 
ren'a ck>lhe8, Infant-slzeO, La- 
dies assorted dothes, Indud- 
Ing evenkig drosses and west- 
em clothes. Men's clothes. 
Books for adults and chMren, 
toys. Household goods. Some 
horse and lack, blankets. 
Many more Items. Al Priced 
To Selll FRIDAY, SATUR- 
DAY, and SUNDAY, 
AUG.5,6.7. 10im-4pm 

(708) 244-3698. 37199 N.OII- 
leys Rd., Gurnee. l-i/2-mile3 
north i)f Grand Ave. and 1-1/2 
mile south of Wadsworth Rd, 
[ust 2/mlnutet from Gur- 
nee Mills and Gratt Amer- 
ica. PLEASE, NO EARLY 
BIRDSI 



340 



Housefaold Goods 
Furniture 



(2)BRAND NEW chairs soHd 
pinewood, floral reversible 
ctishtons, S200/each. 21 Inch 
Curtis Color TV set, $75. (414) 
551-7792. 

EASY CHAIR, SOFA and 
Loveseat, Blue, Mauve, 
Cream, $550. LEATHER 
sofa and kiveseat, $950. Ex- 
cellent condition, MUST 
SELU (708)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, -cdmptele $1,100. Dtn- 
tng room Mt, $1,700, Cher- 
ry. OAK bedroom ■•! 
$1,200. ALSO Sleigh bed- 
. room set. $1,745. All In PER- 
FECT condition. MUST 
SELLl (708)548-1045. 

3/plece SOLID OAK OFFICE 
desit wall unit, lift. long, 
sft.high, 5tt.6-tnch wide. 
$500. Call for dlscrlptlon: 
(708)244-4484 or (708) 
838-0444. ■ 

7-ptec* BEDROOM SET, 
medium Oak. Queensize, 
Very good condition. Paid 
$7,000 asking $3,000. (708) 
395-4237. 

BEDROOM DRESSER 

BEAUTIFUL 72/lnch Pecan 
wood, 9-drawer3. Excellent 
condlttoh. A give-away at $275 
(708) 587-4302. 

BIG FURNITURE SALE! Dif- 
ferent Varieties, Call Sheny 
alter 3 pm. (708) 872-1366. 

COUCH, L-SHAPED section- 
al, almost new, Blue, kept 
covered. Must sell. 
$300/best (414) 657-5632. 

CUSTOM SOFA ft Loveseat 
Excellent condltton. 12 threw 
pillows, cream & light rose 
cotors. Accent pillows (green, 
black, burgundy) New 
$2,300 Sacrillce $700(706) 
822-8118. 

DINING ROOM SET. Beauti- 
ful Unique, Oak Queen 
Anne. 102/inch table, 
e/chalrs. 60/lnch China Cabi- 
net. Periectl $2,450. (708) 
374-O203. 

MATTRESS SETS, ANY 

size, never used, retail, $500- 
$1,100. Sacrillce: $135- 
$295.(708)913-8965. 



- New & Used 



IVdimted 

Merchandise 



Community Market 
St Garage Sale 

Still., Aug. 28 • Deerfield 

Over 300 BpBCes available (some covered) for 

Belling Rummage, Arts & Grafts, Snacks & 

Goodies, CoUecttbles, Farmer's Market. 

Covered S|Mce - *40 • OntoMe Space • *25 

Call DM.R, Chamber of Conunerce 

T0o"94S"4660 for info or apptication$ 



# 



'■'<r 



/ 



war 



-.^ 



*.-^^aj»--. 



ClASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers Auqusr 3r, 1994 




'^MH^*"^^ y'M'<^L^>\ 






340 



Household Goods 
Fumilurc 



DINING ROOM SET, QUEEN 
ANN, Cherrywood, 9-ploce, 
excfillent quality, sacrifice, 
$1.B50. PorlQCtI (70B) 040- 
8865. 

FOn SALE CHERRY hutch, 
52'wx72*h, voiy good condl- 
llon $150 (708) 438-0247 
alter 3pm. : 

MATTRESS SALE- D«cora- 
tors* Top Quality; Sprlng-Atr, 
mattress and box spring. 
Never used. $270/c)uaen 
size. (Other sizes Edso avail- 
'able). Will deliver. (708) 
374-0203. 

ORQAN, TOOLS, COM- 
MERCIAL-TYPE Window air 
condttloners, Lamps, chairs. 
Prices negotiable. (708) 
52fr-e554. 

MOVING MUST SELL! 
Whk^ool 4yr. oM large capaci- 
ty electric dryer, many 
features, malcMng WASHER, 
Sacrnice $350/ofler (set). 
(708) 473-1366. 

QUEEN SOFA SLEEPER 
lyr. new. Blue and cream 
striped. Excellent condition. 
Was $700. $499A}est. (708) 
662-e322. 

TV FOR SALE- UVC. Orlgl- 
naiy $1,200. 2yrs. old. Mint 
condition, $500. (708) 
548-4365. 



348 



Lawn/Gardca 



14hp MURRAY RIDING 
Lawn mower, with vac wagon. 
Excellent condition. Asking 
$800. (708) 740-2750. 

SEARS SB-inch cut, 

120HC 4-speed ridlrtg lawn 
mower, includes 36/lnch, 
snowplow, blade, tire, chains 
and dump trailer. Mint condi- 
tion. Musi Seel $900A}e5t 
(7pay52&-5743. 




S24 



Eduolloo 
lostniction 



WILL TEACH PRIVATE 
Piano and Voice lessons, 
Round Lake area home, 
(708) 265-9313, lor irtoima- 
tlon. 



S39 


Housekeq>ing 



MEAN MAiDS- WE HATE 
AND TERMINATE OIRTI 
HOUSECLEANINQ: weekly. 
bl-weeMy or whenever. Move- 
ins OR Move-outa. Referenc- 
es. Call Tilly. (708)746-2245. 



S42 



Landscaping 



*LAWN SERVICE AVAIL- 
ABLE. REASONABLE 
PRICES. DEPENDABLE 
SERVICE. (708) 
39&-S063, or(414) 
878-1755. 



S54 


Movin^Storage 



MOVING?? CALL BOS The 
Mover. Furniture; pianos; 
8^es; reslaurar^ equipment; 
Light machinery. Uft gate 
van and smal crane tmcks. 
PACK RAT EnterprlSM. 
(708)662-1956. 



S93 



Trccs/Pianls 



TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

LandClecaing 
Seasoned Haidwood 

■ 

Nofdstrain Ttpoo 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

708-526-0858 



S99 



HsceUaneous 
Safvices 



PERMANENT COSMETICS. 
Brow, eye and Lip color. 
BaaulHul Forevert. Eledroly- 
•la By Sheny. IB years ex- 
pertenoe-coftHled. W«ulc»- 
guf, Lak* Villi. Lake Bluff. 
(7QB)244-ie40. 



350 


Mscdlaneous 



■LUCKY- HOMEOWNERSI 
Special Siding Offerl Wo 
are a new dealer In town took' 
Ing lor a fow homos to display 
something now in house ski- 
ing, Peopk) willing to holp us 
get started, will roclove top 
workmanship, plus a large 
price reduction. II your house 
is in need, and you will allow 
us to show It off. Call 5iDE-A- 
HOME, (815) 

943-2004,Deailng direct 

with a Senkir dtizen owner, 
saving misunderstandings 
arxl high sales commissions. 
Open 7/days a week. Satur- 
day and Surxlay calls arxl c^ 
pointments OK. Addll tonal Dis- 
counts for cash. Financing 
available If desired. Homes 
needed througtwut the countyl 

7" SATELLITE DISH, track- 
er 2-systom, 2yr3. old, over 
400 possble channels. AsMng 
$1,500 (815) 344-7960, alter 
5pm. 

BEAUTICIAN HYDRAULIC 

chair, King size tied spread. 
3/set3 of dishes,' China set 
for 12. (708) 872-2456. 

FIREPLACE INSERT, with 
Electric blowers, 30x38. 
$650/best. (708) 395-9567. 

FULL LENGTH MENS 
Racoon coat, Large- extra 
largo, has been stored. 
$750/be3l. (708) 740-4260 
9am-lpm or 7pm-9pm. 

HOMEOWNERS WANTED 11 
KAYAK POOLS is looking tor 
DEMO HOMESITES to display 
our naw MAINTENANCE FREE 
KAYAK POOL. Savo thou- 
sand! of $9$ with this uniqua 
opportunitylll CALL NOWIII 
1-800-31 KAYAK 152925) 

PLAYHOUSE "or EXTRA 
LARGE DOG HOUSE. 611 
Wide, an. long. 5fl. Wgh, 
$200A>est. Dog house, $45. 
(708) 223-0729. 

WANT MORE PRIVACY?? 
Do It With TREESI No fence 
or permlls necessa/y wllh our 
beautiful thick Blue Scotch 
Pines. We guarantee, deliv- 
er and pfant for FREE with 
onJers of 10 orAnore trees. 
4fl.-5ft. $65/each; Sfl.-6lt. 
S85/each; 6ft.-7tt. 
$120/each. Larger trees also 
available. Nursery Grown. 
Thousands 1o choose from. 
(815) 338-3348. 

SUNQUEST WOLFF TANNING 
BEDS. New' Commercial- 
Home Units. From 9199.00/ 
Lamps-Lotions-Accessories. 
Monthly payments low as 
$18.00. Call Today FREE 
NEW Color Catalog. 1-800- 
462-9197. , 



SPAS& 
HOTTUBS 

Ractoiy outlet. 
Save thousands. 
Complete & finai 

fall liquidation 

WooDUND Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



354 



Medical Equip 
Supplies 



ELECTRIC LIFT CHAIR- 

Recilner model chair gently 
lifts to a standing position. 
Hand-held louch control. 
Brown velour. Excellent condi- 
lion. Originally $1,500, Will sell 
$250. (706)526-4971 day or 
evening. ' 

LARK 3 WHEEL scooter, 
used for physically Impaired, 
excellent condition (708) 
627-3623. 

RECLINER LIFT CHAIR. Like 
new $500. Collapsible 
wheelchair, $300. Walker, 
walker cane, bathroom akis. 
PRICED TO SELL (414) 
694-1618. 



358 



Musical Instniments 



ALTO SAX- CHARLIE PARK- 
ER Model, Dancing giri on 
bell. Collector's Item. Good 
condition. Original lacquer 
and case. $525. (708) 
746-2822. 

SELMER TENOR 5AX- 

Super action, high 'F shaip', 
Uke new. (708) 746-2622. 




CONSOLE/SPINET PIANO 
FOR Sale. Take on small 
payments. Seo locally. i-B0O- 
343-6494. 

GRAND PIANO, 5ft. WurUtz- 
er, good condtllon, $700. 
Sanyo 1102Z Copier, 3- 
papor Imys, 5-copy sizes. 
Fair condllion. (708) 
249-9714. 

MUST SELLII 7' Black lac- 
quered piano by Baldwin. 3 
years old, moving (708} 
949-1319. 

WILL TEACH PRIVATE 
Piino and Voice lessons, 
Round Lake, area home. 
(708) 265-9313. for Infomia- 
tlon. 



360 



' Pets & Supplies 



POODLES- STANDARD 

AKC S/weeks, unique red col- 
or, socialized by children and 
adults. Males/females. $450- 
$500. Alio Toy size, almost 
ready. Call (708) 526-1539. 

1yr.old, BULL MASTIFF 
dog. Great with ktds, red fawn, 
Long line of Charrpions, com- 
pletely trained. Crate aiKf call 
accessories. Pakl $600. Ask- 
Ing $300. (708) 473-^850. 

COLLIES- TOP QUALITY 
PUPS. Blues and Trl-colors, 
AKC Registered, shots and 
eye cfwcks. $400. Also 2yr. old 
TrT Male, Syr. oW Blue Male, 
All to good homes only. (815) 
675-6365. . 

ENGLISH BUDGIE BREED- 
ER (Parakeet*) Selling all 
Breeding stock and Equlp- 
menl. (708) 356-9328. 

FEMALE SPAYED Tabby 

Cat needs loving home. 
Adults preferred. Call lor de- 
tails. (706) 587-8720. 

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUP- 
PIES, AKC/OFA parents. 
Guaranteed. Great with chik}- 
ren. Good for working or 
companionship. Ger- 
man^American bloodlines. 
$400. (414) 534-7747 

GERMAN SHORTHAIRED 
POINTER, lemale, lyr. old, 
spayed. Needs room. Excet- 
lenl pot. good home $150. 
(708) 540-6307. 

IGUANA, FEMALE 4-1/2R. 
Cage and all accessories. 
Good natured, veiy healthy. 
$450.(708)548-7114. 

GOLDEN RETRIEVER 

NEEDS loving home, to- 
male.lSyrs. old. In excellent 
health. Intelligent, well be- 
haved, good companion. 
(708)382-6882. . 

SUN CONURES. LOVE- 
BIRDS, CANARYS: Hand 
Fed, bonded pairs. All cotois. 
Various prices. (708) 
487-0047. 

UMBRELLA COCK-A-TOOS. 
HAND Fed baby birds. Ask 
for Karen. (708) 362-5954. 



PETS IN NEED 
Needs YourHelpI 

Here Is a sample of some of 

the animals we have 

available for 

adoption; 

Long and short haired cats 

and kittens, some 
deda wed, Siamese cats. 
SNh Tzu. Dalmatian, Bea- 
gle, king haired Shepherd 
Lab, Shepherd Dane, long 
haked Dachshund, Lab mix, 

Pomeranian, Lab Dobe, 

English Setter, Lab Sprlrtg- 

er, pure bred German 

Shepherd, puppies, and 

many other small, medium 

arxl largo dogs. 

Adopt from a shelter 

& receive your 

spay/rveuter card. 

Be a responsible pet ownerl 

(815)PAT-1462 
Pets In Need 



370 


Wanted To Buy 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDf?K>N- or Parte. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machlnet, Paying 
CASHt Can <708)9BS-274^ 

WANTED- SWIMMING 

roOL, 'Above ground. REA- 
SONABLY PRICED. CALL 
everings (r08)74fr-0902. 

WANTED: ALL OLD TRAINS 
AND TOYS. Uonet, Ameri- 
can Flyer. TOP Cash Paid. 
(708)299-1101. 



Homes For &de 




D 



500 



Homes For Sale 



Homes For Sale 



3-BEDROOM RANCH 

l.5bath, with llnlshed base- 
ment and wet-bar. 2,5car ga- 
rage, central air, sewer, high 
etilclont lumace, $99,900. 
(414) 862-6298. 

BARRINQTON- Northwest 
Hwy, 3-bedrocm, 2-bath, on 
1/3acro, Appliances, conlrai 
air, 2.5car garage. Energy et- 
lidont. Rustic cedar shakos. 
Just reduced: $18 9 | <W0 
NOW $184,900. Contract 
sate possible. (708) 
526-8306. 




GUHNEE- 53B8 Virginia 
Ct. By Owner. Beautiful 2- 
story. Colonial jusi Syrs. NEWl 
3-badroom, 2.5t>ath, central 
air. partial finished basement. 
Professkinally landscaped, 
fenced lot on cul-de-sac. 
$171,900. OPEN SUNDAY 
1-4pm. (708) 249-4103. 
leave message. 

OPEN HOUSE- Saturday 
and Sunday, 12am-4pm, 
THROUGH AUGUSTI Wau- 
conda. 4-bedroom, 
1-3/4balh, on 4/acres, Horses 
allowed. 2/acres buiidable. 
Much more. 27102 N. Mack 
Dr. Off Rt.176. (708) 
526-6872 or HELP-U-SELL 
(708)516-1200. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
Aug.7, 1pm-5pm. Racine 
County. 4651 Nicholson Rd. 
3/bedoom Lannon Stone 
Cape Cod, .4-car garage, 
2/acres. zoned light industrial. 
$159,900. For more Info call 
(414) 681-1350. (414) 
681-1350. 

LINDENHUHST- MOVE 
RIGHT IN and ENJOY this 
Picture Perfect 4-bedroom 
ranch with 2/bath3, 2.5car 
garage, and lull llnlshed 
basement. This home 
boasts many upgrades and 
Is tastefuly decorated In neu- 
tral colors. Other assets in- 
clude a large lot and LOW 
taxes $140,000 OPEN 
HOUSE- SAT. ASUN. 2- 
Spm. 1907 PInecreat Ln., 
off Hawthorn. (708) 
356-2101. 

BEACH PARK- OPEN 
HOUSE- SAT. and SUN. 
10am-4pm. 3-bedroom, lull 
basement, 14x20 addition 
on 120x132 lot. 2.5car de- 
tached garage, hot air heat 
wKh central air. Priced: 
$106,000. 10069 Chaplin 
St., (l/2block west of Sheri- 
dan Rd., 3/blocks south of 
Wadswoilh Rd.) (708) 
623-7514. 

GURNEE- OPEN HOUSE 
Sunday 12-4pm. 94 
Berkshire Ct. Beautiful pond 
setting. Shows like a model. 2- 
bedroom, 2.5baths +den. Full 
basement, attached garage. 
Lots of Upgrades. $134,900. 
Gene Sherman, broker/owr^er. 
(708) 263-«)13. 




What's New 
On the {Market 



Lake Forcst/Mettewa 

(LlbertyvlUeHlgh School) 

250 Bradley 

Spacious 9 room hcnne on 
large lot Dramatic fireplace, 
family rown, full basement, 3 
car attached garage. 53^0,000. 

Ann Turner 

(708) 729-7200 
CoidweU Banker 



Timber Lakes Area 

Your dream house on a 
dream piece of property 

3 bdrm, 2 bath, 
2 car Ranch. $199,900. 

Contact 
Nancy Ann Fehn 

G-21 Bell & Snell 

708-381-9100 



BEACH PARK- Custom 
ranch, laco brick all sides, 
large lot, prtvalo yard, newly 
decorated In/out. 4-bedroom, 
3-balhs, finished basement, 
extras gaJoroI Shown by ap- 
pointment, no agents please. 
(708) 336-3535. 

VbEDROOM - Bl-level, 
Round Lake Beach, Family 
Room, near schools. (708) 
356-1032, owner. 

BY OWNER GRAYSLAKE 
RANCH HOME In West Trail 
Subdivision $255,000 (708) 
223-4347. 

BY OWNER- 4-bodroom trt- 
level In Round Lake Beach, 
1-3/4 balh, large lamify room, 
fenced yard with deck and ' 
shed. Ckise to schools and 
shopping. $88,000 NO REAL- 
TORS. For appointment call 
(708) 546-3374. 

BY OWNER- PARK LIKE set- 
ting, high, atop a wooded hill- 
side, 1/2 btock (rem Grass 
Lake In Spring Grove. 7 
rooms, 3-bedroom3, den, 
large living room with oak 
parquet floor, deck, 
woodshed, lake rights. 
$65.000. (708) 587-1963. 

CRYSTAL LAKE School*. 
DEAL DIRECT WFTH BUILD- 
ER I 4-bedroom, 2-stoiy. 2.5- 

baths, deck, energy efficient. 
River rights on wooded loL 
DRY basement has poten- 
tial. tl Q I i C aO $189,900. 
(708) 526-6306. 

CUTE h AFFORDABLE 
Round Lake Beach 3 bed- 
room ranch with cathedral 
celling, landscaping &. many 
extras. $75,900. 1524 Mead- 
owbrook For Sale by Owner. 
(708) 740-9168. Appolnt- 
ment. 

FOX LAKE- LARGE Dehixe 
Cedar/Bdck 2-story with Eng- 
lish basement on 1-acre + 4- 
bedroom, 2.5bath. Jacuzzi, 
fireplace, 3-car garage. TOO 
MANY UPGRADES TO LISTl 
Ready to move-In. Rnandng 
available. $269,900. DEAL 
DIRECT With BUILDER and 
SAVE. (708) 526-8306. 



GAGES LAKE- 3-bedroom 
1/balh ranch, completely re- 
modeled. I.Scar detached ga- 
rage, 200/yard3 trom lake. 
Under 100K. Call now and you 
pick the catpetl 33688 Forest 
Dr. Dave-(708) 662-6193. 

GURNEE- 4-bedroom 
ranch, central air, new carpet- 
ing, now modem Wichen, ga- 
rage, on large wooded lot. Ex- 
cellent schools. $116,500. 
(708) 205-1690. 

JOHNSBURG- RIVER 

RIGHTS. 2-bedroom, with 
lower level posslbllliles. Al- 
most now Raised ranch. 
I.Scar garage. Central air. 
Many upgrades. Ready 
Nowi Contract possible. 
1 1 80,000 $124,900. (708) 
526-8306. 



GURNEE- LEASE WITH OP- 
TION TO BUY. $5,000 
moves you In. 3-bedroom, 
family room, ' liropiaco, 
2.5balh. Executive Duptox In 
Heather RWS®- 

$1,500/month rent, 

$500/month rent Credit. 
Available Ocl.lst. (708) 
S45-03O4. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3- 

bedroom, 2-baih Ranch, fire- 
place, full basement, central 
air, HUGE 6/car heated ga- 
rage (great lor camper and 
boat storage). Located In 
quiet neighborhood within 
walking distance from shop- 
ping and restaurants. 
$129,500. twin Ukes, Wl. 
(414)877-9109. 



m 


^npp^^ 


1^ 


^^KKf^^^'^^^^Kli^STi 




^^^Urr ' * * ■Br"'^ 


Wi 


Wfe »,;■■? 


A^-V- 


^f^f^'-jfURDt-y^^'', '■ 


'^^' 


Kfr, jijjv 'v J 


^ 


B^Bflfe^al^.^ - 




MJ 



**ATrENTION** 

lookingloStWAUomtl 

looking To Buy A Home? 
LET ME MAKE IT 
EASIER FOR YOU! 

CALL: 
MERL CARBERRY 

OFFICE: 816-5900 
VOICEMAIL: 374-5072 

Caldwell Banker 
Real Estate 



Ingleside New Construction 

3 Bedrooms, 1.5 baths. 

Eat In kitchen, large family 

room, 2 car gamge. 

Central air and more. 

$176,300.00 
(708) 550-9709 




Island Lake fex River Shores 

, 22 months young! 3 bedroom, 1 .5 bath or) 

quarter acre lot with fenced in yard brick patio. 

Bay windows, looking out to a landscape front 

yard; skylight In kitchen, ceramic tile foyer, 

kitchen, and half bath. Custom blinds 

throughout home. Also includes air 

. conditioning and all major appliances. 

FHA assumable mortgage available at 8.0%. 

$135,500.00 

924 Knightsbridge Drive 

Island Ijatie 

(708)526-8183 



/^uifllL\ Qualitu Custom 



Homes 




h'-l'i. I 1,1. 1 iirii i I I 



I he C()l)l)le.sl(nie 



(on your lot) 

Wa taka speciol attontion lo dotoil, and il 
you'd like to odd your ipeciai loudi to any 
batjc plan, rfj no probl«ml Every homo Is 
built by axp«rt craftsman and only with nuns 
brand producls. 



— ppr 



•I ^ 




FiJNiRrrAN 




Compw« Ilwt9 ttandtrd foaturM: 

■ 12r of R38 celling insulation 

- 2)0 exterior walls R-20 standard 

• Ceilingi and interior waits are gypium board 

■ Malntsnanoe fret vtnyl siding, etandard 

• Cadar or other aldlngt, optional 






WelGome 
HoniB 

TO OVER 90,000 

FAMILIES 



•QisforcadBirhut 

• Paachim iRSittftd imtal dad antwica door 

• Tlwnrai wood «NndQM will) nwiniMinoa hM 
fAttiordadwrappinoi. 

•AeonpMihemi^pd^itilntduidcMpriid 

Plica does not incbdi paiiiib, wney and wiel- 
nMring bt ciMfing Mwar and w««r or MpUc 
and well, cvfvadi, drivawayt, wiia, ludicap- 
Ing or.linandng {Hiaat and odwr ila In^roM- 
mants avalabla. Lowar iavati on Bi-lavais and 
Tri-la%-«bnolliniriiad). 



OOUNIY LINE BmLDERS 

216 Janet Drive 
Island Lake 

708-526-8306 



BUSCHMUNCOMPJUIIES 

300 N. tVHIwaukae Ave. Sta A 
Lake Villa 

708-265-0230 






. -^ ^^4^ ^m^.^fj^j'^ri^^t^ i.-.xt^'mm*^ 



A'uqusT^^ 1994 .UkEM, Newspapers, CLASSIFIEI>t 




i 



. 



Id 

>tk; 
"P- 

tnd 







500 



Homes For Sale 



500 



Homes For Safe 



ij 



DO YOU HAVE 4,5 or 6 
chtldren? 4*5 bedroom house 
with 3ybalh3, 40x60 Polo bam 
on 2.5acro3 In Spring Grove 
area. (815) 675-^07. 

HOUSE FOR SALE- 
DOWNTOWN Antloch. 

Older homo, Excellent condi- 
tion, 3-bodroom. 2<balh, living 
and . dining , 2>car garage. 
Priced, for a Quick Sale. 
$109.900 (708) 395-0662. 

ISLAND LAKE, WEST- 
RIDGE 3-bedrbom, I.Sbalh, 
basement, garage; deck, 
fenced yanl. S159,d00 (70B) 
487-4921. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER* Ex- 
tremely clean ' 3-bedroom 
Ranch on over 2/aciBs. Call- 
fomla drtttstone llreplace In 
family room, master suite 
wtth private balh. Profeaslon- 
ally bun rec room. Rrst tloor 
laundry, sunroom. Built-in 
bookshelves. Formal dining 
room, plaster walla. Perfect 
for growing family. New 
cedar, deck leads to magntlK 
cently landscaped yard and 
2nd garage. Kenosha near 
Interstate. $170,000 (414) 
; 657-2256., ■ :V . 

LINDENHURST- RAISED 
RANCH home overlooking 
lake. 34)edroom9, 2-(ull baths, 
fully finished basement. Large 
deck etjnounded by beautlul 
landscape. AD applances Irh 
eluded.. $139,900 (708) 
3S6-6937. 

McHENRY- RAISED RANCH. 

3-bedroom. Finished lower 
level, deck, energy eflk:ient, 
2-car garage. Many up- 
grades! : River rights. Avail- 
. able August ist. Contract 
Possible. ••' <iai |MO i 

$127,900. (708) 52d-«306. 

^^^^^"■— ■■^^^■^■^^^"■" 

y 'ROUND LAKE PARK- 
{ 60011. of Beachl Private boat 
'■':• slip. 3-b6droom. 2,5bath, cen- 
yi tral air, basement, deck, 2-car 
'• garage. 5/months NEWI 
$192.500. (706) 740-2563. 

. SELL • HOMES ON CON- 
■ TRACT. NO CREDIT CHECKI' 

Call Sheny after 3pm. CfM) 
872-1366. '':'"::.'■ ' 

;; KENOSHA- 2624-33rd ST. 3^ 

bedroom ranch, I.Sbath, 

'' central air, 1.5car garage, 

it basement. $69,900. (414) 

654-2314, appointment. 

LAKE VILLA Township, BY 
OWNER. 1/2-acre. 3-bed- 
■:. room 2-full baths, Callfomla 
aunporch, 2.5car garage 
unattached heated, tractor 
shed. Beautifully land- 
SCaped. (708) 356-9103. . 

LAKEFRONT HOME. LOVE- 
LY 3-BEDROOM house on 
. the Chain with private pier, 
new kitchen, full basement, 
2. Scar garage New well on 
d/4-Acre. Not In Flood 

> plalne. Reduced to sell! 

V $1 87.900 (708) 740-7653. 

LAKEFRONT RACINE 
COUNTY, BOHNERS LAKE, 
3-bedroom, I.Sbath, 2/tire- 
places, full basement, l/car 
garage, central air. Quiet 
nelghboriiood recent upgrad- . 
ed larKlscapIng, Aluminum 
sMIng. Good llshing 
$225,000; 10/miles east of 
Lake Geneva. (414) 
279-3120 after 3pm and 
week-ends. . 

MUNDELEIN- DIAMOND 
LAKE AREA. Spactous Con- 
temporary Ranch. 1,464sq.ft. 
- -fbasemenl. 4-bedrooms 2- 
baths, 25x1 4tt, klving room 
with tirepiace, cattiecfaal ceil- 
ings and skyligMs, fomial din- 
ing room, master bedroom 
has cathedral celling, skylight 
and atrium door to balcony, 
central air, over 30 thermo*. 
pane casement windows, 
loads of Irac and recessed 
HgNing. Walk to beach, only 
minutes from shopping. 
$115.900(708)949-3961. 

NEW 2,(X)0 SQUARE FOOT 
HOME, 4 bedroons, 2 1/2 
baths, formal dining room, 
family room with fireplace, 
full basement, 2 car garage 
. with blacktop drive. All for 
$149,900(708) 587-2904. 

NO AGENTS 2+ bedrooms, 
basement, . 2 car garage, 
fenced yard, new sklng. re- 
modeled. Adorable, must' see 
to appreclaletClose to 41 and 
tollway $65,000 (708) 
244-3264 leave message. 



OAK LOG home: 2-large 
bedroom, oxposed beams, 
more living space In base- 
ment. TLC. Close to state- 
line. Only serious . buyers. 
$87,000(414)697-1752. ' . 



504 



Homes For Heot 



7 room HOUSE on the wa- 
ter. . No pels. $7SOATionth plus 
ulliitles. Call Thomas 
(708)678-6000, eam-5pm. 
(708)395-2171 after 6pm. . 

FOX LAKE- Small 2-bed- 
room house. Modem Mtchen, 
basement, carpeted. No pets. 
Security and references re- 
quired. $420Anon1h. (708) 
587-7033. 

grayslake, like new 

Duplex with single attached 
garage, S-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, central . air, 
$900ATionth ■fullitties -fde- 
posit. NO PETSI (708) 
587-6503. ■ ' • 

ISLAND LAKE- 4-bedroom 3- 
balh, ' fenced yard, 

$1,300/month , (708) 

526-1135. leave m^sage. ■ 

LAKE CATHERINE HOUSE- 
En]oy peace and quiet nes- 
tled among the Oaks. Beauti- 
fully landscaped 2-bed- 
rooms, fireplace, I.Sbath, 
boatslip. Prefer quiet Non- 
■party-lng" Tenant. 

$720/month. References. 
(708) 395-5530, pm. or 
(708)395-6342. days. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 

bedroom'; 1/car garage, 
fenced yard,- laundry' room. 
$735Anonth -f security. Avail- 
able Oct.lst. (708) 
740-0919. 

ROUND LAKE PARK- VERY 
dean 3-bedroom ranch, on 
quiet street. Near lake. Avail- 
able Sept. 1st. (Possibly 
sooner) $775/month 4secur- 
ity. (708) 945-5217. 

WATERFRONT 
HOUSE/APARTMENT 
FOR RENT- on west skle of 
MIneoia Bay In Fox L^e. Ap- 
pliances Indudod. $525/monlh 
plus security. (708)543-2958. 

ZK>N- NEW 3-bwfniom du- 

.plex . available August '1st. 
Pay own utllties. Security de- 
posit/ Lease required. Sec- 
tkin-8 not available. 
S725Anonth. (708) 

872-8782. 

ZION- SMALL 3-BEDROOM 
house, fe(K»d yard, on large 
lot. $600/month 4Ultiitie8. 
(708) 746-5882. 



508 



Homes Wanted 



STOP FORECLOSURE- ARE 
YOU FACING BANKRUPT- 
CY- DIVORCE- PROBATE- 
UNEMPLOYMENT. We Buy 
Houses. We Loan Money. 
Alt Caah or Terms. Fast 
Settlement. Scott: (708) 
945-8235. 



514 



Condt^own Homes 



518 


. Mobile liomes 



520 



^pailmeQts for Rest 



1992 1,280sq.ft. Mobile 
Home, 2-bodroom8, 2-fuIl 
baths, riroplace, skylights, 
washer/dryer, dishwashor, 
stove, rolrigoralor. central air. 
Asking $39,000 Lake Geno- 
Va. (414) 249-0533. 

1987 2-BEDROOM. Locat- 
ed: Great Lakes. Price re- 
duced. Many appliances. I ■ 
have orders and need to 
SELL, all otters cortsldered. 
(708)785-1622. 

2'BEOROOM, DEN, 1.5balh, 
14x70. Deck, shod, central 
air, $9,000 (708) 731-1934 
or (708)244-8204. 

KENOSHA- TIMBER RIDGE- 
3-bedroom, 14x70. 2-fuli 
baths. 2x6 walls. All major. 
appBances stay. Job Trans- 
fered. $18,000 LEHMAN 
HOMES (706) 662-1965. 

MOBILE HOMES- SINGLES 
and Doubles. 2-3 bedrxxNus. 
Lake County and Keposh'a 
County. Bank kians and ap- 
praisals. 5% Down on Any 
l^w Homo Financed. (708) 
662-1965. 

PARK CITY- 2-bedroom 
12x60 $6,500: 2-bedroom 
12x65, -front den, $7,500; 2- 
bedroo,m I.Sbath, 12x65. 
$9,900. ALL very clean, up- 
graded, mafor appliances 
and more. Bank Financing. 
OTHER USTINQS In area 
Parit. LEHMAN HOMES 
(708)662-1965. 

Vo«rN««i Si 

HOHM Now 

(414) 857-2891 

(Call for 89l9ction9 
istyt§s) 

RahilMMiii 
|Lali0 Manorl 



LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Urge . U2- 
bedroom apartments.. Lake 
Vina. $545 and $eeo/month. 
Heat water, air Included. 
(708)356-5474. ' 

MUNDELEIN- 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTIn 4-unit bu|M- 
Ing, stove, refrigerator carpet- 
ing, blinds, laundry facility. 
$580/monlh +Socurity de- 

posit. (708) 834-2100. 

ORCHARD APARTMENTS- 3- 
1/2 miles west of CLC on 
Washington 8t. 2A}edrooms, 
balcony, laundry faclltty. No 
pets. No watert}eds. Lease. 
$560/month. (708) 

328-6674. 

PLEASANT PRAIRIE, 
Wise. 2-bedroom apart- 
ments, upper arvd tower ftais 
of fxiuse. Basemert storage, 
large yard, 1/car garage, no 
pets. . $540/monlh •HJtilHtes. 
Available now. (708) 
249-1089. 

KENOSHA-. Si07-22nd AVE. 

• Ntee S-room tower. Perfect 
tor seniors. Appliances, ga- 
rage,' no pets. $500/month. 
(414)652-6114. :, . ■ 

SPRING GROVE 4-ROOM 

Air cohdillorted redecorated 
2nd floor apartment, heal In- 
cluded. No .. pets. 
$5S0/monlh ^security depos- 
it. (815) 675-2860, Heave 
message. 



I 



WAUCONDA- ROOM with 
full prtvileges, lake front con- 
do. ' Pool, llreplace, 
$425/mon1h +1/2 utilities de- 
posit. Call Scott (708) 
487-5433. 

WAUKEGAN AREA- Fresh- 
ly remodeled, kitchen ap- 
pliances, secure 2-ftal. 
900sq.ft. lA)edroom Country 
setting. $550/month +deposlt. 
(708) 336-1482. 



Tour the New 1995 
Nfodel Homes!!! 

Discover qualified living at affordable prices. 
Deluxe 2 & 3 bedroomhomes starting al only 

$29,950 

See Our MODEL HOME at the Walworth County Fair 
^,^-^August 28 - September 5 

/i' J^^^_ ' ■^ Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 

"TOnOEfE= (414) 248-3831 



4 



520 



AparlntcQls Fbr Rcol 



520 



Apaitmcots 
For lent 



CRYSTAL LAKE- BY OWN- 
ER. Luxury first floor condo, 2- 
bedroom, 2-bath, fireplace, 
lull basement, attached ga- 
rage. Upgrad^ Include: cus- 
tom kitchen cabinets, quany 
tile Itoors, central vac system 
~ and more. Excellent in-town lo- 
cation. $148,500 (815) 
459-3794. 

WAUCONDA, ON BANGS 
LAKE. Poolslde; private 
beach; boat dock. New: Oak 
trim, doors, cabinets, . car- 
pets. 2-bedroom CONDO. All . 
appliances. $94,000. (708) 
729^7920/owner. 

VACATION VILLAGE- 2- 
level 1-bedroom remodeled 
condo. Central air, new car- 
pel, parquet floor and linoll- 
ums. Patio and balcony, 
Overiooks Marina. Pool, ten- 
nis, etc. Full security. 
$34,900. (708) 587-4029. 



VERNON HILLS TOWN- 
HOME. 3-bedroom 2-bath, 
attached garage. ' Newly 
decorated, new carpeting 
and appliances. Near poo), 
clubhouse, and park. Many 
extras. $98,700; (708) 
934-0162. 



VERNON HILLS CONDO- 
2-BEDROOH I.Sbath, pool, 
all appliances, new caipelhig, 
and ceramk; tito. Great toca- 
Itoh. $69,500 (708) 549-9414. 



GURNEE- 2-BEDROOM 

1st Floor, Near Wanen High 
School. - Stove, relrigerator, 
dishwasher, fireplace, base- 
ment, garage, fenced yard. 
$720/month, lyr. lease -f se- 
curity. No pets. (708) 
295-1758. 

ANTIOCH- 2nd floor, fully 
carpeted, 2-bedroom, eat-In 
kitchen, central air, laundiy 
facilities. Immaculate. 
QUIET. Walking distance to 
town. No pets. $625/monlh, 
+security deposit. Available 
Sept.lst. Optional garage. 
Taking applications. . (708) 
395-3409. 

APARTMENT FOR RENT- 
Large 1-bedroom, air .condi- 
tioned. 2124 Kristan, North 
Chk»go. (near Great Lakes 
Base) (708) 623-3907. 

APARTMENT FOR RENT 
Waukegan, south skio, 2 t)ed- 
room, lease, security, section 
8 Is ok. $425/month (708). 
816-0625. 

GRAYSLAKE- 2-bedroom 
apartment with balcony, 
freshly painted, adults pre- 
ferred, lyr. lease, security de- 
posit, no pets. $595/monlh. 
(708)729-3767. 

WAUKEGAN* 2 BEDROOM, 
cottages, Victorian setting, 
off street parking. Available 
now. $6S0-$750/month. 
(708) 33^-0144. 

GRAYSLAKE- LARGE 2- 

bedroom apartment, upper. 
Newty remodeled. No pets. 
$600Anonth -fsecurtly depos- 
H. (708) 223-4664 or 
(708)223-0830. 

ZiON: APARTMENTS, Efll- 

ciencles Available 

$350/month. IttMiea Infcuded. 
Laundry, Near transportatton. 
Exceltont tocatton. (815) 
459-5884. 



520 



Apartments For Real 



520 



Apartmcois For Rent 



UNION GROVE, WL 
room apartments, FREE heal. 
Now carpet. Colling Fan. Mini 
blinds. Close to schools. No 
. pots. From $400/monlh. (414) 
878-^609.' 

WiNTHROP HARBOR- 1A2 

bedmoms. Complotety remo- 
deled, t^ew cabinets, paint, 
carpet, more. Laundry In 
building. No pets. $475- 
$55o/month. (708) 

, 731-3597. 

WAUCONDA- 1-Bedroom 

apartments on Bangs Ljd(e, 
includes boat sl^, sand beach. 
Very private. Many extras) 
$785 • to $825/month. 
(708)487-6161. 

SINGLE PROFESSIONAL fe- 
male to share home in coun- 
try with same. Large yard. 
garage space, laundry facill- 
ttes. Smafl pet o.k. Ctdl after 
8pm (414) 942-^793. 

SHARE 2-BEDROOM 

APARTMENT, Round Lake, 

. $200Anonth. (708)93»t0541, 

(708) 356-1615. 

' ENGINEER AND TEACH- 
ER seek 3rd young profes- 
slonai (M/F) to sliare house, 
Wauconda. Non-smokera, 
$300+1/3. (708)526-3203. 
message. ' 



2t>«<»^ GRAYSLAKE. 



CROSS LAKE. WISC. 3-1/2 
rooms. I.Sbath iapartmenl tor 
rent. Washer/dryer hookups. 
lake and yard priviledges. 
$475Anonlh. Heal and utilities 
included, security deposit and 
references required. No 
Pet3.(414) 862-2424. . 

WAUCONDA- ONE BED- 
ROOM /Vpartment, newly 
decorated, living room, kNcIv 
en and small spare room. Car- 
peted, yard, stove, refrigera- 
tor, heat and hot water Includ- 
ed. $515/month, lease and se- 
curity! No pels. Available Im- 
mediately. (708)433-0891. 

HAINESVILLE- 2-BEDROOM 
APARTMENTS, new 6/unit 
buikling, carpeting, aixf taun- 
diy faclitties, $625/month 
+security. Taking applica- 
tion now for immedl^e oc- 
cupancy. No pets. Call (708) 
546-1474. ■ 

ISLAND LAKE short term 
rental, $950 per month, plus 
utilities, phis security deposit. 
3 bedrooms, 11/2 bath, 1 car 
garage, available Seplemtter 
61h. (706) 526-7979, 

ISLAND LAKE- 2-BED- 
ROOM, 2-bath Starting at 
$625/month, 1/month FREE. 
Senior Special, 10% dis- 
count, 2/months FREE. 
(708)304-6766. 

KENOSHA- 4428'29th AVE. 
2-bedroom upper apart- 
ment, utilities Included. 
$500/m6nth 4escrow. (414) 
6K-2910. 

WAUCONDA, 2-bedrooms, 

2-baths. 2yr.otd. Downstairs 
end-unX, wtth patio and 1-car 
anached garage. Air. all ap- 
pliances- Including wash- 
er/dryer in unit. No pets. 
$825/hMnlh, +utili1ies and 
security. Available Sept.lst. 
(708) 487-1647. 




ii tu ii iiiitumi i niMiiiin 
STATIONSIDE | 

VILIAGE 

I5215 11111AVCNIIE 
KENOSHA, m 

Luxuriom Uving 

A(mimcnU & Townhouses 

; 2 Dcdrooiiu - 2 Daths 

Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Gin^cs Available 

Qnaiore 

NoPcU 

\ Call (4l4) 656-1010 

mniimmi iii M i iiuim 



•Microwave Ovens 

•Dishwashers 

•Washers & Dryers 

•Vaulted Ceilings 

•Patios or Balconies 

•Convenient Location 

(708) 356-0800 

705 Water's Edge Dr. 
Uke Villa, IL 

On Roulo 132 (GniiKJAve.) 

|uit'a*3lal Roula B3 at th« 

wuUi *kto of Dmp Lahs 



. LEXING- 
TON Homes. Home to share- 
full priviledges. Prefeired older 
mature female/ . male. 
$425/month, +1/2 ulliitles. 
(708)548-1137. 

MUNDELEIN MOM with two 
children kicking for. female, lo 
share lovely home near lake. 
No drugs, smokera, pets $375 
1/3 of utiitIk)S (708) 566-1503 
• alter 5pm. ' 

PROFESSIONAL MALE 

SEEKS roommate to share 
2/bedroom, I.Sbath apart- 
ment, partly furnished, a)r, 
conditioned.- Pool, tennis. 
$285/month . Short lease 
avaa^rie. (708) 546-4146 

. MUNDELEIN ■ 

- A,' SpKi6ut,twttyl&2 
1 bedroom tpwlmntt. 
Secure , bu]Idint< 
Mboaso cq pmDiK^ 
Lauiufay fKilitki. 
AvmtUik bsMdiately. 
Minulef lo ibopiifaii. 

* CALL 

5j^ (708)566-2700 g 

if i^'it'itii'iiirli-kitif* 
•k Inglasldo -k 

* ••399-*** J 

A pays 1st (ra- rent & deposit it 

• •..•-'-'•■«« it 

* One Bedrooms * 

^ •Spacloui 2 

? •Prtvite Btlconin ^ 
^ •Siwrt t«nn Inms avail. ^ 

{ ^Lakeview i 
2 Apartments* 

S (708)587-9277 * 

■ff 'tpuS/M tpffiana. ryrlNM A 



r 



^ 



WAUKEGAN 

One bedroom, heat 
Included. New caipet& 
paint, quiet building, no 
pets.$450/mo.Onemo, 
security deposit itqulrcd. 

(708) 244-1305 
939-0970 



\ 



1 



Antioch's 

linesl 2 bedroom 

apanmens. 

1 baih Of 1 IC baltii. 

Balcony or patio. 

Extra storage. 

No Pais. 

Ask about sanior 

citizen inconllves 

Mliiaty clause. 

Renl'BM/nw.tsec 

(708)638-0655 

IN Anita 
9 Terrace i 

imuii 




Water's Edge Apts 



•FREE heal, cooking & water 
•Central Air 

•Spaciously designed apts. 
•Picture window kitchens 
•On-site management/maintenance 

Call for appt 

(708) 587-6888 

f=> FdxLake/Ingleslde 






PEBBLESHIRE 
PHASE 1 

Spadous, modem 1 & 2 bdtm 

apts from ^973 

FREE heat & cooking (|as. 

•PLUSH CARPETING 
•MODERN APPUANCES 
•LAUNDRY FACILniES IN 

EVERY BUILDING 
•ON SITE MAINTENANCE 
MINUTES FROM 

HAWTHORH CENTER 



708-367-4S04 

695 Westmoreland Of. tS^ 



528 


• . ApWipmes ' 
To Share . 


SINQLE, Mip-AQE Wom- 
an, profosslonal, Ubrarlan 
noeda a clean, homoy room lo 
rent In Qrayslaka. 
(815)432-3349. after 10am. 


530 


Rooms ForRoit 


AIR CONDmONEO- LAKE- 
SIDE wHh Private antranco 
(rom only Seo/week. (70B) 
350-2747. 



SLEEPINQ ROOMS With 
kitchen privileges, on Petllo 
Lake. Ses/wook +1-week so- 
curity deposit.' (708) 
3d&-e567. 



533 


BolUkip 


BEAT HIGH LUMBER COSTS! 

Metal Building Manufacturer 
SetedJng Builder/Dealer. Buy 

Factoty Offset. Settous inquiries 
Only. Soma Areas Taken. 

(103) 759-3200, ext 2000 


534 


Business Property 
For Sale,; 



,zr^:- 



MUST SELL- ESTABLISHED 

BUSINESS MEAT MARKET. 
Great location. Northwest 
sut}Urt}s. MOVINGI pdr ap- 
pointment, call .(708) 
381-5333. (708) 3SS-6S78, 



538 



Business Ftopcrt/ 
For Rent 



BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED 
OFFICE SPACE- rentals. 
New lighting and carpeting. 
Ulilltlos Included.' Multiples 
available. S250/month 
+l/monlh socurtty, 
(708)623-^1485. 

MUNDELEIN- 2/orfic« 

spaces lor rent, 250 - or 
500sq.1t. Downtown tocatkin. 
August occupancy. (708) 
949-9446. - ■ 



BUSINESS 
RENTAL 

Come explore -the low 
cost of doing business in 
McHenry County 'and 
Spring Grove, Zoned for 
all your commercial and 
industrial needs. 1,000 
sq, ft. and lEurger start- 
ing at $4.00 sq. ft. gross. 

Spring Grove 
Business Center 

815-675^183 




Fatns 



WADSWORTH- 23 ACRES 

■f house. Partially wooded with 
pond. Zoned: 1-acre. (708) 
336-6840, owner. "• 



560 



Vaoul Lol/Acreagc 



l.&f ACRE IN BEAUTIFUL 
NEARLY COMPLETED AM- 
BERFIELD LAKES SUB., 
LAKE VILLA. ASKING, 
SeS.OOO (708) 223-0884. 

3/ADJOINING CHANNEL 
FRONT Lots, on Uvingstone 
Street. Pistakee Highlands. 
$35.OO0/best (708) 
724^0058, 

ENJOY FRESH COUNTRY 
air in Lake Geneva area. 
Bulkfabie wooded lots of 
2-i/3acres each within 1/2 
mile ol Hwy.so. (414) 
248-2019 or (414)248-2005. 

GREEN OAKS/ LIBERTY- 
VILLE. Fully improved resh 
dontlal kits. 2/3 acre wtth pri- 
vate lake rights. (708) 
362-0949. 

LARGE LOT- OVER 3 
ACRES In Hunt Club Famis. 
Great lot to build your dream 
home. $99,900. Call (708) 
244-1642. 

WISCONSIN WOODED 

PROPERTY! Silver Lake Wl. 
Beautltully wooded building 
site just over the t)order on 
HWY-B with view ol Wllmot 
Mountain. Land surveyed 
arKl approved for conventtorv 
al Mplkx Well re(|uired. Poa- 
st>llty d addWona) land avail- 
abte. $23,500. For further in- 
formallor) call Robyn Kay al 
home: (414)763-9550 or al 
1a1 Choica PropcrtlM Inc. 
(414) . S34-6017 or 

(1/800)367-9472. 



¥■ 



r.-:r'!jfr 



r»4^> *«*^>**» 






^1 t»**n>r.- •■^^ '-•-!.• •-11^. 




CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers AuqusT 5, 1994 



-v;, 




Oat Of Area 
Property 



560 



Vacant Lota/ 
Acreage 



LOTS FOR SALE • lOOxTSO 
teol EasI Loon Lako, two 
blocks from Iho Lake. Private 
Boat Launch, and six Aero 
boacti. HURRYI Tho (lah aro 
blltngl SI 9.500 Ask tor MIko or 
Sue. (708) 395-5004. 



OR, ASHLAND 



12.65 ac, 3 ponds, Irrigation, frull 
tfMS, loc'd trtn, from town. 2488 s.f. 
custom homo. Sauna, lap pool, gsl 
hso, sludk), solarium, solar holwaior 
1 much moro. S39aK. Soulhorn 
Orogon Frm Real Estate Catalog. 1' 
800-621-1631, NofVwoat Brokers 
Inc., 1941 SisMyou Blvd., Ashtnnd, 
OR 97520. 



568 



Out Of Area 
Property 



AZ.--DIVORCESALE. 

Treed 7.3 ac. 6000 3,f. home, 
22 mi. to multi-million dollar 
casino & Sunrise skiing area. 6 
ml, from 17,000' njnway jot air- 
port. Was $800K, Now $495K. 
By Ownef, (602) 333-2977 



MINNESOTA RESORT 
FOR SALE - LEECH LAKE 

Lodgo/residonco, 21 cabins, 25 
seasonal mobile spaces. 46 
harbor slips. S400K downpay- 
meni. Ask tor Brian Hanson, 
LEECH LAKE REALTY, 
Walker, MN 800/594-0642, 
Hackensack 800/659-8101. 



VA/ CHARLOTTESVILLE- 

Eslates w/5-572 oc. River 

Frontage 4 Mtn's. For brochures, 

write or call us w/delaJIs of what 

you would like & your price range. 

MEADQWBROOK REALTY, 1136 

Emiml St., Chaflotlesville, VA 
22903. Rick WtlhoUe, (804) 977- 

2067 or ofc. (804) 979-0450. 



MISSOURI 

750+ acres show place w/5000 

s.f. luxury home cattle ranch, 

10 miles to Stockton Lake. 

SeoOK, many other fine proper- 

ties avail. JOHN WHITESELL 

RE/,L ESTATE, (417) 876-LftND. 

(417)876-6570. 



TREYBURN, N.C. 

Tho best 2 aero peninsula 
waterfront lot In Treyburn. 
N.C.'s premier Inland golf 
club community Is now 
available. Below market 
value, Sl85K/obo. By 
Owner. 919-620-0002 or 
910-725-1838. 



MT. -Corp/lndiv. Retreat. 22 ac 
In beaut, f^ontana w/600' of 
Gallatin River running thru prop- 
erty. Restored farm home, bam 
& addt'l bidga. Ideal for anyone 
wanting to be near nature, 
abundant wildtifo, trout & views 
ol majQStk: mtns. Fenced & 
cross fenced for horses. S645K 
Call Helen Johnson, HELEN 
JOHNSON R.E., INC. 

800-545-0345 or 
Fax: 406-586-0787 



N.H. LAKES REGION 

Old Time General Store 

Established Somelime in 1800's 
Loc'd in a small New Hampshire 

(own. Has a little bit of everything. 

Includes a sit down eating area & a 

6 room owner's apt. 5395,000. 

CSIl (603) 776-6072 



WESTERN NC. (Cherokee 
Area) "21 unit resort on 45 ac 
+/- (w/casino gambling coming 
soon). S500K. Recently remod- 
eled 13 unit motel w/separate 
3br home, $350K.. STARLIGHT 
REALTY. (704)497-5936, Other 
fine properties also available. 



570 


Ccmclciy Lots 



M A." 1 hr. Boston. Ei^oy 4 sea- 
sons' living on 40 prlv. ptcluresquB 

h3l top acres, terrace walls, fields, 
trails, pond, pond hse. Surrounding 
beautiful 5br, country estate, Ctassic 

3 story NE Bam. sep. guest hse, 

$675K. STEEPLECHASE REALTORS, 

(508) 464-5002. 



(2) CEMETERY LOTS, 

Highland Memorial Park, IL 
3500 each. Moving oul-ol- 
slate. (414) 862-6986 Bet- 
weon 4- pm. 

3 CEMETERY LOTS- Sec- 
tion L. North Shore Garden ol 
Memories. SI, 000 each. Call 
Karon. (708)223-5082. 



^s:23t^<':^^ 



RKreatIonaI 



704 



Rccrcallooal 
Vehicles 



710 



Boats/Motors/ 
Etc. 



VACATION AIR 3211. 1994 

travel trailer, sleeps 6, air, 
self contained, microwave. 
Washer/dryer, MORE! Ask- 
ing 310,200. (708) 
381-2339. 

BONANZA MOTOR HOME 
1977, 24FT. sleeps 4, 
38,000 original miles, new 
brakes/tires, stove, refrigera- 
lor. strower, air, 38.000 Ilrm 
(708) 872-8867. 

HONEY 22n. 19BS MO- 
TORHOME. GMC twin air, 
32.000/m!tes. Will consider 
trade. S14.aQ0/best (708) 
438-2016. 

LANDAU 37FT FIBER- 
GLASS MOTORHOME. 

39.500(708)546-3781. 

TIOGA 27FT 1988 Motor- 
trame, sleeps 6. Excellent con- 
dltkin. Call alter 4:30pm (708) 
746-2403. 



708 



Snowmobtlcs/ATV's 



KAWASAKI 4-WHEELER 

1991, 300CC wilh trailer (414) 
843-2862 Ask lor Jim. 




len. ARKANSAS TRAVEL- 
ER Aluminum Seml-V, 75hp 
EvInnJde, 3-in-llne, RlgW trail- 
er. New tarp, plus extras. 
32,600 (414) 694-2688. 

AVENGER lart. JETBOAT 
1975 blue/silver metallic 
Hake. 4&4 Chevy Hoitey 750 
double pumper catb drive, 
1986 Calkins trailer, 
$4,S00A>est or TRADE for 
Sperta car. (708) 395-5715. 

*BROWNINa FIBERGLASS 
21FT BOAT, I/O, V6 Buick 
engine, CMC outdrive, tan- 
dem aOe IraHer, must seN. will 
8acrtfk» 32,500 or best (708) 
249-1783. 



TRl-HULL, 17FT. 1972. 
New 8Shp Force, new galvan- 
ized trailer, S2.500/best offer. ' 
Alter 6pm (708) 566-9570. 

CENTURY 1978 4000 
CUDDY Cabin, Johnson, 
porta polly. Excellent condl- 
llon. $4,000 (414)249-0677. 

CENTURY RAVEN ITft. and 
trailer, Mercury I/O, low 
hours, like newl Must see to 
believe. 35,500 (708) 
356-3879. 

CHRIS CRAFT 1963 21ft. 
Sea Skift. 263cu.in. 4/8an^i, 
Woody, dual axle trailer, moor- 
ing cover, and Bimlnl cover. Ait 
in good condllkin. Low hours. 
In water now. S3,850/bosl 
otter (708) 395-BB7S. 

CHRIS CRAFT 2aFT 
HARD TOP 1978. mint con- 
dllkin, toaded, 320,000 or ttest 
otter, in water 100 Club Mart- 
na. Fox Lake (708) 894-3665. 

CHRISCRAFT, 1987 26(1. 
. 260 Stinger 454/Magnum. 
racing seats, arch. 130/hrs. 
MUST SELLI 321,000 (708) 
788-8240. 

DONZI RAGAZZA CUDDY 
CABIN 23FT, 160 hours, 
350 GM/Cobra wilh trailer, ex- 
cellenf^onditton. 316.900 or 
best offer (708) 367-0431. 

FIBERGLASS 17ft. BOAT. 
Deep-V. 85hp Mercury out- 
board. Good condition, wHh 
trailer, 31,350. Days: 
(708)623-3700 or eves7 
weekends (708) 546-6866. 



PADDLE BOATS I 

&CAHOES 
& JON BOATS 

Factory Outlet 
Rnal rail clearance 
& llquldaHon. ' 
Save Hundredsf 

WooDUMD Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



710 


Boal/Molors/Elc. 



19B0 CHRIS CRAFT. 31tt, 
llybridgo. dual statkin, sloops 
6. 326,900. (708) 662-0171 
or (708)746-0302. 

21ft. BAYLINEfl. 1984 CIER- 
RA Cuddy Cabin, canvas 
back, I/O, Iralksr. Very good 
condltktn. Will consider small- 
or boat trade, $9,099 (414) 
694-1911. 

4 WINNS 21 FT CUDDY 
1985, 230hp, low hours, ox- 
colleni condlik)n, full canvas, 
depth Under, radk). E-Z kiader 
Irallor, 315,000 Alter 5pm 
(708) SB7-071Q. 

ARISTO CRAFT 1968, in- 
board- outboard. Runs (re- 
poworod with an 8cylindor). 
31.000/bOSl (414) 869-4278. 

BASS TRACKER 16FT 
1992, Pro 16, With cover, 
trailer, dual batteries, trolling 
motor, lights, used only 8 
hours. $4,900. (708) 
587-5411, _^_^^ 

BAYLINEH 17ft. 1993 With 
trailer 70hp outboard. Plus 
Many Extras. $7,500/bBSt' 
- (708) 662-6249. 

BAYLINER 1986 2450 Sier- 
ra Sun BrWgo. Excellent condl- 
llon. only SOOhrs. Appraised at 
$12,000. Asking $lO.OOO/bost 
(708) 587-0035. 

BAYLINER 21 SO with EZ 

Loader Iraller, now Inferior, 
130hp $2,900 (708) 

658-5480. 

BAYLINER- 1986 27ft. low 
trours, all options. Must sacrt- 
llce. $1.800(708)516-3401. 



BASS & FISHING 
BOATS 

Complete 6 final 

fbll & liquidation. 

P^oc^af^ • Starcraff 

^^onari< • eiassport 

TUny 8 Ai\orel 

Save hundreds, 

even ttiousandsl 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



THOMPSON 19n. OPEN 
BOW. Fiberglass, 120hp 
OMC blueANhlle, new interior, 
new cover. Iraller, Extras! 
$3,900(708)566-1132. 



PONTOON 
BOATS 

Complete & final 
fall clearance & 

llquldattoa New & used 
No reasonable cflfer 

refused. Save hundreds, 
even thousandsl 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



THUNDERCRAFT, 19BB 

16.6tt. Open Bow, 130hp Mer- 
cruiser, Inboard/ Outboard, 
tow hours, garage kept, ready 
for water. All equipment 
$6.800 (708) 746-6650. 

TIARA 25ft. 1985, 260hp 
Mercury, head, Cuddy. Blue- 
water fishing. Docked: Great 
Lakes. 319.000. (708) 
564-1534. 

YARCRAFT 1977 20f1. 

Closed bow cabin. Runs good 
with trailer. Closed bow cabin. 
Runs good, wilh trailer, 
3l.200*0Sl (708) 973-2311. 



MERCURY & FORCE 
OimOARDS 

Complete 6 final fall 

clearance b liquidation. 

No reasonable offer 

refused. All sizes. 

Rush - save hundreds 

Er even thousandsl 

WooDiAHD Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



710 



Boats/Moton/ 
Etc 



718 


Trmd/Vacallon 



SEA KING 16ft., 50hp, 
1965, with Ira Ik) r, 3e7S/bosl. 
(708) 689-2031 . 

SEA RAY, 190 1972, 350 
Chevy engine, I/O, Exfromely 
tow hours. Very good oondl- 
Iton, (708) 395-4208. 



8/DAYS, 7/NlGHT Vacations. 
Studio Unit. 1or2 Bedroom. 
In any of 39/stalos or 
7/C0Untrt6S. $425. Subject to 
availability. (708) 395-9226. 





MUST SELL! 1991 Skamp- 
er Pop-Up sleeps 6, $2,500 
(706)949^762. 

REAL-LITE TRAVEL TRAIL- 
ER, 21fl. 1988, air, awning, 
scroen room, electric jack, 
twin beds, deluxe interior. Ex- 
cellent condition, (708) 
746-2018. - 

TRUCK CAMPER CLEAN 

and In good condllion, S300 or 
best offer. Must soo to appro- 
elate. (708) 356-4)801 Even-. 
Ings after 6:30pm. 



BOYS BIKE- HUFFY. 6 
speed, $40. Girts biko, brand 
now. beautiful Huffy Regatta, 
10 speed 3100. (708)263- 
1646. ' __^_; 

POOL TABLE, 4 1/2 X9, 3 
piece slate with ball return. 
31,600 or best oftor (708) 
395-3914 Alter Spm. 

STARTER POOL. 18ft. 
Above ground swimming 
pool, 4t1. deep. Everything 
except liitor and liner. 
$150/bosl (708) 223-2901. 







^^■!^^^SfeS^5:^§W4^®S5^^W:^'iW^S:i;S:S::>>x 




FIBERGLASS BASS BOAT, 

1411., 40t¥> engine, with trail- 
er, many extras. Excellent 
condltton, S2,ooo/best (708) 
265-1695, it no answer. 
toave message. 

MASTERCRAFT TRI- 

STAR1988, 19.5n. ExceHent 
condllion. Must selil 
312,900. (708) 893-5726 or 
(708)351-4768. . 

PONTOON BOAT- 24ft. Ri- 
viera Cnjiser 1987 60hp 
Johnson "VRO*. with trimfllll, 
tow hours. 221>Kh tubes, tut) 
furniture, Bimlnl top, docK 
cover. Many extras, Can be 
seen in water S6,500/llrm 
. (708) 356-2358. 



804 



Cars for Sale 



BUICK ELECTRA LTD 

1978, 4-door, lull power, 
cmlse, am/Im cassette, Boau- 
tllul Interior. Dependable. 
31.195.(706)223-2761. 

CHEVROLET- 1980 Che- 
vette. Good condition. 
$350^St. (414) 551-0275. 

MUST SELLI TOO FAST 
FOR ME. CHEVROLET 
CAMARO 1979 Clean every- 
thing. 5.000/mllos on now 355. 
$3.495/best (708) 746-5119. 

CHEVY CAPRICE STA- 
TION WAGON 1983, com- 
plete maintenance and repair 
log, since new. Must see! 
$1,500 or best (708) 
587-8648. 

CHRYSLER NEW YORK- 
ER 1986, 2.2 Hire, new turbo 
trans, vinyl lop, radiator, ioad- 
ed, $2.500 (708) 526-8461. 

CHRYSLER- LEBARON 

1981. Runs well. Body exej- 
lent condition. Georgia car. 
Very dependable. $1,a95/ne- 
gotlable. (708) 223-1821. . 

DODGE DIPLOMAT 1984, 
very good condition, new 
paint. Asking $1,000 or best 
offer (815) 363T-1830 After 
6pm. ■ 

DODGE MAXI WAGON 
1985, njns great, air, new bat- 
tery, radiator, carpeting and 
front tires, (no rust), looks 
good, drive anywhere, $5,300 
orbesi offer. (708) 362-1246. 

DODGE OMNI 1987 4-door. 
automallG, power steering, 
clean, great car. $1,195 

(708) 367-4212. 

DODGE OMNI 19B7 

46,0004- miles, Excellent cort- 
dllton, $2,600 (708) 740-2259. 

CHEVY EL CAMINO 1975. 
Arizona Car. 'very clean, 
ntoe car,* Straight, no rust. 
32,500/best offer. (708) 
731-0619. 

FIREBIRD, 1992 BLACK 

With goto pinstrlpping. Beige In- 
terior, T-tops. power windows, 
door locks, under 12,000 
miles, V6. Excelteni condllion. 
$12,500 Call after 5pm. (708) 
497-4063. 

FORD CAMARO, 1982, 
Built up 350 engine, automat- 
ic. $2,500/best (414) 
862-9555. 

FORD ESCORT 1989, 4- 

door, air conditioning, 5- 
speed, AM/FM Cassello, ortgi- 
nat owrwr. ExQellent condition 
32,450 (708) 549-1922. 

FORD MUSTANG 19BB GT 
5.0 5-speed, sunroof, alarm. 
Loaded) 65,000/nntles. 

36,20Q/besl (708) 740-6908. 

FORD MUSTANG 1993, 5.0 
2 door hatchback. 5-speed, 
V-8, power steering, 
$12.500 (708) 548-2536. 

FORD T-BIRD, 19B8 Tuibb 
coupe, loaded, good condi- 
tion, $4,500/best (706) 
623-8655. 

FORD THUNOERBIRD, 

10B4. Power windows, steer- 
ing, brakes, air. am/tm cas- 
sette , $900/beat (708) 
740-3909. 



BUICK REGAL 1984, two- 
tone sliver and burgundy, 2- 
door, good condition (414) 
654-1946. 

GRANDMA'S CAR- Excelteni 
condition. Garage kept. 
1/motlculous owner. BUICK 
1981 Skylark sedan, 
52.000/origtnal miles. Au- 
tomatte, air, burgandy exteri- 
or/ interior, new tires and ex- 
haust. Must see $2,995 
(708) 223-5035 or leave 
message. 

CHEVROLET BERETTA 
1990, red, automatic, new 
tires, excellent condltton (414) 
862-6753. 

MERCEDES 220, 19l>3, njns 
good, good air conditioning, 
new exhaust. $900 or best. 
(708) 263-0307. - 

BUICK CENTURY 1986 4- 

door, 'has always' started, 
even in cold weather' $975. 
(708)234-4137. 

BUICK CENTURY station- 
wagon. 1984. Very clean. 
Runs but needs woric. 
$600/best. (708) 740-2267. 

HONDA ACCORD LX, 
1990, 2-door coupe, 5-speed, 
tully fcjaded, power moonrool, 
new tires, new brakes, mint 
condition. $7,995. (708) 
395-3523. 

HONDA CIVIC 1984, runs 
great, looks good. Many 
new parts. Very reliable. 
31,500 (708) 223-6330. 

LINCOLN TOWN CAR 1983, 
Signature Series, triple-blue, 
31,900. Good condition. 
(708) 436-0771 

MERCURY MARQUIS 1983, 
BO.OOO/mlles. Excellent mn- 
nlng condition. Well cared 
lor $2,000 Ingieside. (706) 
S87-2673. _^ 

MERCURY TOPAZ 1993, 
while/gray Inlerior, air, am/Im 
cassette, power steering/ 
brakes, . 10,000/mlles. 

$9,000. (708) 83&-5888. 



• UjC, Us First • 

We Buy All Makes. 

We will sell your cart 

Guaranteed $$ Value 

Good Credit? Bad Credit? 

Bankruptcy No Probieml 

Buy Here/Pay Here 



'92 S10 PIck-Up 5B995 

'91 Suhblrd Convertfcie.. ,39995 

'91 Hyundai Scoupe 34995 

-83 AMCEigtf 4x4 WtQon ..31995 

'89 Beratta $5495 

'91 Sonata ........„46995 

'88 MtZda 929 .....37995 

'B7 Old* 93 Touring S«lin..45995 

85 Used 
Cars & Ihicks 

In Stock 

Wqrquardt 

n — - - 

n 



^lM 



OnRt.41at 

WuhlngtonSt.,Etttexit 

GumM, IL 

• (708)24il300i 



804 


"Cars for Sale 



MOVING OVERSEAS, 

MUST sell OMsmoblio Delia 
88, 1086, power steering, 
windows, locks, air, stereo, 
only 52,000 certified with ex- 
tended wan-anty. Excolloni 
condltton. 35,100 or best offer 
(708) 549-8673 /^Ime. 

MUST SELL 1S72 CAM- 
ARO PROJECT, 327 Volte 
Motor, 202 Heads, Pink Rods, 
Roltor Rockors 60 over, 12.1 
Compression. Excel Super 
Coll, RCI Fuel Coil, RCi Race 
Seals, M.T. Front Runners, on 
Center Linos, Rally'B, Automo- 
ter, Gaugos, Body b Flawtosa, 
Mint intorior. Must See, Over 
$10,000 invested $5,000 
Page Anytime (708)626-0984. 

MUST SELLI I One Car 
Owner, Butok Skyhawk 1986, . 
hatchback, good condition 
$1.100(815)385-1801. 

NISSAN PULSAR NX 1088. 
aulomallc, air, T-tops,- tilt, ox- 
cellent condltton, white exteri- 
or/bfuo Inlerior Only $3,400 
(708) 623-9655. 

OLDS 19B3 CUTLASS Stor- 
ra Wagon, 6-passenger, lower 
miles on nowor engine, 
$1,500.(708)740-3591. 

OLDS 98 1974 2-door, 
' 37,500 original miles, ga- 
rage kept. $4,200. (414) 
652-1216. 

OLDS- 1976 DELTA 88, 4- 
door, 74,000/mllos, Very 
good Interior. Paint faded. 
Little rust. $600. 

PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE 
1988. black 2-door automat- 
ic, power everything! Air, 
Sunroof; am/Im cassette. 
Turbo quick. $3,995. (708) 
223-6775. 

PONTIAC FIERO 19BS 
mns great, $1,700/best. Con- 
tact: ' Sgt. Nemec (708) 
893-7550 or(70B)266-7308. 

PONTIAC STATION wagon. 
1979, middle-sized, good 
condition, runs good, new 
front brakes, all power. 
$650/best offer. Call (706) 
662-6670. . 

PONTIAC TRANS AM 
1975, 350tip, started to re- 
build, must sell. Many new 
- parts, too many to list.' $1,600 
or best otter (708) 680-6107 
Matt Evenings. 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



BUICK, CENTURION, 1973. 
Original 455, 54,000 miles, 
comes wtth extra heads and 
transmission. Driven dally. 
Extra clean interior. Body 
great. S3,900/Best. (708) 
249-8973. , 

CHEVY CAMARO, 1971 
Z28, 45,000 original miles 
on Body. Fasti 454cu.in. EX- 
CELLEhfTI 58,500 
(414)249-0677. . 

CLASSIC 1963 FORD Fal- 
con Sprint Converilbto, V-8, 4 
speed, like new. Excellent con- 
dition. $4,975. (708) 
785-6814. 





^^^HTouTwhcdOrircl 
riy^j Jeeps' I 

* CHEVY 3/4-TON 4x4 Pick- 
up 1079, Custom paint, 
3-inch lilt, 33-Inch tiros. 
Many new parts. $1,600 
(708) 566-1439. 

CHEVY BLAZER K5 1079 4- 
wheel' drive, $l,O00/bost 
(708) 740-4314. 

DODGE RAMCHARGER 
1983, 4x4, rebuilt, automalk: 
transmission, newer tiros, 
now paint job, $3,500/ best 
offer. (414)248-1018. Call 
anytime and teavo message. 

FORD RANGER XLT 1993, 
13,000 mllos, $10,000 firm. 
Tonnoau cover Excellent con- 
dllton (414) 889-4685. 

ISUZU 1992 GREEN 
Rodeo XS, Stick shlll, 24k 
miles, $14,000 Call Oavo, 
(708) 362-5605. 

JEEP COMMANCHE CHIEF 
1987, 4x2 plck-tjp. S-speed. 
64K miles, veiy clean. 
$4,700, best oiler (414) 
643-3074. 

JEEP WRANGLER, 1989 
4x4, Excellent condition. 
$8.500 (706) 263-8427. 

JEEP, CHEROKEE, 1989. 
23K snow plow, loaded, 
$13,000. (706) 438-0886. 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



CAP FOR 1987 TOYOTA 

pickup tnick, black. Exceltont 
condition. Used once. $500. 
(708) 546-0814. ,-. . 

chevy' PICK-UP 1979, 
good woric tnick. 73,000 mitos 
$800 or best offer (708) 
356-1037 alteram. 

F350 1978 DUMP TRUCK, 
400 4-speed, $3,200 (414) 
736M914. ■ . 

. FORD 1980, 14FT ^Alumi- 
num box truck i 1'ton, automat- 
to. Must sell. $1,500 or btest 
otfer (708) 395^741. 

FORD, 250 pickup 1989 ex- 
tended cab XLT package, bed- 
liner, stainless tackier 'rack, 
88,000 miles $8,800 B6b, 
(708) 362-9270. 

GMC 1091, SONOMA SL, 

S-15-pk:kup, 23 Uler, 4/cyl)n- 
6sT &-speed,-tow miles, EX- 
.CELLElsfT CONDITION, 

$S,500/best (815) 385-2436. 

LANDSCAPERS BIkara, 
race enthusiasts. 1992 Wei is 
Cargo wflh Drop down drtve- 
'em up rear door.ar>d 2/slde 
doors. In brand new corxtltton. 
Used twice. $8,200. (708) 
740-7350. eves after 7;30pm 
only ptoase. 




1983 liOO-aC JCB BACK- 
HOE, good condHlon, (708) 
336-2357. ' 

CASE UNILOADER (Bobcat) 
4-cyllnder, water cooled, wtth 
cage and 4-in-1 bucket. 
$4,500 (708) 359-5964. 



844 




GOOD CHEVY 305 V8 en- 
gine 3200 or best otter (414) 
657-8309. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP Bod- 
las. Factory-new, guaranteod 
from $1300.00. Doors From 
$89.00, Fenders From 
$50.00, Bods From S800.00, 
Bedlinnrs $169.00. BUMP- 
ERS, GRILLS, REPAIR PAN- 
ELS. PAINTS. ABRASIVES, 
WINDSHIELDS, RADIATORS. 
Deliverv. MARK'S 217-824- 
6184. 



1992 GSXn 750 Motorcy- 
cle, piped. Jetted, filtered, 
geared down, 2nd took seal. 
Magenta black & blue. 2 
matct^ng helmets. Very ntoe. 
35.000 tlmi. (708) 546-7232. 

CUSTOM POWERLITE 

BMX BIKE, excellent condi- 
tion. Asking 3250 or best oHer 

(708)395-3181. 



CHEVY CONVERSION VAN 

1988, 305cu.ln, Electric wind- 
ows, door locks, new tires, 
TV. air. class-3 low hitch. 65k 
miles. Excelient condition. 
No rust. $8,500/best. (708) 
265-1766. 

FORD-~E-150 1989 CON- 
VERSION VAN. Automatic, 
black/whito TV, Loaded. Mint 
condltion.46,000/miie3. Ask- 
ing $10,50OA)esl offer. (708) 
395-^608. 

INTERNATIONAL ALUMI- 
NUM STEPVAN 1975, Con- 
tractor's dream, electric 
lights, woritbench. shelves. 
carpel, row tires. Runs great 
$4,000 (708) 872-8867. 



HARLEY DAVIDSON 

TRIKE, 1957. Electric and 
kickstart, everyling new 
$8,000 or best offer (708) 
740-7350 Evenings alter 7:30 
PM Only Please (Just In time 
lor summer fun and sturgis). 

KAWASAKI 1100 1983, 
Shalt drive, mint condition, 
4,000 mitos $2,400 or best 
olfer (815) 675-2448. 

KAWASAKI 1992 ZX11, 

6,800 miles, bra, 2-seals, 
Vance and Hines pipe. 
$5,B00/best (708) 
546-2821 .after 6pm, or 
teave message. . 

KAWASAKI ZnySO, 1991 
bought new 1993, red, 
2,700/mito8, adult ridden, ex- 
cellent condition. 
$3,000/be3l (708) 740-^14. 

YAMAHA SECA 750-1881, 

great shape, is.ooo mitos, 
shaft drive, good tires, runs 
great. WUI trade for 60'8, 70's 
mopar car parts. $1,250 or 
best offer. (708)S87-867a.» 



I 



iHL 



AuqtHT $, ;1994 UkelANd NtwipAptw CIASSIFIEP 




Lakeland Newspapers Is YpuR 



Jf M^l_*|l>^l>^lf Jl I^T 



TO PLAGE 
YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

708-223-8161 



-TbijHESE Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



AiiinOne 



rtftfUS 



Home Jjervke 

Wc HMctallze IttTDor koBe Mcdi wlici: 

•YonSt Out OTTmn or On VicDlon 

•VWn U]n<l-Up«nd Yon Need Some Emndi 
Done: House mlchlns. Peii {On, Blidt, lUh), 
BouH rtaiti'Omlea Tending, Mril ni» • 
Pott Offic^Mdl Boi, or OfOUiT StoR 

W« Wileom* nm TcVm OiirNtwSnwict 




ntopp A^ 

GREEKHOVSE 



^' 



for Mprtet qmoU or men ttiftrnMion otU: 
Oomi SM «8 M0 M mufj.** to 9M fm 



Flower and vegetable plants of 

all kinds $5.95 and up 

Perennial plants, 3' peat pots $1.00 each 

Vegetables, herbs and perennial plants, 

geranium plants ot Bllldnds 

$1,00 each arKl up 

Hanging baskets and potted plants 

8 Miles iiorUt of Long Grove 
1/a mile north of Route 28 • 
onOldMcHeniyRoad 






ra 



Pild Driving & Excavating 
Sewer & Water Constrjctioh 

SCHNEIDER'S 
TRUCKING. INC 

^{708) 396-28ia 





HEADACHES 



HEADACHE 



WANTED 

Honest, caring doctor who has 
helped TOO's of pain sufferers. 
Non-invasive, conseri/ative care. 
$200 in services for participation. 

Cali249T0041 fordetalis. 



MAINTENMIGE 

No Job Too Small, I'll Do It AH. 

•Rimodeling 

Kitchens, Batlirooms& Hec Rooms 

•PaMiiig Iii4 Wallpapiring 
•Flooring 

■ (All Types) 

•Siding Ind Rooling 
•Carpontry 

Decks & Additions 

HI Wak Very Will Dm 

nUIISflMAIEfrCAU 

(414) Saf-2439 




NorthPoint 

ANWER 

/Jk 811 Sheridan Road ''WIntbrpp Harbor, E 60096 

fy (708)872-1204 

Lam &Gandm Equipment Saies, Service &Jlentab 
'^'flmeups '^Repairs ^Overhauls 
^Accessories ^Parts ^Sharpening 
Pick up & delivery auailable 




Discover 
Renting 

You can do it yourself 

(708) 740-8800 

Round Lake Park 



Ram Rental 




Bxpoiiancad 
Carpenters 

Crown Moiildlngs, ' 

Decl». Porches, Doors, 

Chair Rail Trims, Etc. 

CaaMike 

(788) 218^871 

(818) 887-7848 

FREE Estimateis Insured 



I DECKS PLUS 

CONSTRUCnON 
OENERiJL CARPENTRY 



• Custom Decks 'Porclies 
' Room Additions • Basemerrt Remodeting 
■ Bathrooms -iCrtchens • Custom Carpentty 
• Improvements & j^epairsl 




INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 
(414) 889-8442 



-, (414) 889-B44Z 

iJ Please Call Gary Kolkau 



^':'!>:':-;':-:'j|BeeEHnr'Aein^BB^^B/''^-^^^ ^ 



HOME 
REMODELING & 
IMPROVEMENT 

All Phases 
Reasonable Rates 

FREE ESTIMATES 
(708)587-9729 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



>'^^^;^^;; 



% -fc s 



~mmm 



)r^-M^^ 




ofy 



: paimrng & Sfatntng 
Call How A 



Atfordabl»|lates 










Fine 
Homes 




:szt 



Hauled Amy 

^ Equipment & Steel 
H§ Forms Cleaned Up 

^B We pick up all metal, 
S^ /arm equipment, etc. 

P (708) 498-6735 ;:::; 



.MS* 



LEAFBLAD GRADING 
& CONCRETE 

•Backhoe & Bobcat Excavatioq 
•Gravel Driveways 
•Landscaping & Decorative 
Rock Constnjctlon 
•Tree Planing & Removal 
•Lot Clearing 
•Drain TBas , •Truck Hauling 

CONCRETE 

'Removal 'Installation 
Fully Insured 
708-356-3050 

i no |ob too Iwgi to Mtlmito or too iiml to •ppnclM 




Paul 



•New Homes •Renoyations 
•Additions •Carpentry 

(708)566-4724 



We bring Imuglnallon to rcolltif 



•Top QuiHty Proftttionil Work 
•Viry Rtatonrtito Rattt 
•Fully Inturtd 
•Ctfptntry 
•Drywalin'aping 
•Rtmodtting 

CAU NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATE 
1-800-246-2720 




Call US when you 



LECJAL SERVICES 

WILLS 

LIVING TRUSTS 

REAL ESTATE 

COURT REPRESENTATION 

ATTORNEY RONALD RUNKLE 

(708)356-9905 

36871 N. ROUTE 83 

LAKE VILLA, IL 60046 



DONT THROW AWAyII 
THAT OLD LAMP, ^' 
BR/NG /T TO OUR, 
LAMP DOCTORSJi 
FOB REPAIRS, 

I WARREN ELECTRIC INC. I 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wlldwood, It 60030 

(70BV223-8691 




need a siatt..... 

SPECIALIZING IN: 

AUTO & MOTORCYCLE NEON 

CUSTOM EXPOSED WINDOW 

SIGNS 

BORDER TUBE NEON 

ASK US ABOUT OUR SPECIAL 
.OCCASION RENTALS 
23 NORTH AVE. - ANTIOCH, IL. 

(708)395-7217 



J 




E 



Adult & Pediatric Allergy 




DR. DANIEL YAMSHON 



'ASTHMA 
»H AY FEVER 



»mVES 
•HEADACHES. 



•ECZEMA 
'FOOD ALLERGY 



FREE ALLERGY SCREENING 



AlpintFimllyPhyilclini Buffalo Grovi Round Lakt Beach 

1S S. Old Rand Road 150 Half Day Rd. 2 Eatt Rollins Rd. 

(706)550-9300 (708)913-0300 (708)546-5800 

24 Hour Ana. Sarvica (312)989-8729 



i DECK SAVERS +S 

A Pressure Washing' ^ 

J Restoration - Staining J 

J •Decks •Siding J 

^ •Fences •Docks ^ 

^ Pressure Treated Wood Is ^ 

JL NotWcathciproon j^ 

T INSURED T 

T (708)395-8428 J 



WICK'S TOPSOIL 

4 YDS. - $65.00 
6 YDS. - $75.00 
8 YDS. - $85.00 
14 YDS. - $115.00 

Local Delivery 

Out of Area Xtra Del. Chg^ 

(708) 367-6566 

(815) 344-7928 



.. 



If yoti fovi to cflokf 

hats to cook' 

or Jiiit iMo4 new idiat/ thara « 

iriHi your frietidil 
CALL FOR DETAILS 

<ltt>7«h9M8 



A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 

I CW LANDSCAPE CO, INC. t 

A LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS &C0N1B«:TQf^ A 
A Serving LaUfCmtly Since 1960 A 

.^ •Computer Design 'Seeding ' ^ 

j^ •Flagstone Patios •Soddinig ^ 

A •Stone Walls 'Planting A 

* 'Texture Gardens -Grading * 

1 (708)746-8953 1 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAA 

••••••••••••••AAA 

t ^ ■mnKs INSM SwunS 

^SlOlAOl Speciai ^$ 

5 Any size boat trailer -or' ^ 
^ 2 snowmobiles on trailer ^ 

A 'as.oo pM- moflrtit it 

2 (7081 587-9100 ^ 
A VOW RATES! • 
i WNIER MSM STOMCE! t 

A $12,00 per ft. 20' or under A 
A $13.00 per ft. 21* or aver * 

A Cars, RVs, etc. * 

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 






MASONRY MAINTENANCE 

SYSTEMS, INC. 

(708) 726-8700 

TUCKPOINTING 

•MASONRY 
•CHIMNEYS 
•PARAPET WALLS 
•FLOWERBOWSTOOP WAUS 

POWERWASHING 

•SIDING 

(ALUMINUMA/INYL) 
•WOOD 

(HOUSES-DECKS-FENCES) 
•DRIVEWAYS/PATIOS 

(CONCRETH& AGGREGATE) 
•SIDEWALKS/WALKWAYS 
•BRlCKS/STONEmOCK . 

FREE ESTIMATES & 
DEMONSTRATIONS 





iAURSEN & 
LACKMANt. 

Window & Door Replacement 

Service You Can Trust 

Free Estimates 

OepentiOr^l:^ (708) 838-5300 




U 



FLOORS U WALKON,mc 



Cvpeu • Hardwood • Cenmle • Vinyl 
Kitchen A Bathroom Remodeling 

RMldmnlial A ConuMrelol Jmin/Uifnii 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

'REE ESTlHAIfa 
(708) 356-2500 
(708) 310-5220 , 




9m 



'jSo;Me«rtC«v-v 



4;i:,»-«^'»f«Wi^ftJ'"^.'V*^r^'*' 



.•.i^itiW3i5i'i=J- 



^^^m^^^^-tfirizt:^ 




n CLASSIFIED UkElANd NewspApERS Avqusr ;, 1994 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



JMimMmm 



TO PLACE 
YOUR AD HERE 
CALL ^^ 

708-223-8161 



f 



jsssssssss^ 



To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



. iimifcMiyQtiMitT' 



iBORSic St son; 

I LANDSCAPING 

I Landscape Con frac(ors& 

I Maintenance 

[ Slit Seeding ■ Complete Henovalion 

I •Seeding •Sodding 
[ •Trees •Shrubs 
i •topsoil •woodchips 
i free estimates 
I (708)662-3134 



WJl. SOD FARM 

Wisconsin Grown & Inspected 

#1 Kentucky Bluegrass Blended Sod 

Peat or Mineral 

Forklift Delivered 

Hiofitt (414)895-272$ 
FAX: (414) I95-74U 




* HAIR CUTS by * 

* FREDDIE'S II t 

ik "Your Neighborhood i* 

* Barber Shop" J 

^ Corner o/ Washington J 

* & Lewis, Waukegan ^ 

I 8;30im - 5:00pm Tu«.-Frldiy ^ 

I B:30im - 3:00pm Saturday i 

t (708)249-2264 5 

* •FiedHlousek ^ 
^^ Proprietor it 

(ISQ SS0-9IM 

Specializing In Big Semen TV/VCR 
Computers/Stereo 

In Home - Carry In Service 

211 So. Rand Rd. 

Lake Zurich, IL 

(WUh this ad. Free estimate. Carry In only) 




G.S.E. Service 

CARPEHIW • EUCIRICAL 

Plumung 

All phas&s of home 
remodeling & repair 

FREE ESTIMATES 

1708) 587-09371 



SHAVINGS 

1 Bate or 1 ,000 
Cash & Carry 
■ 1/2 mlie north State Line Rd, 
East o/Wity 45 on County Ttunk CJ 

HORTON BROS. 

. Bristol. Wl 
(414)857-2525 



PRCmiCR 

pence CO. 

(708) 9JJ-0338 

Custom Cedar • Chain Link 
Free Estimates 






in; I HI' iH vv;ti \lt Ki-iR- 

|.- ' > 1 1 1|. M I \\ . ■ ' >\t V.l I K' '1 M . I'M >l .1 K I \ I 

ft.1 I I SUA I. W^ ^^l lAlMt |t1t 
(■\[\ 1 IM . r M'l K IV',. \ [:••■ iN'i I W V'i V-I:IIM 

Wl vfi 1 1 1 n i.".>i HI ii.\ ( !■ >Nvi: i» \ 

K, I a- 4n. K ! 1 11 V I'A \K Wil 1.1* 
u I i.^:t.'>hJtV 



QUAUJY HIGH P^^^SSUmWASHmG 
^^^^JNQ LAKE COUNTY Cl£Arr < 

FULLY UCENBED AND INSURED 

TO WASH AIX SURFACES 

PRBB ESlllIATBS 



(708) 546-8000 





Duraclean 

Rated best by 
independent tests 



Carpet & 
Furniture 
Cleaning 
CALL 
TODAY! 




These high quality shirts feature 50%/50% Heavyweight 

Jersey Knit, taped high crew neck, hemmed short 

sleeves, and full cut. .,^«,. «,iinTe 

NO ART OR SCREEN CHARGES ON 48 OR MORE SHIRTS 

1 44 or more with your 1 -color imprint 

WHITE -$5.60 each COLORS - $6.44 each 

ITEMS and IDEAS (7a8) 439^488 



UWDSCAPDIG SPECIMiST 
TREES ft SHRUBS 

VOOD DECKS ft BRICK PATIOS 

CALL FOH DETAILS 

(wood deck* & Brick patios, too) 

BUDGrr 

UUIDSCAPIHG 

PATIOS & 

DESIGNEB 

DECKS 

17081 838'2101 




SCHNEIDER || tRENOVATIONS 



DUNCAN 
PAINTING 

*iferibfs/atwfeis • FREE ES77M47ES 

Insured Quality Wori< 

References - Top Line Material 

WE DO OUR OWN WORK 

Call 
(708) 566-1002 



BUILDERS 

^Wditiom "Itit 4 Batitt fimoAkd 

>Ganges *Donnen - 

■Hindrmui Scrrkei 'Free Ikupa 
'Coitom Built Deda and Giubo 
FREE EsTiMATEft 
CaU Toby AT 



•Kitchens •Baths 
•basements •decks 

From D£sfqN To FiNi'sh 
PAiNTiNq Asd Trim 

'OW CALL DOES IT AU" 

REASOr^BLE AND INSURED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

i-«oo-at»-saTf 



BEEPERS!! 



Sales aServtbel 

MOTOROLA 
BRAVO 

tabdMC 
«t Pag«r 
• FrMD«<}^«nr 

• Om Month Alrtim««Mo(r#! «•« 

Action B«eper Corp. 
546-9690 

|M0t4T»-TSM 




niiu i TT i ri i ii i ii ii i ii Mi i imii 

; ; •Orive^ovays ! I ■ 

; ; •ResurFscing ; ; ; 

'• > •Repairs ; ; ; 

; ; •Parking Lots ■ • i 

; ; ; "Seal Coating ill 

R0sld9nVal Spoclallsis 
Boncfod and tnsurod 

FREE ESTIMATES 

(708) 149-MS8 i 

ii (8IS)144-84IO | 

nim i iiMMiiimimmiinnu 



COFFEE MUG SPECIAL! 
^ li oz. White Porcelain 
E witlil -color imprint 
g as low as $.99 each. 

Don't miss this special offer! 

Call ITEMS and IDEAS at (708> 438-7488 




Protect Now 

before 

Summer 

Sun Damage! 









^.ar-W •»««•- 



WE SEAL DRIVEWAYS 



...and smatf parking /off 

•Seal Coating •Patchwork •Crack Filling 
Protect and Preserve * Reasonable rates. Call for a FREE estimate 

(708) 740-4051 or (708) 356-1911 

AMERICAN SEALCOATING BY GEORGE 



JACK'S 

REMODEUNG 

Domum* swing •Soim* windows 
Docks • Bilhrooms • Buements 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus reforences 
CALL JACK AT 

(708) 546-3759 



-iti 




^11 



Sehvisg Yotm FAiimnc 

AND DBCOKATiNG NSaOS. 

CamplAe launor/Eiuawr 
■ AlMMunb/DuUMnWoifc. 
Quality Wofc - Netily Done ' 

FREE EsnMAiBs 

AgordabU Pricts . 

"Have THB X» DCMB RHlfll" 

Call (708) 223-2656 

24Hr.Misaait 



FINANCIAL PLANNING 



Robert Ritzwolleh, CPA 

* Tax Deferred Investments 

* Life/Disability Insurance 

* Tax Preparation 

Free Financial Analysis 

Call for details 

(708) 587-4552 



*; 




^©"^ WlliS ^^^ 

MMMNEMBHANS' RJUUMUr AND MOM 
CALL fOU ADDtnaNAL SUIVICIS OFVUIXD 
WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER* . 
^ (708) 548-1300 X 



ALUMINUM e 
VINYL SIDING 

Stittit ^ Fcist.iii 
Winriow and Woud Trini 

^ EAGLE SIDING CO. 
(708) 526-7222 



The 
PAINTERS 

•Reasonable Rates 
•Free Estimates 

•SATISFACTION.CUARANtEED 

^(708)22l4yy8i 




i 

I 

I 



T C 



T e G MEK/VL CO.: 

W» rocycio aluminum cansi 

W« alio buy •Iniulated Wlr» 

•Copp«r •Irau •Lead •Stainless 

•Aluminum Siding •Batteries ^Zlnc 
•Auto Radiators •Catalytic Converters 



Buy«rt of non-f«rrous motalt. 
InduiMal accounts welcomo. 



376PralrloSt. 
Ciyttal Ldk«. IL^ | 



615-459-4445 



Hours: Mon.-Frl. e-5; Sot. 8-1 



1 Blocks, of H\A/y. 176 
BeWnd J & L Gas Station 






.I'V 








AuqiisT Iff 1994 LvIceIanc] Newspapers CLASSIFIED! 




r 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



TO PU\CE 

YOUR AD HERE 

CALL 

708-223-8161 



la W 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



Iji SCRAr HET4L 11 

111 H/UXCD Amy If 

UH Equipment & Steel §•{ 

••jj: ^ • •»•• 

»ir Farms Cleaned Up H::$ 

We pfcJc up all metal, ^:s 
farm equipment, etc. H:i| 

^^ (708) 498-6735 i| 



TAX PREPARATION 



Robert Ritzwoller 

Certified Public 
Accountant 

•Individual 
•Small Business 
•IRA's/Annuities 

(708) 587-4552 



(I PSYCHIC CARD READING 

^ ByLee^Harris . , / 



Cudi, Palmt, Character Iteadlnga* 

Adylce on All Problems of Life Such Am Love, Marriage, 

Bualneaa, Etc. Speclallxlng In Reuniting Loved Ones, 

Removing Stumbling Blocks 

70S/202-0831 

filSO AVAILABLE FOR PARTIES 






i^^^(i^^i^^^^^(i^^(i^^(i^ 



utuiDtftiTiypfiit, 

Invciilify, IMdcc^it Etc 

FULL OR PART TIME 
May wm m—t wtth you 
ami talk ovm your n—d»7 ' 

We think w« con tio of ossittcrtco 

The Business IPiace 

Virginia Johii^on 

P.O. Box 27, Boind Uric*. I. tt073-O027 
(708)546^910 




Pet Parade 




Daily exercise is basic need for dogs 



^ „ , , „ „,-./^. .kI,-. xu -1 trainer In top shape. Botti must want to retrieve a 

Dally exercise is a 3. BICYCLING the dog must be In good health to ball; this Is something that 

?^JL^. ^ffl^'J-? ^?^J" L^-ll°l?[!^'i*l!: ^f^"*.?.' begin with as this dog- cant be taught. 



order for the dog to be both the dog and the 

mentally and physically trainer. The dog must be 

healthy. Lack of activity reliably obedient 

leads to boredom that In because a dog that 

turn .. leads to suddenly darts, after a 

unacceptable behavior . rabbit can cause serious 

Including chewing. Injury to the bicycle rider, 

digging and barking. The 4. OBEDIENCE 

exercise can take many TRAINING not only will this 



sport requires very 7. PLAYTIME any regular 

strenuous physical activity that keeps the 

activity. Increases the dog moving. Retrieving a 

bond between the two, ball or Frisbee Is a good 

and the added benefit is example of the type of 

the self-confidence of the activity that keeps the 



contaminated. 

Remember to build up 
to full activity slowly. Don't 
run three miles the first time 
out. Always warm up; 
when we do our class- 
work we start with the 
dogs heeling to 
accomplish this. Cold 



dog Increases. Many shy. dog In motion. Running muscles Injure easily. 



forms and Is dependent 
on the age and physical 
condition of both the dog 
and the trainer. - • 



dogs blossom 
of their agility 



reserved 

because 
keep both the dog and draining, 
the trainer in great 6. FLYB ALL another very 
physical shape, but It will, strenuous dog-sport. After 
strengthen the hurrian- 



with other dogs Is another. 
8. SWIMMING another 
great physical exercise 
that many dogs enjoy. 
You must have access to 



1 ,.,Aiiyc ^* 11 ^. the Initial training period, water regularly and the 

1 . WALKS good for all dog bond. The biggest ^he dog does all the work dog must like to swim. The 

dogs and trainers. Try to advantage is a wel! and must be In very good water must be clean and 

build up to two miles a behaved, healthy pet. It physical condition. A dog not chemically 

allows the trainer to set up ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

clear-cut household rules 



maximize the 



day to 
benefits. 

2. JOGGING builds Kp 
stamina, muscle tone and 
cardiovascular fitness h 
both the dog and the 
trainer. 



To be physically fit the 
dog must be maintained 
at an Ideal weight; not loo 
fat and not too lean. Use 
the rib test to determine 
-this. 

Keep the dog 
groomed. The naiis 
shouldn't be too long, the 



coat shouldn't be matted 
and the ears should be 
free of Infection. Check 
those ears especially 
after the dog engages In 
■ water sports. 

Avoid hard surfaces 
that can wear down the 
dog's pads-remember 
the dog Isn't wearing the 
latest In aerobic 
footwear. In hot weather, 
exercise early In the 
morning or In the cool of 
the evening. Use 
common sense, the dog 
cant. Most of all, enjoy. 
—by CATHIE SABIN, 
B.C. Dog Training 



while giving the dog a 
job. 

5. AGILITY will keep 
both the dog and the 



Puppies & Kittens 



CKtlfti.iliwri 



Hii-.kif- 
Bt.Mivl 



AKC & Mixed Breeds 

Mir.r.tKir.- f'nr. h-i '. .i.-.ii [> im- Mix 

r F'u I.riH'f Po-.dlf Mu ',i,ifm<vi'l 

P,,(ujlc Ami'in .iri E^ktrTu 

.IlK' C.K k,; -.I .u.i.l -WnA-F i.'OAIW, 

2^110 W.i shine lion - W.'uil^eci.iii 

.Kitty . oitu-i liofn S( Tl'iii.bi- Hosf'iM/l 

(708) 2'10-5'Mn 



m 



FOUR PAWS 

TRAINING CENTER 

"Posiuve Training With Positive Results" 

AH training iTMthodi ar* not alika. Come viait ui during ctaises and otnarva a dif- 
larent approacti to dog training. Our mathodt utllizt food, enthutlaim and praisa, 
and exerciHt are broken down Into plaoti both dogt and owner* cen nunage. We 
have cluiei for puppiei end older dogi, and for all levels of obedience compell- 
lion training. For mora Infonnatlon pleue give u« t ealL 

SCHEDULE NEXT TERM STARTS 



COURSE 

Qgntral Olwdiww! 

■Puppy K(nd«rgir1wi • 
•BmIc Ob«di«nc« I • 
•Battc OlMdlanct II - 



Thu. 6:30 PM or 
Sit. 10 AM 

Thu. 7:30 PM or 

Sll. 11 AM 

TtiU. 8:30 PM 



Juty2S 
August 27 

July2S 
August 27 

July 2a 



Competition Cliitw: 

•Novic«(COT)Ut)- Wtd. 7:30 PM or Thu. 9 AM July 27 or July 28 
*Op«n (CDX TItIt) - Wtd. kK PM or Thu. 10 AM July 27 or July 28 
■Utility (VD titit) - WhI 6:30PM July 27 

•CtaaMCa In dog agility now available- 
20970 White Roid • Antioch, IL 60002 • (708) 838-0523 



Help Curb Pet Overpopulation 
Problems. 

Spay 
or NeotQ 
Now!! 

Contact: 
Animal Protection 

P.O. Box 106 

Gurnee, IL 60031 

(708) 740-3977 





BC DOG TRAINING GROOMING 
AND PET SUPPLY 

AUGUST EVENTS - «*AMY AMMEN SEMINAR" 

Saturday 11:30-6:30 «& Sunday 9:09-4:00 

AMY AMMEN CO-AUTHOREDTBE DUALRING DOG WITH JACQUELINE HWSER 

AMY IS THE FIRST WISCONSIN TRAINER TO OBTAIN THREE! OTCir S • ON A CH AfcffiRJCAN 

STAFFORDSHIRE TERRIER. A FLAT COATED REITUEVER, AND A ai JAPANESE CHW, 

AMY HAS ALSO TRAINED A AM«:AN AUSTRALIAN CATTl£ DOG. A CH & UD BRIAND. 

A CDX COCKER SPANIEL. A AWCAN UD SIBERIAN HUSKY. AND ACDX WHIPPET 

The cost for this exciting WORKING SEMINAR is $30/day, $55/botk 

This cost includes coffee and lunch. Make your check payable to I.OA. <t mail to: 

'aoTcr KriOfctk (708) 29847W? WS2 South RlrcrRoMl, DtJ PWne», IL<00I6-£74S 




Saturday August 20th ^lyOG WASH DAY! 

BRING YOUR DOG & A TOWEL 

$1.00 ea. - AU proceeds going to Save-A-Pet • 11:30am - 3:00pm 

Sponsored by "Froitun Pet Foods" 

Come in for a bath - have with a clean dog &food samples: 

(708)566-1960 



I HELPED SAVE A SMALL LIFE TODAYI 

The Assisi Animal Foundation 

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE... 

TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE A MIRACLE 

GIFTS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE 
NOT FOR PROFIT...VOLUNTEER 

E)rogram tor the elderly, provide education proQrams 
or youRQ people and offer a special "pet retirefnent" 
program. THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELPI 




We don 't destroy homeless animals) They live their 
full lives uncaged if not adopted. We spay and 
neuter, conduct a dynamic pet visitation/therapy 



Name. 



Address _ 
City, ST„ 
Zip Code 



Individual 

Membership $15 

Family Membership 

$20 

Donation $ 



I 

Pleate mall to: Atslsl Animal Foundation ' 

I P.O.B. 143 Crystal Lake, IL 60014 (815)455-941 1 i 




L'i^fc.' A !>y '-■■'--'- -11- i <* . 



>«i«n: 



|0;r:r:r'T".ingv»?.^ttaBi»«^?=^»fj*^ •-JT/ i" - - ■ 



If 



CLASSIFIED UkElANd Newspapers AiiqufT 3, 1994, 





ANTIQUES 8t CRARS • ANTIQUES & CRARS 





•ANTIQUES & CRARS -ANTIQUES & CRARS 




Summer slows with a variety of craft 






Doll, bear show 

On Sunday. Aug. 7 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 1he 
Storyland Doll Club will 
present {ts 15th Annual Doll 
& Bear Show and Sale at 
the spacious, air condi- 
tioned Operating Engi- 
neer's Hall. 6200 S. Jollet 
Rd. In Countryside, III. The 
hall Is on Jollet Road (Rte. 
66) Just west of LaGrange 
Road (Rte. 45) adjacent 
to LaGrange. 

Doll and bear lovers of 
all ages will appreciate 
the great variety of dolls, 
bears and related Items 
for sale. There will be an- 
tique and modern col- 
lectible dolls, books, 
clothes and accessories, 
doll repair, handmade 
and reproduction dolls, 
and unique bears. Local 
and out-of-town dealers 
will be participating along 
with Storyland club mem- 
bers. 

Admission Is $3 for 
adults, and children under 
the age of 12 will be 
admitted free of charge 
when accompanied by 
an adult. Food and bev- 
erages wilt be available 
on the premises, and 
there Is ample free park- 
ing. Call Judy at 388-7628 
for more Information. 

Antiques, collectibles 

On Sunday. Aug. 14 an 
Antiques & Collectibles 
Show will be held at the 
Lake County Fairgrounds. 
Hundreds of exhibitors 
from several states will be 
selling their collections 
from the past. From the 
loigest to the smallest, this 
established and well- 
re-.ognlzed show Is for 
be n the serious and ca- 
sual collector. Viewing 



hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Adult admission Is $3. For 
further details call 223- 
1433or35<S7499. 

Artworks 

Two hundred artists 
traveling from over 25 
states, two Canadian 
provinces and the Virgin 
Islands will exhibit their 
work during the fifth annual 
Chicago's New East Side 
Artworks sponsored by 
Chicago's New East Side 
Assn. 

The free event will be 
held Thursday, Aug. 18 
through Saturday, Aug. 20 
In the heart of the New 
East Side neighborhood 
at Michigan Avenue and 
Lake Street, Show hours 
are noon to 7 p.m. on 
Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 
p.m. on Friday, and 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Satur- 
day. 

All visual art forms are 
represented In this Juried 
show. Attendees can 
view a broad range of 



I 



1:1 



\1VTIQIIE 
MALL 

Intiochf Illinois 

;UY-SELL-TRADE 

FEATURING 

20 DEALERS 

Channel Lake 
Schoolhouse 

Rts. 173 & Lake Ave. 

3 1/2 miles west of Rte. 83 

on me. 173 

Dealers Welcome 

14,000 sq.Ji. available 

Open 6 days lO-S 

dosed Tuesdays 

(708) 395-0000 



ll 



^ 



^ 



styles In ceramics, fiber, 
glass, Jewelry, wood, 
mixed media, painting, 
drawing, pastel, pen and 
Ink, photography, prints 
and sculpture. All work 
exhibited Is for sale. 

The annual "Arty Party." 
an Artworks tradition 
honoring the exhibitors, will 
be held at the Fairmont 
Hotel's Moulin Rouge on 
Thursday, Aug. 18 from 8 
to 10 p.m. Admission Is $12 
per person. Jazz singer 
Rita Warford will perform 
during the reception and 
hors d'oeuvres will be 
served. Artist awards wilt 
be presented at the 
party. Including the $1,000 
"Amoco Purchase 
Award," $1,000 "Prudential 
Plaza Award" and ribbons 
In six other media cate- 
gories. Tickets may be re- 
served by calling 
(312)551-9290. 

During Artworks, 
acoustic guitar duo "Cirrus 
Falcon" will play popular 



light rock music at the 
Boulevard Towers Plaza 
located at Michigan Av- 
enue and Lake Street. 
Music of the Andes will 
also be performed on 
percussion and wind In- 
struments at regular Inter- 
vals during the event. 

Coil Artworks at 
(312)561-9290 for further 
Information. 
Wearable art 

Artists from 10 states will 
be exhibiting and selling 
their one-of-a-kind fash- 
lons. Jewelry, hats, ties and 
accessories at the Cuneo 
Museum and Gardens 
Wearable Art '94 on Sat- 
urday and Sunday, Sept. 
17 and 18. 

Local artists Include 
Justine Vaughn, SuesI 
Metcalf-Hart, Dawri 
Larsen arid Duane Waller. 
Other artists Include: Wo- 
ven garments from Cali- 
fornia Rags; vintage fab- 
rics from West Africa and 
Oriental obis designed by 



Design International of 
Wisconsin; "Rlvawear", a 
cartoon series using vari- 
ous techniques done on 
ctothlng by Ruth Reynolds 
of Jollet; and several 
artists specializing In hats 
(including Joppa from 
New Hampshire and Pam 
Palmer who studied under 
John Koch of Chicago). 

Artists' works Include 
hand dyed, block 
printed, hand woven, 
hand knit, pieced and/or 
embellished garments 
and a variety of Jewelers. 

In addition, a fashion 
show will be offered on 
Saturday with a luncheon 
in the Carriage Museum to 
benefit Connection/ 
PADS. Resen/ations can 
be made by mailing $30 
per person to: Ubertyville 
Junior Woman's Club, 
PADS Luncheon, Box 893, 
Ubertyville, IL 60061. On 
Sunday, tea-room mod- 
eling will be offered with 
brunch at the mu seum . 



For further Information 
call thie Cuneo Museum at 
362-3042 or Connec- 
tlon/PADS at 362-3381. 

Artworks 

Two hundred artists 
traveling from over 26 
states, two Canadian 
provinces and the Virgin 
Islands will exhibit their 
work during the fifth annual 
Ctilcago's New East Side 
Artworks sponsored by 
Chicago's New East Side 
Assn. The free event wlB 
be held Thursday, Aug. 18 
through Saturday, Aug. 20 
in the heart of the New 
East Side neighborhood 
at Michigan Avenue and 
Lake Street. Show hours 
are noon to 7 p.m. on 
Thursday, 10 a.m. to 7 
p.m. on Friday, and- 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. on Satur- 
day, All visual art forms 
are represented In thlsju- . 
ried show. Call ArtWorks • 
at (312)551-9290 for further , 
Information. 



Grayslake 

Anttqncs 

& 
Collectibles 

Lake County 
Fairgrounds 

Grayslake, Illinois 
iliinois120&U.S. 45 

8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

SUNDAY 
AUGUST 14 

Admission ^.00 



A'>>- 



Amcrican CraflBmanship 

Handcrafted in the U&A 

Largest Selection of Country Crafts, Collectible, 
Southwest Deigns & Hb/f<fay Traditions 




J 



TULIP 
mTGH 



Open 
, 390 Lake Street M.-Th..lO-5 

AntlocML 60002 Frl .10^7 

1 395-7331 Sat 104 





New Selection 
of Unique 
Southwest 
(^ramies 



CRAFIERS GALLERY 

opauag ^ 
d'ateUe 







Monday 1:00 pm - 6:00 pm |2^ Center St. 

Tuesday-Friday 10:00arn - 6:00 pm (Jyayslake, IL 60030 

Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm (^Lc.\ £ / « r.r^^^ 

Ji Sunday 11:00 am -4:00 pm \'^"/ JxO-^AUDj: 



•^'^'^■^ 



\, f ,lAnamosa Uinhaues 



One Mem Or Entire Estate 



Specializtrg in Fumttur©..,Fofmai To Counlry...Coins 
Depre^ion Glass, Toys, Dols, Primitive Aco^sories, Collectibles 

5 Mlnute3 West ot Gumee Mills Mali ^^^^^ . g^^^^^ 

10am-5pm 
Closed Monday 
Just West ol Rl. 45 on Rl. 132 • 19056 W. Grand Avb. 



356-0832 




Craft & Art Fair 

Mallard Creek Shopping Center 

(Omni-Walmait) 

NW Comer of Rt. 83 & Rollins Rd. 

Round Lake Beach 

Sat.,Aug.27, 10-5 
Sun.,Aug. 28, 11-4 

75 Exhibitors from 

a 4 State Area 

For more information, call 

Craft Show Promotions, Inc. 

^ 708-231-8644 



(in Dealer Mull 

i^Soudi Lake Street 

(i rays lake, IL 

(708) 'ZZ'M)ryn\ 



50 Dealer Mall 
:S7()41 \. Route S;i 

Lake Villa, IL 
(708) 2()5-<)()f)() 



SHOWCASE BOOTHS AVAILABLE FOR LEASEl 

$100.00 per month 
Call (708) 265-9090 for more Info. 



(iriiN'sIakc Hours: 

Moil. -Sat. I()-.=S 

Sun. 12-5 

2nil Sun. 1()-5:H() 



Lake \ ilia I lours: 
Mon.-I ri. i(M> 
Sat. 10-5 Sun. 12-i 
^Zui\ Sun. 1()-5:H() 






AuqusT 9, 1994 [Man6 Newspapers SPORTS/tESHJRE 



Vikes split pre-season tilts, prepare for season|gpeii<er 




STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

A decade has' passed since the 
last time Keith RIchtcr strapped 
on the helmet and shoulder pads 
and took to the football field. 

He played for the second time 
after the decade off on Saturday 
as the kiclccr and punter for the 
Lake County Vikings.' 

"I just wanted to sec if I could 
stil! do it/' Richter said following 
a 16-7 loss to Indiana Renegades. 

Richter is glad to be in semi- 
pro -football. He last played in 
1983 at the University of Min- 
nesota 

He kicked a field goal to start 
the Vildngs season ofT right after a 
long drive last week. His only 



chance before a , respectable 
Round LakcHlgh gathering was a 
missed 30-yard field goal 

"I feel my range is 40-45 
yards," Richter said. 

Rlchtpr prepped at Trcmpcr 
High in Kenosha before playing 
for the Golden Gophers of Min- 
nesota. 

"We're still building. We have 
not put In all of our offense/' 
quarterback Chris Hare said. 

, The Vildngs QD, who shares 
time with Todd Brown, passed for 
some 190 yards. Seven turnovers 
kept the Vikes from putting any- 
thing consistent together. 

The VUccs vow more Intensive 
practices before the Aug. 6 regu- 
lar season opener against Palos. 



The 6 p.m. contest is at Round 
Lake HIgli. 

Hare had a successful college 
career, starting with a 7-2 team at 
Ripon College, Wis, 

"You have more talented ath- 
letes here (scml-pro), but the dif- 
ference is here you practice twice 
a week as opposed to every day," 
Hare said. 

*We gotlax up the middle. We 
missed opportunities. That was 
the key," Coach Kurt Kamp- 
cndahl said. 

He said the Renegades did 
not pass or run much on his 
Viking "Purple Haze" defense. 
"The defense played a hcckuva 
game," he stated. 

See VIKINGS page C- 




Tho Vikings Cary Halth on tho carry for sbc yards.— Photo by 
Caroy 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



I 



i 




■■''-'.''<\:--^''>V'-^ ' -1f**''<^' *''^ 




Settlor links 

Senior dtizehs tee off 
Paqe ei24 S ; 



■;'• r 



:■ ■r^" ■•■v; 



^'■■\v- 



golf 



GOP calling for greens 
fundraiser 
Jp|qEC24. :^ . 

Startyour 
engines 

Lake^Villa driver takes 
third trophy 
PAqEC25 

Tee Up for 
LaCasa's 
outing 

LaCasa is holding its sev> 

'cnth ,^nual golf outing at 
Highland Park Country Club 
Aug. 8. 

, LaCasa is dedicated to 
serving the needs of sur- 
vivors of sexual assault and 
abuse and educating the ' 

■ community to eliminate sex- 
ual assault and abuse. 

.Highlights of the event 
Include team prizes, rafde 
prizes, spedal feature' holes, 
silent auction, 'holc-in-one 

^ challenges and a live auctiorL 

7;^v{ Raffle pitees include two 
round-trip airline tickets, a set 
of men's and women's golf 
dubs, private boKseatsforci^t 
at Arlington International 
Racecourse, and tickets to 

,'^Bidls, Beats, Bladdiawks and 

?' White Sox ganK». 

Registration begins at 
10:30 a,m., grilled buffet 

* lunch at 11:30 a.m., shotgun 
start and scramble format at 
>12;30 p.in.,'trick shot clinic at 

. '5:30 p.ia and awards dinner 

' at 6:30 p.m. 

' For more information, 
call 244* 11B7. 



World's 



World Cup mania is behind us, 
but the international sports in 
Illinois continue with the 
Pedigree® North American 
Young Rider Championships. 
Aug. 16 through 21 at Tempel 
Farms in Wadsworth. 

Every region of the United 
States will send teams of com- 
petitors, from California (their 
zone five team ruled the show 
jumping last year) to the eastern 
states (the winner of the three- 
day event — the equestrian 
triathlon-^haulcd all the way 
from North Carolina). The mid- 
west always makes a strong 
showing of its own (the Midwest 
team was gold in dressage in '93). 

Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, 
Sweden and Japan will send indi- 
viduals and teams. Going along 
with all these kids are horses of 
the finest quality to be seen any- 
where. Coaches, too, are often 
weU-known faces from the pro- 
fessional horse world. 

From 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., the 
rolling, open fields of Tempel 
Farms will be teeming with activ- 
ity as prctitninary competition 
begins on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 
with dressage in the' morning and 
preliminary jumping in the after- 
noon. In fact, there will be worid- 
class show jumping every after- 
noon from Wednesday to Sunday 
in the huge sand arena surround- 
ed by lots of shady places to sit, 



to compete at Tempel Farms 




be it the grandstand or lounging 
on the grass. 

On Thursday and Friday, Aug. 
18 and 19, the midwest defends 
its gold medal in team dressage 
championships, beginning at 1 
p.m. in arena one. 

Aug. 20, Saturday, spectators 
should plan to get there eariy (fl 
a.m.) and bring a picnic to watch 
the exciting three-day event 
cross-country competition. The 
cross-country is a galoping, leap- 
ing test of a horse and rider's 
physical ability and mental 
toug^ess, a throwback to the 
sport's military origins. 

The rider and horse negotiate 
huge, natural obstacles, includ- 
ing a water jump, moving at the 
gallop over several miles of coun- 
try before the course is through. 

Those same three-day cven- 
ters then have to get up Sunday 
morning and, with the same 
horses, jump a course of show 
jumps in the jumping arena, to 
demonstrate their horse's fimess 
(their own, too!) and "cat-like 
ability" to negotiate the tight 
course tums and higher heights 
of the bright decorated jumps. 

The final day, Sunday, Aug. 21, 
will see the best of the best in all 
three Olympic disciplines as the 
individual championships in 
three-day, dressage and jumping 
are decided in separate competi- 
tions during the day. 




Tho Podigroo North Amorlcan Young RIdor Championships tako ^ 
piaco Aug. 1 6 through 21 a) Tompol Fam» In Wadsworth. Young 
ridors from around the globo will bo compoting In tho ovont. 



Women's soccer at CLC Dikta host Marconi tournament 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter "~" ~" 

A new era begins for (ZoUegc 
of Lake County athletics Aug. 17. 

That Is when members of the 
first team for women's soccer will 
gather for a meeting and then hold 
a first practice, starting a new sport 
at the Grayslake college. 

The new coach is Mike 
C Flaherty of Woodstock. 
O' Flaherty has experienced soc- 
cer from all aspects; player, coach 
and official. He has noticed an. 
improvement in skill level, and 
not just due to the enthusiasm for 
World Cup. 

"The under 12 teams today 
could play with the under 16 
teams of 10 years ago. There is a 
real increase in soccer due to bet- 
ter coaching and youth leagues or 
you could just practice on your 
own," O'Flahcrty said. 



He has played amateur soccer 
in Germany. O' Flaherty has offi- 
ciated in almost 490 matches. 

"Soccer goes on without 
those pauses such as free throws 
in basketball. You have to be 
physically and psychologically in 
shape. It is an intcllccmal game," 
he said. 

In order for the American soc- 
cer to really grow as it is the 
world's most popular sport, there 
needs to be a league established, 
he said. 

"Youngsters have to have 
something to aspire to," 
O'Flaherty said. 

O'Flahcrty would like to have 
between 15 to 17 players report 
for the first practice at 2 p.m. Aug. 
17 at the gym. The first game is 
five days later, the same day 
glasses begin. "Having players 
play up to their capabilities and 
victories will come, " he said . 



The Leukemia Research 
Foundation will host the second 
annual Joe Marconi Memorial 
Pro-Am Bowling Tournament 
'Strikes Against Leukemia' Aug. 6 
at Bnmswick Deer Park Lanes, 
21080 N. Rand Rd. in Lake Zurich. 

The event begins at 11:30 am. 
with Mike Ditka serving as hon- 
orary cha'mnan. 

The scheudJed for the event is 
as follows: 

10 am. — ^volunteers arrive-^ 
go to registration table for assign- 
ments. 

11:15 a.m.— Mike Ditka 
arrives, 

11:15 a.m.— Pro bowlers, 
sportscasters, Bears arrive. 

11:30 a.m.— Pre- 

registration/rcgistration of 

bowlers. Practice bowl for pro 
bowlers. 



11:45 a.m.— Roll call: pros, 
sportscasters, Bears in VIP room. 

Noon^anie Wcisenbcrg 
introduces Mike Ditka. Dldca will 
speak abut - Joe Marconi and 
introduce Jan Marconi, Bears, 
sportscasters. 

12:30 p.m. — Sportscasters 
IkiwI four frames and Bears. 

1 p.m. — Ditka announce- 
ment, pro-am begins bowl three 
games, announces pros. 

3 to 3:30 p.m.— Bowling ends. 
All scores tabulated while: 
Volunteer pulls Lucky Buck and 
prizes are given out and Mike 
Ditka announces winners and Jan 
Marconi hands out trophies and 
balls to winners and kids prizes. 

Deena Stickgold to make 
announcement regarding pledges. 
Nancy/Marcia: Good-byes, and 
thank you to all plaques given out 



ti » ^ «^ ^V^Sp^*^^^- 



ifliuwt-'f«-.in**'»«*<*-*^'— • 




SPORTS 7 LiEISlJRE UtcElANd'htEWspApERs Auqusr f, 1994 



1: 



Senior citizen miniature golf tourney to be held Aug. 10 



An 18-hoIc miniature golf 
tournament for senior citizens 
will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.rh. 
on Wednesday/ Aug. 10 at Fun 
Harbour. 



The 4.5 acre family enter- 
tainment center is located at the 
south end of the Lakchurst 
Shopping Center, Waukcgan. 

The golf course Is considered 



YMCA seeks swim instructors 

The Lake County Family YMCA in north Waukcgan Is looking for 
volunteers ages 16 and older to help with swimming lessons for the fall 
classes which begin Sept. 6. 

As an aquatic volunteer who gives five hours or more a week, vol- 
unteers would receive 

• Training to help teach swim lessons 

• Early registration on YMCA classes 

• Discount on YMCA classes 

• Free recreational use of the YMCA 

• Free babysitting during volunteer hours 
•'ITie rewards of helping otlicrs 

To become a YMCA aquatic volunteer, call Karl Kopp at 360-9622. 

Republicans calling 'fore' some fun 



"The Lake County Republican 
Central Committee invites every- 
one 'fore' a day of fun raising 
funds for Republican candidates 
at the 1994 Lake County 
Republican Open," stated 
Patricia Page, general chairman 
of this year's open. The open, 
held annually by the Lake County 
Republican Central Committee, 
is scheduled for Friday, Aug. 12. 

"As ticket committee chair- 
man, I wish to extend an invita- 
tion to anyone who wishes to par- 
ticipate in the 1994 Republican 
Open," remarked Robert P. Ncal, 
Lake County Board commission- 
er-Dist. 2 and former chairman of 
the Lake County Republican 
Party, lie said, "With tliis year 
being an cloction year, we expect 
a tremendous turn-out at this 
year's open. To accommodate 
our guests, wc will be cntcrtain- 
{ng golfers at two golf courses — 
Midlanc Country Club in 
Wadsworth and Countryside 
West Golf Course in Mundelcin." 

"The success of this year's 
Republican Open will give the 
Lake County Republican Party 
the resources to secure 
Republican victories from 
Governor Edgar to Lake County 
Clerk Candidate Willard 



Hclander," said lohn Schulicn, 
Republican county chairman. 

The Lake County Republican 
Open offers two categories of 
tickets. Celebrity tickets, which 
include golf with cart at Midlane 
Country Club, breakfast, lunch, 
dinner and entrance into the 
celebrity reception are only $150 
per person. Regular tickets, 
which include golf with cart at 
Countryside West Golf Course, 
breakfast, lunch and dinner arc 
only $75 per person. 

Dinner for all. participants, 
which commences at 6:30 p.m., is 
at Midlanc Country Club In 
Wadsworth. Dinner only tickets 
are available for a low donation of 
$40. The program, which 
includes the presentation of 
prizes and guest speakers, will 
begin at 7:30 p.m. 

"Anyone wishing to partici- 
pate in this year's Republican 
Open or attend the dinner may 
contact Lake County Republican 
Headquarters at 680-6600 to 
receive tickets," said Ncal. 

"We look forward to welcom- 
ing the largest number of golfers 
ever to this year's Lake County 
Republican Open," concluded 
Page. 



.Your Best Local Televisipn News Source 
exclusively on US Cable 



lAKE 
COUNVr 



UVE 



Infonnative 
Up-to-date 
Community Oriented 



• Weeknightsat 

5:30 & 7:30 p.m. 

• Channels 



id CabiG 

of Lake County 




to be one of the most colorful and 
enjoyable miniature golf facilities 
in the Chicago area. It is located 
In the center of the outdoor play 
center operated by the family 
amusement company that owns 
Fun Harbour. 

Participants 60 ,ycars of age 
will play In foursomes using of- 
ficial Fun Harbour score cards, 
llie management will provide the 
golf putters and golf balls for use 
by those taking part in tlie event, 

Manager Steve Ilamcl said 
that white "prizes will be award- 
ed, including duplicate prizes for 
ties, the Idea for tills' event is not 
take part only if you arc a great 
miniature golfer, but rather just 
to have fun.'.' 



Cost of the event Is a $2 entry and female players. Hamcl added 

fee. Flist prize is dinner for two at that he expects some of the par- 

thc nearby Olive Garden in ticipants will bring along a 

Lakchurst; a second place prize will spouse or friend who may not 

consist of movie passes to the want to play in tlie tournament 

Lakchurst Cinema; and thb-d place but will have fun as a cheer leader 

will be 100 redemption coupons for or participating In some other 

gifts at Fun Harbour and a free activity in the fun center. 



round of miniature golf. 

Hamcl said there arc some strict 
mlcs to the contest There ^arc no 
practice strokes so that each stroke 
counts, and most important 
"everyone must have fun." 

The event Is open to both mate 



Pre- registration can be made 
by calling 570-0071, although this 
is not required to participate. 
Golfers will tee ofifon the minia- 
ture course very five minutes, 
Hamel said. 



Wednesday at 10 a.m. Is the deadllfie for 
Classified Ads...Don't Forget • 



<*Read It & Reap" Contest 

YOU may be chosen as (he rcclpieni of $50, compUmcnis of Lakeland Newspapcre, Each week, we will be publish- 
ing llic l.d. numbers of two readers In Lakeland Newspapers. If your reader l.d. number appears, you lave until 
Wednesday of the' following week to call lakeland Newspapers and claim your prize. (Winncrs.will have two weeks after 
llic conlacl dale lo pick up their prize.) Current subscribers may find their l.d. number on tlie mailing label alBxed to 
the front page of the paper, like tliis.... 




Reader I. p. 
Number 



ST0120 - Mr. & Mrs. Stevens 
• Mundelein 

MA01 55 -Jeanne Mack 
•Lake Villa 



rt*) 



To subscribe and become eligible for this long-running contest, 
call the Lakeland Newspaper circulation departriient at 223-8161. 

Contest Rules: 1. Two winners are picked randomly from 13 of the Lakeland Newspapers through a random computer search. 
2. Winners will be notified by reader identification numbers in the newspaper each week. 3. To claim prize, winners must contact 
Lakeland Newspapers' Circulation Department by the following Wednesday o{ publtcatton, 12:00 noon, and schedule pick-up of 
prize. 4. Winners must show proof of identification at the Lakeland Newspapers front office to claim prize. 5. Winners must pick 
up prize within 2 weeks of nobfication. 6. Subscription must be paid in full to be eligible to claim prize. 7. All winners must agree 
to have their names and pictures lo be used for promotional purposes. 8, Contest will begin January 21, 1994, and will end 
December 30, 1994. 9. Contest is void where prohibited by bw. 10. Employees of Lakeland Newspapers and their relath/es are 
not eligible to win prizes. 1 1 . Decisions of ludges are final. 12. This contest Is not designed to be a tottery systmn. Unclaimed 
prizes will not be ro-asslgned. 




CARPET 

and 

UPHOLSTERY 

Cleaned Without Steam, 

the DRY FOAM EXTRACTION 

WAY 

• Cleans thoroughly 

• Dries FAST (1-2 hours) 
■ Eliminates ovenvettlng 

problems 

DELUXE 

John S. Grams, Owner ' 
(815) 344-4918 
A truitid name for ant 30 ynn 

KM A s s o c I A t e . 



^(M*e £ TOa^aen. 



inVENTORY REDUCTION SALEI 

0% Financing 











FOR 12 MONTHS 
OR 

5% CASH DISCOUNT 



PLUS 



i^saveWoI 

I ON ALL FURNACE AND AIR | 
|jC0N£ITpNING COMBJNWIONJ 

"The Best Service, Highest Quality 

Workmanstitp Since 1 946" —■-■■■««i««™i« 

r$30o~oFFl 

EASTOFMCHENfW ON ROUTE 120 |ONANAIR CONDITIONER UPGRADE | 






70^7-0468 



U'Cf M 



iiH3 I ((or roplacemeat of your working | 
mn I tiactrtc central air condllionsr) 



1 



i 



a 



iM^i&fS!!^ 





AuqusT 9, 1994 UkelANcl NewspApcRS SPORTS/LEISURE; 








MICHAEl H. BABICZ 



Correspopdont . , . 

Sprint poiritlcadcr Dlck- 
Colburn of Muskcgo, two-time 
defending modified champion 
Lenny Ostrowski Jr. of Nortli 
Cape and Rob Olson of Lake 
Viila, in tiic sportsman each 
won tticir ttiird Budwciscr 
Racing Series feature, of the 
season on Budwciscr Nigiit at 
Toft Auto Racing's Wilmot 
Speedway. 

Gary Zobel took ttic early lead 
in the 25-lap sprint main on the 
super fast tiiird mile! Tommy 
Sexton rocketed on the iiigh side 
to take top spot at the stripe to 
complete lap 4. 

On lap 6, a caution flew for a 
spin and during it Sexton's left- 



rear iHigah showing signs of los- 
Ingair. 

Colburn put his Cycle 
E ra pi re / S ha v c,r 
Construction/G&G \ Trucking 
Gambler into the lead on lap 17. • 

A final caution flew when 
Allen Winker and Joe Kristan col- 
lided while battling for fourth 
with tliree laps to go. Colbum 
stayed in front with 2993 Wilmot 
Champion Mike Frost coming- 
from ninth starting spot to fitlish 
second. 

' "I have to thank my crew chief, 
Bob Krincr, for putting a great car 
under me," said Colburn, joined 
in victory lane by the crew, his 
wife, Nancy, and daughters 
Christ! and Amy. "The car could 
run anywhere I wanted to put It. 



It's a great win heading into The 
Open (August 3)." 

Todd Hcpfncr took the lead iii 
ttic 20-lap modined mfdit with a 
ycUow appearing on lap three for 
a two-car tangle in turn four. * 

The final 17 laps went green 
with Ostrowski putting his home- 
built North cape 
G r o c c r i c s/ i* c a ch e s 
Restaurant/Paul Bradley 
Restoration Lxsn sr. Chassis into 
the lead shooting from third to 
first on the backstrctch during lap 
seven. Ostrowski scored the win 
by less than two car Icngttis over 
a fast finishing Dennis Spitz. 

"1 saw a little bit of dust fly on 
the high side so I decided to go up 
there and try it,*^ said Ostrowski, 
joined in victory lane by his wife, 



Lorie, and the crew. "It worked. 
The crew did a great job setting 
up the car." 

While attempting to lap a 
backmarker, Kuxhouse and 
Devair came together in turn 
four, collecting Surleta and bring- 
ing out a caution. Olson inherited 
the lead after managing to avoid 
thcpileup. 

A final yellow came on lap 11 
when two more cars tangled in 
turn three. Olson kept his Hillary 
& ' Associates/ Frank's 

Lounge/Midwest Motorcoach 
1992 Windpusher Camaro In 
front to the finish. 

"We were lucky," said Olson 
about missing the halfway point 
Incident "The track was super 
fast and the car was set up just 



-WiliviOT SpEEdwAy ResuIts 



Budwciscr Racint Series 
Bndwelser Night 
. Satnrdayjalf 30 
Sprints 

25-lap Feature: 1. Dick Colbum, 
Muslccgo; 2. .Mike Frost, ZIon; 3. 
Dennis Spitz, Kenosha; 4. John 
Hajduk, Jr., Noblcsville, Ind.; 5. Kurt 
Davis, West Allis; 6. Gary Zobel, 
Brlgliton; 7. Tim Cox, Park City, III.; 8. 
Totid Daun, Kcnostia; 9. Dave Bliss, 
Fiarvard; 10. Don Durliam, Racine. 

15-lap Last Chance Qualifier "B" 
Main: Kris Spitz. Kenosha; Durham; 
Tim Ammon, Kenosha; Paul Tctrault, 
Bradley, III; Barry Kruegar, Anlloch. 

First 10-lap; Heat: Frost; Joe 
Kristan, Bcacli Park, II!.; Joe 
Henrichs, Franltlin; Hajduk; second 
ticau Davis; Daun; Bliss; Phil Wade, 
Kenosha; third heat: Allen Winker, 
Kenosha; Zobci; D. Spitz; Cox. 
', Bicne Excavating 5-lap Dash: 
Frost; Davis; D. Spitz; Ammon. 
Modlfleds 

20-Iap Feature: 1. Lenny 
Ostrowski, Jr., North Cape; 2. 
Dennis Spitz, Kenosha; 3. Todd 



Hcpfner, Sussex; 4. .Gary Dye, 
Genesee; 5. Craig imager,* Milwaukee; 
6. Mike Dubs, Ruscti, III; 7. Allen 
Winker, Kenosha; ' B. Larry 
Vandervere, Beach Park, III; 9. 
Jimmy Uttech Jr., Kenosha; 10. Fred 
Zack, Gtendalc. 

12-lap Last Chance Qualifier "B" . 
Main: A. Winker; Tom Larson, New 
Berlin; Keith Olscn, Milwaukee; Jerry 
Doles, Waukcgan; Glen Hcpfner, 
Sussex. 

First 10-Iap Heat: Zack; 
Ostrowski; T. Hcpfner; Tim Cox, Park 
City, III; second hcau L Uttech; 
Danny Smith, Winthrop Harbor, III; 
Dye; Dubs; third heau D. Spitz; Bob 
Dodd, Beach Park; Kurt Winker, 
Kenosha. 

J&L Oil 5-lap Dash: J. Uttech; 
Ostrowski; D. Spitz; Dye (NTR- 
1:22.09, old-l:22.B0 by Gary Dye oh 
4/16/94). 

Sportsmsn 

20-lap Feature: 1. Rob Olson, Lake 
Villa; 2. John Pqehlcr, Libcrtyville; 3. 
Scott Kuxhouse, Antloch; 4. Ed 
Dcvall, Waukcgan; 5. Bob Tcllefsen, 







Tho VIklngi' Miko Draper gots nallod ottor catching a poss.— 
Photo by Bill Caroy 



MARQUARDT 
VOLKSWAGEN 



1994 JEHA III 
'199^mo.* 






94CABRIOIET 
SneThouiindi 

Stock 
Now! 



"MOST LOVED CARS IN THE WORLD' 

TEST DRIVE ONE TODAY! 

'SPECIAL LEASE RATES AVAILABLE 

10 YEAR/100,000 Mli^ UMITED POWER TRAIN WARRANTY 






On Rte. 41 At Washington • Gumee Area • 249-1300 

'Basod on $1500 down, non-airbag. 5 spd., 48 mo. lease 
plus tax, title. D.O.C. fee, first pmt. and sec, dep. 



McHcnry; 6. Jim Bennett, Round 
Lake; 7. Brian Ulrich, Racine; 8. Ted 
Dobncr, Salem; 9." Larry Surleta, 
Round Lake; 10, Boliby John Henstcy, 
Round Lake. 

First 8-lap Heat Dobner; Bennett; 
Dcvall; JuUca Mytlymakl, Beach Park; 
second . heat: Kuxhouse; Olson;' 
Surleta; Tcllefsen. 
1994 Budwelter Raclns Series 
oniclal Point SlandliiKi. 
(AftoflulrSO) 
Splints 
1. Dick Colburn {9}-ai2;2, Dennis 
Spitz (41)-769; 2. Allen Winker (lOw)- 
748; 4. Dave Bliss {39)-735; 5. Todd 
Daun (19)-723; B. Gary Zobel (Z93)- 
664; 7. Tim Cox (40)-637; 8. Kris Spitz 
(4K)-521; 9. Tim Ammon (l)-5li9; 10. 
Kurt Davis (6K)-514. 
Blene Bxcsvstlng Sprint Dssta 
L Dick Colbum t9)-56; 2. Todd 
Daun (19)-40; 3. Dennis Spitz (41)- 
38; '4. Allen Winker (10w)-20: '4. Tim 
Ammon (I) -20; 6. Tim Cox {40]-ie; 
•7. Dave Bliss (39) -12; •7. Tommy 
Sexton 189)-12; •7. Kurt Davis (6K)-. 
12; 10. Gary Zobel (Z93)-10. 



Modlfleds 

1. Ilmmy Uttech, Jr. (12) -923; Z 
Lenny Ostrowski, Jr. (83)-897: 3. 
Dennis Spitz (41) -891; 4. Gary Dye 
(4)-837; 5. Todd Hepfncr (28) -701; G. 
Fred Zack (92)-693; 7. Craig Lager 
{18)-S25; 'B. Tim Cox (40-620; •B. 
Larry Vandervere (I4)-620; 10. Jerry 
Doles (55)-609. 

JItL Oil Modified Dash . 

1. Jimmy Uttech Jr. (12)-5B; 2. 

Fred Zack (92)'-52; 3. Dennis Spitz 

(41)-46; 4. Lenny Ostrowski, Jr. (83)- 

44; 5. Tim Cox (40) -24; 6. Gary Dye 

(4)-20; '7. Todd Hepfner (28) -S; >7, 
Allen Winker (10w)-6; "g. Jon 
Behncke (6)-4: *9. Paul Seldler (36)-4; 

•9. Jerry Doles (55) -4; '9. Kurt Winker 

(20)-4. 

Sportsman 
1. John Pochlcr (23) -812; 2. Ed 

Devall (6)-794; 3. Scott Kuxhouse 

(57)-786; 4. Larry Surleta (55}-778; 5. 

Jim Bennett (33) -684; 6. Dave Holdcn 

(29)-670; 7. Rob Olson (95}-626; 8. 

Bobby John Henslcy (15)-5e6; 9. Bob 

Tellcfsen .(4DS)-4B8; 10. Carl Geler 

(10)-374. 




From C23 

The offensive line continues to 
be tested as only five linemen arc 
asked to play the whole way. "We 
should be able to rotate people In 
and out," Kampcndahl said. 

The Vikings' touchdown came 
on a special teams play. Cullcn 
Thompson blocked a pimt and 
Mike Dunn ran the ball in for a TD 
with 7:04 left in the third quarter 
and a 9-7 Indiana lead. 



"This was back to reality. 
People thought just because we 
won last week, and the other team 
had to travel, that all wc needed to 
do was show up. Wc did not get 
bito the game tmtil the second 
quarter," Kampendahl said. 

Indiana scored on a safety and 
a 15-yard TD pass as well as a sec- 
ond touchdown in the waning sec- 
onds on a 19-yard interception 
run. 




Would you like to 

shoot lower scores? 

Let us show you how - 

with our Custom Made 

Golf Clubs! We offer... 





Component 

Made 
Custom Clubs 

oJ head designs ;■; 

'Your choice ol 
hundre<Jsofsha« ■ 

• Hiindfodsofgnp ;; 

designs In any aze,},;; 

• A;e buiit ttio dub ll 
onoselfalalirna f[ 

• Crafted to FIT your K 
heighl, your sto and 

yo»Jf6W(>g 

• Priced realisbcafly I;; 
and they caibnpnjy<i 




ml 




Brand Kanie 

>::;^;:.6c«;;ciui»;i| 

*Unnied99{eciIoriol;::.- 

'Usij^fy'aainglel^p;::; 
^-(tosigriiriofwsize^:;:;: 

•Masspro(ijt»diri.::y^^ 



rStS/ 675~2T47 

35 years of Customizing lessons 
available wili] PGA P(o 

1810 Route 12 'Spring Grove, tL 



right for It Wc broke a toislon bar 
in the, heat, the crew worked 
hard, replaced it, and cverytfilng 
came together." 

There will be no Friday racing 
on August 5. • ■ ■ ' ' 

August '6 will be the Annual : 
Toft Auto Racing's Wilmot 
Speedway Race Against Drugs 
Night Sponsored by Paul Bach's 
Lake County East-West Chrysler- 
Plymouth/Jeep-Eagle, the pro- 
gram will feature four divisions 
Including sprints, modlfleds, 
mini-sprints and street stocks, 
The Herb's Auto Parts Street 
stock Challenge is $225 if the 
same driver wins a heat and, from 
the back, the feature. 



•;; "^^•- ■ 


^^k' 


^•^'0^1 


%Sj ' 


l^^P ' 


'. t^^^- ' 


i-,*-'^ 



lUfiET 

m 

DIDNT 

BreugM 

To 
You By 



MICHAEL FOHRMAN 
OF FOHRMAN DODGE 

One of the most amazing records In 
^rts was the one set by Connie Made 
who managed ihe same big league 
basdiall team for FIFTY consecutire 
years! ... Mack was the manager of the 
A's from 1901 through 1950 -... 
There's a record that .will probably 
never be broken. ■, t 



Here's an oddity ... The 1927 
Yankas are often (ailed the greatest 
team in baseball history - yet they do 
NOT hold the record for winning the 
most games in a season ... The *27 
Yanks won 110 games, but two other 
teams haw won more in a year ... 
The Cubs of 1906 won II6, and the 
Indiansof 1954 won 111. 



Did you know that a big league 
baseball player onoe struck out while 
sitting on the bench! ... It happened 
In 1952 to Sammy White ... He had 
two strikes on him and was rqilaoed 
by a pinch-hitter ... The pinch-hltter 
took a third strike, but under baseball 
scoring rules, the strikeout was 
charged to White since he had two of 
the three strikes - so, White struck 
out while sitting in the dugout! 

• • • 

I betyou didn't know... 

For over 14 years, Fohrman Dodge 
has been arranging purchase plans 
for military pctsonnel regardless of 
pay grade or credit history. 

Fohrman Dodge's Award Winning 
Service Department will handle all 
your service needs regardless of 
make, model or where you bought 
your vehicle. 

[ii^ THirAoroi Toooiiirj 

! TOWARDS MVEfllCUPlltfflASE ' 
I -OR- I 

\ 10%iUiitioialOffAajP«(s I 
I PvchaMorRtpirSmlcf | 

LUmH 1 pef iTcrtsoctlon. , 

Not vcfid wllh othef specldL I 



I ()MKI\I AN 

i)()i)(;i; 

2725 BELVIDERE RD. 
WAUKEGAN 

336-3510 

5 min. So. of Great America 



r lEJIiwvii -1 



r-s-wjM-BBaSi 



iari*jy.Jttit:Y^P jl; - " . u5u >5^ ^^S??^vT ?*»?!ST35S^^ 




SPORTS/LEISURE UIceIancI Newspapers AuqufT 9, 1994 



>i r. 



i- ;i. 



is f" 

r 



■ ' is- 



In-water boat show drops 
anchor August 25 to 28 



Celebrating its 15th year, the 
Michigan City Jn-Water Boat 
Show — Lake Michigan's largest 
and oldest boating exposition — 
will take place August 25 to 2B in 
Michigan City, Ind. 

During its four day run, more 
than 30,000 nautical enthusiasts 
are expected to preview the latest 
in new 1995 boats and acces- 
sories from the top names in 
boating, such as Sea Ray, Ocean, 
Trojan, MacGregor and Matteras. 

Show-goers will have an 
opportunity climb aboard a fleet 
of more than 450 power and sail 
boats, ranging in size up to 54 feet 
and Including cruisers, motor 
yachts, runabouts, "muscle" 
boats, sailing auxiliaries, day sail- 
ers, water-ski boats and Ashing 
machines. 

The 150 accessory exhibits will 
offer everything from nautical 
clothing, jewelry, sailing acces- 
sories and safety equipment to 
scuba gear, marine electronics, 
charts, plotting tools, and boat 
paint, polishes and waxes. 

Representatives will be on 
hand to answer qiiestions about 
Tmancing, insurance, boating 



courses, waterfront property, 
dockage, canvas work, resorts 
and sailing schools, 

This year's Queen of the Fleet, 
the show's largest boat, is the all- 
new Viking 54-foot Sports Yacht. 
Tlie luxury features three state- 
rooms and three heads, an 
enclosed 186-square-foot aft 
deck, single-level salon, dinette 
and galley. It is the first time this 
Viking model, valued in excess of 
$1.1 million, will be displayed at a 
public show on the Great Lxikes. 

A number of special attractions 
also arc planned by show man- 
agement, including a 15th 
Anniversary fireworks display 
that will take place on Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday evenings 
starting at 8:15 p.m. 

."We've arranged for three 
nights of spectacular fireworks, 
as a tribute to the city that has 
helped make this show such a big 
success," said Show Manager 
Norman Schultz. "When we first 
opened in 1980, it was with little 
more than 100 boats and three 
dozen accessory displays. I think 
we've grown bigger than anyone 
fu^t expected." 




Write Us 



Lakeland Newspapers wants to hear news of 
local sporting events, clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and white photos are also welcorrie. 
Please send news Items to Claudia M. Lenart 30 
S. Whitney, Grayslake, 60030 or call 223-8161. 



Summer 




It's Summer Sale Time at Scandinavian Design. 

Everything is on Sale, 

Even EkorneSf and Techline. 

SAVE 1 0% TO 50% NOW 
THRU SEPTEMBER 4TH 

Scandinavian 



Design 



Si27Roo9evBnRil.-H9no$haWI 6S2'C0$4 

Hours: Mon.-Ttiurs. 106, Fri. til 9, Sat. til 5, Sun. 1-5 




High flyin' fun 

Jlmwetirman of Kenosha, Wis. ard Rob Whalen of Kqnsasvllle, HI., compete In the Motorcross 
event B class at the Lake County Fair. The popular event brought competitors from as far away 
as New Zealand to Lake County.— Photo by Bill Caroy 



1 



In' 

Pi 
In 

fr< 
e' 

Tt 

si 
c 

.e 

S' 

c 



Wilmot hosting record-paying competition Aug. 20-21 



Toft Auto Racing's Wilmot 
Speedway will be hosting a 
record-paying open competition 
sprint show to highlight the 
Annual Kenosha County Fair 
Championships on Aug. 20 and 
21. . — 

The special sprint program 
will feature a $2,000 to win "A" 
Main Feature which will pay $200 
to start, the most prize money 
ever paid out for a fair event 

The weekend events at "Wis- 
consin's Clay Center of Speed" 



are sponsored by Miller B'eer 
through C.J.W. Distributing of 
Kenosha. 

The sprint cars will compete in 
time trials, qualifying heat races, 
last chance qualifier. "B" Main 
plus a feature event 

In addition, motorcycle-en- 
gine powered mini-sprints arc on 
the program. Mufflers arc 
required for the sprints. 

On Aug. 21, the traditional and 
always popular demolition derby 
will be .held. For the second 



C.-nci Ayrvrvvvizt- 



straight year, the derby will be 
divided into two sessions. 
Preliminary rounds are sched- 
uled for 2:30 p.m., with finals to 
begin at 6 p.m. 

The feature event for the demo 
will pay the winner $500, second 
place will receive $300 and third 
place $200. 

Demolition derby rules are 
available at the Speedway Sou- 
venir Stand on race nights. 

For further information 
call (414)862-2458. 



JOE MARCONI MEMORIAL PRO-AM 
BOWLING TOURNAMENT 



SATURDAY AUGUST h, 1 994 - 1 1 :30 AM 

BRUNSWICK DEER PARK lANES • 21080 N. RAND RD. • lAKE ZURICH, IL 




rO BENEFIT THE 




UUKEMIA 
RESEARCH 
FOUNDATION 



HONORARY CHAIR 
MIKE DITKA 



Mike Ditko, Joe's former teammate and friend will host our 2nd Annual JOE 
MARCONI CELEBRITY PRO-AM TOURNAMENT, "STRIKES AGAINST LEUKEMIA." 

Pro bowlers, sport celebrities, and Chicago Bear Alumni, ore donating their time 

to bowl with you. The event will be a "NINE PIN NO TAP'. It will be your 

chance to bowl with the pros ond hove o great time roising money for the 

Leukemia Research Foundation. 

TO REGISTER BY PHONE OR FOR MORE INFO CALL: 



(708)480-1177 



Sj^BRUNSWlCK ^^ • 

Deer Park Hallmark^Johnson 

LANES ( ^ 



WAmericaV^ 
Airiines 



PODOLSKY 

BrunawlektaciMlkHiCMMn ASSOCIATES 




NAME 

ADDRESS 

Cmf/STATE/ZIP 



REGISTRATION FORM 

Register By- 
_phon€__ 



D TEAM ENTRY/SIOO D SINGLE ENTRV/S30 D 12&UNDER/$iO 

THE LEUKEMIA RESEARCH FOUNDATION, 899 SKOKIE BLVD., NORTHBROOK, IL mil ' 






AtMjiiir f, 1994 UlxlANd NcwspApEK SpORTS/LEISURE 




\ y\y\ 



7^ 



7^ 



71 






Xakelaad- 

Newspapers ' 



Year round g^uniiiis make eyes^l^iice across plyitings 



I was commissioned to dp q- site 
Inventory/analyze along with , some 
preliminary sketcties of a 20-acre resort 
In Roatan. Honduras. After returning 
from the resort, I got to thinking how 
every little corner/space was used 
around the buildings and resort areas. 
These smallgqrdehs had to be viewed 
, year round and therefore were filled 
with different ' colors, textures and 
shapes. These gardens' definitely 
caused emotions to stir and made my 
eyes dance across the plantings qs ttie 
sun and winds created shadows, 
adding yet another dlrrvenston to. the 



garden. As I thought about these gar- 
dens and viewed them on my cam-, 
corder at the office, I began to devel- 
op.an Idea for these type of gardens In 
the Lake County area. A small garden 
that could be viewed year round and 
emit, emotion from one's heart and 
soul. Too many times our. landscapes 
look barren from December until April,, 
and this does not have to be.- 
Following Is a plant list and plan view of 
one small garden for year round Inter- 
est, -by MIKE GRECO. MIko Groco 
Landscaping. Inc.. Gurhoo. 
Plant llsr 





,..ahd smalt parking lots 

Seal Coating • Patchwork 
• Crack Filling 

Protect and Preserve 
Reasonable rates, Call for a FREE estimate 

(708, 740^051 « AMEfflCAN SMIATING 

(708) 356-1911 BywO<< 




Uour ine G 



oarse 



Uourihe Jfome 



Homes from the Uyw 200's or purchase ct site and buUH 
your otvn home. Sites from *29, 000, 



Loctlcd on EwrtMii Oolf Clat/i,. 

77 beto coaai minuief fnn Ltka (kwn. 

DIHBCnONS: 

EtaaailCAGO, Ua InknlaMMlo 

bifentUt 43 Dorlii 10 lli|hMy 1ZJ67 muta la 

P»(lv Roadcutio COM Ratd mik. Rnm 

Ihi ncfthwttt MlNitc. ukB iU|hway 1 Z «Hi 

10 lUftnity 11/CT OHth lo nxtCT Ron! cut 




RpLLING 5REEN 

COUNTRY ESTATES 



iThliit 



■Dllto(Mtoh«Mddmiata»<li<jMaagjiigjJ!«<jrtjM^ 



Appraisals available 
upon request 

MoidHoan 

414-72VS004 

4l4-74a-ai0$ Ifcniap 



1 . 1-14 foot contorted Scotcti pine 
2. 1 -9 foot Japanese red maple 
3. l-:2 Inch weeping cherry 

A. zinnias. 

B. Pink Impattente 
•C, Black-eyed Susans 

D. Blue oats 
E.WhltltatTis 

F. Purple llatrls 

G. Pink Foxglove 
H. False sun flower 



1. Golden goblin galllardia 
J. Toadflax 
' K. Coneflower 
L. Cosmos 
M.Casablanca lily ' 
N. Verbena 
O. Scabloso 
P. Campanula 

Q. yihcG minor groundcover 
R, 1-3 foot high by 4-foot long by 2-foot 
wide ledge rock 



. jwaHarjiM TH»U»m 




MIKE GRECO 
LANDSCAPING 

• Lmdscnpe Architects 
• Contrdctors • Nursery 

GuRNEE, IL 60031 
708/855-0590 



m 



Wfi>^ 





ETHEL'S PLACE 
FARM STAND 

51 YEARS FAMILY RUN BUSINESS 

TOP QUALITY FRUITS & VEGETABLES 

Hours: 8:00 *a.m:-9:00 p.m. Daily 

NOW IN!!! 

Our Famous Homegrown White 
Yellow & Bi Color Corn 

Buy 12 Get 1 Free!!! 
Home Grown Tomatoes 

Thompson Green Seedless Grapes 

Large Idaho Baking Potatoes^2^^ 
101b. Bag 

ice Cold Watermelon Whole, 1/2 and 1/4 

Top Soil 40 lb. Bag *1" 

5 Bags for "^S^-NO Limit 



Medium ZLicchini 4 for ""I.OO 
Srnnll Zucchini 69C lb. 

NOW rN!!! 

Pickles. Benns & Beetss by the Peck. Pound 
Or Bushel Rendy For Canning Or Fre 
Free Dill with Pickles. 



We nserve the right to limit quantitie}. Prices in effect while quantities but. 
Located 1 1/2 mi North of Lake CookRd. on U.S. 12 

438-4440 

2nd Location Quentin & Long Grove Rd. is open 



m 



tt?>i.-' ■ — • - ■■^_.\l.,'^*— , 






^s^swwwsrtawasiMBMittKss 



tfry^*>^^E^ry^y; g3>l>T ; ^';*=" ''f!r H; '<'T^ ' | Ti ii lYm.™ ' ' •' 7^- -— - 




1 SPORTS/LEISURE LvkdANd Newspapers AuqusT 9, 1 994 





STYl£ 







J^I ■*«TP» * H^f*i^M«te|»i^ 




lOTif/e Tfie 'Wfiei^' Dea/eis 4fie fluiiiiffig Out, 
C'UON & SEE THE VAN EXPERTS. We Have MORE 
Conversion Vans, MOREOmiom Sport Pick-Ups, 
MORE4x4^Blazersi^ 



FultSixG 

ar Astro Vans 

FORm/UST: 




Sa THESE AND OTHER NATIONAL MANUFACTURERS! 

CUSTOM CRAFT |^^,fJQp GE1^4INI 

Archer -^- ECUPSE U ■ "- 

Loach /U/ CONVERSIONS Midwest 



:ysig^yfty* a:vy g v.< !*v?.»a!!^?j'<:W^^ S *!gg^^j'.: 



«!«»bK«Ma£A&U!!'<iii^«;«i£ii£ivtekSim^tni>f^<«4 



rt!a»MW!wrt m!HM) > M»Bnn r * » . < mw < iMit«wim»W K S B 



m?^ 



wm 



FACTORYmmECTEXPOsPRICINGTOYOU 



Vans, Conversion Vans, Spori 
Pickups, 4x4s, Blazers & More! 

Save oOfliMl «nlA A A On Our 

From^' 






hmm^iss 



#1 DoBletln Lake & McHenty Counties 



\ ■ 





jrr: 



'95 Luffiffias, '95 Monte Carlos and '95 S-f O 
Blazers In St€H:k Ready To Go! 



S-IO Pick 

Ups 
FOR JUST: 



loJftuT 



^ 



Prixms 

iFORJUSn 











Srrr.^ 



Metro 

FOR JUST: 



Lumina 

Mini 

Van 

IFOR JUST: 








\ COMIVIERCIAL VBfiCLf HEADQUARTHiS 





C1SOO 

Full Sim 

Pick Up 

FOR JUST: 



BUIU) THBVi THE WAY YOU WANT! 





^'W^ 



Cavalier 

\ FOR JUST: 



Corsica 

FOR JUST: 
















@iBQif 




No Credft?^Batf Credit? You Deserve A SecoMCftahce,' 
Call Jerry ByairToaia}r^§0i^^ 




WHOLESALE SPECIALS 



91S-1DBLAZER4X4 ,S9875 

96 d'lU rivnUrii«tit»Htitiiiiit«Miiiti9tffHnl 

93 CORSICA 4DRLT (8450 

91CAMAR0CPE,,,.,. (7850 

88 COnSICA 4Dni.iiiiH.i.i>iiui. i934/u 

93 TOYOTA PICK UP., 
■93 TRACKER HARDTOP., 



•iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



TRUCK SPECIALS 



UFORDCONV.VAN,.,.,.. «8S0 

93CHEVYCOIIV.VAN. 
90 ASTRO PASSVAN. 
99CHBI.CONVVAN. 
% CONVERSION VAH. 
^GEOTRACKER. 

09 DnUIivv lATiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiKiiiiiiiiiivwfi 

'9tS-10BLAZER4l(L.„.STO 

% S-10BLAZER4X4......,.1JKE NEW 

93 NISSAN E](TCAfi4ll4P/U StU 

'91 MAZDA MPVVAN... .(12,450 

^S-1I)BLAZ£R4](44DR. 



l<M«ittii>iiiiiitiiM»r 



ItiiiHiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiri 



iMillli iiiiiuuitiiiiiniiil 



CAR SPECIALS 



fHIIIIIIIDIUIiniir 



liKiMiMiHiiHitiiiiiniiiiiiinni 



liiiiiiiiuitiiiiiiiiiiir 



iiiiliiHiiiiiiiniiliniiditiiiiiiiln 



wmsa 

(8480 
(11,886 



■HlllDIDIIIIIIIIIIIUXtV 



$7886 



AmiMiiiiiuiM •iniHi^ 



liiiiiiiiniKiuiiil 



93CAPRICECLASSL 
93 CORSICA LT.. 
33GEOSTORMGSI., 
NBEREnA.,.., 
91BEREnAC0UPE., 

92 CAVAUER COUPE. 
91LUHINA4DR., 
81 ALFA ROMEO MILAN., 
8SCADJ11ACBRHM,. 
93COUGARXR7., 
92GRANDPRIXSE, 
93MA](IMAG1(E. 
93LUMINAEURO.. 
8SCADILLAC SEVILLE, 
83UMOUSIE 

^MITSUBISHIGAIANT.. 
9IMITSECLiPSL 
89 GRAND PRL 
'91 CORVETTE Cmi 

93 SUNBInD CONVhi ...(iBf885 

83 PORSCHE 929, fKnUGlEIINI 



■■•iiiiiiiitiiiiiiiitiiiiiuiiiiimr 



liiiHiiiiiiiiKiiiiir 



■ niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiMiii 



I •imuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



■iiiiiimiiiiiiimiiMttii' 



■iiiiHliiiliiiiiiiilllluiiliir 



fllltlltllUlltlUIIMMIHj 



■lllilllllllllllllllllir 



(8850 

(4758 

J8750 

(14,885 

(12,858 

i9lS|885 

JHIEW 

>9S88u 



■iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiir 



|ii«ii«iimiutiiMiiiiiiiitit»uiiii' 



I iitiiiiiiiiiiiii 



XIIHItHHHUIItlltllHIUIIIItl 



uiitiiiiiiiimiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiHl 



(2885 

(11,750 



ItllltllllHIltltl 



' All tcbales applied Just acid tax. lie. title & doc fee 



Chicagoland's Transportation Authority Since 1926 



Monday-Friday 9an»^pm 








Just west otm. 83 
0nmi20 








SeHablaEsfmnol